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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "2000-2001 2001-2002 2002-2003" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

engineering (coe) 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

s by gender College of engineering (coe) Enrollment 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Male 1,888 1,901 1 Engineering (ChBE) Civil Engineering (CE) · Local Technical Assistance Program (LTAP) Computer Science (CS) Electrical & Computer Engineering (ECE) Mechanical & Industrial Engineering (M&IE) Air Force ROTC Army ROTC

Dyer, Bill

2

Alabama Blood Lead Surveillance Report 1997 -2005 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Alabama Blood Lead Surveillance Report 1997 - 2005 0 5,000 10,000 15,000 20,000 25,000 1997 1998 Tested #12;Alaska Blood Lead Surveillance Report 1997 - 2006 0 50 100 150 200 250 300 1997 1998 1999 2000;Arizona Blood Lead Surveillance Report 1997 - 2006 0 10,000 20,000 30,000 40,000 50,000 60,000 1997 1998

3

Optimization Online - Category Archive  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Optimization Online. Browse Submissions By Area. Combinatorial Optimization. 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011

4

Optimization Online - Category Archive  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Optimization Online. Browse Submissions By Area. Nonlinear Optimization. 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011...

5

Red-billed Quelea Impacts of wildlife on agriculture Impacts of wildlife on agriculture  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

70000 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Populationestimate DelistedDelisted 5-day season 5-day season 16-day

Johnson, Matthew

6

Applications -- Science and Engineering Submissions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Optimization Online An E-Print Site for the Optimization Community. Applications -- Science and Engineering submissions; 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004...

7

Optimization Online - Category Archive  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Optimization Online. Browse Submissions By Area. Global Optimization. 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012

8

The Clean Tech Revolution: Why It's Real  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

(GW) 0 1 2 3 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 Total Installed Solar Capacity(GW) 0 Irvine, California The problem is huge #12;4/1/2011 2 The problem is getting worse * Harvard Public 10 20 30 40 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 Total Installed Wind Capacity

Loudon, Catherine

9

A review of the European particleboard market  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Spain Italy France Germany Source: E.P.F. Top 7 countries = 80% #12;Production Breakdown per CountryProduction Breakdown per Country 0 2 4 6 8 10 Germany France Italy Spain Belgium UK Austria 1999 2000 2001 2002 Capacity 0 2 4 6 8 10 Germany France Italy Spain Belgium UK Austria 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 (million m

10

Matlab (2001/2002) Introduction Introduction  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Matlab (2001/2002) Introduction Introduction Matlab stands for Matrix Laboratory and can be used time. So Matlab is particularly suited to try out new ideas and to experiment. But it is also used. The first version of Matlab was written by Cleve Moler in Fortran for use on mainframes and released in 1978

Gutknecht, Martin H.

11

SpillTransport in Low ODFW Presentation to ISAB  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

10 20 30 40 50 60 70 2001 2005 2007 2010 Water Year AverageLGRFlow(Kcfs) (Apr3-June20) #12;Estimated (based on 1998-2009 passage timing) 0% 10% 20% 30% 40% 50% 60% 70% 80% 90% Ch1 Steelhead Ch0 Sockeye 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 0 10 20 30 40 50 60 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004

12

Colorado School of Mines Graduate Bulletin 2001-2002 1 School of Mines  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Colorado School of Mines Graduate Bulletin 2001-2002 1 Colorado School of Mines 2001-2002 Graduate Bulletin #12;2 Colorado School of Mines Graduate Bulletin 2001-2002 To CSM Graduate Students This Bulletin is for your use as a source of continuing reference. Please save it. Published by Colorado School of Mines

13

ALGEBRA LINEAL I Curso de CC. Fisicas, 2002-2003  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ALGEBRA LINEAL I 1er Curso de CC. Fisicas, 2002-2003 Examen final, 31 de enero de 2003 Apellidos T : R3 R4 la aplicacion lineal que con respecto a estas bases, tiene de matriz: 1 0 1 0 1 0 1 0 0

Guijarro, Luis

14

CALCULO NUMERICO II Curso 2002/2003 (2 o  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

C´ALCULO NUM´ERICO II Curso 2002/2003 (2 o cuatrimestre) Programa A. M´etodos num´ericos para de m´etodos lineales multipaso. B. M´etodos num´ericos para ecuaciones en derivadas parciales. 4 tema 5 utilizaremos como material b´asico unas notas sobre An´alisis Num´erico de EDP de evoluci

Quirós, Fernando

15

E-Print Network 3.0 - aastatel 2001-2002 reieluukaela Sample...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Wood Network, Ltd. 2001-2002 What is eBusiness? Where organizations Source: Louisiana Forest Products Development Center Collection: Renewable Energy 3 Economia del Sistema...

16

Summary of ICTP activities in support of science in Uruguay  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Summary of ICTP activities in support of science in Uruguay 23/10/2013ICTP Public Information Office #12;*For the period 1970-1982, 3 visitors came from Uruguay; the total number of visitors is 195 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 ICTP Visitors from Uruguay, 1983

17

Technology Transfer Office (TTO) Promote and facilitate the transfer of UC San Diego innovations for the benefit of the University community and the public.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Technology Transfer Office (TTO) MISSION Promote and facilitate the transfer of UC San Diego San Diego established its Technology Transfer Office (TTO) to promote and facilitate this process TECHNOLOGY TRANSFER RESULTS FY2000 ­ FY2007 Fiscal Year 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 Licenses 47

Fainman, Yeshaiahu

18

Economic Outlook 2011Economic Outlook 2011 U.S. Economy and AgricultureU.S. Economy and Agriculture  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

.S. Real GDP -8.0 -6.0 -4.0 -2.0 0.0 2.0 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 Source/Deficit 1997-2011 Actual and Projected Federal Budget Surplus and Deficits, FY97- 10 Source: CBO -1500 -1000

Hayes, Jane E.

19

NYC Bar Association meeting, March 22, 2007  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Carbon Monoxide Emissions (Permit limit: 100 ppm, 4-hr. avg.) 0 20 40 60 80 100 120 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 Permit Level Stack Emissions Emissionsinpartspermillion(ppm) (Emissions as determined = 80% below #12;LCSWMA WTE Hydrogen Chloride Emissions (Permit limit: 25 ppm, 24-hr. avg.) 0 5 10 15 20

Columbia University

20

Est Chile preparado para el Retail de Energa Elctrica?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Santiago Gastos e Inversiones por ~180 MMUSD/año Inversiones por más de 800 MM USD en 12 años 0 10 20 30 40 50 60 70 80 90 100 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 Inversión anual en

Rudnick, Hugh

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "2000-2001 2001-2002 2002-2003" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Colorado School of Mines Undergraduate Bulletin 2001-2002 1 School of Mines  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Colorado School of Mines Undergraduate Bulletin 2001-2002 1 Colorado School of Mines 2001 ­ 2002 Undergraduate Bulletin #12;2 Colorado School of Mines Undergraduate Bulletin 2001-2002 To CSM Students This Bulletin is for your use as a source of continuing reference. Please save it. Published by Colorado School

22

E-Print Network 3.0 - area watersheds 2002-2003 Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Economics and Statistics 2002-2003... and Professionals from Honduras (areas affected by Hurricane Mitch). ... Source: Schweik, Charles M. - Department of Natural...

23

Grey seal distribution and abundance in North Wales, 2002-2003  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

i Grey seal distribution and abundance in North Wales, 2002-2003 Westcott, S.M. & Stringell, T.B. Stringell Title: "Grey seal distribution and abundance in North Wales, 2002-2003" Authors: Westcott, S Library x1 C. Duck, SMRU x1 Joe Breen EHS x1 PML, Library, Plymouth x1 S. Westcott x5 M. Baines x1 S

Bearhop, Stuart

24

Kootenai River Focus Watershed Coordination, 2001-2002 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The 2001-2002 Kootenai River Network Annual Report reflects the organization's defined set of goals and objectives, and how by accomplishing these goals, we continue to meet the needs of communities and landowners throughout the Kootenai River Basin by protecting the resource. Our completed and ongoing projects throughout the watershed reflect the cooperation and support received and needed to accomplish the rehabilitation and restoration of critical habitat. They show that our mission of facilitation through collaboration with public and private interests can lead to improved resource management, the restoration of water quality and the preservation of pristine aquatic resources. Our vision to empower local citizens and groups from two states, one province, two countries and affected tribal nations to collaborate in natural resource management within the basin is largely successful due to the engagement of the basin's residents--the landowners, town government, local interest groups, businesses and agency representatives who live and work here. We are proof that forging these types of cooperative relationships, such as those exhibited by the Kootenai River subbasin planning process, leads to a sense of entitlement--that the quality of the river and its resources enriches our quality of life. Communication is essential in maintaining these relationships. Allowing ourselves to network and receive ideas and information, as well as to produce quality, accessible research data such as KRIS, shared with like organizations and individuals, is the hallmark of this facilitative organization. We are fortunate in the ability to contribute such information, and continue to strive to meet the standards and the needs of those who seek us out as a model for watershed rehabilitative planning and restoration. Sharing includes maintaining active, ongoing lines of communication with the public we serve--through our web site, quarterly newsletter, public presentations and stream table education--at every opportunity. We continue to seek ideas to guide us as we grow. We want to enlarge that sense of ownership that the river does indeed run through it, and belongs to us all. Through a continued and common effort, we hope to carry forward the good work and the momentum that underscores our intent. We are proud to report our accomplishments of this past year because they reflect our renewed sense of purpose. In alliance with diverse citizen groups, individuals, business, industry and tribal and government water resource management agencies, we strive to continue to protect and restore the beauty and integrity that is the Kootenai River watershed.

Kruse, Gretchen (Kootenai River Network, Libby, MT)

2002-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

25

Photosynthesis Research 70: 241243, 2001. 2002 Kluwer Academic Publishers. Printed in the Netherlands.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Photosynthesis Research 70: 241243, 2001. 2002 Kluwer Academic Publishers. Printed, Chris and Alex follow. On behalf of the Editorial Board of Photosynthesis Research, I extend heartfelt honors. Olle was honored recently with a special issue of Photosynthesis Research, Volume 67, Nos. 1 2

Govindjee "Gov"

26

Photosynthesis Research 70: 325328, 2001. 2002 Kluwer Academic Publishers. Printed in the Netherlands.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Photosynthesis Research 70: 325328, 2001. 2002 Kluwer Academic Publishers. Printed- thesis (August, 1823, 2001, Brisbane, Australia), the International Society for Photosynthesis Research-Slack C- 4 pathway of photosynthesis. On behalf of the entire international photosynthesis community

Govindjee "Gov"

27

Kursplan fr lsret 2001/2002 STATISTIK MED BESLUTSTEORI TNX071  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Tools for Making Aute Risk Decisions, The Centre for Chemical Process Safety, American Institute. - Statistisk Dataanalts - kapitel 1-8, 10. Studentlitteratur, Lund 2000. Decision of Analysis - kapitel 11 urKursplan fr lsret 2001/2002 STATISTIK MED BESLUTSTEORI TNX071 Statistics with Decision Theory

28

THE UNIVERSITY OF BRITISH COLUMBIATHE UNIVERSITY OF BRITISH COLUMBIA ANNUAL REPORT 2000 / 2001  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

THE UNIVERSITY OF BRITISH COLUMBIATHE UNIVERSITY OF BRITISH COLUMBIA #12;ANNUAL REPORT 2000 / 2001 & Partnerships 17-18 Financial Summary 19-20 Notes to Financial Summary 20 #12;The University of British Columbia MISSION The University of British Columbia will provide its students, faculty, and staff with the best

Ollivier-Gooch, Carl

29

Kursplan fr lsret 2002/2003 STATISTIK MED BESLUTSTEORI TNX071  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Tools for Making Aute Risk Decisions, The Centre for Chemical Process Safety, American Institute. - Statistisk Dataanalts - kapitel 1-8, 10. Studentlitteratur, Lund 2000. Decision of Analysis - kapitel 11 urKursplan fr lsret 2002/2003 STATISTIK MED BESLUTSTEORI TNX071 Statistics with Decision Theory

30

Printed from AccessScience @ McGraw-Hill (www.AccessScience.com). Copyright 2000, 2001, 2002 The McGraw-Hill Companies. All rights reserved. Any use is subject to the  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

at the website. Laser-driven x-ray sources ver since the invention of the microscope, one of the great trends, which can then be used to convert light to short pulses of x- rays. Electron motion in laser fields physics Physics: Lasers Page 1 of 6Laser-driven x-ray sources 3/14/2003http://www

Umstadter, Donald

31

Journal of Fusion Energy, Vol. 19, No. 1, March 2000 ( 2001) Review of the Fusion Materials Research Program  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, Livermore, CA 94551. 6 University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI 53706. 7 Columbia University, New York, NY 10027Journal of Fusion Energy, Vol. 19, No. 1, March 2000 ( 2001) Review of the Fusion Materials.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Fusion Energy Sciences Advisory Committee Panel on the Review of the Fusion

Abdou, Mohamed

32

Walla Walla River Fish Passage Operations Program, 2002-2003 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In the late 1990's, the Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation, Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife, and Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, along with many other agencies, began implementing fisheries restoration activities in the Walla Walla Basin. An integral part of these efforts is to alleviate the inadequate fish migration conditions in the basin. The migration concerns are being addressed by removing diversion structures, constructing fish passage facilities, implementing minimum instream flow requirements, and initiating trap and haul efforts. The objective of the Walla Walla River Fish Passage Operations Project is to increase the survival of migrating adult and juvenile salmonids in the Walla Walla River basin. The project is responsible for coordinating operation and maintenance of ladders, screen sites, bypasses, trap facilities, and transportation equipment. In addition, the project provides technical input on passage criteria and passage and trapping facility design and operation. Operation of the various passage facilities and passage criteria guidelines are outlined in an annual operations plan that the project develops. During the 2002-2003 project year, there were 545 adult summer steelhead (Oncorhynchus mykiss), 29 adult bull trout (Salvelinus confluentus); 1 adult and 1 jack spring chinook (O. tshawytscha) enumerated at the Nursery Bridge Dam fishway adult trap between January 1 and June 23, 2003. Summer steelhead and spring chinook were observed moving upstream while bull trout were observed moving both upstream and downstream of the facility. Operation of the Little Walla Walla River juvenile trap for trap and haul purposes was not necessary this year. The project transported 21 adult spring chinook from Ringold Springs Hatchery and 281 from Threemile Dam to the South Fork Walla Walla Brood Holding Facility. Of these, 290 were outplanted in August for natural spawning in the basin.

Bronson, James P. (Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation, Department of Natural Resources, Pendleton, OR); Duke, Bill B. (Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife, Pendleton, OR)

2004-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

33

Texas Air Quality Status and the Texas Emission Reduction Plan  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Through Energy Efficiency Conference ? Galveston, Texas ? October 10, 2012 0.0 1.3 2.7 4.0 5.3 6.7 8.0 60 90 120 150 180 210 240 1991 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011...Texas Air Quality Status and the Texas Emission Reduction Plan Susana M. Hildebrand, P.E., Chief Engineer Texas Commission on Environmental Quality Clean Air Through Energy Efficiency Conference ? Galveston, Texas ? October 10, 2012...

Hildebrand, S.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

34

Desafos y Perspectivas para el Sector Elctrico Chileno  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 Años Potencia[MW] 0% 10% 20% 30% 40% 50% 60% 70?:Volatilidad en la Hidraulicidad 0% 10% 20% 30% 40% 50% 60% 70% 80% 90% 62-63 64-65 66-67 68-69 70-71 72-73 74 incrementada en un 5% 0% 10% 20% 30% 40% 50% 60% 70% 80% 90% 62-63 64-65 66-67 68-69 70-71 72-73 74-75 76-77 78

Rudnick, Hugh

35

Journal of Fusion Energy, Vol. 20, No. 3, September 2001 ( 2002) Report of the FESAC Panel on a Burning Plasma Program  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

- ence, although it is not designed to be the sole burning plasma facility in the world.Fusion energy methods of energy production, are strong reasons to pursue fusion energy now. vened for this purposeJournal of Fusion Energy, Vol. 20, No. 3, September 2001 ( 2002) Report of the FESAC Panel

Najmabadi, Farrokh

36

Arrow Lakes Reservoir Fertilization Experiment; Years 4 and 5, Technical Report 2002-2003.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report presents the fourth and fifth year (2002 and 2003, respectively) of a five-year fertilization experiment on the Arrow Lakes Reservoir. The goal of the experiment was to increase kokanee populations impacted from hydroelectric development on the Arrow Lakes Reservoir. The impacts resulted in declining stocks of kokanee, a native land-locked sockeye salmon (Oncorhynchus nerka), a key species of the ecosystem. Arrow Lakes Reservoir, located in southeastern British Columbia, has undergone experimental fertilization since 1999. It is modeled after the successful Kootenay Lake fertilization experiment. The amount of fertilizer added in 2002 and 2003 was similar to the previous three years. Phosphorus loading from fertilizer was 52.8 metric tons and nitrogen loading from fertilizer was 268 metric tons. As in previous years, fertilizer additions occurred between the end of April and the beginning of September. Surface temperatures were generally warmer in 2003 than in 2002 in the Arrow Lakes Reservoir from May to September. Local tributary flows to Arrow Lakes Reservoir in 2002 and 2003 were generally less than average, however not as low as had occurred in 2001. Water chemistry parameters in select rivers and streams were similar to previous years results, except for dissolved inorganic nitrogen (DIN) concentrations which were significantly less in 2001, 2002 and 2003. The reduced snow pack in 2001 and 2003 would explain the lower concentrations of DIN. The natural load of DIN to the Arrow system ranged from 7200 tonnes in 1997 to 4500 tonnes in 2003; these results coincide with the decrease in DIN measurements from water samples taken in the reservoir during this period. Water chemistry parameters in the reservoir were similar to previous years of study except for a few exceptions. Seasonal averages of total phosphorus ranged from 2.11 to 7.42 {micro}g/L from 1997 through 2003 in the entire reservoir which were indicative of oligo-mesotrophic conditions. Dissolved inorganic nitrogen concentrations have decreased in 2002 and 2003 compared to previous years. These results indicate that the surface waters in Arrow Lakes Reservoir were approaching nitrogen limitation. Results from the 2003 discrete profile series indicate nitrate concentrations decreased significantly below 25 {micro}g/L (which is the concentration where nitrate is considered limiting to phytoplankton) between June and July at stations in Upper Arrow and Lower Arrow. Nitrogen to phosphorus ratios (weight:weight) were also low during these months indicating that the surface waters were nitrogen deficient. These results indicated that the nitrogen to phosphorus blends of fertilizer added to the reservoir need to be fine tuned and closely monitored on a weekly basis in future years of nutrient addition. Phytoplankton results shifted during 2002 and 2003 compared to previous years. During 2002, there was a co-dominance of potentially 'inedible' diatoms (Fragilaria spp. and Diatoma) and 'greens' (Ulothrix). Large diatom populations occurred in 2003 and these results indicate it may be necessary to alter the frequency and amounts of weekly loads of nitrogen and phosphorus in future years to prevent the growth of inedible diatoms. Zooplankton density in 2002 and 2003, as in previous years, indicated higher densities in Lower Arrow than in Upper Arrow. Copepods and other Cladocera (mainly tiny specimens such as Bosmina sp.) had distinct peaks, higher than in previous years, while Daphnia was not present in higher numbers particularly in Upper Arrow. This density shift in favor to smaller cladocerans was mirrored in a weak biomass increase. In Upper Arrow, total zooplankton biomass decreased from 1999 to 2002, and in 2003 increased slightly, while in Lower Arrow the biomass decreased from 2000-2002. In Lower Arrow the majority of biomass was comprised of Daphnia throughout the study period except in 2002, while in Upper Arrow the total biomass was comprised of copepods from 2000-2003.

Schindler, E.

2007-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

37

Evaluate Bull Trout Movements in the Tucannon and Lower Snake Rivers, 2002-2003 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We collected 279 adult bull trout (Salvelinus confluentus) in the Tucannon River during the Spring and Fall of 2003. Passive Integrated Transponder (PIT) tags were inserted in 191 of them, and we detected existing PIT tags in an additional 31bull trout. Thirty five of these were also surgically implanted with radio-tags, and we monitored the movements of these fish throughout the year. Fourteen radio-tags were recovered shortly after tagging, and as a result, 21 remained in the river through December 31, 2003. Four bull trout that were radio-tagged in spring 2002 were known to survive and carry their tags through the spring and/or summer of 2003. One of these fish spent the winter near river mile (RM) 13.0; the other 3 over-wintered in the vicinity of the Tucannon Hatchery between RM 34 and 36. Twenty-one radio tags from bull trout tagged in 2002 were recovered during the spring and summer, 2003. These tags became stationary the winter of 2002/2003, and were recovered between RM 11 and 55. We were unable to recover the remaining 15 tags from 2002. During the month of July, radio-tagged bull trout exhibited a general upstream movement into the upper reaches of the Tucannon subbasin. We observed some downstream movements of radio-tagged bull trout in mid to late September and throughout October. By late November and early December, radio tagged bull trout were relatively stationary, and were distributed from the headwaters downstream to river mile 6.4, near Lower Monumental Pool. As in 2002, we did not conduct work associated with objectives 2, 3, or 4 of this study, because we were unable to monitor migratory movement of radio-tagged bull trout into the Federal hydropower system on the mainstem Snake River. Transmission tests of submerged ATS model F1830 radio-tags in Lower Granite Pool showed that audible detection and individual tag identification was possible at depths of 20 and 30 ft. Tests were conducted using an ATS R-4000 Receiver equipped with an ''H'' antenna at 200 and 700 feet above water surface from a helicopter. Audible detection and frequency separation were possible at both elevations. Two years of high tag loss, particularly after spawning, has prevented us from documenting fall and winter movements with an adequate sample of radio tagged bull trout. The high transmitter loss after spawning may be a reflection of high natural mortality for large, older age fish that we have been radio tagging to accommodate the longer life transmitters. Therefore, we are planning to reduce the size of the radio tags that we implant, and delay most of our collection and tagging of bull trout until after spawning. These changes are a new approach to try to maximize the number of radio tagged bull trout available post spawning to adequately document fall and winter movements and any use of the Snake River by bull trout from the Tucannon River.

Faler, Michael P. (US Fish and Wildlife Service, Idaho Fishery Resource Office, Ahsahka, ID); Mendel, Glen W.; Fulton, Carl (Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, Fish Management Division, Dayton, WA)

2004-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

38

Impact of the Implementation of the 2000/2001 IECC on Residential Energy Use in Texas: Analysis of Residential Energy Savings  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of envelope construction and HVAC equipment typically used in residences. The characteristics published by the National Association of Home Builders (NAHB 2004) for typical residential construction in East and West Texas for 1999, was used as the base... construction requirement of the 2000/2001 IECC. The pre-code NAHB characteristics are different for counties situated in east or west Texas for single-family construction, the main difference being the window-to-wall area ratio and the glazing...

Im, P.; Culp, C.; Ahmad, M.; Malhotra, M.; Haberl, J. S.; Yazdani, B.; Mukhopadhyay, J.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

39

(Data in metric tons, unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: Indium was not recovered from ores in the United States in 2002. Domestically  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Statistics--United States: 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002e Production, refinery -- -- -- -- -- Imports. World Refinery Production, Reserves, and Reserve Base: Refinery productione Reserves3 Reserve base3 2001

40

E-Print Network 3.0 - aeronautic sound shield Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Soundings 199899 1998 2000 2001 2002 2002... the detector from stray light and the cooling fins from solar heating. It also allows a ... Source: Vmel, Holger - Cooperative...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "2000-2001 2001-2002 2002-2003" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

INFRARED OBSERVATIONS OF THE MILLISECOND PULSAR BINARY J1023+0038: EVIDENCE FOR THE SHORT-TERM NATURE OF ITS INTERACTING PHASE IN 2000-2001  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We report our multi-band infrared (IR) imaging of the transitional millisecond pulsar system J1023+0038, a rare pulsar binary known to have an accretion disk in 2000-2001. The observations were carried out with ground-based and space telescopes from near-IR to far-IR wavelengths. We detected the source in near-IR JH bands and Spitzer 3.6 and 4.5 {mu}m mid-IR channels. Combined with the previously reported optical spectrum of the source, the IR emission is found to arise from the companion star, with no excess emission detected in the wavelength range. Because our near-IR fluxes are nearly equal to those obtained by the 2MASS all-sky survey in 2000 February, the result indicates that the binary did not contain the accretion disk at the time, whose existence would have raised the near-IR fluxes to twice larger values. Our observations have thus established the short-term nature of the interacting phase seen in 2000-2001: the accretion disk existed for at most 2.5 yr. The binary was not detected by the WISE all-sky survey carried out in 2010 at its 12 and 22 {mu}m bands and our Herschel far-IR imaging at 70 and 160 {mu}m. Depending on the assumed properties of the dust, the resulting flux upper limits provide a constraint of <3 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 22}-3 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 25} g on the mass of the dust grains that possibly exist as the remnants of the previously seen accretion disk.

Wang, Xuebing; Wang, Zhongxiang [Key Laboratory for Research in Galaxies and Cosmology, Shanghai Astronomical Observatory, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 80 Nandan Road, Shanghai 200030 (China)] [Key Laboratory for Research in Galaxies and Cosmology, Shanghai Astronomical Observatory, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 80 Nandan Road, Shanghai 200030 (China); Morrell, Nidia [Las Campanas Observatory, Observatories of the Carnegie Institution of Washington, La Serena (Chile)] [Las Campanas Observatory, Observatories of the Carnegie Institution of Washington, La Serena (Chile)

2013-02-20T23:59:59.000Z

42

Enhanced Operation Strategies for Air-Conditioning and Lighting Systems Toward Peak Power Reduction for an Office Building in Kuwait  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Enhanced?Operation?Strategies?for?Air? Conditioning?and?Lighting? Systems?Toward?Peak?Power?Reduction? for?an?Office?Building?in?Kuwait F. Alghimlas A. Al-Mulla G.P. Maheshwari D. Al-Nakib Building and Energy Technologies Department...?Increase?in?Power?and?Energy? 6160 6450 6750 7250 7480 7750 8400 8900 9070 9710 27.0 27.5 29.3 31.1 33.1 35.6 37.9 41.6 42.6 45.2 25 30 35 40 45 50 5500 6500 7500 8500 9500 10500 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 Y e a r l y E...

Alghimlas, F.; Al-Mulla, A.; Maheshwari, G.P.; Al-Nakib, D.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

43

Post-Release Attributes and Survival of Hatchery and Natural Fall Chinook Salmon in the Snake River; 2000-2001 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report summarizes results of research activities conducted in 2000, 2001, and years previous to aid in the management and recovery of fall chinook salmon in the Columbia River basin. The report is divided into sections and self-standing chapters. For detailed summaries, we refer the reader to the abstracts given on the second page of each chapter. The Annual Reporting section includes information provided to fishery managers in-season and post-season, and it contains a detailed summary of life history and survival statistics on wild Snake River fall chinook salmon juveniles for the years 1992-2001. The Journal Manuscripts section includes complete copies of papers submitted or published during 2000 and 2001 that were not included in previous annual reports. Publication is a high priority for this project because it provides our results to a wide audience, it ensures that our work meets high scientific standards, and we believe that it is a necessary obligation of a research project. The Bibliography of Published Journal Articles section provides citations for peer-reviewed papers co-authored by personnel of project 199102900 that were published from 1998 to 2001.

Connor, William P. (US Fish and Wildlife Service, Idaho Fishery Resource Office, Ahsahka, ID)

2003-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

44

Effects of Hyporheic Exchange Flows on Egg Pocket Water Temperature in Snake River Fall Chinook Salmon Spawning Areas, 2002-2003 Final Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The development of the Snake River hydroelectric system has affected fall Chinook salmon smolts by shifting their migration timing to a period (mid- to late-summer) when downstream reservoir conditions are unfavorable for survival. Subsequent to the Snake River Chinook salmon fall-run Evolutionary Significant Unit being listed as Threatened under the Endangered Species Act, recovery planning has included changes in hydrosystem operations (e.g., summer flow augmentation) to improve water temperature and flow conditions during the juvenile Chinook salmon summer migration period. In light of the limited water supplies from the Dworshak reservoir for summer flow augmentation, and the associated uncertainties regarding benefits to migrating fall Chinook salmon smolts, additional approaches for improved smolt survival need to be evaluated. This report describes research conducted by the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) that evaluated relationships among river discharge, hyporheic zone characteristics, and egg pocket water temperature in Snake River fall Chinook salmon spawning areas. This was a pilot-scale study to evaluate these relationships under existing operations of Hells Canyon Dam (i.e., without any prescribed manipulations of river discharge) during the 2002-2003 water year. The project was initiated in the context of examining the potential for improving juvenile Snake River fall Chinook salmon survival by modifying the discharge operations of Hells Canyon Dam. The potential for improved survival would be gained by increasing the rate at which early life history events proceed (i.e., incubation and emergence), thereby allowing smolts to migrate through downstream reservoirs during early- to mid-summer when river conditions are more favorable for survival. PNNL implemented this research project at index sites throughout 160 km of the Hells Canyon Reach (HCR) of the Snake River. The HCR extends from Hells Canyon Dam (river kilometer [rkm] 399) downstream to the upper end of Lower Granite Reservoir near rkm 240. We randomly selected 14 fall Chinook salmon spawning locations as study sites, which represents 25% of the most used spawning areas throughout the HCR. Interactions between river water and pore water within the riverbed (i.e., hyporheic zone) at each site were quantified through the use of self-contained temperature and water level data loggers suspended inside of piezometers. Surrounding the piezometer cluster at each site were 3 artificial egg pockets. In mid-November 2002, early-eyed stage fall Chinook salmon eggs were placed inside of perforated polyvinyl chloride (PVC) tubes, along with a temperature data logger, and buried within the egg pockets. Fall Chinook salmon eggs were also incubated in the laboratory for the purpose of developing growth curves that could be used as indicators of emergence timing. The effects of discharge on vertical hydrologic exchange between the river and riverbed were inferred from measured temperature gradients between the river and riverbed, and the application of a numerical model. The hydrologic regime during the 2002-2003 sampling period exhibited one of the lowest, most stable daily discharge patterns of any of the previous 12 water years. The vertical hydraulic gradients (VHG) between the river and the riverbed suggested the potential for predominantly small magnitude vertical exchange. The VHG also showed little relationship to changes in river discharge at most sites. Despite the relatively small vertical hydraulic gradients at most sites, results from the numerical modeling of riverbed pore water velocity and hyporheic zone temperatures suggested that there was significant vertical hydrologic exchange during all time periods. The combined results of temperature monitoring and numerical modeling indicate that only 2 of 14 sites were significantly affected by short-term (hourly to daily) large magnitude changes in discharge. Although the two sites exhibited acute flux reversals between river water and hyporheic water resulting from short-term large magnitude

Hanrahan, T.; Geist, D.; Arntzen, C. (Pacific Northwest National Laboratory)

2004-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

45

Research @ Microsoft Beijing, 2002 / 2003  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Li Barn-Wan Li Jianghong(Angela) Li Mu Li Cong Li Xun Li Yantao Li Lin Liang Hongbin Liao Shiding Lin

46

FORMAL HERMENEUTICS BASED ON FREGE DUALITY Oleg Prosorov  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

FORMAL HERMENEUTICS BASED ON FREGE DUALITY Oleg Prosorov Steklov Institute of Mathematics, St interpretation theory called formal hermeneutics in our previous works (1997, 2001, 2002, 2003, 2004, our formal hermeneutics intends to reveal the mathematical structures that underlie the natural

Prosorov, Oleg B.

47

PNNL: Breakthroughs Magazine - Winter 2000-2001  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administration the1 - September 2006 TheSteven Ashby Dr. Steven Ashby Photo Dr.1999 issue1998

48

Review of Particle Physics, 2002-2003  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This biennial Review summarizes much of Particle Physics. Using data from previous editions, plus 2205 new measurements from 667 papers, we list, evaluate, and average measured properties of gauge bosons, leptons, quarks, mesons, and baryons. We also summarize searches for hypothetical particles such as Higgs bosons, heavy neutrinos, and supersymmetric particles. All the particle properties and search limits are listed in Summary Tables. We also give numerous tables, figures, formulae, and reviews of topics such as the Standard Model, particle detectors, probability, and statistics. This edition features expanded coverage of CP violation in B mesons and of neutrino oscillations. For the first time we cover searches for evidence of extra dimensions (both in the particle listings and in a new review). Another new review is on Grand Unified Theories. A booklet is available containing the Summary Tables and abbreviated versions of some of the other sections of this full Review. All tables, listings, and reviews (...

Particle Data Group. Berkeley; Hagiwara, Kaoru; Hikasa, Ken Ichi; Nakamura, Kenzo; Tanabashi, Masaharu; Aguilar-Bentez, M; Amsler, Claude; Barnett, Richard Michael; Burchat, Patricia R; Carone, Cristopher D; Caso, Carlo; Conforto, Gianni; Dahl, Orin; Doser, Michael; Eidelman, Simon; Feng, Jonathan L; Gibbons, Lawrence; Goodman, Maury; Grab, C; Groom, Donald E; Gurtu, Atul; Hayes, Kenneth G; Hernndez-Rey, Juan Jose; Honscheid, Klaus; Kolda, Christopher; Mangano, Michelangelo L; Manley, D Mark; Manohar, Aneesh Vasant; March-Russell, John David; Masoni, Alberto; Miquel, Robert; Mnig, Klaus; Murayama, Hitoshi; Navas, Sergio; Olive, Keith A; Pape, Luc; Patrignani, Claudia; Piepke, Andreas; Roos, Matts; Terning, John; Trnqvist, N A; Trippe, Thomas G; Vogel, Petr; Wohl, Charles G; Workman, Ronald L; Yao Wei Ming; Armstrong, Betty; Gee, Paul S; Lugovsky, Kirill Slava; Lugovsky, S B; Lugovsky, V S; Artuso, Marina; Asner, David M; Babu, K S; Barberio, Elisabetta; Battaglia, Marco; Bichsel, H; Biebel, Otmar; Bloch, Philippe; Cahn, Robert N; Cattai, Ariella; Chivukula, R Sekhar; Cousins, Robert D; Cowan, Glen D; Damour, Thibault Marie Alban Guillaume; Desler, Kai; Donahue, Richard J; Edwards, Donald A; Elvira, V D; Erler, Jens; Ezhela, Vladimir V; Fass, A; Fetscher, Wulf; Fields, B D; Foster, Brian; Froidevaux, Daniel; Fukugita, Masataka; Gaisser, Thomas K; Garren, Lynn; Gerber, Hans Jrg; Gilman, Frederick J; Haber, Howard E; Hagmann, Christian; Hewett, Joanne L; Hinchliffe, Ian; Hogan, Craig J; Hhler, Gerhard; Igo-Kemenes, Peter Miklos; Jackson, John David; Johnson, Kurtis F; Karlen, Dean A; Kayser, Boris; Klein, Spencer R; Kleinknecht, Konrad; Knowles, Ian G; Kreitz, Patricia A; Kuyanov, Yu V; Landua, Rolf; Langacker, Paul; Littenberg, Laurence S; Martin, Alan Douglas; Nakada, Tatsuya; Narain, M; Nason, Paolo; Peacock, John A; Quinn, Helen R; Raby, Stuart A; Raffelt, Georg G; Razuvaev, E A; Renk, Burkhard; Rolandi, Luigi; Ronan, Michael T; Rosenberg, Leslie J; Seligman, William G; Shaevitz, Michael H; Sjstrand, Torbjrn; Smoot, George F; Spanier, Stefan; Spieler, Helmuth; Spooner, C; Srednicki, Mark A; Stahl, Achim; Stanev, Todor; Suzuki, Mahiko; Tkachenko, N P; Valencia, German; Van Bibber, Karl; Vincter, Manuella G; Ward, D R; Webber, Bryan R; Whalley, Michael; Wolfenstein, Lincoln; Womersley, John William; Woody, Craig L; Zenin, O V; PPE

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

49

Copyright 2002-2003 Sistina Software, Inc  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

by: ajl Updated for LVM 1.0.8; fixed broken link; Clarified redhat init script section; Revision 0.5 Updated for LVM 1.0.5 and converted to DocBook XML 4.1.2. Revision 0.1 2002-04-28 Revised by: gf Initial Systems, Inc Revision History Revision 0.19 2006-11-27 Revised by: ajl Clarified full snapshot conditions

Westall, James M.

50

Some electric myths Larry Hughes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the very high energy-intensity of paper-making and the fact that a similar decline had happened in 2006's contribution will decline even further in the future as additional government regulations take hold, first through 2050 ­ Dalton projections): 0% 20% 40% 60% 80% 100% 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009

Hughes, Larry

51

Some electric myths Larry Hughes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the province. The impact of these closures should not have come as a surprise, given the very high energy-intensity's contribution will decline even further in the future as additional government regulations take hold, first through 2050 ­ Dalton projections): 0% 20% 40% 60% 80% 100% 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009

Hughes, Larry

52

JESSE B. NIPPERT Division of Biology  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

University of Idaho Sum. 1998 NSF-REU Fellowship Ecosystems Center, Woods Hole, MA--Abisko Scientific-2002 University of Idaho M.S. Forest Resources Advisor: John D. Marshall 1994-1998 Kansas State University B University 2001-2002 Graduate Teaching Assistant University of Idaho 2000-2001 Graduate Research Assistant

Nippert, Jesse

53

Net Taxable Gasoline Gallons (Including Aviation Gasoline)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Net Taxable Gasoline Gallons (Including Aviation Gasoline) Period 2000 2001 (2) 2002 2003 2004 "gross" to "net" , was deemed impractical. (5) This report replaces the Gross Taxable Gasoline Gallons (Including Aviation Gasoline) report which will not be produced after December 2002. (6) The November 2007

54

UniversityofRegina Calendar Year: 2000/2001  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of Mass Communication One of: French 1500 - Intermediate Language I OR French 2000 - Intermediate Language of the admission decision in writing. The School of Journalism stresses the utility of a broad liberal arts base

Seldin, Jonathan P.

55

Ficha 2 --Geometria II Semestre 2000/2001  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

tri^angulo esf´erico em S2 , define-se tri^angulo dual ( ABC), como sendo o tri^angulo esf´erico A B. (Lei dos senos para tri^angulos esf´ericos) sin a sin (A) = sin b sin (B) = sin c sin (C) = | det [A, B, obtendo uma divis~ao da su- perf´icie esf´erica em 12 "pent´agonos esf´ericos". Subdivida depois um destes

Godinho, Leonor

56

Colville Tribal Fish Hatchery, 2000-2001 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Federal hydropower projects as well as private power utility systems have had a devastating impact upon anadromous fish resources that once flourished in the Columbia River and it's tributaries. Several areas were completely blocked to anadromous fish by dams, causing the native people who's number one food resource was salmon to rely entirely upon resident fish to replace lost fisheries resources. The Colville Tribal Fish Hatchery is an artificial production program to partially mitigate for anadromous fish losses in the ''Blocked Area'' above Chief Joseph and Grand Coulee Dams pursuant to Resident Fish Substitution Policy of the Northwest Power Planning Councils Fish and Wildlife Program. The hatchery was accepted into the Council's Fish and Wildlife Program in 1984 as a resident fish substitution measure and the hatchery was completed in 1990. The minimum production quota for this facility is 22,679 kg (50,000 lbs.) of trout. To achieve this quota the Colville Tribal Hatchery was scheduled to produce 174,000 fingerling rainbow trout (5 grams/fish), 330,000 sub-yearling rainbow trout (15 grams/fish), 80,000 legal size rainbow trout (90 grams/fish), 196,000 fingerling brook trout (5 grams/fish), 330,000 subyearling brook trout (15 grams/fish) and 60,000 lahontan cutthroat trout (15 grams/fish) in 2001. All fish produced are released into reservation waters, including boundary waters in an effort to provide a successful subsistence /recreational fishery for Colville Tribal members as well as a successful non-member sport fishery. The majority of the fish distributed from the facility are intended to provide a ''carry-over'' fishery. Fish produced at the facility are intended to be capable of contributing to the natural production component of the reservation fish populations. Contribution to the natural production component will be achieved by producing and releasing fish of sufficient quality and quantity for fish to survive to spawning maturity, to spawn naturally in existing and future available habitat (i.e. natural supplementation), while meeting other program objectives. In addition to the hatchery specific goals detailed above, hatchery personnel will actively participate in the Northwest Power Planning Council program, participate in the Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife Foundation, Resident Fish Committee, and other associated committees and Ad Hoc groups that may be formed to address resident fish issues in the blocked area above Chief Joseph and Grand Coulee Dams.

Arteburn, John; Christensen, David (Colville Confederated Tribes, Nespelem, WA)

2003-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

57

Kursplan fr lsret 2001/2002 FYSIOLOGI KNL021  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

för: K4Mi. Valbar för: K4Bi, K4Li, K4Lä. Kursansvarig: Professor Nils-Georg Asp, Nils_Georg.Asp@inl

58

Annual Report for the Year 2001-2002  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1998 1999 2000 Periodical Prices RPI Periodical price increase mapped against the RPI (source CURL) C um ul at iv e % in cr ea se C ar te r St ud io RIGHT The Munby Rare Books Room in the newly opened north-west corner extension. 5assistance...

Cambridge University Library

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

59

Forrest Ranch Acquisition, Annual Report 2001-2002.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Through their John Day Basin Office, the Confederated Tribes of Warm Springs Reservation of Oregon (Tribes) acquired the Forrest Ranch during July of 2002. The property consists of two parcels located in the John Day subbasin within the Columbia basin. The mainstem parcel consists of 3,503 acres and is located 1/2 mile to the east of Prairie City, Oregon on the mainstem of the John Day River. The middle fork parcel consists of 820 acres and is located one mile to the west of the town of Austin, OR on the middle fork John Day River. The Forrest Ranch Project is under a memorandum of agreement with the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) to provide an annual written report generally describing the real property interests of the project and management activities undertaken or in progress. The Forrest Ranch acquisition was funded by BPA as part of their program to protect, mitigate, and enhance fish and wildlife habitat affected by the operation of their hydroelectric facilities on the Columbia River and its tributaries. Following lengthy negotiations with the BPA and property owner, the Tribes were able to conclude the acquisition of the Forrest Ranch in July of 2002. The intent of the acquisition project was to partially mitigate fish and wildlife impacts for the John Day Dam on the Columbia River as outlined in the Northwest Power Planning Council's Wildlife Program (NPPC 1994, section 11.1, section 7.6). While the Tribes hold fee-title to the property, the BPA has assured a level of program funding through a memorandum of agreement and annual statement of work. As early as 1997, the Tribes identified this property as a priority for restoration in the John Day basin. In 2000, the Tribes arranged an agreement with the landowner to seek funds for the acquisition of both the Middle Fork and upper Mainstem John Day River holdings of Mr. John Forrest. This property had been a priority of not only the Tribes, but of many other basin natural resource agencies. The contract period was the first year of the program with December 2001 through July 2nd 2002 being previous to acquisition of the property. The majority of the activities conducted under the contract period were spent on O&M and pre acquisition activities.

Smith, Brent

2003-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

60

DEPARTMENT OF COMPUTER SCIENCE MSCS Program Sheet (2001-2002)  

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Specialization Name: Adviser: Date: Proposed date for Student ID#: Email: degree conferral: HCP? Coterm? GENERAL (Stat 116 or Man Sci & Eng 220) Automata and Complexity (CS154) Algorithmic Analysis (CS161) Choose one Man Sci 252 Psych 206 CS257 Econ286 Man Sci 339 Stat 202 CS270A EE263 Man Sci 351 Stat 315A CS274 EE

Li, Fei-Fei

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "2000-2001 2001-2002 2002-2003" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
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61

Colville Tribal Fish Hatchery, 2001-2002 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Federal hydropower projects as well as private power utility systems have had a major negative impact upon anadromous fish resources that once flourished in the Columbia River and it's tributaries. Several areas have been completely blocked to anadromous fish by dams, destroying the primary food resource (salmon) for many native people forcing them to rely heavily upon resident fish to replace these lost resources. The Colville Tribal Fish Hatchery is an artificial production program that addresses the loss of anadromous fish resources in the Upper Columbia Sub-Region within the ''blocked area'' created by the construction of Chief Joseph and Grand Coulee Dams. This project enhances resident fisheries located in the Intermountain and Columbia Cascade Provinces, specifically within the Colville Reservation portion of the Upper Columbia, SanPoil and Oakanogan Sub-Basins. The project partially mitigates for anadromous fish losses through protection/augmentation of resident fish populations to enhance fishery potential (i.e. in-place, out-of-kind mitigation) pursuant to Resident Fish Substitution Policy of the Northwest Power Planning Councils Fish and Wildlife Program. The hatchery was accepted into the Council's Fish and Wildlife Program in 1984 and the hatchery was completed in 1990. The Colville Tribal Hatchery (CTH) is located on the northern bank of the Columbia River just down stream of the town of Bridgeport, Washington that is just down stream of Chief Joseph Dam. The hatchery is located on land owned by the Colville Tribes. The minimum production quota for this facility is 22,679 kg (50,000 lbs.) of trout annually. All fish produced are released into reservation waters, including boundary waters in an effort to provide a successful subsistence/recreational fishery for Colville Tribal members and provide for a successful nonmember sport fishery. The majority of the fish distributed from the facility are intended to support ''carry-over'' fisheries. Fish produced at the facility are intended to be of sufficient quality and quantity to meet specific monitoring and evaluation goals and objectives outlines in the 2002 statement of work (SOW).

Arteburn, John; Christensen, David (Colville Confederated Tribes, Nespelem, WA)

2003-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

62

Hubert H. Humphrey Fellows at UC Davis 2001-2002  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

resource management policy. He is interested in the activity of the Department of State's legal services Administration Buenos Aires, Argentina Mr. Somma's major area of research and activity is the ecological analysis. He focuses on the Yungas Region, the highest biodiversity area of Argentina. In addition to his work

Schladow, S. Geoffrey

63

Kootenai River Focus Watershed Coordination, 2002-2003 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Kootenai River Network Inc. (KRN) was incorporated in Montana in early 1995 with a mission ''to involve stakeholders in the protection and restoration of the chemical, physical and biological integrity of the Kootenai River Basin waters''. The KRN operates with funding from donations, membership dues, private, state and federal grants, and with funding through the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) for a Focus Watershed Coordinator Program. The Focus Watershed Program is administered to KRN as of October 2001, through a Memorandum of Understanding. Katie Randall resigned her position as Watershed Coordinator in late January 2003 and Munson Consulting was contracted to fill that position through the BPA contract period ending May 30, 2003. To improve communications with in the Kootenai River watershed, the board and staff engaged watershed stakeholders in a full day KRN watershed conference on May 15 and 16 in Bonners Ferry, Idaho. This Annual General Meeting was a tremendous success with over 75 participants representing over 40 citizen groups, tribes and state/provincial/federal agencies from throughout northern Montana and Idaho as well as British Columbia and Alberta. Membership in the KRN increased during the course of the BPA 02/03 grant period. The board of directors grew in numbers during this same time frame and an Advisory Council was formed to assist in transboundary efforts while developing two reorganized KRN committees (Habitat/Restoration/Monitoring (HRM) and Communication/Education/Outreach (CEO)). These committees will serve pivotal roles in communications, outreach, and education about watershed issues, as well as habitat restoration work being accomplished throughout the entire watershed. During this BPA grant period, the KRN has capitalized on the transboundary interest in the Kootenai River watershed. Jim and Laura Duncan of Kimberley, British Columbia, have been instrumental volunteers who have acted as Canadian liaisons to the KRN. As a result, restoration work is in the planning stages for Canadian tributaries that flow into the Moyie River in northern Idaho and the Yaak River in northwest Montana.

Munson, Bob; Munson, Vicki (Kootenai River Network, Libby, MT); Rogers, Rox (US Fish and Wildlife Service, Libby, MT)

2003-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

64

Kursplan fr lsret 2002/2003 MOLEKYLR CELLBIOLOGI KMB050  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

förståelse för de biogeokemiska kretsloppen. I samband med metabolismen belyses energiproduktion genom

65

Common Data Set 2002-2003 Page 1 of 31  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

international students only in the category "Nonresident aliens." Complete the "Total Undergraduates" column-seeking) Nonresident aliens 94 347 361 Black, non-Hispanic 97 380 384 American Indian or Alaskan Native 8 33 33 Asian

66

Earth Sciences Division Research Summaries 2002-2003  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Research in earth and atmospheric sciences is becoming increasingly important in light of the energy, climate change, and environmental issues facing the United States and the world. The development of new energy resources other than hydrocarbons and the safe disposal of nuclear waste and greenhouse gases (such as carbon dioxide and methane) are critical to the future energy needs and environmental safety of this planet. In addition, the cleanup of many contaminated sites in the U.S., along with the preservation and management of our water supply, remain key challenges for us as well as future generations. Addressing these energy, climate change, and environmental issues requires the timely integration of earth sciences' disciplines (such as geology, hydrology, oceanography, climatology, geophysics, geochemistry, geomechanics, ecology, and environmental sciences). This integration will involve focusing on fundamental crosscutting concerns that are common to many of these issues. A primary focus will be the characterization, imaging, and manipulation of fluids in the earth. Such capabilities are critical to many DOE applications, from environmental restoration to energy extraction and optimization. The Earth Sciences Division (ESD) of the Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab) is currently addressing many of the key technical issues described above. In this document, we present summaries of many of our current research projects. While it is not a complete accounting, it is representative of the nature and breadth of our research effort. We are proud of our scientific efforts, and we hope that you will find our research useful and exciting. Any comments on our research are appreciated and can be sent to me personally. This report is divided into five sections that correspond to the major research programs in the Earth Sciences Division: (1) Fundamental and Exploratory Research; (2) Nuclear Waste; (3) Energy Resources; (4) Environmental Remediation Technology; and (5) Climate Variability and Carbon Management. These programs draw from each of ESD's disciplinary departments: Microbial Ecology and Environmental Engineering, Geophysics and Geomechanics, Geochemistry, and Hydrogeology and Reservoir Dynamics. Short descriptions of these departments are provided as introductory material. A list of publications for the period from January 2002 to June 2003, along with a listing of our personnel, are appended to the end of this report.

Bodvarsson, G.S.

2003-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

67

Forrest Ranch Management and Implementation, Annual Report 2002-2003.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Through their John Day Basin Office, the Confederated Tribes of Warm Springs Reservation of Oregon (Tribes) acquired the Forrest Ranch during July of 2002. The property consists of two parcels located in the John Day subbasin within the Columbia basin. The mainstem parcel consists of 3,503 acres and is located 1/2 mile to the east of Prairie City, Oregon on the mainstem of the John Day River. The middle fork parcel consists of 820 acres and is located one mile to the west of the town of Austin, OR on the middle fork John Day River. The Forrest Ranch Project is under a memorandum of agreement with the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) to provide an annual written report generally describing the real property interests of the project and management activities undertaken or in progress. The Forrest Ranch acquisition was funded by BPA as part of their program to protect, mitigate, and enhance fish and wildlife habitat affected by the operation of their hydroelectric facilities on the Columbia River and its tributaries. Following lengthy negotiations with the BPA and property owner, the Tribes were able to conclude the acquisition of the Forrest Ranch in July of 2002. The intent of the acquisition project was to partially mitigate fish and wildlife impacts for the John Day Dam on the Columbia River as outlined in the Northwest Power Planning Council's Wildlife Program (NPPC 1994, section 11.1, section 7.6). While the Tribes hold fee-title to the property, the BPA has assured a level of program funding through a memorandum of agreement and annual statement of work. As early as 1997, the Tribes identified this property as a priority for restoration in the John Day basin. In 2000, the Tribes arranged an agreement with the landowner to seek funds for the acquisition of both the Middle Fork and upper Mainstem John Day River holdings of Mr. John Forrest. This property had been a priority of not only the Tribes, but of many other basin natural resource agencies. The contract period was the first year of the program with December 2001 through July 2nd 2002 being previous to acquisition of the property. The majority of the activities conducted under the contract period were spent on O&M and pre acquisition activities.

Smith, Brent

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

68

Hangman Restoration Project, Annual Report 2002-2003.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Progress has been made in defining the level of work that needs to be accomplished in the Hangman Watershed in order to restore a viable riparian system and hydrology. The end goal is to use wildlife habitat to protect streams and provide water for instream fish habitats. In order to define the most expedient means of attaining that goal an Instream Flow/Watershed Hydrology Study was initiated. The study is intended to be comprehensive in order to determine the potential of increasing base flow with Hangman Watershed Streams and predict available fish habitats for the range of flow level possibilities. The Study Plan and work for the first field season was contracted and the Plan and end of field season reports are included with this Annual Report. The initial draft of the wildlife portion of the Monitoring and Evaluation Plan was completed and presented to the Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife Authority Wildlife Committee. The Committee felt that the Basin Hydrology Study needed to be closer to completion before the bulk of wildlife monitoring should be implemented. The extent of the landscape that must be restored in order to facilitate the needed stream flows may not be large enough to affect the population levels of the Plan's target species. The main result of the Committee review of the Monitoring and Evaluation Plan however, was that since the Hangman Restoration Project is not a HU driven wildlife mitigation project than the Wildlife Committee does not have a role to play since their focus is wildlife HU crediting projects. Further work on the wildlife portion of the Monitoring and Evaluation Plan is suspended until the crediting issues surrounding the Hangman Restoration Project are settled. Certain aspects of the Plan, such as the land bird, amphibian, reptile and beaver monitoring can be implemented in the spring of the coming year because monitoring these species and groups needs to be accomplished regardless of crediting status and baseline data is needed for these. Data from the Hangman Creek Watershed from portions upstream and east of the Coeur d'Alene Indian Reservation were included in the Second Iteration of the Habitat Prioritization Plan. These data were gathered both by the Coeur d'Alene Tribe and Idaho's Department of Environmental Quality. The addition of this portion of the Watershed in the Prioritization Plan fills a gap that the lack of data left in the first draft of the Plan. The streams in these upper headwaters support remnant salmonid populations and are close enough to be integrated with the streams and trout populations on the Reservation. The addition of this area strengthens the base from which the Hangman Restoration Project can work to secure and expand resident fish populations. An extensive 2-year search for historic photos of the upper portion of the Hangman Watershed was completed during this annual funding cycle. The disappointing result is that few photographs were acquired. One excellent panoramic view of the Upper Hangman Watershed from Tekoa Mountain was recovered and photos of this view were taken for comparison. The task of finding historic photos has been removed from future Scopes of Work, however search for photos will continue as part of the Project's public outreach. The notable exception to the lack of historic photos is the purchase, digitizing and GIS registry of 1947 aerial photo coverage of the entire Hangman Creek Watershed east of the Washington/Idaho State Boarder. In addition, 1933 aerial photo coverage of most of this same area is being registered to our GIS system. These 1933 photos were available to the Tribe prior to the initiation of this Project; however these photos are being registered partly as a result of requests made from this Project. The process of developing a map of potential vegetation types for the Hangman Watershed has benefited from establishment of an Interagency Agreement with the U.S. Geologic Survey to hire a Scientific Advisor. The Scientific Advisor has assisted with the design of a scheme to sample remnant native vegetation within an

Coeur d'Alene Tribe

2003-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

69

Fifteenmile Creek Riparian Buffers Project, Annual Report 2002-2003.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This project implements riparian buffer systems in the Mid-Columbia, addressing limiting factors identified in the Fifteenmile Subbasin Summary, June 30, 2000. The project is providing the technical planning support needed to implement at least 36 riparian buffer system contracts on approximately 872 acres covering an estimated 40 miles of anadromous fish streams over a three year period. During this second year of the project, 11 buffer contracts were implemented on 10.9 miles of stream. Buffer widths averaged 132 ft. on each side of the stream. Implementation included prescribed plantings, fencing, and related practices. Actual implementation costs, lease payments, and maintenance costs are borne by existing USDA programs: Conservation Reserve and Conservation Reserve Enhancement Programs. The lease period of each contract may vary between 10 to 15 years. During this year the average was 14.6 years. The total value of contracts established this year is $666,121 compared with $71,115 in Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) contract costs to provide the technical support needed to get the contracts implemented. This project provides technical staffing to conduct assessments and develop plans to help keep pace with the growing backlog of potential riparian buffer projects. Word of mouth from satisfied customers has brought in many new sign-ups during the year. In addition, specific outreach efforts targeting the orchard areas of the county began to bear fruit with orchardists sign-ups as the project year ended. Progress this second year of project includes only work accomplished in the Fifteenmile subbasin. A similar but separate effort to implement buffers in the Columbia Plateau Province was initiated during the year under project number 2002-019-00. This project supports RPA 150 and 153 as required under the Federal Hydropower System biological opinion.

Graves, Ron

2004-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

70

Colville Tribal Fish Hatchery, 2002-2003 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Colville Tribal Hatchery produced 62,335 pounds of trout during the contract period, however, only 46,092 pounds were liberated to lakes and streams. The remaining production will be carried over to 2004 to be planted as larger fish into reservation waters for the lakes opener. New raceways were completed in November and brought on line in the spring. These raceways currently hold the redband rainbow brood stock and will be spawned in 2004. Efforts are continuing to capture redbands from other streams in coordination with the monitoring and evaluation program. Creel was expanded by hiring a second creel clerk to give better coverage of reservation waters by reducing travel time. Marking continues on all fish planted from CTH and refinements continue to be made. The first tag retention study has been completed and the second study is now underway to determine long term tag recognition. Lakes continue to be surveyed to complete the baseline analysis of all reservation lakes and will be completed in 2004.

Fairgrieve, William; Christensen, David (Colville Confederated Tribes, Nespelem, WA)

2004-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

71

Banks Lake Fishery Evaluation Annual Report 2002-2003.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife implemented the Banks Lake Fishery Evaluation Project (BLFEP) in September 2001 with funds from the Bonneville Power Administration. Fiscal Year (FY) 2001 of the BLFEP was used to gather historic information, establish methods and protocols, collect limnology data, and conduct the first seasonal fish surveys. FY 2002 was used to continue seasonal fish and lakewide creel surveys and adjust methods and protocols as needed. Water quality parameters were collected monthly from February to May and bi-monthly from June to August. Banks Lake water temperatures began to increase in April and stratification was apparent by June at all 3 limnology collection sites. By late August, the thermocline had dropped to nearly 20 meters deep, with 16-17 C temperatures throughout the epilimnion. Dissolved oxygen levels were generally above 10 mg/L until August when dissolved oxygen dropped near or below 5 mg/L below 20-meters deep. Secchi depths ranged from 2.5-8 meters and varied by location and date. Nearshore and offshore fish surveys were conducted in October 2002 and May and July 2003 using boat electrofishing, fyke net, gill net, and hydroacoustic surveys. Yellow Perch Perca flavescens (32 %) and cottid spp. (22 %) dominated the nearshore species composition in October; however, by May yellow perch (12 %) were the third most common species followed by smallmouth bass Micropterous dolomieui (34 %) and lake whitefish Coregonus clupeaformis (14 %). Lake whitefish dominated the offshore catch during October (78 %) and May (81 %). Fish diet analysis indicated that juvenile fishes consumed primarily insects and zooplankton, while adult piscivores consumed cottids spp. and yellow perch most frequently. For FY 2002, the following creel statistics are comprehensive through August 31, 2003. The highest angling pressure occurred in June 2003, when anglers were primarily targeting walleye and smallmouth bass. Boat anglers utilized Steamboat State Park more frequently than any other boat ramp on Banks Lake. Shore anglers used the rock jetty at Coulee City Park 76 % of the time, with highest use occurring from November through April. An estimated total of 11,915 ({+-}140 SD) smallmouth bass, 6,412 ({+-}59 SD) walleye, 5,470 ({+-}260 SD) rainbow trout, and 1,949 ({+-}118 SD) yellow perch were harvested from Banks Lake in FY 2002. Only 3 kokanee were reported in the catch during the FY 2002 creel survey. In the future, data from the seasonal surveys and creel will be used to identify potential factors that may limit the production and harvest of kokanee, rainbow trout, and various spiny-rayed fishes in Banks Lake. The limiting factors that will be examined consist of: abiotic factors including water temperature, dissolved oxygen levels, habitat, exploitation and entrainment; and biotic factors including food limitation and predation. The BLFEP will also evaluate the success of several rearing and stocking strategies for hatchery kokanee in Banks Lake.

Polacek, Matt; Knuttgen, Kamia; Shipley, Rochelle

2003-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

72

August 2005 at all in a  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

· · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · Astronomy Botany Birds Cell Biology Cosmology Dating Methods Dinosaurs Early Man Education Evolution Fossils Physics Politics and Ethics SETI Solar System Theology Zoology Awards: Amazing Dumb 2001 2002 2003 2004 to an amorphous structure when exposed to solar radiation. Another odd thing about the tiger stripes is that each

West, Stuart

73

Regional GHG Emissions Stat s Greenhouse Gas and the Regional  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

(milliontonsCO2) Petroleum + Pet Coke Natural Gas Coal 8 0.0 10.0 20.0 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 and ½ Valmy coal plants) 2 #12;6/5/2013 2 GHG Emissions by Economic Sector in the Pacific Northwest (2010 Renewables 7 6%In 2011, the region 0.2% 6.4% Coal, 15.7% Nuclear, 2.0% 7.6%, g generated ~27,000 MWa ­ 68

74

Texas Emissions Reductions Program (TERP) Energy Efficiency/Renewable Energy (EE/RE) Update  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Electricity Generated in Texas by Renewable Sources Solar Biomass Landfill gas Hydro RENEWABLES: WHAT ARE THEY? Wind energy is the largest portion. Landfill gas, hydro are next. Biomass, solar are smallest 0 5,000,000 10,000,000 15,000,000 20...,000,000 25,000,000 30,000,000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 E le ct ri ci ty G en er at ed in M W h Year Annual Electricity Generated in Texas by Renewable Sources Solar Biomass Landfill gas Hydro Wind 0 20000...

Haberl, J. S.; Yazdani, B.; Culp, C.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

75

Geometria 1. Gruppo E-N. Anno Accademico 2000-2001. Alcuni preliminari.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

sia bagnata #18;e che stia piovendo" Come si scrive questa proposizione con il simbolo )? Domanda 2 \\Condizione necessaria a?nch#19;e stia piovendo #18;e che la strada sia bagnata" Che di#11;erenza c'#18;e fra bagnata #18;e che stia piovendo" Come si scrive questa proposizione con il simbolo )? #18; E vera

Piazza, Paolo

76

RF cavity R&D at LBNL for the NLC Damping Rings, FY2000/2001  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

95, Dallas, TX. "700 MHz Window R&D at LBNL", R. Rimmer et.al. , 11/2000. LBNL-47939, CBP tech note 230. [10] "A High-Proc. PAC 2001, Chicago. , LBNL-47968, LAUR 01-2574. , CBP

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

77

A Journal of Newar Studies - Number 4, NS 1121 / 2000-2001  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Samiti (INBSS) 1923 NE Schuyler St. Portland, OR 97212, USA Ph. (503) 282-0447 Fax (503) 774-7554 E-mail: drasha@aol.com From South Asian Countries Siddhi R. Shakya P. a Box 571 Kathmandu, Nepal Ph: 977-1- 265348 AD 2000/01 ~@~~g~ (Newal) Vijiiana... Buddhist Dancer 57 Digitalization of 'Asha Archives' 59 Newah Organization of America (NOA) 60 News Report on Nepal Sambat 62 NepaIi flP1Ic:q))"l 65 'li'i'tlSil ~~ ~ !f1qj

Shakya, Daya R; Manandhar, Gaurishankar

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

78

Hood River and Pelton Ladder Evaluation Studies, Annual Report 2000-2001.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) funded the development of two master plans which outline the rationale, and general approach, for implementing a defined group of projects that are an integral part of a comprehensive watershed goal to 'Protect, enhance and restore wild and natural populations of anadromous and resident fish within the Hood River Subbasin'. The Hood River Production Master Plan and the Pelton Ladder Master Plan were completed in 1991 and subsequently approved by the Northwest Power Planning Council in 1992. Action items identified in the two master plans, as well as in a later document entitled 'Hood River/Pelton Ladder Master Agreement' (ODFW and CTWSRO Undated), are designed to achieve two biological fish objectives: (1) to increase production of wild summer and winter steelhead (Oncorhynchus mykiss) to levels commensurate with the subbasins current carrying capacity and (2) re-establishing a self-sustaining population of spring chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha). Numerical fish objectives for subbasin escapement, spawner escapement, and subbasin harvest are defined for each of these species in Coccoli (2000). Several projects are presently funded by the BPA to achieve the Hood River subbasin's numerical fish objectives for summer and winter steelhead and spring chinook salmon. They include BPA project numbers 1998-021-00 (Hood River Fish Habitat), 1998-053-03 (Hood River Production Program - CTWSRO: M&E), 1998-053-07 (Parkdale Fish Facility), 1998-053-08 (Powerdale/Oak Springs O&M), and 1998-053-12 (Hood River Steelhead Genetics Study). Collectively, they are implemented under the umbrella of what has come to be defined as the Hood River Production Program (HRPP). The HRPP is jointly implemented by the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife (ODFW) and The Confederated Tribes of the Warm Springs Reservation of Oregon (CTWSRO). Strategies for achieving the HRPP's biological fish objectives for the Hood River subbasin were initially devised based on various assumptions about (1) subbasin carrying capacity, (2) survival rates for selected life history stages, and (3) historic and current escapements of wild, natural, and hatchery stocks of anadromous salmonids to the Hood River subbasin. The Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife began funding a monitoring and evaluation (M&E) project in December 1991 to collect the quantitative biological information needed to (1) more accurately assess the validity of these assumptions and (2) evaluate the proposed hatchery supplementation component of the HRPP. Bonneville Power Administration assumed funding of the M&E project in August 1992. The M&E project was initially confined to sampling anadromous salmonids escaping to an adult trapping facility operated at Powerdale Dam; which is located at River Mile (RM) 4.5 on the mainstem of the Hood River. Stock specific life history and biological data was collected to (1) monitor subbasin spawner escapements and (2) collect pre-implementation data critical to evaluating the newly proposed HRPP's potential biological impact on indigenous populations of resident fish. The scope of the M&E project was expanded in 1994 to collect the data needed to quantify (1) subbasin smolt production and carrying capacity, (2) smolt to adult survival rates, and (3) the spatial distribution of indigenous populations of summer and winter steelhead, spring and fall chinook salmon, and coho salmon. A creel was incorporated into the M&E project in December 1996 to evaluate the HRPP with respect to its defined subbasin and spawner escapement objectives for Hood River stocks of wild and hatchery summer and winter steelhead and for natural and Deschutes stock hatchery spring chinook salmon. In 1996, the M&E project also began monitoring streamflow at various locations in the Hood River subbasin. Streamflow data will be used to correlate subbasin smolt production with summer streamflows. Data collected from 1991-1999 is reported in the following annual progress reports: Olsen et al. (1994), Olsen et al

Olsen, Erik

2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

79

Annals of Operations Research 100, 251272, 2000 2001 Kluwer Academic Publishers. Manufactured in The Netherlands.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

model for the weekly cost-optimal generation of electric power in a hydro-thermal generation system,13,18,29] for earlier relevant work). The present paper aims at treating power optimization in a hydro-thermal system in The Netherlands. Stochastic Lagrangian Relaxation Applied to Power Scheduling in a Hydro-Thermal System under

Rmisch, Werner

80

Habitat Evaluation Procedures (HEP) Report; Steigerwald Lake National Wildlife Refuge, Technical Report 2000-2001.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Steigenvald Lake National Wildlife Refuge (NWR, refuge) was established as a result of the U. S. Army Corps of Engineers (COE) transferring ownership of the Stevenson tract located in the historic Steigerwald Lake site to the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (FWS, Service) for the mitigation of the fish and wildlife losses associated with the construction of a second powerhouse at the Bonneville Dam on the Columbia River and relocation of the town of North Bonneville (Public Law 98-396). The construction project was completed in 1983 and resulted in the loss of approximately 577 acres of habitat on the Washington shore of the Columbia River (USFWS, 1982). The COE determined that acquisition and development of the Steigenvald Lake area, along with other on-site project management actions, would meet their legal obligation to mitigate for these impacts (USCOE, 1985). Mitigation requirements included restoration and enhancement of this property to increase overall habitat diversity and productivity. From 1994 to 1999, 317 acres of additional lands, consisting of four tracts of contiguous land, were added to the original refuge with Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) funds provided through the Washington Wildlife Mitigation Agreement. These tracts comprised Straub (191 acres), James (90 acres), Burlington Northern (27 acres), and Bliss (9 acres). Refer to Figure 1. Under this Agreement, BPA budgeted $2,730,000 to the Service for 'the protection, mitigation, and enhancement of wildlife and wildlife habitat that was adversely affected by the construction of Federal hydroelectric dams on the Columbia River or its tributaries' in the state of Washington (BPA, 1993). Lands acquired for mitigation resulting from BPA actions are evaluated using the habitat evaluation procedures (HEP) methodology, which quantifies how many Habitat Units (HUs) are to be credited to BPA. HUs or credits gained lessen BPA's debt, which was formally tabulated in the Federal Columbia River Power System Loss Assessments and adopted as part of the Northwest Power Planning Council's Fish and Wildlife Program as a BPA obligation (BPA, 1994). Steigenvald Lake NWR is located in southwest Washington (Clark County), within the Columbia River Gorge National Scenic Area. Historically part of the Columbia River flood plain, the refuge area was disconnected from the river by a series of dikes constructed by the COE for flood control in 1966. An aerial photograph from 1948 portrays this area as an exceedingly complex mosaic of open water, wetlands, sloughs, willow and cottonwood stands, wet meadows, upland pastures, and agricultural fields, which once supported a large assemblage of fish and wildlife populations. Eliminating the threat of periodic inundation by the Columbia River allowed landowners to more completely convert the area into upland pasture and farmland through channelization and removal of standing water. Native pastures were 'improved' for grazing by the introduction of non-native fescues, orchard grass, ryegrass, and numerous clovers. Although efforts to drain the lake were not entirely successful, wetland values were still significantly reduced.

Allard, Donna

2001-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "2000-2001 2001-2002 2002-2003" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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81

Earth Sciences Division Revision to Publications List. Annual Report 2000-2001  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

C . Martin, E.A. Blakely, K . Bjornstad and W.R. McKinney,Goldstein, E.A. Blakely, K . Bjornstad, M.C. Martin and W.R.Martin, E.A. Blakely, K . Bjornstad and W.R. McKinney, IR

Benson, Sally; Goldstein, Norman

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

82

NSAC Members 2000 2001 | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)  

Office of Science (SC) Website

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear SecurityTensile Strain Switched5 IndustrialIsadore Perlman,Bios HighRadiobiology: Low DoseofMiscellaneousRocioVan0

83

REVIEW 2001/2002 1 INTRODUCTION BY THE VICE-CHANCELLOR  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

INDIVIDUALS 23 THE EDUCATIONAL ENVIRONMENT 26 STUDENT STATISTICS 27 INCOME AND EXPENDITURE ACCOUNT with great competence, energy and good humour, successful on every level. Coinciding with the Games been difficult to square. We recognise the strain on the Funding Council budget of the national

84

Council on East Asian Libraries Statistics 2001-2002 For North American Institutions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

198627 CT r- t CN r i0 483414n 105794 0 806179 00o id01 10802900 445702 m r r CT 114244 Tt- m 592107 c 05 731096ycoe r t- co543791r 125408 cni- oio M ID t1037411 308186 0OT 2307560rt CM 201460 0tcooCMi- tor 0v 222283 arsirsi ci CM 0 0 0 0 CT 0 r 0 0 0 0 0...cri 116420c 3 64230M 63339cy 10915CTt- m64357vo amzJPNQ 0 0T CNCM T- COT T- COT OO00 IO10CM UM 00 0TTO t 0mCM CMT- CMm 0t CMN C CMt T-CO 0 0 3 0t- toco30 2 0 emte mTT- CTio cdT 01cn cl0 t0 0r 00r rr r v hoyb0r- oi4991T 021r icm CT 0m ircm 0 Nm tt- m...

Doll, Vickie; Simpson, Fung-yin Kuo

2003-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

85

Research on Captive Broodstock Programs for Pacific Salmon, 2001-2002 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In the 2000 Federal Columbia River Power System (FCRPS) Biological Opinion, NMFS identified six populations of steelhead and several salmon populations that had dropped to critically low levels and continue to decline. Following thorough risk-benefit analyses, captive propagation programs for some or all of the steelhead (Oncorhynchus mykiss) populations may be required to reduce the risk of extinction, and more programs may be required in the future. Thus, captive propagation programs designed to maintain or rebuild steelhead populations require intensive and rigorous scientific evaluation, much like the other objectives of BPA Project 1993-056-00 currently underway for chinook (O. tshawytscha) and sockeye salmon (O. nerka). Pacific salmon reared to the adult stage in captivity exhibit poor reproductive performance when released to spawn naturally. Poor fin quality and swimming performance, incomplete development of secondary sex characteristics, changes in maturation timing, and other factors may contribute to reduced spawning success. Improving natural reproductive performance is critical for the success of captive broodstock programs in which adult-release is a primary reintroduction strategy for maintaining ESA-listed populations.

Berejikian, Barry A.; Tezak, E.P. (National Marine Fisheries Service); Endicott, Rick (Long Live the Kings, Seattle, WA)

2002-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

86

Technology and Space - Sustainable Architecture and the Blueprint Farm [EDRA / Places Awards, 2001-2002 -- Research  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and Place: Sustainable Architecture and the Blueprint Farmand Place: Sustainable Architecture and the Blueprint Farm,no common vision of sustainable architecture, agriculture or

Moore, Steven A

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

87

Doppler Sodar Report, 2001/2002 Season Ian Renfrew and Russ Ladkin  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, ten solar panels and ten wind generators. A Tattletale logger monitors the APS along with a standard damage ranging from minor repairs to complete write-off. Several of the solar panels also suffered BAS FpAWS and controls the Sodar Processing Unit (SPU). Operators communicate with the logger via

Renfrew, Ian

88

Kursplan fr lsret 2001/2002 INLEDANDE PROGRAMVARUTEKNIK -PROJEKT EDA322  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to Software Engineering - Project Poäng: 5.0 Betygskala: UG. Obligatorisk för: D2. Kursansvarig som sedan praktiseras i form av projektarbete. I projektarbetet ingår bl.a. specifikation

89

Lake Roosevelt Rainbow Trout Habitat/Passage Improvement Project, Annual Report 2001-2002.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The construction of Chief Joseph and Grand Coulee Dams completely and irrevocably blocked anadromous fish migrations to the Upper Columbia River. Historically this area hosted vast numbers of salmon returning to their natal waters to reproduce and die. For the native peoples of the region, salmon and steelhead were a principle food source, providing physical nourishment and spiritual sustenance, and contributing to the religious practices and the cultural basis of tribal communities. The decaying remains of spawned-out salmon carcasses contributed untold amounts of nutrients into the aquatic, aerial, and terrestrial ecosystems of tributary habitats in the upper basin. Near the present site of Kettle Falls, Washington, the second largest Indian fishery in the state existed for thousands of years. Returning salmon were caught in nets and baskets or speared on their migration to the headwater of the Columbia River in British Columbia. Catch estimates at Kettle Falls range from 600,000 in 1940 to two (2) million around the turn of the century (UCUT, Report No.2). The loss of anadromous fish limited the opportunities for fisheries management and enhancement exclusively to those actions addressed to resident fish. The Lake Roosevelt Rainbow Trout Habitat/Passage Improvement Project is a mitigation project intended to enhance resident fish populations and to partially mitigate for anadromous fish losses caused by hydropower system impacts. This substitution of resident fish for anadromous fish losses is considered in-place and out-of-kind mitigation. Upstream migration and passage barriers limit the amount of spawning and rearing habitat that might otherwise be utilized by rainbow trout. The results of even limited stream surveys and habitat inventories indicated that a potential for increased natural production exists. However, the lack of any comprehensive enhancement measures prompted the Upper Columbia United Tribes Fisheries Center (UCUT), Colville Confederated Tribes (CCT), Spokane Tribe of Indians (STI) and Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW) to develop and propose a comprehensive fishery management plan for Lake Roosevelt. The Rainbow Trout Habitat/Passage Improvement Project (LRHIP) was designed with goals directed towards increasing natural production while maintaining genetic integrity among current tributary stocks. The initial phase of the Lake Roosevelt Habitat Improvement Project (Phase I, baseline data collection: 1990-91) was focused on the assessment of limiting factors, including the quality and quantity of available spawning gravel, identification of passage barriers, and assessment of other constraints. After the initial assessment of stream parameters, five streams meeting specific criteria were selected for habitat/passage improvement projects (Phase II, implementation -1992-1995). Four of these projects were on the Colville Indian Reservation South Nanamkin, North Nanamkin, Louie and Iron Creeks and one Blue Creek was on the Spokane Indian Reservation. At the completion of project habitat improvements, the final phase (Phase III, monitoring-1996-2000) began. This phase assessed the changes and determined the success achieved through the improvements. Data analysis showed that passage improvements are successful for increasing habitat availability and use. The results of in-stream habitat improvements were inconclusive. Project streams, to the last monitoring date, have shown increases in fish density following implementation of the improvements. In 2000 Bridge Creek, on the Colville Reservation was selected for the next phase of improvements. Data collection, including baseline stream survey and population data collection, was carried out during 2001 in preparation for the design and implementation of stream habitat/passage improvements. Agencies cooperating on the project include the Colville Confederated Tribes (CCT), Natural Resource Conservation Service (NRCS, Ferry County District), Ferry County Conservation District, and Ferry County. The Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) provided

Sears, Sheryl

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

90

Mitigation for the Construction and Operation of Libby Dam, 2001-2002 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Libby Reservoir was created under an International Columbia River Treaty between the United States and Canada for cooperative water development of the Columbia River Basin (Columbia River Treaty 1964). Libby Reservoir inundated 109 stream miles of the mainstem Kootenai River in the United States and Canada, and 40 miles of tributary streams in the U.S. that provided habitat for spawning, juvenile rearing, and migratory passage (Figure 1). The authorized purpose of the dam is to provide power (91.5%), flood control (8.3%), and navigation and other benefits (0.2%; Storm et al. 1982). The Pacific Northwest Power Act of 1980 recognized possible conflicts stemming from hydroelectric projects in the northwest and directed Bonneville Power Administration to ''protect, mitigate, and enhance fish and wildlife to the extent affected by the development and operation of any hydroelectric project of the Columbia River and its tributaries...'' (4(h)(10)(A)). Under the Act, the Northwest Power Planning Council was created and recommendations for a comprehensive fish and wildlife program were solicited from the region's federal, state, and tribal fish and wildlife agencies. Among Montana's recommendations was the proposal that research be initiated to quantify acceptable seasonal minimum pool elevations to maintain or enhance the existing fisheries (Graham et al. 1982). Research to determine how operations of Libby Dam affect the reservoir and river fishery and to suggest ways to lessen these effects began in May, 1983. The framework for the Libby Reservoir Model (LRMOD) was completed in 1989. Development of Integrated Rule Curves (IRCs) for Libby Dam operation was completed in 1996 (Marotz et al. 1996). The Libby Reservoir Model and the IRCs continue to be refined (Marotz et al 1999). Initiation of mitigation projects such as lake rehabilitation and stream restoration began in 1996. The primary focus of the Libby Mitigation project now is to redevelop fisheries and fisheries habitat in basin streams and lakes.

Dunnigan, James L.; Marotz, Brian L.; DeShazer, Jay (Montana Department of Fish, Wildlife and Parks, Libby, MT)

2003-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

91

Evaluate Bull Trout Movements in the Tucannon and Lower Snake Rivers, 2001-2002 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We collected, radio-tagged, and PIT-tagged 41 bull trout at the Tucannon River Hatchery trap from May 17, through June 14, 2002. An additional 65 bull trout were also collected and PIT tagged by June 24, at which time we ceased PIT tagging operations because water temperatures were reaching 16.0 C or higher on a regular basis. Six radio-tags were recovered shortly after tagging, and as a result, 35 remained in the river through November 30, 2002. During the month of July, radio-tagged bull trout exhibited a general upstream movement into the upper reaches of the Tucannon Subbasin. We began to observe some downstream movements of radio-tagged bull trout in mid to late September and throughout October. These movements appeared to be associated with post spawning migrations. As of November 30, radio tagged bull trout were relatively stationary, and distributed from the headwaters downstream to river mile 11.3, near Pataha Creek. None of the radio-tagged bull trout left the Tucannon Subbasin and entered the federal hydropower system on the mainstem Snake River. We conducted some initial transmission tests of submerged radio tags at depths of 25, 35, 45, and 55 ft. in Lower Monumental Pool to test our capability of detection at these depths. Equipment used included Lotek model MCFT-3A transmitters, an SRX 400 receiver, a 4 element Yagi antenna, and a Lotek ''H'' antenna. Test results indicated that depth transmission of these tags was poor; only the transmitter placed at 25 ft. was audibly detectable.

Faler, Michael P. (US Fish and Wildlife Service, Idaho Fishery Resource Office, Ahsahka, ID); Mendel, Glen W.; Fulton, Carl (Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, Fish Management Division, Dayton, WA)

2003-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

92

Kursplan fr lsret 2001/2002 ROAD-MAN-LANDSCAPE -DESIGNPROJECT ASB150  

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, landscape and environmental requirements. Innehåll: Course content: New roads in the landscape. Conversion concepts in traffic planning, road construction, landscape architecture, urban architecture, planning (graduate) students of engineering, architecture and landscape architecture, and future planners

93

Kursplan fr lsret 2001/2002 ROAD-MAN-LANDSCAPE -IN THEORY ASB155  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-operation with complementary competences, and taking into account traffic, landscape and environmental requirements. Innehåll planning, road construction, landscape architecture, urban architecture, planning processes and the use) students of engineering, architecture and landscape architecture, and future planners and managers

94

Technology and Space - Sustainable Architecture and the Blueprint Farm [EDRA / Places Awards, 2001-2002 -- Research  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and Place: Sustainable Architecture and the Blueprint Farmand Place: Sustainable Architecture and the Blueprint Farm,and Place: Sustainable Architecture and the Blueprint Farm,

Moore, Steven A

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

95

Hyperfine Interactions 136/137: 549553, 2001. 2002 Kluwer Academic Publishers. Printed in the Netherlands.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in the Netherlands. 549 Hyperfine Interactions of 181 Ta in Zr2Ni Observed Using PAC Spectroscopy A. N. POYNOR1,2 , S

Motta, Arthur T.

96

2001-2002 Long Range Plan Working Group Members | U.S. DOE Office of  

Office of Science (SC) Website

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear SecurityTensile Strain Switched5 Industrial CarbonArticlesHuman ResourcesScienceHome TheFusion Plasmas |Science

97

NSAC Members 2001 2002 | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)  

Office of Science (SC) Website

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear SecurityTensile Strain Switched5 IndustrialIsadore Perlman,Bios HighRadiobiology: Low DoseofMiscellaneousRocioVan01

98

Two-way Immersion Bilingual Programs in Texas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

was able to identify 63 two-way programs in 32 school districts in Texas for the 2000-2001 academic year. Reported from our current 2002 study are the baseline data that lay the groundwork for more comprehensive evaluations of two-way (dual language...) programs in Texas. The Texas Two-Way Consortium and the Bilingual Program at Texas A&M University sponsored an online survey to identify all the TWI programs in Texas in the 2001-2002 school year (http://texastwoway.org). The primary purpose of our...

Galloway, Martha; Lara-Alecio, Rafael; Irby, Beverly J.; Rodriguez, Linda; Gomez, Leo

2010-10-22T23:59:59.000Z

99

Kursplan fr lsret 2002/2003 FRANSKA FR TEKNIKER; SPRK, KULTUR OCH  

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), (Glossar finns på Exp. 1). Camus, A.: L´?tranger, Gallimard, Coll. "Folio", (Glossar finns på Exp. 1

100

Hood River Monitoring and Evaluation Project, Annual Report 2002-2003.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Hood River Production Program Monitoring and Evaluation Project is co-managed by the Confederated Tribes of Warm Springs (CTWSRO) and the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife. The program is divided up to share responsibilities, provide efficiency, and avoid duplication. From October 2002 to September 2003 (FY 03) project strategies were implemented to monitor, protect, and restore anadromous fish and fish habitat in the Hood River subbasin. A description of the progress during FY 03 is reported here. Additionally an independent review of the entire program was completed in 2003. The purpose of the review was to determine if project goals and actions were achieved, look at critical uncertainties for present and future actions, determine cost effectiveness, and choose remedies that would increase program success. There were some immediate changes to the implementation of the project, but the bulk of the recommendations will be realized in coming years.

Vaivoda, Alexis

2004-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "2000-2001 2001-2002 2002-2003" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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101

Yakima Tributary Access and Habitat Program, 2002-2003 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Yakima Tributary Access and Habitat Program (YTAHP) was organized to restore salmonid passage to Yakima tributaries that historically supported salmonids and to improve habitat in areas where access is restored. This program intends to (a) screen unscreened diversion structures to prevent fish entrainment into artificial waterways; (b) provide for fish passage at man-made barriers, such as diversion dams, culverts, siphons and bridges; and (c) provide information and assistance to landowners interested in to contributing to the improvement of water quality, water reliability and stream habitat. The YTAHP developed from a number of groups actively engaged in watershed management, and/or habitat restoration within the Yakima River Basin. These groups include the Washington State Fish and Wildlife (WDFW), Kittitas County Conservation District (KCCD), North Yakima Conservation District (NYCD), Kittitas County Water Purveyors (KCWP), and Ahtanum Irrigation District (AID). The US Bureau of Reclamation (Reclamation) and Yakama Nation (YN) both participated in the development of the objectives of YTAHP. Other entities that will be involved during permitting or project review may include the YN, the federal Natural Resources Conservation Service (NRCS), the US Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS), the National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS), and US Army Corps of Engineers (COE). The objectives of YTAHP are listed below and also include subtasks detailed in the report: (1) Conduct Early Action Projects; (2) Review Strategic Plan; (3) Restore Access, including stream inventory, prioritization, implementation; and (4) Provide opportunities to improve habitat and conserve resources. The BPA YTAHP funding supported activities of the program which are described in this report. These activities are primarily related to objective 1 (conduct early action projects) and parts of objectives 2-4. The work supported by YTAHP funding will support a series of scheduled projects and be made larger by complementary funding through NRSC EQIP, Irrigation Efficiencies, WA State Salmon Recovery Funding Board and other local, state and federal programs. Projects completed FY-03: The Cooke Creek siphon and screen/bypass was completed on time and within budget. The Rosbach Farms project was completed in cooperation with the NRCS Environmental Quality Incentives Program and the KCCD's Irrigation Efficiencies Program. Tributary survey teams were trained and surveys of tributaries in Yakima and Kittitas counties commenced in December of 2002. By the end of September 2003 Cowiche Creek in Yakima County was completed as well as Coleman, Reecer, Currier, Dry, Cabin, Indian, and Jack Creeks in Kittitas County. A screen was installed on the Hernandez/Ringer diversion in cooperation with the NRCS office in Kittitas County. YTAHP submitted six applications to the Salmon Recovery Funding Board and three were selected and funded. Another Salmon Recovery Funding Board project awarded in 2000 to the Yakama Nation was transferred to the KCCD. Two miles of fencing of riparian zones on the north fork Ahtanum was completed by the North Yakima Conservation District in cooperation with the Department of Natural Resources and the Ahtanum Irrigation District and funded by US fish and Wildlife as part of YTAHP's outreach partnering. Completion of this year's effort has provided significant inroads to working on the private lands in two counties which will be vital to future efforts by YTAHP and others to protect and enhance Yakima River Basin habitat. 2003 saw the migration of the WEB site from MWH to the Kittitas County Conservation District and can be accessed at www.kccd.net.

Myra, D.; Ready, C.

2003-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

102

Kootenay Lake Fertilization Experiment; Years 11 and 12, Technical Report 2002-2003.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report examines the results from the eleventh and twelfth years (2002 and 2003) of the Kootenay Lake fertilization experiment. Experimental fertilization has occurred with an adaptive management approach since 1992 in order to restore productivity lost as a result of upstream dams. One of the main objectives of the experiment is to restore kokanee (Oncorhynchus nerka) populations, which are a main food source for Gerrard rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss). Kootenay Lake is located between the Selkirk and Purcell mountains in southeastern British Columbia. It has an area of 395 km2, a maximum depth of 150 m, a mean depth of 94 m, and a water renewal time of approximately two years. The quantity of agricultural grade liquid fertilizer (10-34-0, ammonium polyphosphate and 28-0-0, urea ammonium nitrate) added to Kootenay Lake in 2002 and 2003 was similar to that added from 1992 to 1996. After four years of decreased fertilizer loading (1997 to 2000), results indicated that kokanee populations had declined, and the decision was made to increase the loads again in 2001. The total load of fertilizer in 2002 was 47.1 tonnes of phosphorus and 206.7 tonnes of nitrogen. The total fertilizer load in 2003 was 47.1 tonnes of phosphorus and 240.8 tonnes of nitrogen. Additional nitrogen was added in 2003 to compensate for nitrogen depletion in the epilimnion. The fertilizer was applied to a 10 km stretch in the North Arm from 3 km south of Lardeau to 3 km south of Schroeder Creek. The maximum surface water temperature in 2002, measured on July 22, was 22 C in the North Arm and 21.3 C in the South Arm. In 2003, the maxima were recorded on August 5 at 20.6 C in the North Arm and on September 2 at 19.7 C in the South Arm. The maximum water temperature in the West Arm was 18.7 C on September 2, 2003. Kootenay Lake had oxygen-saturated water throughout the sampling season with values ranging from about 11-16 mg/L in 2002 and 2003. In both years, Secchi depth followed the expected pattern for an oligo-mesotrophic lake of decreasing in May, June, and early July, concurrent with the spring phytoplankton bloom, and clearing again as the summer progressed. Total phosphorus (TP) ranged from 2-11 {micro}g/L in 2002 and 2-21 {micro}g/L in 2003. With average TP values generally in the range of 3-10 {micro}g/L, Kootenay Lake is considered to be an oligotrophic to oligo-mesotrophic lake. Total dissolved phosphorus (TDP) followed the same seasonal trends as TP in 2002 and 2003 and ranged from 2-7 {micro}g/L in 2002 and from 2-10 {micro}g/L in 2003. Total nitrogen (TN) ranged from 90-380 {micro}g/L in 2002 and 100-210 {micro}g/L in 2003. During both the 2002 and 2003 sampling seasons, TN showed an overall decline in concentration with mid-summer and fall increases at some stations, which is consistent with previous years results. Dissolved inorganic nitrogen (DIN) concentrations showed a more pronounced declining trend over the sampling season compared with TN, corresponding to nitrate (the dominant component of DIN) being used by phytoplankton during summer stratification. DIN ranged from 7-176 {micro}g/L in 2002 and from 8-147 {micro}g/L in 2003. During 2003, discrete depth sampling occurred, and a more detailed look at the nitrate concentrations in the epilimnion was undertaken. There was a seasonal decline in nitrate concentrations, which supports the principle of increasing the nitrogen loading and the nitrogen to phosphorus (N:P) ratio during the fertilizer application period. Chlorophyll a (Chl a) concentrations in Kootenay Lake were in the range of 1.4-5.1 {micro}g/L in 2002 and 0.5-4.9 {micro}g/L in 2003. Over the sampling season, Chl a at North Arm stations generally increased in spring corresponding with the phytoplankton bloom, decreased during the summer, and increased again in the fall with mixing of the water column. The trend was similar, but less pronounced, at South Arm stations in these years, and spring Chl a concentrations were lower. During 2002, total algal biomass averaged during June, July and August was lower in the North

Schindler, E.

2007-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

103

Coeur d'Alene Tribal Production Facility, Volume III of III, 2002-2003 Progress Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This appendices covers the following reports: (1) Fisheries Habitat Evaluation on Tributaries of the Coeur d'Alene Indian Reservation, 1993-94 annual report; (2) Coeur d'Alene Tribe Fish, Water, and Wildlife Program, Supplementation Feasibility Report on the Coeur d'Alene Indian Reservation, 1998 technical report; and (3) Fisheries Habitat Evaluation on Tributaries of the Coeur d'Alene Indian Reservation, 1998 annual report.

Anders, Paul

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

104

Coeur d'Alene Tribal Production Facility, Volume II of III, 2002-2003 Progress Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This appendices covers the following reports: (1) Previous ISRP Reviews (Project 199004400) Implement Fisheries Enhancement Opportunities-Coeur d'Alene Reservation; (2) Step 1 review of the hatchery master plan (Memorandum from Mark Fritsch, Fish Production Coordinator, Draft version March 10, 2000); (3) Coeur d'Alene Tribe response to ISRP comments on Project No. 199004402; includes attachment A Water Quantity Report. This is an incomplete document Analysis of Well Yield Potential for a Portion of the Coeur d'Alene Reservation near Worley, Idaho, February 2001; (4) Coeur d'Alene Tribe Fisheries Program, Rainbow Trout Feasibility Report on the Coeur d'Alene Indian Reservation prepared by Ronald L. Peters, February 2001; (5) Coeur d'Alene Tribe response letter pursuant to the questions raised in the Step 1 review of the Coeur d'Alene Tribe Trout Production Facility from Ronald L. Peters, March 27, 2001 ; includes attachments Water quantity report (this is the complete report), Appendix A Logs for Test Wells and 1999 Worley West Park Well, letters from Ralston, Appendix B Cost of Rainbow Purchase Alternative; (6) NPPC response (memorandum from Mark Fritsch, March 28, 2001); (7) Response to NPPC (letter to Frank Cassidy, Jr., Chair, from Ernest L. Stensgar, April 18, 2001); (8) Final ISRP review (ISRP 2001-4: Mountain Columbia Final Report); (9) Response to ISRP comment (letter to Mark Walker, Director of Public Affairs, from Ronald Peters, May 7, 2001); (10) Final comments to the Fish 4 committee; (11) Scope of Work/Budget FY 2001-2004; (12) Letter from City of Worley concerning water service; (13) Letter to BPA regarding status of Step 1 package; (14) Fisheries Habitat Evaluation on Tributaries of the Coeur d'Alene Indian Reservation, 1990 annual report; (15) Fisheries Habitat Evaluation on Tributaries of the Coeur d'Alene Indian Reservation, 1991 annual report; and (16) Fisheries Habitat Evaluation on Tributaries of the Coeur d'Alene Indian Reservation, 1992 annual report.

Anders, Paul

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

105

E-Print Network 3.0 - areas 2002-2003 final Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

and Utilization 28 Response of Pinus sylvestris L. to recent climatic events in the French Mediterranean region Summary: .8 -0.8 -0.4 0 0.4 0.8 1.2 Mf %bc Rw Nby Blg 1996...

106

Resident Fish Stock Status above Chief Joseph and Grand Coulee Dams; 2002-2003 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In 1980, the United States Congress enacted the Northwest Power Planning and Conservation Act (PL 96-501, 1980), which established the Northwest Power and Conservation Council (NPCC), formerly the Northwest Power Planning Council. The NPCC was directed by Congress to develop a regional Power Plan and also the Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program (FWP) to restore or replace losses of fish caused by construction and operation of hydroelectric dams in the Columbia River Basin. In developing the FWP, Congress specifically directed NPCC to solicit recommendations for measures to be included in the Program from the region's fish and wildlife agencies and Indian tribes. All measures adopted by the Council were also required to be consistent with the management objectives of the agencies and tribes [Section 4.(h)(6)(A)], the legal rights of Indian tribes in the region [Section 4.(h)(6)(D)] and be based upon and supported by the best available scientific knowledge [Section 4.(h)(6)(B)]. The Resident Fish Stock Status above Chief Joseph and Grand Coulee Dams Project, also known as the Joint Stock Assessment Project (JSAP) specifically addresses NPPC Council measure 10.8B.26 of the 1994 program. The Joint Stock Assessment Project is a management tool using ecosystem principles to manage artificial and native fish assemblages in altered environments existing in the Columbia River System above Chief Joseph and Grand Coulee Dams (Blocked Area). A three-phase approach of this project will enhance the fisheries resources of the Blocked Area by identifying data gaps, filling data gaps with research, and implementing management recommendations based on research results. The Blocked Area fisheries information is housed in a central location, allowing managers to view the entire system while making decisions, rather than basing management decisions on isolated portions of the system. The JSAP is designed and guided jointly by fisheries managers in the Blocked Area. The initial year of the project (1997) identified the need for a central data storage and analysis facility, coordination with the StreamNet project, compilation of Blocked Area fisheries information, and a report on the ecological condition of the Spokane River System. These needs were addressed in 1998 by acquiring a central location with a data storage and analysis system, coordinating a pilot project with StreamNet, compiling fisheries distribution data throughout the Blocked Area, identifying data gaps based on compiled information, and researching the ecological condition of the Spokane River. In order to ensure that any additional information collected throughout the life of this project will be easily stored and manipulated by the central storage facility, it was necessary to develop standardized methodologies between the JSAP fisheries managers. Common collection and analytical methodologies were developed in 1999. The project began addressing identified data gaps throughout the Blocked Area in 1999. Data collection of established projects and a variety of newly developed sampling projects are ongoing. Projects developed and undertaken by JSAP fisheries managers include investigations of the Pend Orielle River and its tributaries, the Little Spokane River and its tributaries, and water bodies within and near the Spokane Indian Reservation. Migration patterns of adfluvial and reservoir fish in Box Canyon Reservoir and its tributaries, a baseline assessment of Boundary Reservoir and its tributaries, ecological assessment of mountain lakes in Pend Oreille County, and assessments of streams and lakes on the Spokane Indian Reservation were completed by 2001. Assessments of the Little Spokane River and its tributaries, Spokane River below Spokane Falls, tributaries to the Pend Oreille River, small lakes in Pend Oreille County, WA, and water bodies within and near the Spokane Indian Reservation were conducted in 2002 and 2003. This work was done in accordance with the scope of work approved by Bonneville Power Administration (BPA).

Connor, Jason M. (Kalispel Tribe of Indians, Usk, WA); McLellan, Jason G. (Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife); Butler, Chris (Spokane Tribe of Indians, Wellpinit, WA)

2006-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

107

Corso di Basi di Dati A.A. 2002/2003 -Appello del 16 aprile 2003  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

sola citt, e di ognuno di essi interessa il numero (unico nell'ambito della citt), ed il numero di'assicurazione, ed il proprietario (una ed una sola persona fisica, della quale interessa il codice fiscale

108

Lake Roosevelt Rainbow Trout Habitat/Passage Improvement Project, Annual Report 2002-2003.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The construction of Chief Joseph and Grand Coulee Dams completely and irrevocably blocked anadromous fish migrations to the Upper Columbia River. Historically this area hosted vast numbers of salmon returning to their natal waters to reproduce and die. For the native peoples of the region, salmon and steelhead were a principle food source, providing physical nourishment and spiritual sustenance, and contributing to the religious practices and the cultural basis of tribal communities. The decaying remains of spawned-out salmon carcasses contributed untold amounts of nutrients into the aquatic, aerial, and terrestrial ecosystems of tributary habitats in the upper basin. Near the present site of Kettle Falls, Washington, the second largest Indian fishery in the state existed for thousands of years. Returning salmon were caught in nets and baskets or speared on their migration to the headwater of the Columbia River in British Columbia. Catch estimates at Kettle Falls range from 600,000 in 1940 to two (2) million around the turn of the century (UCUT, Report No.2). The loss of anadromous fish limited the opportunities for fisheries management and enhancement exclusively to those actions addressed to resident fish. The Lake Roosevelt Rainbow Trout Habitat/Passage Improvement Project is a mitigation project intended to enhance resident fish populations and to partially mitigate for anadromous fish losses caused by hydropower system impacts. This substitution of resident fish for anadromous fish losses is considered in-place and out-of-kind mitigation. Upstream migration and passage barriers limit the amount of spawning and rearing habitat that might otherwise be utilized by rainbow trout. The results of even limited stream surveys and habitat inventories indicated that a potential for increased natural production exists. However, the lack of any comprehensive enhancement measures prompted the Upper Columbia United Tribes Fisheries Center (UCUT), Colville Confederated Tribes (CCT), Spokane Tribe of Indians (STI) and Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW) to develop and propose a comprehensive fishery management plan for Lake Roosevelt. The Rainbow Trout Habitat/Passage Improvement Project (LRHIP) was designed with goals directed towards increasing natural production while maintaining genetic integrity among current tributary stocks. The initial phase of the Lake Roosevelt Habitat Improvement Project (Phase I, baseline data collection: 1990-91) was focused on the assessment of limiting factors, including the quality and quantity of available spawning gravel, identification of passage barriers, and assessment of other constraints. After the initial assessment of stream parameters, five streams meeting specific criteria were selected for habitat/passage improvement projects (Phase II, implementation -1992-1995). Four of these projects were on the Colville Indian Reservation South Nanamkin, North Nanamkin, Louie and Iron Creeks and one Blue Creek was on the Spokane Indian Reservation. At the completion of project habitat improvements, the final phase (Phase III, monitoring-1996-2000) began. This phase assessed the changes and determined the success achieved through the improvements. Data analysis showed that passage improvements are successful for increasing habitat availability and use. The results of in-stream habitat improvements were inconclusive. Project streams, to the last monitoring date, have shown increases in fish density following implementation of the improvements. In 2000 Bridge Creek, on the Colville Reservation was selected for the next phase of improvements. Data collection, including baseline stream survey and population data collection, was carried out during 2001 in preparation for the design and implementation of stream habitat/passage improvements. Agencies cooperating on the project include the Colville Confederated Tribes (CCT), Natural Resource Conservation Service (NRCS, Ferry County District), Ferry County Conservation District, and Ferry County. The Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) provided

Sears, Sheryl

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

109

Grande Ronde Basin Fish Habitat Enhancement Project, Annual Report 2002-2003.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

On July 1, 1984 the Bonneville Power Administration and the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife entered into an agreement to initiate fish habitat enhancement work in the Joseph Creek subbasin of the Grande Ronde River Basin in northeast Oregon. In July of 1985 the Upper and Middle Grande Ronde River, and Catherine Creek subbasins were included in the intergovernmental contract, and on March 1, 1996 the Wallowa River subbasin was added. The primary goal of 'The Grande Ronde Basin Fish Habitat Enhancement Project' is to create, protect, and restore riparian and instream habitat for anadromous salmonids, thereby maximizing opportunities for natural fish production within the basin. This project provided for implementation of Program Measure 703 (C)(1), Action Item 4.2 of the Northwest Power Planning Council's Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program (NPPC, 1987), and continues to be implemented as offsite mitigation for mainstem fishery losses caused by the Columbia River hydro-electric system. All work conducted by the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife is on private lands and therefore requires that considerable time be spent developing rapport with landowners to gain acceptance of, and continued cooperation with this program throughout 10-15 year lease periods. This project calls for passive regeneration of habitat, using riparian exclosure fencing as the primary method to restore degraded streams to a normative condition. Active remediation techniques using plantings, off-site water developments, site-specific instream structures, or whole channel alterations are also utilized where applicable. Individual projects contribute to and complement ecosystem and basin-wide watershed restoration efforts that are underway by state, federal, and tribal agencies, and local watershed councils. Work undertaken during 2002 included: (1) Implementing 1 new fencing project in the Wallowa subbasin that will protect an additional 0.95 miles of stream and 22.9 acres of habitat; (2) Conducting instream work activities in 3 streams to enhance habitat and/or restore natural channel dimensions, patterns or profiles; (3) Planting 31,733 plants along 3.7 stream miles, (4) Establishing 71 new photopoints and retaking 254 existing photopoint pictures; (5) Monitoring stream temperatures at 12 locations on 6 streams; (6) Completing riparian fence, water gap and other maintenance on 100.5 miles of project fences. Since initiation of the project in 1984 over 68.7 miles of anadromous fish bearing streams and 1,933 acres of habitat have been protected, enhanced and maintained.

McGowan, Vance

2003-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

110

Assessment of Native Salmonids Above Hells Canyon Dam, Idaho, 2002-2003 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We assessed the relationships between specific stream attributes and Yellowstone cutthroat trout Oncorhynchus clarki bouvieri distribution and biomass at 773 stream reaches (averaging 100 m in length) throughout the Upper Snake River Basin in Idaho, in an effort to identify possible limiting factors. Because limiting factors were expected to vary across the range of cutthroat trout distribution in Idaho, separate logistic and multiple regression models were developed for each of the nine major river drainages to relate stream conditions to occurrence and biomass of cutthroat trout. Adequate stream flow to measure fish and habitat existed at 566 sites, and of those, Yellowstone cutthroat trout were present at 322 sites, while rainbow trout O. mykiss (or rainbow x cutthroat hybrids) and brook trout Salvelinus fontinalis occurred at 108 and 181 sites, respectively. In general, cutthroat trout presence at a specific site within a drainage was associated with a higher percentage of public property, higher elevation, more gravel and less fine substrate, and more upright riparian vegetation. However, there was much variation between drainages in the direction and magnitude of the relationships between stream characteristics and Yellowstone cutthroat trout occurrence and biomass, and in model strength. This was especially true for biomass models, in which we were able to develop models for only five drainages that explained more than 50% of the variation in cutthroat trout biomass. Sample size appeared to affect the strength of the biomass models, with a higher explanation of biomass variation in drainages with lower sample sizes. The occurrence of nonnative salmonids was not strongly related to cutthroat trout occurrence, but their widespread distribution and apparent ability to displace native cutthroat trout suggest they may nevertheless pose the largest threat to long-term cutthroat trout persistence in the Upper Snake River Basin.

Meyer, Kevin A.; Lamansky, Jr., James A. (Idaho Department of Fish and Game, Boise, ID)

2004-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

111

Coeur d'Alene Tribal Production Facility, Volume I of III, 2002-2003 Progress Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In fulfillment of the NWPPC's 3-Step Process for the implementation of new hatcheries in the Columbia Basin, this Step 1 submission package to the Council includes four items: (1) Cover letter from the Coeur d'Alene Tribe, Interdisciplinary Team Chair, and the USFWS; (2) References to key information (Attachments 1-4); (3) The updated Master Plan for the Tribe's native cutthroat restoration project; and (4) Appendices. In support of the Master Plan submitted by the Coeur d'Alene Tribe the reference chart (Item 2) was developed to allow reviewers to quickly access information necessary for accurate peer review. The Northwest Power Planning Council identified pertinent issues to be addressed in the master planning process for new artificial production facilities. References to this key information are provided in three attachments: (1) NWPPC Program language regarding the Master Planning Process, (2) Questions Identified in the September 1997 Council Policy, and (3) Program language identified by the Council's Independent Scientific Review Panel (ISRP). To meet the need for off-site mitigation for fish losses on the mainstem Columbia River, in a manner consistent with the objectives of the Council's Program, the Coeur d'Alene Tribe is proposing that the BPA fund the design, construction, operation, and maintenance of a trout production facility located adjacent to Coeur d'Alene Lake on the Coeur d'Alene Indian Reservation. The updated Master Plan (Item 3) represents the needs associated with the re-evaluation of the Coeur d'Alene Tribe's Trout Production Facility (No.199004402). This plan addresses issues and concerns expressed by the NWPPC as part of the issue summary for the Mountain Columbia provincial review, and the 3-step hatchery review process. Finally, item 4 (Appendices) documents the 3-Step process correspondence to date between the Coeur d'Alene Tribe and additional relevant entities. Item 4 provides a chronological account of previous ISRP reviews, official Coeur d'Alene fisheries program responses to a series of ISRP reviews, master planning documentation, and annual reports dating back to 1990. Collectively, the materials provided by the Coeur d'Alene Tribe in this Step-1 submission package comprehensively assesses key research, habitat improvement activities, and hatchery production issues to best protect and enhance native cutthroat trout populations and the historically and culturally important tribal fisheries they support.

Anders, Paul

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

112

Yakima/Klickitat Fisheries Project; Klickitat Only Monitoring and Evaluation, 2002-2003 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The monitoring and evaluation activities described in this report were determined by consensus of the scientists from the Yakama Nation (YN). Klickitat Subbasin Monitoring and Evaluation (M&E) activities have been subjected to scientific and technical review by members of YKFP's Science/Technical Advisory Committee (STAC) as part of the YKFP's overall M&E proposal. Yakama Nation YKFP project biologists have transformed the conceptual design into the tasks described. This report summarizes progress and results for the following major categories of YN-managed tasks under this contract: (1) Monitoring and Evaluation - Accurately characterize baseline available habitat and salmonid populations pre-habitat restoration and pre-supplementation. (2) EDT Modeling - Identify and evaluate habitat and artificial production enhancement options. (3) Genetics - Characterize the genetic profile of wild steelhead in the Klickitat Basin. (4) Ecological Interactions - Determine the presence of pathogens in wild and naturally produced salmonids in the Klickitat Basin and develop supplementation strategies using this information.

Sampson, Melvin; Evenson, Rolf

2003-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

113

Application of an ASHRAE 152-2004 Duct Model for Simulating Code-Compliant 2000/2001 IECC Residences  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

( Eq. 1 )))(1()1( ))(1( 60 ( , , sambspsprrpr inrambr ine cap cap ines cooling ttBCtBCa hhaQ E E QaDE ??+??+ ??+= ? ? Eq. 2 where, Bs = conduction efficiency of supply duct = )) 60 exp( spine s RCQ A... ? ? , Eq. 3 Br = conduction efficiency of return duct = )) 60 exp( rpine r RCQ A ? ? , Eq. 4 as = air leakage efficiency of the duct of supply duct = ( e se Q QQ ? ), Eq. 5...

Haberl, J.S.; Kim, S.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

114

Monitoring the Migrations of Wild Snake River Spring/Summer Chinook Salmon Smolts, 2001-2002 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report details the 2002 results from an ongoing project to monitor the migration behavior of wild spring/summer chinook salmon smolts in the Snake River Basin. The report also discusses trends in the cumulative data collected for this project from Oregon and Idaho streams since 1989. The project was initiated after detection data from passive-integrated-transponder tags (PIT tags) had shown distinct differences in migration patterns between wild and hatchery fish for three consecutive years. National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS) investigators first observed these differences in 1989. The data originated from tagging and interrogation operations begun in 1988 to evaluate smolt transportation for the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers. In 1991, the Bonneville Power Administration began a cooperative effort with NMFS to expand tagging and interrogation of wild fish. Project goals were to characterize the outmigration timing of these fish, to determine whether consistent migration patterns would emerge, and to investigate the influence of environmental factors on the timing and distribution of these migrations. In 1992, the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife (ODFW) began an independent program of PIT tagging wild chinook salmon parr in the Grande Ronde and Imnaha River Basins in northeast Oregon. Since then, ODFW has reported all tagging, detection, and timing information on fish from these streams. However, with ODFW concurrence, NMFS will continue to report arrival timing of these fish at Lower Granite Dam.

Achond, Stephen; Hockersmith, Eric E.; Sandford, Benjamin P. (National Marine Fisheries Service, Northwest Fisheries Science Center, Seattle, WA)

2003-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

115

11. PUBLICATIONS 2001-2002 Addis Tsehaye, Buchanan, A.H. & Walker, J.C.F. Selecting trees for structural  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

.J., 2001. Reducing sediment inputs into Scottish streams: a review of the efficacy of soil conservation.N., & Southerwood, J., (in press). Justice is requisite to sustainability: the future of the forests on South Island Landless Natives Act Lands, New Zealand. In Resource Management and Indigenous Land Claims in the Pacific

Hickman, Mark

116

Universitt Hannover Studierendenstatistik WS 2001/2002 Seite 1 von 9 Studiengang Abschlu-Fachflle je Semester Summe Summe Summe  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

LG 50 30 3 36 2 21 43 4 36 60 285 140 2 LR 1 8 2 5 17 33 17 2 LGH 5 1 2 8 4 2 LGHR HR 13 7 5 2 5 1 1. 3 3 3 3 LG 45 21 2 21 15 2 9 17 23 155 76 1 LR 1 3 2 4 10 6 1 LGH 1 1 0 0 LGHR HR 6 2 2 2 1 1 14 8 2 427 23 (Erdkunde) LG 8 12 2 8 3 7 1 10 2 3 7 63 32 1 LR 2 5 2 5 8 22 10 LGH 1 1 0 LGHR HR 5 5 4 1 1 16

Vollmer, Heribert

117

White Sturgeon Mitigation and Restoration in the Columbia and Snake Rivers Upstream from Bonneville Dam; 2001-2002 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We report on our progress from April 2001 through March 2002 on determining the effects of mitigative measures on productivity of white sturgeon populations in the Columbia River downstream from McNary Dam, and on determining the status and habitat requirements of white sturgeon populations in the Columbia and Snake rivers upstream from McNary Dam.

Ward, David L.; Kern, J. Chris; Hughes, Michele L.

2003-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

118

Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife Fish Program Hatcheries Division: Ford Hatchery, Annual Report 2001-2002.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife implemented the Banks Lake Fishery Evaluation Project (BLFEP) in September 2001 with funds from the Bonneville Power Administration. The first year of the BLFEP was used to gather historic information, establish methods and protocols, collect limnology data, and conduct the first seasonal fish surveys. Water quality parameters were collected monthly from February to May and bi-monthly from June to August. Banks Lake water temperatures began to increase in April and stratification was apparent by June at all 3 limnology collection sites. By late August, the thermocline had dropped to nearly 20 m deep, with 19-20 C temperatures throughout the epilimnion. Dissolved oxygen levels were generally above 10 mg/L until mid summer when dissolved oxygen dropped near or below 5 mg/L below 20-m deep. Secchi depths ranged from 3-10 m and varied by location and date. Nearshore and offshore fish surveys were conducted in May and July using boat electrofishing, fyke net, gill net, and hydroacoustic surveys. Smallmouth bass Micropterous dolomieui (24%) and lake whitefish Coregonus clupeaformis (20%) dominated the nearshore species composition in May; however, by July yellow perch Perca flavescens (26%) were the second most common species to smallmouth bass (30%). Lake whitefish dominated the offshore catch during May (72%) and July (90%). The May hydroacoustic survey revealed highest densities of fish in the upper 1/3 of the water column in the mid- to northern sections of the reservoir near Steamboat Rock. In the future, data from seasonal surveys will be used to identify potential factors that may limit the production and harvest of kokanee, rainbow trout, and various spiny-rayed fishes in Banks Lake. The limiting factors that will be examined consist of: abiotic factors including water temperature, dissolved oxygen levels, habitat, exploitation and entrainment; and biotic factors including food limitation and predation. The BLFEP will also evaluate the success of several rearing and stocking strategies for hatchery kokanee in Banks Lake.

Lewis, Mike; Polacek, Matt; Knuttgen, Kamia

2002-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

119

Fisheries Enhancement on the Coeur d'Alene Indian Reservation; Hangman Creek, Annual Report 2001-2002.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Historically, Hangman Creek produced Chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) and Steelhead trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) for the Upper Columbia Basin Tribes. One weir, located at the mouth of Hangman Creek was reported to catch 1,000 salmon a day for a period of 30 days a year (Scholz et al. 1985). The current town of Tekoa, Washington, near the state border with Idaho, was the location of one of the principle anadromous fisheries for the Coeur d'Alene Tribe (Scholz et al. 1985). The construction, in 1909, of Little Falls Dam, which was not equipped with a fish passage system, blocked anadromous fish access to the Hangman Watershed. The fisheries were further removed with the construction of Chief Joseph and Grand Coulee Dams. As a result, the Coeur d'Alene Indian Tribe was forced to rely more heavily on native fish stocks such as Redband trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss gairdneri), Westslope Cutthroat trout (O. clarki lewisii), Bull trout (Salvelinus confluentus) and other terrestrial wildlife. Historically, Redband and Cutthroat trout comprised a great deal of the Coeur d'Alene Tribe's diet (Power 1997).

Peters, Ronald; Kinkead, Bruce; Stanger, Mark

2003-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

120

UW CENPA Annual Report 2002-2003 May 2003 33 2.18 Electron-capture branch of 100  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Mo as a solar neutrino detector. Neutrinos would undergo the reaction: + 100Mo e + 100Tc, and 100Tc-K Mo-K Mo-K Countsperchannel Energy [keV] 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 10 100 1000 10000 a a b Figure 2¨askyl¨a, Jyv¨askyl¨a, Finland. Department of Physics, Notre Dame University, Notre Dame, IN 46556. 1 H. Ejiri

Washington at Seattle, University of

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121

Simone GilardoniNufact03 7/06/2003 Horn R&D for 2002-2003  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-like: ­ Normally 1-2 interaction lengths · Order 20-30 cm for heavy targets (Hg) · Particle produced with large · Power supply for Test One: 30 kA and 1 Hz, pulse 100 µs long First mechanical measurements Test and water connections #12;Simone GilardoniNufact03 7/06/2003 Inside the neck 5.6 cm #12;Simone Gilardoni

McDonald, Kirk

122

Prova scritta intercorso 2 gioved 29 maggio 2003 Laurea in Scienza e Ingegneria dei Materiali anno accademico 2002-2003  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

lo stato stazionario di numero quantico n = 4. Calcolate (a) l'energia dell'elettrone, in eV, e (b'ultima domanda). [punti: a = 3/10; b = 3/10; c=2/10; d=2/10] 2) Un elettrone di energia E = 1 eV inizialmente: pregi (rispetto al modello classico a sistema solare) e difetti (perché non poteva essere considerato

Marrucci, Lorenzo

123

White Sturgeon Mitigation and Restoration in the Columbia and Snake Rivers Upstream from Bonneville Dam; 2002-2003 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We report on our progress from April 2002 through March 2003 on determining the effects of mitigative measures on productivity of white sturgeon populations in the Columbia River downstream from McNary Dam, and on determining the status and habitat requirements of white sturgeon populations in the Columbia and Snake rivers upstream from McNary Dam.

Ward, David L.; Kern, J. Chris; Hughes, Michele L. (Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife)

2004-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

124

Reviews in Fish Biology and Fisheries 12: 373391, 2002. 2003 Kluwer Academic Publishers. Printed in the Netherlands.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in the Netherlands. 373 Alien invasions in aquatic ecosystems: Toward an understanding of brook trout invasions College Ave., Columbia, MO 65201, USA Accepted 7 January 2003 Contents Abstract page 373 Introduction 374

125

Moses Lake Fishery Restoration Project; Factors Affecting the Recreational Fishery in Moses Lake Washington, Annual Report 2002-2003.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This annual report is a precursor to the final technical report we will be writing the next contract period. Consequently, this report, covering the period between September 27, 2002, and September 26, 2003, represents a progress report towards the final technical report we anticipate completing by September 26, 2004. Sample analysis and field work have progressed well and we anticipate no further delays. There are 4 objectives: (1) To quantify secondary production Moses Lake; (2) To quantify the influence of predation on target fishes in Moses Lake; (3) To quantify mortality of selected fished in Moses Lake; and (4) To assess effects of habitat changes from shoreline development and carp on the fish community in Moses Lake.

Burgess, Dave

2003-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

126

Quantification of Energy and Emissions Saved in Energy Efficiency/ Renewable Energy (EE/RE) Programs in Texas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

(6.0 tons/OSD) 1,772 tons/yr for SO2 2,286,012 tons/yr for CO2 * Note $0.095/kWh, $0.65/therm p. 64 Energy Systems Laboratory 2011 RENEWABLES: WHAT ARE THEY? Wind energy is the largest portion. 0 5,000,000 10,000,000 15... Landfill gas Hydro RENEWABLES: WHAT ARE THEY? Wind energy is the largest portion. Landfill gas, hydro are next. 0 5,000,000 10,000,000 15,000,000 20,000,000 25,000,000 30,000,000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 E le ct ri ci ty G en...

Haberl, J. S.; Baltazar, J. C.; Mao, C.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

127

Re-Analysis of Hydroacoustic Fish-Passage Data from Bonneville Dam after Spill-Discharge Corrections  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers - Portland District asked Pacific Northwest National Laboratory to re-analyze four years of fixed-aspect hydroacoustic data after the District made adjustments to spill discharge estimates. In this report, we present new estimates of all major fish-passage metrics for study years 2000, 2001, 2002, and 2004, as well as estimates for 2005. This study supports the Portland District and its effort to maximize survival of juvenile salmon passing Bonneville Dam. Major passage routes through Bonneville Dam include 10 turbines and a sluiceway at Powerhouse 1 (B1), an 18-bay spillway, and eight turbines at Powerhouse 2 (B2) and a sluiceway including the B2 Corner Collector. The original reports and all associated results, discussion, and conclusions for non flow-related metrics remain valid and useful, but effectiveness measures for study years 2000, 2001, 2002, and 2004 as reported in previous reports by Ploskey et al. should be superseded with the new estimates reported here. The fish-passage metrics that changed the most were related to effectiveness. Re-analysis produced spill effectiveness estimates that ranged from 12% to 21% higher than previous estimates in spring and 16.7% to 27.5% higher in summer, but the mean spill effectiveness over all years was only slightly above 1:1 (1.17 for spring and 1.29 for summer). Conversely surface-passage effectiveness decreased in the years this metric was measured (by 10.1% in spring and 10.7% in summer of 2002 and 9.5% in spring and 10.2% in summer of 2004). The smallest changes in the re-analysis were in project fish passage efficiency (0%-1%) and spill efficiency (0.9%-3.0%).

Ploskey, Gene R.; Kim, Jina; Weiland, Mark A.; Hughes, James S.; Fischer, Eric S.

2007-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

128

Impact of the Implementation of the 2000/2001 IECC on Commercial Energy Use in Texas: Analysis of Commercial Energy Savings  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

window areas for the different orientations. The upper limit on the window-to-wall ratio depends on the plenum Assembly (Annual), Electricity 0 10000000 20000000 30000000 40000000 50000000 60000000 70000000 BA ST R O P, T X BE XA R , T X BR A Z O R... IA , T X C A LD W E LL , TX CHA M B E R S , T X CO L L IN, T X CO M A L , T X DA L L A S , T X DE NT O N , T X E L PA SO , T X EL L IS, T X FO R T B E N D , TX GA LV E S T O N , TX GR E G G G U A D AL U P E, TX HA RDIN, T X HA RRIS , T X HA RRIS O...

Yazdani, B.; Im, P.; Culp, C.; Haberl, J. S.; Chongcharoensuk, C.; Kim, S.; Ahmad, M.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

129

Evaluation of the Life History of Native Salmonids in the Malheur River Basin; Cooperative Bull Trout/Redband Trout Research Project, 2000-2001 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Malheur basin lies within southeastern Oregon. The Malheur River is a tributary to the Snake River, entering at about River Kilometer (RK) 595. The hydrological drainage area of the Malheur River is approximately 12,950 km{sup 2} and is roughly 306 km in length. The headwaters of the Malheur River originate in the Blue Mountains at elevations of 6,500 to 7,500 feet, and drops to an elevation of 2000 feet at the confluence with the Snake River near Ontario, Oregon. The climate of the Malheur basin is characterized by hot dry summers, occasionally exceeding 38 C and cold winters that may drop below -29 C. Average annual precipitation is 300 centimeters and ranges from 100 centimeters in the upper mountains to less than 25 centimeters in the lower reaches (Gonzalez 1999). Wooded areas consist primarily of mixed fir and pine forest in the higher elevations. Sagebrush and grass communities dominate the flora in the lower elevations. Efforts to document salmonid life histories, water quality, and habitat conditions have continued in fiscal year 2000. The Burns Paiute Tribe (BPT), United States Forest Service (USFS), and Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife (ODFW), have been working cooperatively to achieve this common goal. Bull trout ''Salvenlinus confluentus'' have specific environmental requirements and complex life histories making them especially susceptible to human activities that alter their habitat (Howell and Buchanan 1992). Bull trout are considered to be a cold-water species and are temperature dependent. This presents a challenge for managers, biologists, and private landowners in the Malheur basin. Because of the listing of bull trout under the Endangered Species Act as threatened and the current health of the landscape, a workgroup was formed to develop project objectives related to bull trout. This report will reflect work completed during the Bonneville Power contract period starting 1 April 2000 and ending 31 March 2001. The study area will include the North Fork Malheur River and the Upper Malheur River from Warm Springs Reservoir upstream to the headwaters.

Gonzales, Dan; Schwabe, Lawrence; Wenick, Jess (Burns Paiute Tribe, Department of Fish and Wildlife, Burns, OR)

2001-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

130

Spring Chinook Salmon Interactions Indices and Residual/Precocial Monitoring in the Upper Yakima Basin; Yakima/Klickitat Fisheries Project Monitoring and Evaluation, 2001-2002 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report examines some of the factors that can influence the success of supplementation, which is currently being tested in the Yakima Basin using upper Yakima stock of spring chinook salmon. Supplementation success in the Yakima Basin is defined relative to four topic areas: natural production, genetics, ecological interactions, and harvest (Busack et al. 1997). The success of spring chinook salmon supplementation in the Yakima Basin is dependent, in part, upon fish culture practices and favorable physical and biological conditions in the natural environment (Busack et al. 1997). Shortfalls in either of these two topics (i.e., failure in culturing many fish that have high long-term fitness or environmental conditions that constrain spring chinook salmon production) will cause supplementation success to be limited. For example, inadvertent selection or propagation of spring chinook that residualize or precocially mature may hinder supplementation success. Spring chinook salmon that residualize (do not migrate during the normal migration period) may have lower survival rates than migrants and, additionally, may interact with wild fish and cause unacceptable impacts to non-target taxa. Large numbers of precocials (nonanadromous spawners) may increase competition for females and significantly skew ratios of offspring sired by nonanadromous males, which could result in more nonanadromous spring chinook in future generations. Conditions in the natural environment may also limit the success of spring chinook supplementation. For example, intra or interspecific competition may constrain spring chinook salmon production. Spring chinook salmon juveniles may compete with each other for food or space or compete with other species that have similar ecological requirements. Monitoring of spring chinook salmon residuals, precocials, prey abundance, carrying capacity, and competition will help researchers interpret why supplementation is working or not working (Busack et al. 1997). Monitoring ecological interactions will be accomplished using interactions indices. Interactions indices will be used to index the availability of prey and competition for food and space. The tasks described below represent various subject areas of juvenile spring chinook salmon monitoring but are treated together because they can be accomplished using similar methods and are therefore more cost efficient than if treated separately. Three areas of investigation we pursued in this work were: (1) strong interactor monitoring (competition index and prey index), (2) carrying capacity monitoring (microhabitat monitoring); (3) residual and precocial salmon monitoring (abundance). This report is organized into three chapters to represent these three areas of investigation. Data were collected during the summer and fall, 2002 in index sections of the upper Yakima Basin (Figure 1). Hatchery reared spring chinook salmon were first released during the spring of 1999. The monitoring plan for the Yakima/Klickitat Fisheries Project calls for the continued monitoring of the variables covered in this report. All findings in this report should be considered preliminary and subject to further revision as more data and analytical results become available.

Pearsons, Todd N.; James, Brenda B.; Johnson, Christopher L. (Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, Olympia, WA)

2003-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

131

Survival Estimates for the Passage of Spring-Migrating Juvenile Salmonids through Snake and Columbia River Dams and Reservoirs, 2001-2002 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In 2001, the National Marine Fisheries Service and the University of Washington completed the ninth year of a study to estimate survival and travel time of juvenile salmonids (Oncorhynchus spp.) passing through dams and reservoirs on the Snake and Columbia Rivers. All estimates were derived from passive integrated transponder (PIT)-tagged fish. We PIT tagged and released at Lower Granite Dam a total of 17,028 hatchery and 3,550 wild steelhead. In addition, we utilized fish PIT tagged by other agencies at traps and hatcheries upstream of the hydropower system and sites within the hydropower system. PIT-tagged smolts were detected at interrogation facilities at Lower Granite, Little Goose, Lower Monumental, McNary, John Day, and Bonneville Dams and in the PIT-tag detector trawl operated in the Columbia River estuary. Survival estimates were calculated using the Single-Release Model. Primary research objectives in 2001 were to: (1) estimate reach and project survival and travel time in the Snake and Columbia Rivers throughout the yearling chinook salmon and steelhead migrations; (2) evaluate relationships between survival estimates and migration conditions; and (3) evaluate the survival-estimation models under prevailing conditions. This report provides reach survival and travel time estimates for 2001 for PIT-tagged yearling chinook salmon and steelhead (hatchery and wild) in the Snake and Columbia Rivers. Results are reported primarily in the form of tables and figures with a minimum of text. More details on methodology and statistical models used are provided in previous reports cited in the text. Results for summer-migrating chinook salmon will be reported separately.

Zabel, Richard; Williams, John G.; Smith, Steven G. (Northwest and Alaska Fisheries Science Center, Fish Ecology Division, Seattle, WA)

2002-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

132

Smolt Monitoring at the Head of Lower Granite Reservoir and Lower Granite Dam; Smolt Monitoring by Federal and Non-Federal Entities, 2001-2002 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This project monitored the daily passage of chinook salmon Oncorhynchus tshawytscha, steelhead trout O. mykiss, and sockeye salmon smolts O. nerka during the 2001 spring out-migration at migrant traps on the Snake River and Salmon River. In 2001 fish management agencies released significant numbers of hatchery chinook salmon and steelhead trout above Lower Granite Dam that were not marked with a fin clip or coded-wire tag. Generally, these fish were distinguishable from wild fish by the occurrence of fin erosion. Total annual hatchery chinook salmon catch at the Snake River trap was 11% of the 2000 numbers. The wild chinook catch was 3% of the previous year's catch. Hatchery steelhead trout catch was 49% of 2000 numbers. Wild steelhead trout catch was 69% of 2000 numbers. The Snake River trap collected 28 age-0 chinook salmon. During 2001 the Snake River trap captured zero hatchery and zero wild/natural sockeye salmon and six hatchery coho salmon O. kisutch. Differences in trap catch between years are due to fluctuations not only in smolt production, but also differences in trap efficiency and duration of trap operation associated with flow. The significant reduction in catch during 2001 was due to a reduction in hatchery chinook production (60% of 2000 release) and due to extreme low flows. Trap operations began on March 11 and were terminated on June 29. The trap was out of operation for a total of two days due to mechanical failure or debris. Hatchery chinook salmon catch at the Salmon River trap was 47% and wild chinook salmon catch was 67% of 2000 numbers. The hatchery steelhead trout collection in 2001 was 178% of the 2000 numbers. Wild steelhead trout collection in 2001 was 145% of the previous year's catch. Trap operations began on March 11 and were terminated on June 8 due to the end of the smolt monitoring season. There were no days where the trap was out of operation due to high flow or debris. The decrease in hatchery chinook catch in 2001 was due to a reduction in hatchery production (39% of 2000 releases). The increase in hatchery and wild steelhead trap catch is due to the ability to operate the trap in the thalweg for a longer period of time because of the extreme low flow condition in 2001. Travel time (d) and migration rate (km/d) through Lower Granite Reservoir for PIT-tagged chinook salmon and steelhead trout marked at the head of the reservoir were affected by discharge. There were not enough hatchery and wild chinook salmon tagged at the Snake River trap in 2001 to allow migration rate/discharge analysis. For steelhead trout tagged at the Snake River trap, statistical analysis of 2001 data detected a significant relation between migration rate and Lower Granite Reservoir inflow discharge. For hatchery and wild steelhead trout, there was a 2.2-fold and a 1.5-fold increase in migration rate in, respectively, between 50 and 100 kcfs. Travel time and migration rate to Lower Granite Dam for fish marked at the Salmon River trap were calculated. Statistical analysis of the 2001 data detected a significant relation between migration rate and Lower Granite Reservoir inflow discharge for hatchery and wild chinook salmon and hatchery and wild steelhead trout. Migration rate increased 3.7-fold for hatchery chinook salmon and 2.5-fold for wild chinook salmon between 50 and 100 kcfs. For hatchery steelhead there was a 1.6-fold increase in migration rate, and for wild steelhead trout there was a 2.2-fold increase between 50 kcfs and 100 kcfs. Fish tagged with passive integrated transponder (PIT) tags at the Snake River trap were interrogated at four dams with PIT tag detection systems (Lower Granite, Little Goose, Lower Monumental, and McNary dams). Because of the addition of the fourth interrogation site (Lower Monumental) in 1993, cumulative interrogation data is not comparable with the prior five years (1988-1992). Cumulative interrogations at the four dams for fish marked at the Snake River trap were 86% for hatchery chinook, 70% for wild chinook, 71% for hatchery steelhead, and 89% for wild steelhead. Cumulat

Buettner, Edwin W.; Putnam, Scott A.

2003-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

133

Effects of Cougar Predation and Nutrition on Mule Deer Population Declines in the Intermountain Province of the Columbia Basin, 2001-2002 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Construction of the Grand Coulee and Chief Joseph dams has resulted in inundation and loss of 29,125 total habitat units for mule deer and irrigation agriculture in many parts the Intermountain Province (IM) of the Columbia Basin. Mule deer in the Shrub-Steppe are ranked high priority target species for mitigation and management and are declining in most portions of the subbasins of the IM. Reasons for the decline are unknown but believed to be related to habitat changes resulting from dams and irrigation agriculture. White-tailed deer are not ranked as target species and are believed to be increasing throughout the basin because of habitat changes brought about by the dams and irrigation agriculture. Recent research (1997-2000) in the NE IM and adjacent Canadian portions of the Columbia Basin (conducted by this author and funded by the Columbia Basin Fish & Wildlife Compensation Program B.C.), suggest that the increasing white-tailed deer populations (because of dams and irrigation agriculture) are resulting in increased predation by cougars on mule deer (apparent competition or alternate prey hypothesis). The apparent competition hypothesis predicts that as alternate prey (white-tailed deer) densities increase, so do densities of predators, resulting in increased incidental predation on sympatric native prey (mule deer). Apparent competition can result in population declines and even extirpation of native prey in some cases. Such a phenomenon may account for declines of mule deer in the IM and throughout arid and semi-arid West where irrigation agriculture is practiced. We will test the apparent competition hypothesis by conducting a controlled, replicated ''press'' experiment in at least 2 treatment and 2 control areas of the IM subbasins by reducing densities of white-tailed deer and observing any changes in cougar predation on mule deer. Deer densities will be monitored by WADFW personnel using annual aerial surveys and/or other trend indices. Predation rates and population growth rates of deer will be determined using radio telemetry. Changes in cougar functional (kills/unit time), aggregative (cougars/unit area), numerical (offspring/cougar), and total (predation rate) responses on deer will also be monitored using radio telemetry. The experiment will be conducted and completed over a period of 5 years. Results will be used to determine the cause and try to halt the mule deer population declines. Results will also guide deer mitigation and management in the IM and throughout the North American West.

Wielgus, Robert B.; Shipley, Lisa

2002-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

Yakima/Klickitat Fisheries Project; Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife Policy/Technical Involvement and Planning, 2001-2002 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Yakima/Klickitat Fisheries Project (YKFP) is a supplementation project sponsored by the Northwest Power Planning Council (Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program 1994, Measure 7.4K). The objectives of the YKFP are: (1) to test the hypothesis that new supplementation techniques can be used in the Yakima River Basin to increase natural production and to improve harvest opportunities while maintaining the long-term genetic fitness of the wild and native salmonid populations and keeping adverse ecological interactions within acceptable limits (Yakima Fisheries Project Final Environment Impact Statement, 1996); (2) provide knowledge about the use of supplementation, so that it may be used to mitigate effects on anadromous fisheries throughout the Columbia River Basin; (3) to maintain and improve the quantity and productivity of salmon and steelhead habitat, including those areas made accessible by habitat improvements; (4) to ensure that Project implementation remains consistent with the Council's Fish and Wildlife Program; and (5) to implement the Project in a prudent and environmentally sound manner. Current YKFP operations have been designed to test the principles of supplementation (Busack et al. 1997). The Project's experimental design has focused on the following critical uncertainties affecting supplementation: (1) The survival and reproductive success of hatchery fish after release from the hatchery; (2) The impacts of hatchery fish as they interact with non-target species and stocks; and, (3) The effects of supplementation on the long-term genetic fitness of fish stocks. The YKFP endorses an adaptive management policy applied through a project management framework as described in the Yakima/Klickitat Fisheries Project Planning Status Report (1995), Fast and Craig (1997), Clune and Dauble 1991. The project is managed by a Policy Group consisting of a representative of the Yakama Nation (YN, lead agency) and a representative of the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW). The functions of the parties are described in an MOU between the YN and the WDFW. A Scientific and Technical Advisory Committee (STAC) consisting of one representative from each management entity reports to the Policy Group and provides technical input on policy and other issues. Additional committee's, such as the Monitoring Implementation and Planning Team (MIPT), serve as the discretion of STAC. The Policy Group and STAC meet periodically (usually monthly) to conduct the business of the YKFP. Although the YKFP is an all stocks initiative (BPA 1996), most effort to date has been directed at spring chinook salmon and coho salmon. This report is a compilation of the year's activities between August 1, 2001 and July 31, 2002. All findings should be considered preliminary until data collection is completed or the information is published in a peer-reviewed journal.

Easterbrooks, John A.; Pearsons, Todd N. (Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, Olympia, WA)

2003-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

135

Effects of Cougar Predation and Nutrition on Mule Deer Population Declines in the IM Province of the Columbia Basin, Annual Report 2002-2003.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Construction of the Grand Coulee and Chief Joseph dams has resulted in inundation and loss of 29,125 total habitat units for mule deer and irrigation agriculture in many parts the Intermountain Province (IM) of the Columbia Basin. Mule deer in the Shrub-Steppe are ranked high priority target species for mitigation and management and are declining in most portions of the sub basins of the IM. Reasons for the decline are unknown but believed to be related to habitat changes resulting from dams and irrigation agriculture. White-tailed deer are believed to be increasing throughout the basin because of habitat changes brought about by the dams and irrigation agriculture. Recent research (1997-2000) in the NE IM and adjacent Canadian portions of the Columbia Basin (conducted by this author and funded by the Columbia Basin Fish & Wildlife Compensation Program B.C.), suggest that the increasing white-tailed deer populations (because of dams and irrigation agriculture) are resulting in increased predation by cougars on mule deer (apparent competition or alternate prey hypothesis). The apparent competition hypothesis predicts that as alternate prey (white-tailed deer) densities increase, so do densities of predators, resulting in increased incidental predation on sympatric native prey (mule deer). Apparent competition can result in population declines and even extirpation of native prey in some cases. Such a phenomenon may account for declines of mule deer in the IM and throughout arid and semi-arid West where irrigation agriculture is practiced. We will test the apparent competition hypothesis by conducting a controlled, replicated 'press' experiment in at least 2 treatment and 2 control areas of the IM sub basins by reducing densities of white-tailed deer and observing any changes in cougar predation on mule deer. Deer densities will be monitored by WADFW personnel using annual aerial surveys and/or other trend indices. Predation rates and population growth rates of deer will be determined using radio telemetry. Changes in cougar functional (kills/unit time), aggregative (cougars/unit area), numerical (offspring/cougar), and total (predation rate) responses on deer will also be monitored using radio telemetry. The experiment will be conducted and completed over a period of 5 years. Results will be used to determine the cause and try to halt the mule deer population declines. Results will also guide deer mitigation and management in the IM and throughout the North American West.

Wielgus, Robert; Shipley, Lisa; Myers, Woodrow

2003-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

136

Numerically Simulating the Hydrodynamic and Water Quality Environment for Migrating Salmon in the Lower Snake River, 2002-2003 Technical Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Summer temperatures in the Lower Snake River can be altered by releasing cold waters that originate from deep depths within Dworshak Reservoir. These cold releases are used to lower temperatures in the Clearwater and Lower Snake Rivers and to improve hydrodynamic and water quality conditions for migrating aquatic species. This project monitored the complex three-dimensional hydrodynamic and thermal conditions at the Clearwater and Snake River confluence and the processes that led to stratification of Lower Granite Reservoir (LGR) during the late spring, summer, and fall of 2002. Hydrodynamic, water quality, and meteorological conditions around the reservoir were monitored at frequent intervals, and this effort is continuing in 2003. Monitoring of the reservoir is a multi-year endeavor, and this report spans only the first year of data collection. In addition to monitoring the LGR environment, a three-dimensional hydrodynamic and water quality model has been applied. This model uses field data as boundary conditions and has been applied to the entire 2002 field season. Numerous data collection sites were within the model domain and serve as both calibration and validation locations for the numerical model. Errors between observed and simulated data varied in magnitude from location to location and from one time to another. Generally, errors were small and within expected ranges, although, as additional 2003 field data becomes available, model parameters may be improved to minimize differences between observed and simulated values. A two-dimensional, laterally-averaged hydrodynamic and water quality model was applied to the three reservoirs downstream of LGR (the pools behind Little Goose, Lower Monumental, and Ice Harbor Dams). A two-dimensional model is appropriate for these reservoirs because observed lateral thermal variations during summer and fall 2002 were almost negligible; however, vertical thermal variations were quite large (see USACE 2003). The numerical model was applied to each reservoir independently to simulate the time period between May 1 and October 1, 2002. Differences between observed and simulated data were small, although improvements to model coefficients may be performed as additional thermal data, collected in the reservoirs during 2003, becomes available.

Cook, C.; Richmond, M.; Coleman, A. (Pacific Northwest National Laboratory)

2003-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

137

Assessment of High Rates of Precocious Male Maturation in a Spring Chinook Salmon Supplementation Hatchery Program, Annual Report 2002-2003.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Yakima River Spring Chinook Salmon Supplementation Project in Washington State is currently one of the most ambitious efforts to enhance a natural salmon population in the United States. Over the past five years we have conducted research to characterize the developmental physiology of naturally- and hatchery-reared wild progeny spring chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) in the Yakima River basin. Fish were sampled at the main hatchery in Cle Elum, at remote acclimation sites and, during smolt migration, at downstream dams. Throughout these studies the maturational state of all fish was characterized using combinations of visual and histological analysis of testes, gonadosomatic index (GSI), and measurement of plasma 11-ketotestosterone (11-KT). We established that a plasma 11-KT threshold of 0.8 ng/ml could be used to designate male fish as either immature or precociously maturing approximately 8 months prior to final maturation (1-2 months prior to release as 'smolts'). Our analyses revealed that 37-49% of the hatchery-reared males from this program undergo precocious maturation at 2 years of age and a proportion of these fish appear to residualize in the upper Yakima River basin throughout the summer. An unnaturally high incidence of precocious male maturation may result in loss of potential returning anadromous adults, skewing of female: male sex ratios, ecological, and genetic impacts on wild populations and other native species. Precocious male maturation is significantly influenced by growth rate at specific times of year and future studies will be conducted to alter maturation rates through seasonal growth rate manipulations.

Larsen, Donald; Beckman, Brian; Cooper, Kathleen

2003-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

138

Evaluation of the Life History of Native Salmonids in the Malheur River Basin; Cooperative Bull Trout/Redband Trout Research Project, 2002-2003 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Malheur River is a 306-kilometer tributary to the Snake River, which drains 12,950 square kilometers. The Malheur River originates in the Blue Mountains and flows into the Snake River near Ontario, Oregon. The climate of the basin is characterized by hot dry summers, occasionally exceeding 38 C, and cold winters that may drop below -29 C. Average annual precipitation is 30 centimeters in the lower reaches. Wooded areas consist primarily of mixed fir and pine forest in the higher elevations. Sagebrush and grass communities dominate the flora in the lower elevations. Efforts to document salmonid life histories, water quality, and habitat conditions have continued in fiscal year 2002. Bull trout Salvelinus confluentus are considered to be cold water species and are temperature-dependant. Due to the interest of bull trout from various state and Federal agencies, a workgroup was formed to develop project objectives related to bull trout. Table 1 lists individuals that participated in the 2002 work group. This report will reflect work completed during the Bonneville Power Administration contract period starting April 1, 2002, and ending March 31, 2003. All tasks were conducted within this timeframe, and a more detailed timeframe may be referred to in each individual report.

Miller, Alan; Soupir, Jim (US Forest Service, Prairie City Ranger District, Prairie City, OR); Schwabe, Lawrence (Burns Paiute Tribe, Department of Fish and Wildlife, Burns, OR)

2003-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

139

Chief Joseph Kokanee Enhancement Project; Strobe Light Deterrent Efficacy Test and Fish Behavior Determination at the Grand Coulee Dam Third Powerplant Forebay, 2002-2003 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Since 1995, the Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation (Colville Confederated Tribes) have managed the Chief Joseph Kokanee Enhancement Project as part of the Northwest Power Planning Council (NWPPC) Fish and Wildlife Program. Project objectives have focused on understanding natural production of kokanee (a land-locked sockeye salmon) and other fish stocks in the area above Grand Coulee and Chief Joseph Dams on the Columbia River. A 42-month investigation concluded that entrainment at Grand Coulee Dam ranged from 211,685 to 576,676 fish annually. Further analysis revealed that 85% of the total entrainment occurred at the dam's third powerplant. These numbers represent a significant loss to the tribal fisheries upstream of the dam. In response to a suggestion by the NWPPC Independent Scientific Review Panel, the scope of work for the Chief Joseph Kokanee Enhancement Project was expanded to include a multiyear pilot test of a strobe light system to help mitigate fish entrainment. This report details the work conducted during the second year of the study by researchers of the Colville Confederated Tribes in collaboration with the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. The 2002 study period extended from May 18 through July 30. The objective of the study was to determine the efficacy of a prototype strobe light system to elicit a negative phototactic response in kokanee and rainbow trout. The prototype system consisted of six strobe lights affixed to an aluminum frame suspended vertically underwater from a barge secured in the center of the entrance to the third powerplant forebay. The lights, controlled by a computer, were aimed to illuminate a specific region directly upstream of the barge. Three light level treatments were used: 6 of 6 lights on, 3 of 6 lights on, and all lights off. These three treatment conditions were applied for an entire 24-hr day and were randomly assigned within a 3-day block throughout the study period. A seven-transducer splitbeam hydroacoustic system was used to evaluate the effectiveness of the strobe lights in eliciting a negative phototactic response in fish. The transducers were deployed so they tracked fish entering and within the region illuminated by the strobe lights. Two of the seven transducers were mounted to the frame containing the strobe lights and were oriented horizontally. The remaining five transducers were spaced approximately 4 m apart on individual floating frames upstream of the barge, with the transducers looking vertically downward.

Johnson, R.; McKinstry, C.; Simmons, C. (Pacific Northwest National Laboratory)

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

140

Dispersion of Metals from Abandoned Mines and their Effect on Biota in the Methow River, Okanogan County, Washington: Final Report 2002-2003.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A study of mine-waste contamination effects on Methow River habitat on the eastern slopes of the north Cascade Mountains in Washington state, U.S.A., revealed impacts at ecosystem, community, population, individual, tissue, and cellular levels. Ore deposits in the area were mined for gold, silver, copper and zinc until the early 1950's, but the mines are now inactive. An above-and-below-mine approach was used to compare potentially impacted to control sites. The concentrations of eleven trace elements (i.e., Al, As, B, Ba, Cd, Cr, Cu, Mn, Pb, Se, and Zn) in Methow River sediments downstream from the abandoned mine sites were higher than background levels. Exposed trout and caddisfly larvae in the Methow River showed reduced growth compared to controls. Samples of liver from juvenile trout and small intestine from exposed caddisfly larvae were examined for evidence of metal accumulation, cytopathological change, and chemical toxicity. Morphological changes that are characteristic of nuclear apoptosis were observed in caddisfly small intestine columnar epithelial and trout liver nuclei where extensive chromatin condensation and margination was observed. Histopathological studies revealed glycogen bodies were present in the cytosol and nuclei, which are indicators of Type IV Glycogen Storage Disease (GSD IV). This suggests food is being converted into glycogen and stored in the liver but the glycogen is not being converted back normally into glucose for distribution to other tissues in the body resulting in poor growth. Examination of trout hepatocytes by transmission electron microscopy revealed the accumulation of electron dense granules in the mitochondrial matrix. Matrix granules contain mixtures of Cd, Cu, Au, Pb, Ni, and Ti. Contaminated sediments caused adverse biological effects at different levels of biological organization, from the cellular to ecosystem-level responses, even where dissolved metal concentrations in the corresponding surface water met water-quality criteria.

Peplow, Dan; Edmonds, Robert

2003-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "2000-2001 2001-2002 2002-2003" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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141

Yakima/Klickitat Fisheries Project; Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife Policy/Technical Involvement and Planning, 2002-2003 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Yakima/Klickitat Fisheries Project (YKFP) is a supplementation project sponsored by the Northwest Power Planning Council and funded by the Bonneville Power Administration. The YKFP has adopted the definition of supplementation described by Regional Assessment of Supplementation Program (1992), which is ''the use of artificial propagation in an attempt to maintain or increase natural production while maintaining the long-term fitness of the target population, and keeping the ecological and genetic impacts on nontarget populations within specified biological limits''. Recent scientific reviews of hatchery supplementation continue to highlight the experimental nature and risk of supplementation (Independent Scientific Group 1996; National Research Council 1996; Lichatowich 1999; Independent Multidisciplinary Science Team 2000; Independent Scientific Advisory Board 2003; Hatchery Scientific Review Group 2003). In addition, many of these reviews included recommendations about the best ways to operate a supplementation program. Most of these recommendations were already being done or have been incorporated into the YKFP. The objectives of the YKFP are: (1) to test the hypothesis that new supplementation techniques can be used in the Yakima River Basin to increase natural production and to improve harvest opportunities while maintaining the long-term genetic fitness of the wild and native salmonid populations and keeping adverse ecological interactions within acceptable limits (Yakima Fisheries Project Final Environment Impact Statement, 1996); (2) provide knowledge about the use of supplementation, so that it may be used to mitigate effects on anadromous fisheries throughout the Columbia River Basin; (3) to maintain and improve the quantity and productivity of salmon and steelhead habitat, including those areas made accessible by habitat improvements; (4) to ensure that Project implementation remains consistent with the Council's Fish and Wildlife Program; and (5) to implement the Project in a prudent and environmentally sound manner. Current YKFP operations have been designed to test the principles of supplementation (Busack et al. 1997). The Project's experimental design has focused on the following critical uncertainties affecting supplementation: (1) The survival and reproductive success of hatchery fish after release from the hatchery; (2) The impacts of hatchery fish as they interact with non-target species and stocks; and, (3) The effects of supplementation on the long-term genetic fitness of fish stocks. The YKFP endorses an adaptive management policy applied through a project management framework as described in the Yakima/Klickitat Fisheries Project Planning Status Report (1995), Fast and Craig (1997), and Clune and Dauble 1991. The project is managed by a Policy Group consisting of a representative of the Yakama Nation (YN, lead agency) and a representative of the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW). The functions of the parties are described in an MOU between the YN and the WDFW. A Scientific and Technical Advisory Committee (STAC) consisting of one representative from each management entity reports to the Policy Group and provides technical input on policy and other issues. Additional committee's, such as the Monitoring Implementation and Planning Team (MIPT), serve at the discretion of STAC. The Policy Group and STAC meet periodically (usually monthly) to conduct the business of the YKFP. Although the YKFP is an all stocks initiative (BPA 1996), most effort to date has been directed at spring chinook salmon and coho salmon. This report is a compilation of the year's activities between August 1, 2002 and July 31, 2003. The Yakama Nation's portion of the YKFP is presented in another report. All findings should be considered preliminary until data collection is completed or the information is published in a peer-reviewed journal. Pearsons and Easterbrooks (2003) described last year's activities.

Pearsons, Todd N.; Easterbrooks, John A. (Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, Olympia, WA)

2003-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

142

Page 1 of 7 1/16/2012 IAN SUE WING  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

& Policy of Global Change, MIT 2001-2002 Postdoctoral Associate, Joint Program on the Science & Policy

Wing, Ian Sue

143

Throwing Eggs at Windows - Legal and Institutional Globalization in the 21st-Century Economy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

HeinOnline -- 50 U. Kan. L. Rev. 731 2001-2002 HeinOnline -- 50 U. Kan. L. Rev. 732 2001-2002 HeinOnline -- 50 U. Kan. L. Rev. 733 2001-2002 HeinOnline -- 50 U. Kan. L. Rev. 734 2001-2002 HeinOnline -- 50 U. Kan. L. Rev. 735 2001-2002 Hein...Online -- 50 U. Kan. L. Rev. 736 2001-2002 HeinOnline -- 50 U. Kan. L. Rev. 737 2001-2002 HeinOnline -- 50 U. Kan. L. Rev. 738 2001-2002 HeinOnline -- 50 U. Kan. L. Rev. 739 2001-2002 HeinOnline -- 50 U. Kan. L. Rev. 740 2001-2002 HeinOnline -- 50 U. Kan. L...

Head, John W.

2002-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

144

Some Reflections on the Constitutionality of Sex Offender Commitment Laws  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

HeinOnline -- 50 U. Kan. L. Rev. 1011 2001-2002 HeinOnline -- 50 U. Kan. L. Rev. 1012 2001-2002 HeinOnline -- 50 U. Kan. L. Rev. 1013 2001-2002 HeinOnline -- 50 U. Kan. L. Rev. 1014 2001-2002 HeinOnline -- 50 U. Kan. L. Rev. 1015 2001-2002 Hein...Online -- 50 U. Kan. L. Rev. 1016 2001-2002 HeinOnline -- 50 U. Kan. L. Rev. 1017 2001-2002 HeinOnline -- 50 U. Kan. L. Rev. 1018 2001-2002 HeinOnline -- 50 U. Kan. L. Rev. 1019 2001-2002 HeinOnline -- 50 U. Kan. L. Rev. 1020 2001-2002 HeinOnline -- 50 U. Kan...

McAllister, Stephen R.

2002-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

145

Survey of Kansas Tort Law - Part II  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

HeinOnline -- 50 U. Kan. L. Rev. 225 2001-2002 HeinOnline -- 50 U. Kan. L. Rev. 226 2001-2002 HeinOnline -- 50 U. Kan. L. Rev. 227 2001-2002 HeinOnline -- 50 U. Kan. L. Rev. 228 2001-2002 HeinOnline -- 50 U. Kan. L. Rev. 229 2001-2002 Hein...Online -- 50 U. Kan. L. Rev. 230 2001-2002 HeinOnline -- 50 U. Kan. L. Rev. 231 2001-2002 HeinOnline -- 50 U. Kan. L. Rev. 232 2001-2002 HeinOnline -- 50 U. Kan. L. Rev. 233 2001-2002 HeinOnline -- 50 U. Kan. L. Rev. 234 2001-2002 HeinOnline -- 50 U. Kan. L...

Westerbeke, William E.

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

146

Administrative Procedure and the Decline of the Trial  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

HeinOnline -- 51 U. Kan. L. Rev. 473 2002-2003 HeinOnline -- 51 U. Kan. L. Rev. 474 2002-2003 HeinOnline -- 51 U. Kan. L. Rev. 475 2002-2003 HeinOnline -- 51 U. Kan. L. Rev. 476 2002-2003 HeinOnline -- 51 U. Kan. L. Rev. 477 2002-2003 Hein...Online -- 51 U. Kan. L. Rev. 478 2002-2003 HeinOnline -- 51 U. Kan. L. Rev. 479 2002-2003 HeinOnline -- 51 U. Kan. L. Rev. 480 2002-2003 HeinOnline -- 51 U. Kan. L. Rev. 481 2002-2003 HeinOnline -- 51 U. Kan. L. Rev. 482 2002-2003 HeinOnline -- 51 U. Kan. L...

Levy, Richard E.

2003-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

147

A History of the Civil Trial in the United States  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-2003 HeinOnline -- 51 U. Kan. L. Rev. 390 2002-2003 HeinOnline -- 51 U. Kan. L. Rev. 391 2002-2003 HeinOnline -- 51 U. Kan. L. Rev. 392 2002-2003 HeinOnline -- 51 U. Kan. L. Rev. 393 2002-2003 HeinOnline -- 51 U. Kan. L. Rev. 394 2002-2003 HeinOnline -- 51 U...HeinOnline -- 51 U. Kan. L. Rev. 347 2002-2003 HeinOnline -- 51 U. Kan. L. Rev. 348 2002-2003 HeinOnline -- 51 U. Kan. L. Rev. 349 2002-2003 HeinOnline -- 51 U. Kan. L. Rev. 350 2002-2003 HeinOnline -- 51 U. Kan. L. Rev. 351 2002-2003 Hein...

Sward, Ellen E.

2003-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

148

Life after 9-11: Issues Affecting the Courts and the Nation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

HeinOnline -- 51 U. Kan. L. Rev. 219 2002-2003 HeinOnline -- 51 U. Kan. L. Rev. 220 2002-2003 HeinOnline -- 51 U. Kan. L. Rev. 221 2002-2003 HeinOnline -- 51 U. Kan. L. Rev. 222 2002-2003 HeinOnline -- 51 U. Kan. L. Rev. 223 2002-2003 Hein...Online -- 51 U. Kan. L. Rev. 224 2002-2003 HeinOnline -- 51 U. Kan. L. Rev. 225 2002-2003 HeinOnline -- 51 U. Kan. L. Rev. 226 2002-2003 HeinOnline -- 51 U. Kan. L. Rev. 227 2002-2003 HeinOnline -- 51 U. Kan. L. Rev. 228 2002-2003 HeinOnline -- 51 U. Kan. L...

McAllister, Stephen R.

2003-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

149

Taxpayer Privacy and Tax Compliance  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

HeinOnline -- 51 U. Kan. L. Rev. 1065 2002-2003 HeinOnline -- 51 U. Kan. L. Rev. 1066 2002-2003 HeinOnline -- 51 U. Kan. L. Rev. 1067 2002-2003 HeinOnline -- 51 U. Kan. L. Rev. 1068 2002-2003 HeinOnline -- 51 U. Kan. L. Rev. 1069 2002-2003 Hein...Online -- 51 U. Kan. L. Rev. 1070 2002-2003 HeinOnline -- 51 U. Kan. L. Rev. 1071 2002-2003 HeinOnline -- 51 U. Kan. L. Rev. 1072 2002-2003 HeinOnline -- 51 U. Kan. L. Rev. 1073 2002-2003 HeinOnline -- 51 U. Kan. L. Rev. 1074 2002-2003 HeinOnline -- 51 U. Kan...

Mazza, Stephen W.

2003-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

150

What Has Not Changed Since September 11 - The Benefits of Multilateralism  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

2002-2003 HeinOnline -- 12 Kan. J.L. & Pub. Pol?y 6 2002-2003 HeinOnline -- 12 Kan. J.L. & Pub. Pol?y 7 2002-2003 HeinOnline -- 12 Kan. J.L. & Pub. Pol?y 8 2002-2003 HeinOnline -- 12 Kan. J.L. & Pub. Pol?y 9 2002-2003 HeinOnline -- 12 Kan. J.L. & Pub...

Head, John W.

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

151

A Proposed Third-Party Visitation Statute: A Recommendation for Legislative Change in Kansas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

HeinOnline -- 11 Kan. J.L. & Pub. Pol?y 485 2001-2002 HeinOnline -- 11 Kan. J.L. & Pub. Pol?y 486 2001-2002 HeinOnline -- 11 Kan. J.L. & Pub. Pol?y 487 2001-2002 HeinOnline -- 11 Kan. J.L. & Pub. Pol?y 488 2001-2002 HeinOnline -- 11 Kan. J.L. & Pub.... Pol?y 489 2001-2002 HeinOnline -- 11 Kan. J.L. & Pub. Pol?y 490 2001-2002 HeinOnline -- 11 Kan. J.L. & Pub. Pol?y 491 2001-2002 HeinOnline -- 11 Kan. J.L. & Pub. Pol?y 492 2001-2002 HeinOnline -- 11 Kan. J.L. & Pub. Pol?y 493 2001-2002 HeinOnline -- 11...

Valdez, Suzanne

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

152

CURRICULUM VITAE Sarah Amie Newland Pearce  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, Bethlehem, PA. 2000 - 2001 Teaching Assistant Process Sedimentology, Stratigraphy, and Surficial Processes

153

Survey of Kansas Tort Law - Part I  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. L. Rev. 1089 2000-2001 HeinOnline -- 49 U. Kan. L. Rev. 1090 2000-2001 HeinOnline -- 49 U. Kan. L. Rev. 1091 2000-2001 HeinOnline -- 49 U. Kan. L. Rev. 1092 2000-2001 HeinOnline -- 49 U. Kan. L. Rev. 1093 2000-2001 HeinOnline -- 49 U. Kan. L. Rev.... 1094 2000-2001 HeinOnline -- 49 U. Kan. L. Rev. 1095 2000-2001 HeinOnline -- 49 U. Kan. L. Rev. 1096 2000-2001 HeinOnline -- 49 U. Kan. L. Rev. 1097 2000-2001 HeinOnline -- 49 U. Kan. L. Rev. 1098 2000-2001 HeinOnline -- 49 U. Kan. L. Rev. 1099 2000...

Westerbeke, William E.; McAllister, Stephen R.

2001-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

154

ECE/FAO Forest Products Annual Market Review, 2000-2001 __________________________________________________________ 1 Note: the basis of information in this chapter is not the UNECE TIMBER database built on country-supplied  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

competitive advantage, market access, image building and environmental pressure. · On the supply side the area are actively promoting CFPs. · Public procurement plays an important role as a driver of demand in several Paper2 on the status of certification of sustainable forest management in the UNECE region. Dr

155

ECE/FAO Forest Products Annual Market Review, 2000-2001 __________________________________________________________ 1 Note: the basis of information in this chapter is not the UNECE TIMBER database built on country-supplied  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

competitive advantage, market access, image building and environmental pressure. · On the supply side the area are actively promoting CFPs. · Public procurement plays an important role as a driver of demand in several and Forest Discussion Paper2 on the status of certification of sustainable forest management in the UNECE

156

Using 3D Acoustic Telemetry to Assess the Response of Resident Salmonids to Strobe Lights in Lake Roosevelt, Washington; Chief Joseph Kokanee Enhancement Feasibility Study, Annual Report 2001-2002.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In 1995, the Chief Joseph Kokanee Enhancement Project was established to mitigate the loss of anadromous fish due to the construction of Chief Joseph and Grand Coulee dams. The objectives of the Chief Joseph Enhancement Project are to determine the status of resident kokanee (Oncorhynchus nerka) populations above Chief Joseph and Grand Coulee dams and to enhance kokanee and rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) populations. Studies conducted at Grand Coulee Dam documented substantial entrainment of kokanee through turbines at the third powerhouse. In response to finding high entrainment at Grand Coulee Dam, the Independent Scientific Review Panel (ISRP) recommended investigating the use of strobe lights to repel fish from the forebay of the third powerhouse. Therefore, our study focused on the third powerhouse and how strobe lights affected fish behavior in this area. The primary objective of our study was to assess the behavioral response of kokanee and rainbow trout to strobe lights using 3D acoustic telemetry, which yields explicit spatial locations of fish in three dimensions. Our secondary objectives were to (1) use a 3D acoustic system to mobile track tagged fish in the forebay and upriver of Grand Coulee Dam and (2) determine the feasibility of detecting fish using a hydrophone mounted in the tailrace of the third powerhouse. Within the fixed hydrophone array located in the third powerhouse cul-de-sac, we detected 50 kokanee and 30 rainbow trout, accounting for 47% and 45% respectively, of the fish released. Kokanee had a median residence time of 0.20 h and rainbow trout had a median residence time of 1.07 h. We detected more kokanee in the array at night compared to the day, and we detected more rainbow trout during the day compared to the night. In general, kokanee and rainbow trout approached along the eastern shore and the relative frequency of kokanee and rainbow trout detections was highest along the eastern shoreline of the 3D array. However, because we released fish near the eastern shore, this approach pattern may have resulted from our release location. A high percentage of rainbow trout (60%) approached within 35 m of the eastern shore, while fewer kokanee (40%) approached within 35 m of the eastern shore and were more evenly distributed across the entrance to the third powerhouse cul-de-sac area. During each of the strobe light treatments there were very few fish detected within 25 m of the strobe lights. The spatial distribution of fish detections showed relatively few tagged fish swam through the center of the array where the strobe lights were located. We detected 11 kokanee and 12 rainbow trout within 25 m of the strobe lights, accounting for 10% and 18% respectively, of the fish released. Both species exhibited very short residence times within 25 m of the strobe lights No attraction or repulsion behavior was observed within 25 m of the strobe lights. Directional vectors of both kokanee and rainbow trout indicate that both species passed the strobe lights by moving in a downstream direction and slightly towards the third powerhouse. We statistically analyzed fish behavior during treatments using a randomization to compare the mean distance fish were detected from the strobe lights. We compared treatments separately for day and night and with the data constrained to three distances from the strobe light (< 85m, < 50 m, and < 25 m). For kokanee, the only significant randomization test (of 10 tests) occurred with kokanee during the day for the 3-On treatment constrained to within 85 m of the strobe lights, where kokanee were significantly further away from the strobe lights than during the Off treatment (randomization test, P < 0.004, Table 1.5). However, one other test had a low P-value (P = 0.064) where kokanee were closer to the lights during the 3-On treatment at night within 85 m of the strobe lights compared to the Off treatment. For rainbow trout, none of the 11 tests were significant, but one test had a low P-value (P = 0.04), and fish were further away from the strobe lights during

Perry, Russlee; Farley, M.; Hansen, Gabriel

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

157

Consumer Arbitration in the EU and the US  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

.C. J. Int?l L. & Comm. Reg. 390 2002-2003 HeinOnline -- 28 N.C. J. Int?l L. & Comm. Reg. 391 2002-2003 HeinOnline -- 28 N.C. J. Int?l L. & Comm. Reg. 392 2002-2003 HeinOnline -- 28 N.C. J. Int?l L. & Comm. Reg. 393 2002-2003 HeinOnline -- 28 N.C. J. Int...HeinOnline -- 28 N.C. J. Int?l L. & Comm. Reg. 357 2002-2003 HeinOnline -- 28 N.C. J. Int?l L. & Comm. Reg. 358 2002-2003 HeinOnline -- 28 N.C. J. Int?l L. & Comm. Reg. 359 2002-2003 HeinOnline -- 28 N.C. J. Int?l L. & Comm. Reg. 360 2002-2003 Hein...

Drahozal, Christopher R.

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

158

August 30, 2010 C U R R I C U L U M V I T A E  

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, VA. 2003-2004: Consultant, Booz Allen & Hamilton, Inc., McLean, VA. 2002-2003: Consultant, Solers Inc

Burns, John A.

159

November 1, 2011 C U R R I C U L U M V I T A E  

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, VA. 2003-2004: Consultant, Booz Allen & Hamilton, Inc., McLean, VA. 2002-2003: Consultant, Solers Inc

Burns, John A.

160

May 1, 2013 C U R R I C U L U M V I T A E  

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, VA. 2003-2004: Consultant, Booz Allen & Hamilton, Inc., McLean, VA. 2002-2003: Consultant, Solers Inc

Burns, John A.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "2000-2001 2001-2002 2002-2003" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
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We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

February 1, 2011 C U R R I C U L U M V I T A E  

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, VA. 2003-2004: Consultant, Booz Allen & Hamilton, Inc., McLean, VA. 2002-2003: Consultant, Solers Inc

Burns, John A.

162

E-Print Network 3.0 - avaryiyi na chaes Sample Search Results  

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Chae et... ), Wang et al. (1996), Jiang and Wang (2000, 2001), Chae et al. (2000, 2001), Wood and Martens (2003... . Astrophys. J. 595, 1231-1250, 2003. Chae, J., Wang, H., Lee,...

163

E-Print Network 3.0 - affect translation accuracy Sample Search...  

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(ACL) Anthology Collection: Computer Technologies and Information Sciences 2 Machine Translation 16: 89108, 2001. 2002 Kluwer Academic Publishers. Printed in the...

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Explorit Topic List Advanced Search Sample search results for: aedes albopictus diptera Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 Biological Invasions 3: 151166, 2001. 2002 Kluwer Academic...

173

2010 Dry and 2009 - 2010 Wet Season Branchiopod Survey Report, Site 300  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) requested that Condor Country Consulting, Inc. (CCCI) perform wet season surveys and manage the dry season sampling for listed branchiopods in two ponded locations within the Site 300 Experimental Test Site. Site 300 is located in Alameda and San Joaquin Counties, located between the Cities of Livermore and Tracy. The two pool locations have been identified for possible amphibian enhancement activities in support of the Compensation Plan for impacts tied to the Building 850 soil clean-up project. The Building 850 project design resulted in formal consultation with the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) as an amendment (File 81420-2009-F-0235) to the site-wide Biological Opinion (BO) (File 1-1-02-F-0062) in the spring of 2009 and requires mitigation for the California tiger salamander (AMCA, Ambystoma californiense) and California red-legged frog (CRLF, Rana draytonii) habitat loss. Both pools contain breeding AMCA, but do not produce metamorphs due to limited hydroperiod. The pool to the southeast (Pool BC-FS-2) is the preferred site for amphibian enhancement activities, and the wetland to northwest (Pool OA-FS-1) is the alternate location for enhancement. However, prior to enhancement, LLNL has been directed by USFWS (BO Conservation Measure 17 iii) to 'conduct USFWS protocol-level branchiopod surveys to determine whether listed brachiopod species are present within the compensation area.' CCCI conducted surveys for listed branchiopods in the 2009-2010 wet season to determine the presence of federally-listed branchiopods at the two pools (previous surveys with negative findings were performed by CCCI in 2001-2002 and 2002-2003 onsite). Surveys were conducted to partially satisfy the survey requirements of the USFWS 'Interim Survey Guidelines to Permittees for Recovery Permits under Section 10(a)(1)(A) of the Endangered Species Act for the Listed Vernal Pool Branchiopods' ('Guidelines, USFWS 1996 and BO Conservation Measure 17 iii). The dry sampling (included as an Appendix D) followed the wet season surveys in the summer of 2010.

Dexter, W

2011-03-14T23:59:59.000Z

174

The Balancing Act: Arts Integration and High-Stakes Testing  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Raiber, M.A. (2004). Oklahoma A+ Schools research report2002-2003). Edmond, OK: University of Central Oklahoma -Oklahoma A+ Schools. Guskey, T. (2002). Professional

Van Eman, Linnea; Thorman, Jerilyn Ph.D.; Montgomery, Diane Ph.D.; Otto, Stacy Ph.D.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

175

E-Print Network 3.0 - actual del resultado Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

un ... Source: Ecole Polytechnique, Centre de mathmatiques Collection: Mathematics 30 INGENIERA TCNICA EN INFORMTICA DE SISTEMAS Curso Acadmico 2002 2003 Summary: condiciones...

176

December 6th On December 6th  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

that followed the bursting of the dot-com bubble in 2000-2001. #12;In response to this, in 2005, all

Haykin, Simon

177

2009 IECC Recommendations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Standards, based on the 2000 International Energy Conservation Code with the 2001 Supplement (2000/2001 IECC), to the 2009 IECC and Chapter 11 of the 2009 IRC....

Yazdani, Bahman; Culp, Charles; Haberl, Jeff

178

Short Bio Nora Noffke Professional Preparation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Geology & Paleontology Area: Paleontology, Sedimentology, Geobiology Inclusive Data: 1998 1999, Biology, Sedimentology Inclusive Data: 2000-2001 Appointments 2009 - present Visiting Scholar, Carnegie

Noffke, Nora

179

E-Print Network 3.0 - anaerobic aquifer column Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Explorit Topic List Advanced Search Sample search results for: anaerobic aquifer column Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 Biodegradation 11: 107116, 2000. 2001 Kluwer Academic...

180

E-Print Network 3.0 - anaerobic benzene degradation Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Topic List Advanced Search Sample search results for: anaerobic benzene degradation Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 Biodegradation 11: 107116, 2000. 2001 Kluwer Academic...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "2000-2001 2001-2002 2002-2003" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

E-Print Network 3.0 - anaerobic degradation processes Sample...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

2 Biodegradation 11: 107116, 2000. 2001 Kluwer Academic Publishers. Printed in the Netherlands. Summary: -accepting process. Furthermore, evidence from laboratory studies...

182

E-Print Network 3.0 - anaerobic microbial degradation Sample...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

2 Biodegradation 11: 107116, 2000. 2001 Kluwer Academic Publishers. Printed in the Netherlands. Summary: . 107 Anaerobic benzene degradation Derek R. Lovley Department of...

183

E-Print Network 3.0 - anaerobic carbon degradation Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

2 Biodegradation 11: 107116, 2000. 2001 Kluwer Academic Publishers. Printed in the Netherlands. Summary: . 107 Anaerobic benzene degradation Derek R. Lovley Department of...

184

Appendix 68 Bull Trout Data for Hungry Horse and South Fork of the Flathead  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

.4632 0 10 20 30 40 50 60 70 80 90 100 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 No.Redds #12;Figure 2

185

VIGRE Program  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Other members of the Graduate Committee. 1998-2001. L. Lempert, A. Sa Barreto, W. Heinzer, J. Smith, J. S. P. Wang, S. K. Yeung. 2001-2002. J. Brown, Z. Cai,...

186

australes buenos aires: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

degree: M.Sc. in Biochemistry of GADA. Department of Immunology, U of Buenos Aires, Argentina.(2001-2002) Study of different mutations in the ccr5 gen and their relationship...

187

arroyos buenos aires: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

degree: M.Sc. in Biochemistry of GADA. Department of Immunology, U of Buenos Aires, Argentina.(2001-2002) Study of different mutations in the ccr5 gen and their relationship...

188

amarilla buenos aires: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

degree: M.Sc. in Biochemistry of GADA. Department of Immunology, U of Buenos Aires, Argentina.(2001-2002) Study of different mutations in the ccr5 gen and their relationship...

189

Problem Set 2: Chemistry CHEM 213W DUE: Friday, January 26, 2001  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

temperature of 37o C? You must first calculate Hvap at 37o . iii) The heat of combustion of cane sugar is 3 compound would yield more heat upon complete combustion in oxygen? Winter Term 2001-2002 #12;

Ronis, David M.

190

To be in a position to apply to the Western College of Veterinary Medicine at the University of Saskatchewan at  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of Saskatchewan at the end of 30 courses, students should include the following: Biochemistry 3010 (Chemistry 3310 VeterinaryMedicine UniversityofSaskatchewan Calendar Year: 2001/2002 Faculty: Arts & Science (UofL) Program

Seldin, Jonathan P.

191

INDUSTRIAL MAJOR FIRMS' INVESTMENTS IN A FINANCIALIZED CONTEXT  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of the Basque Country, Bilbao on July 2­3, 2009. All remaining errors are mines. E-mail: yann primarily on the basis of a post-Keynesian assumption (Lavoie and Godley, 2001-2002), taken from national

Boyer, Edmond

192

Synthetic versus real time-lapse seismic data at the Sleipner CO2 ...  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Seismic monitoring surveys to follow the migration of the CO2 in the reservoir have been carried out in 1999, 2001, 2002, 2004 and 2006. The CO2 plume is.

artsrj

2007-04-10T23:59:59.000Z

193

Page 1 of 18 November 2013 MICHAEL A. MOONEY, Ph.D., P.E.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of Mines, Golden CO, 2003 - 2010 University of Oklahoma, Norman OK, 2001 - 2002 Assistant Professor Award, Colorado School of Mines (2009) The Best Paper, 22nd Intl. Symp. on Automation and Robotics

194

E-Print Network 3.0 - alexander janushevskis teodor Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Science, University of Iowa Collection: Computer Technologies and Information Sciences 4 PHY 140Y-Foundations of Physics 2001-2002 (K. Strong) Tutorial Groups, page 1 PHY140...

195

Prediction of External Corrosion for Steel Cylinders--2007 Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Depleted uranium hexafluoride (DUF{sub 6}) is stored in over 62,000 containment cylinders at the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PGDP) in Paducah, Kentucky, and at the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PORTS) in Portsmouth, Ohio. Over 4,800 of the cylinders at Portsmouth were recently moved there from the East Tennessee Technology Park (ETTP) in Oak Ridge, Tennessee. The cylinders range in age up to 56 years and come in various models, but most are 48-inch diameter 'thin-wall'(312.5 mil) and 'thick-wall' (625 mil) cylinders and 30-inch diameter '30A' (including '30B') cylinders with 1/2-inch (500 mil) walls. Most of the cylinders are carbon steel, and they are subject to corrosion. The United States Department of Energy (DOE) manages the cylinders to maintain them and the DUF{sub 6} they contain. Cylinder management requirements are specified in the System Requirements Document (LMES 1997a), and the activities to fulfill them are specified in the System Engineering Management Plan (LMES 1997b). This report documents activities that address DUF{sub 6} cylinder management requirements involving measuring and forecasting cylinder wall thicknesses. As part of these activities, ultrasonic thickness (UT) measurements are made on samples of cylinders. For each sampled cylinder, multiple measurements are made in an attempt to find, approximately, the minimum wall thickness. Some cylinders have a skirt, which is an extension of the cylinder wall to protect the head (end) and valve. The head/skirt interface crevice is thought to be particularly vulnerable to corrosion, and for some skirted cylinders, in addition to the main body UT measurements, a separate suite of measurements is also made at the head/skirt interface. The main-body and head/skirt minimum thickness data are used to fit models relating minimum thickness to cylinder age, nominal thicknesses, and cylinder functional groups defined in terms of plant site, storage yard, top or bottom row storage positions, etc. These models are then used to compute projections of numbers of cylinders expected to fail various minimum wall thickness criteria. The minimum wall thickness criteria are as follows. For thin-wall cylinders: 0 (breach), 62.5, and 250 mils. For thick-wall cylinders: 0, 62.5, and 500 mils. For 30A cylinders: 0, 62.5, and 100 mils. Each of these criteria triplets are based respectively on (1) loss of DUF{sub 6} (breaching), (2) safe handling and stacking operations, and (3) ANSI N14.1 standards for off-site transport and contents transfer. This report complements and extends previous editions of the cylinder corrosion report by Lyon (1995, 1996, 1997, 1998, 2000), by Schmoyer and Lyon (2001, 2002, 2003), and by Schmoyer (2004). These reports are based on UT data collected in FY03 and before. In this report UT data collected after FY03 but before FY07 is combined with the earlier data, and all of the UT data is inventoried chronologically and by the various functional groups. The UT data is then used to fit models of maximum pit depth and minimum wall thickness, statistical outliers are investigated, and the fitted models are used to extrapolate minimum thickness estimates into the future and in turn to compute projections of numbers of cylinders expected to fail various thickness criteria. A model evaluation is performed comparing UT measurements made after FY05 with model-fitted projections based only on data collected in FY05 and before. As in previous reports, the projections depend on the treatment of outliers.

Schmoyer, Richard L [ORNL

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

196

INTER-AND INTRASPECIFIC COMMUNITY STRUCTURE WITHIN THE DIATOM GENUS PSEUDO-NITZSCHIA (BACILLARIOPHYCEAE)1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and / or cryptic species are increasingly described for the genus (Hasle 1995, Manhart et al. 1995, Villac and Fryxell 1998, Lundholm et al. 2002, 2003, 2006, Orsini et al. 2004, Hasle and Lundholm 2005). Links

197

State and Power after Neoliberalism in Bolivarian Venezuela  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of coup attempts (in 2002), lockout strikes (2002-2003),by Chvez after the 2003 lockout, merchants in the importwho supported the 2003 bosses lockout of the industry, a

Kingsbury, Donald V.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

198

Slide 1  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

2011 Total global oil production, 2002- 2011 (millions of barrels per day) World real GDP increased 17.5% (logarithmically) from 2004 to 2008 70 75 80 85 90 95 100 2002 2003...

199

Addressing gaps in surgical skills training by means of low-cost simulation at Muhimbili University in Tanzania  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Allied Sciences, Dar es Salaam, Tanzania and 3 Department ofReport of a study done 20022003 Dar es Salaam: Universityof Dar es Salaam; Acknowledgements The authors wish to thank

Tach, Stephanie; Mbembati, Naboth; Marshall, Nell; Tendick, Frank; Mkony, Charles; O'Sullivan, Patricia

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

200

Study of popular Hong Kong cinema from 2001 to 2004 as resource for a contextual approach to expressions of christian faith in the public realm after the reversion to Chinese sovereignty in 1997  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In this thesis I study popular Hong Kong cinema through analysing specific films produced between 2001 and 2004. They are Shaolin Soccer (2001), The Infernal Affairs Trilogy (2002-2003), and Kung Fu Hustle (2004). My aim ...

Yam, Chi-Keung

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "2000-2001 2001-2002 2002-2003" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

ISMAEL ANTONIO JUSTO REINOSO Phone: (+1) (720) 480 8451 isju7327@colorado.edu Date of Birth: 5 January 1976  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

) Concrete Field Testing Technician Grade I. 2010 American Concrete Institute (ACI) Concrete Flatwork Induced Concrete Corrosion (MICC) University of Nottingham, Nottingham, United Kingdom. 2002-2003 Master: American Concrete Institute (ACI) Concrete Works Supervisor. 2011 American Concrete Institute (ACI

Pace, Norman

202

E-Print Network 3.0 - actividades em sistemas Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

en Sistemas de Telecomunicacin. El curso 2000-2001 se puso en marcha la titulacin... ISO 9001:1994 aplicada al Diseo del Programa de Formacin, Organizacin y Desarrollo...

203

(Data in metric tons, unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: Indium was not recovered from ores in the United States in 2001. Domestically  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

--United States: 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001e Production, refinery -- -- -- -- -- Imports for consumption 85.5 75 77 fluctuations caused by economic uncertainties. World Refinery Production, Reserves, and Reserve Base: Refinery

204

(Data in metric tons1 of gold content, unless otherwise noted)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

) and the U.S. Department of Defense administers a Government-wide secondary precious metals recovery program 1999 2000 2001e Production: Mine 362 366 341 353 350 Refinery: Primary 270 277 265 197 220 Secondary

205

Radiative and climate impacts of absorbing aerosols  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and less surface solar radiation in China from 1955 to 2000,2001 in China, and meanwhile, both surface solar radiationsolar heating greatly decreases RH in the lower troposphere for both China and

Zhu, Aihua

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

206

This article appeared in a journal published by Elsevier. The attached copy is furnished to the author for internal non-commercial research  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

institution and sharing with colleagues. Other uses, including reproduction and distribution, or selling et al., 2000, 2001; Li et al., 2002). Clay minerals, due to their large surface area and high cation

Li, Zhaohui

207

John M. Epifanio -Curriculum Vitae Center for Aquatic Ecology  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

John M. Epifanio - Curriculum Vitae Center for Aquatic Ecology Illinois Natural History Survey 607 AND ACADEMIC INTERESTS Conservation Genetics & Molecular Ecology ­ Examination of structure & function Ecology, Illinois Natural History Survey (INHS). 2000 - 2001 Assistant National Program Leader. Fisheries

208

Burying Carbon under the Sea: An Initial Exploration of Public Opinions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

submitted for review by the journal Energy and Environment #12;2 Burying Carbon under the Sea: An Initial; Herzog et al., 1996; IEA GHG, 2000, 2001; Rau and Caldeira, 1999; Stevens & Gale, 2000). Attention from

Watson, Andrew

209

The Social Costs of an MTBE Ban in California  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in Gasoline. Annual Energy Outlook 2000. DOE/EIA-0383,in Gaso- line. Annual Energy Outlook 2000. DOE/EIA-0383,MTBE in Gasoline, Annual Energy Outlook 2000, 2001a. Mazur,

Rausser, Gordon C.; Adams, Gregory D.; Montgomery, W. David; Smith, Anne E.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

210

climate research and seismology department Biennial Scientific Report  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

climate research and seismology department Biennial Scientific Report 20012002 #12;2 #12;3 Contents Preface Foreword Recent highlights On the role of cirrus clouds in climate 11 Pathways in the ocean 19 Monitoring of tropical processes relevant to climate change 29 Current projects Climate

Stoffelen, Ad

211

PHY 140Y -FOUNDATIONS OF PHYSICS FALL TERM SYLLABUS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Force and Energy in Classical Mechanics 5, 6, 7, 8 Newton's laws of motion inertial vs. noninertial OF PHYSICS 2001-2002 SPRING TERM SYLLABUS - TENTATIVE TOPIC TEXTBOOK CHAPTERS Gravitation 9.1 - 9.7 Electrostatics, Coulomb's Law 23.1 - 23.5 Gauss's Law 24.1 - 24.5 Electrostatic Potential 25.1 - 25.3 Rigid

Strong, Kimberly

212

Botanica Marina 54 (2011): 147157 2011 by Walter de Gruyter Berlin New York. DOI 10.1515/BOT.2011.014 Article in press -uncorrected proof  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

.thabard@port.ac.uk 2 School of Biological Sciences, King Henry Building, University of Portsmouth, Portsmouth PO1 2DY. 2001, 2002, 2005, Steinberg and de Nys 2002, Birrell 2003, Paul and Puglisi 2004, Paul et al. 2007 of algae release active compounds into the environment (Dworjanyn et al. 1999, De Nys and Stein- berg 2002

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

213

UNCG Research Excellence Award Recipients Christopher Hodgkins, Department of English  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

UNCG Research Excellence Award Recipients 2010-2011 Christopher Hodgkins, Department of English, Department of Religious Studies Keith Erikson, Department of Nutrition 2005-2006 Patti Reggio, Department-03 Christopher Ruhm, Department of Economics Christian Moraru, Department of English 2001-2002 Loren Schweninger

Saidak, Filip

214

The Science and Technology OdysseyThe Science and Technology Odyssey Pursuing knowledge for the  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of warp drive as she approaches Bemrick. Odyssey 2001-2002 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 FIVE. Four. Three. Two. One. Engage! SS A*STAR goes into warp drive. The Ensign

Tan, Chew Lim

215

DIESEL AEROSOL SAMPLING METHODOLOGY -CRC E-43 TECHNICAL SUMMARY AND CONCLUSIONS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in diameter, PM2.5) in the atmosphere (Health Effects Institute 2001, 2002a). These concerns apply to Diesel exhaust and are discussed in depth elsewhere (Health Effects Institute 1995, 2002b). Particulate emissions to the formation of the large number of nanoparticles. The Health Effects Institute and the investigators were

Minnesota, University of

216

ii Colorado Climate Table of Contents  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

#12;ii Colorado Climate Table of Contents Web: http://climate.atmos.colostate.edu Colorado Climate Winter 2001-2002 Vol. 3, No. 1 Why Is the Park Range Colorado's Snowfall Capital? . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .10 The Cold-Land Processes Field Experiment: North-Central Colorado

217

Control of acid polysaccharide production and 234 Th and POC export  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

is responsible for 234 Th uptake [Burd et al., 2000; Quigley et al., 2001, 2002]. However, while coagulation of surface-active colloidal organic matter appears to be small [i.e., 10 % or less; Quigley et al., 2001] Recent laboratory [Quigley et al., 2002] and field [Guo et al., 2002] evidence strongly suggests

Guo, Laodong

218

The Biomedical Libraries Dartmouth College/Dartmouth-Hitchcock Medical Center  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Biomedical Libraries Dartmouth College/Dartmouth-Hitchcock Medical Center 2001/2002 Annual Report William F. Garrity Director of Biomedical Libraries July 15, 2002 The Biomedical Libraries are the Dana Biomedical Library at the Dartmouth College campus in Hanover, New Hampshire, and the Matthews

Myers, Lawrence C.

219

851 S.W. Sixth Avenue, Suite 1100 Steve Crow 503-222-5161 Portland, Oregon 97204-1348 Executive Director 800-452-5161  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

,000 25,000 30,000 Energy (MWa) Pet Coke Wind Nuclear Natural Gas Hydro Geothermal 5,000 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Coal Biomass Excludes small projects not reporting to EIA;4/2/2013 2 Average Annual Generation Dispatch* Nuclear, 4% Coal, 12%Coal, 12% Gas, 6% Wind, 5% Market, 3

220

International Society for Pharmaceutical Engineering Year Chaptor Advisor President Vice President Treasurer Secretary Publicity Social Service  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Emily Lewis Stacey Phillips 2002-2003 Steve Peretti Jay Thompson Abbi Heilig Sara Guttu Karen Lu 2003 2008-2009 Marcelo Anderson Nicky Seabrook Nick Armstrong Cole Garner Kim Shearer Derek Gallo Megan Crum 2009-2010 Marcelo Anderson Nick Armstrong Brandon Berry Shahbaz Riaz Carrie Purvis Kristy Layton

Velev, Orlin D.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "2000-2001 2001-2002 2002-2003" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Kelly, R. B., Houlsby, G. T. & Byrne, B. W. (2006). Geotechnique 56, No. 9, 617626 A comparison of field and laboratory tests of caisson foundations in  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Kelly, R. B., Houlsby, G. T. & Byrne, B. W. (2006). Ge´otechnique 56, No. 9, 617­626 617 A comparison of field and laboratory tests of caisson foundations in sand and clay R. B. KELLY ? , G. T. (2002, 2003), Kelly et al. (2003, 2004) and Houlsby et al. (2005, 2006). Suction caissons for offshore

Byrne, Byron

222

www.newphytologist.org 413 Blackwell Publishing, Ltd.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

endophyte Epichlo glyceriae has a positive effect on clonal growth of its host (Pan & Clay, 2002; 2003 in hosts infected by E. glyceriae may function as one mechanism by which endophytic fungi could increase, AMF and leaf- inhabiting fungal endophytes are widely distributed in some ecologically important

Alvarez, Nadir

223

MATH AND COMPUTER SCIENCE DIVISION 2001-2003 CATALOG UPDATE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 MATH AND COMPUTER SCIENCE DIVISION 2001-2003 CATALOG UPDATE Changes effective 2002-2003 COMPUTER REQUIREMENTS FOUNDATIONS CS 100 Computer Science Seminar 1 CS 180 Foundations of Computer Science I 3 CS 185 Foundations of Computer Science II 3 CS 285 Foundations of Computer Science III 3 CS 310 Data Structures

Gering, Jon C.

224

Summary of ICTP activities in support of science in Libya  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Summary of ICTP activities in support of science in Libya June 19, 2013 0 ICTP Public Information Office #12;*For the period 1970-1982, 43 visitors came from Libya; the total number of visitors is 244 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 ICTP Visitors from Libya 1983-2012* Visitors

225

SUBSCRIBE TO MAGAZINE H2CARSBIZ  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to host ITER. In his visit to Japan, U.S. Secretary of Energy Spencer Abraham said ìI am proud to say today that the United States strongly supports building ITER here in Japan. From a technical standpoint on neutral grounds, possible in Vienna, in mid February to reach a decision. © Copyright 2002-2003 by H2

226

An assessment of regional climate trends and changes to the Mt. Jaya glaciers of Irian Jaya  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

on the Mt. Jaya glaciers has been lacking since the early 1970s. Using IKONOS satellite images, the ice extents of the Mt. Jaya glaciers in 2000, 2002, 2003, 2004, and 2005 were mapped. The mapping indicates that the recessional trend which began in the mid...

Kincaid, Joni L.

2007-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

227

Curriculum Vitae Steriani Elavsky Last updated on 3/1/2014  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Curriculum Vitae Steriani Elavsky 1 Last updated on 3/1/2014 A. PERSONAL INFORMATION Steriani TEACHING Phone: (814) 865-7851 Fax: (814) 865-1275 E-Mail: sxe16@psu.edu #12;Curriculum Vitae Steriani;Curriculum Vitae Steriani Elavsky 3 Last updated on 3/1/2014 2002-2003 Kines 247, Introduction to Exercise

Dennis, Nancy

228

College of Engineering (COE) Chemical & Biological Engineering (ChBE)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

(WTI) FALL ENROLLMENT 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 Male 1,940 1,870 1,848 1,823 1,779 Female 329 275 242 of these areas. For details, visit www.coe.montana.edu/ newcoe/PDFs/2007StrategicPlanHighlights.pdf WTI $5.2 million annual research expenditures The Western Transportation Institute's (WTI) re- search programs

Dyer, Bill

229

Atmospheric aerosol light scattering and surface wetness influence the diurnal pattern of net ecosystem exchange in a semi-arid  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and can enhance terrestrial carbon sequestration (Gu et al., 1999, 2002, 2003; Roderick et al., 2001 observational evidence of a link between routine aerosol variability, diffuse radiation and carbon sequestration.g. Baldocchi, 1997). Relation- ships using these variables have been used to model carbon exchange between

Cohen, Ronald C.

230

38-kHz ADCP investigation of deep scattering layers in sperm whale habitat in the northern Gulf of Mexico  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A hull-mounted 38-kHz phased-array acoustic Doppler current profiler (ADCP) was used to acoustically survey the continental margin of the northern Gulf of Mexico (GOM) during 6 cruises in 2002-2003. This is the first backscatter survey with a 38-k...

Kaltenberg, Amanda May

2005-02-17T23:59:59.000Z

231

The role of parental involvement in the amelioration of the effects of low socioeconomic status on academic achievement  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

?????????????? 22 Parent Academies???????????????.. 23 Parent/Teacher Conferences???????????.. 24 Parent Volunteer Time?????????????.. 24 Parents as Planners??????????????? 25 Results??????????????????????? 26 CONCLUSIONS...??????????????????????.. 27 4 Summary of Correlation Results??????????????? 28 5 2002/2003 TAKS Scores % Passing by Grade Level for Three Schools with Similar Demographics????????????????? 30 6 Odds Ratio for Rapoport Academy Students vs Comparable Schools .. 30...

Grayson, Nancy E.

2004-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

232

Graduates 0 2 3 2 2 1 2 2 1 1 2 Percent of Graduates with  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

D Completions and Placement, Ten Year Trend 2002-2003 to 2011-2012 French and Italian Placement Category As of 4/2/2013 #12;12 Number of Grads with Placement Info French and Italian, PhD Graduates First First Placement Category by Broad Field Category 77% 14% 18% 60% 11% 68% 36% 18% 3% 13% 42% 11% 3% 4% 7

Grzybowski, Bartosz A.

233

The University of North Carolina at Greensboro Standards of Comfort Policy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

management of utilities, maintenance of building systems, and efficient operation of facilities while the University of North Carolina System Sustainability goal of climate neutrality by 2050. In addition, existing% by 2015, relative to a fiscal year 2002-2003 baseline. State laws require that all new buildings larger

Saidak, Filip

234

No Arbitrage Conditions and Liquidity Fabian Astic Nizar Touzi  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the probability space is #28;nite, those ob- tained by Kabanov & Stricker (2001), Kabanov, Rásonyi and Stricker), Kabanov and Stricker (2001), Kabanov, Rásonyi and Stricker (2002, 2003), Schachermayer (2004 space, of Kabanov and Stricker (2001), Kabanov, Rásonyi, and Stricker (2003), and Schachermayer (2004

Touzi, Nizar

235

College/University: 1997-2002 Institut Teknologi Bandung, Indonesia, Bachelor of  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Education College/University: 1997-2002 Institut Teknologi Bandung, Indonesia, Bachelor of Pharmacy 2002-2003 Institut Teknologi Bandung, Indonesia, Professional Degree (Pharmacist) 2005-2007 Diamantina of Immunology, in Press First name: Usriansyah Last name: Hadis Date of birth: 28.08.1978 Country: Indonesia E

Manstein, Dietmar J.

236

1UNIVERSITY OF HAWAI`I AT HILO GENERAL CATALOG GENERAL CATALOG  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1UNIVERSITY OF HAWAI`I AT HILO GENERAL CATALOG 2002-2003 GENERAL CATALOG Prospective students should address inquiries to: University of Hawai`i at Hilo Office for Student Affairs Admissions Office 200 W. Kawili St. Hilo, Hawai`i 96720-4091 University main exchange: (808) 974-7311 E-mail: uhhadm@hawaii

Wiegner, Tracy N.

237

RESEARCH ARTICLE Matthew W. Bettridge Barton L. Smith  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

RESEARCH ARTICLE Matthew W. Bettridge ? Barton L. Smith Robert E. Spall Aerodynamic jet steering of the suction flow is entrained. Vectoring with multiple suction and blowing slots was reported by Smith et al was investigated experimentally by Smith and Glezer (2002) and numerically by Guo et al. (2002, 2003). Synthetic

Smith, Barton L.

238

2 15.10.2013 Van D. BaxterVolker Weinmann Hybrid heat pump system as chance for the  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

pumps Condensing gas and oil boilers DHW tanks Solar panels Under floor heating Installation equipment assessment; 28 Nov 2010 - Current downward trend by changes in fuel mix (more gas and biomass, less fuel oil% 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Typein% Gas condensing Gas non-condensing Oil

Oak Ridge National Laboratory

239

CURRICULUM VITAE DAVID L. SUNDING  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Institute. "Development of Biofuel Productivity Potentials for Economic Analysis Under Changing Climate in Agriculture." $20,000. 2003- 2004. U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. STAR Grant. "Mechanisms for Risk with Imperfect Competition and Differentiated Products." $40,000. 2002-2003. Outstanding Journal Article Award

Sadoulet, Elisabeth

240

Summary of ICTP activities in support of science in Bolivia  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Summary of ICTP activities in support of science in Bolivia 23/10/2013ICTP Public Information Office #12;*For the period 1970-1982, 20 visitors came from Bolivia; the total number of visitors is 78 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 ICTP Visitors from Bolivia, 1983-2012* Visitors

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "2000-2001 2001-2002 2002-2003" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Kelly L. Drew, Ph.D. November 7, 2011 Curriculum Vitae  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Kelly L. Drew, Ph.D. November 7, 2011 Curriculum Vitae 1 CURRICULUM VITAE Kelly L. Drew, Ph Institute of Arctic Biology University of Alaska Fairbanks, Fairbanks, AK #12;Kelly L. Drew, Ph.D. November) $3,000 (Summer 2000) 2001 American Heart Association #12;Kelly L. Drew, Ph.D. November 7, 2011

242

Use of models and observations to assess trends in the 19502005 water balance and climate  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

) was about 50% of normal during 20002001. The ensuing drought-related water shortage led to seriousUse of models and observations to assess trends in the 19502005 water balance and climate of Upper-driven interannual (and longer) variability is evident. Evaporation and the other components of the water balance

243

Das Mitteilungsblatt erscheint jeweils am 1. und 3. Mittwoch jeden Monats. Eigentmer, Herausgeber, Vervielfltigung und Vertrieb: Zentrale Verwaltung der Universitt Innsbruck, Innrain 52, A-6020  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

2000/2001 Ausgegeben am 16. Mai 2001 21. Stck 438. Reform des Studienplans fr die Studienrichtung Begutachtungsverfahren gem 14 UniStG 439. Reform des Studienplanes fr das Doktoratsstudium der Sozial- und Wirtschaftswissenschaften an der Karl-Franzens-Universitt Graz - Begutachtungsverfahren 440. Reform des Studienplanes fr

Breu, Ruth

244

Das Mitteilungsblatt erscheint jeweils am 1. und 3. Mittwoch jeden Monats. Eigentmer, Herausgeber, Vervielfltigung und Vertrieb: Zentrale Verwaltung der Universitt Innsbruck, Innrain 52, A-6020  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

2000/2001 Ausgegeben am 20. Juni 2001 32. Stck 597. Reform des Studienplanes fr das Diplomstudium Slawistik an der Karl-Franzens- Universitt Graz 598. Reform des neuen Diplomstudienplanes fr die Studienrichtung Romanistik an der Universitt Salzburg - Begutachtungsverfahren 599. Reform des Studienplanes fr

Breu, Ruth

245

Das Mitteilungsblatt erscheint jeweils am 1. und 3. Mittwoch jeden Monats. Eigentmer, Herausgeber, Vervielfltigung und Vertrieb: Zentrale Verwaltung der Universitt Innsbruck, Innrain 52, A-6020  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

2000/2001 Ausgegeben am 1. August 2001 46. Stck 740. Reform der Studienplne fr die theologischen 14 Abs 1 UniStG 741. Reform des neuen Studienplanes fr das Diplomstudium Architektur gem. UniStG 14 an der Universitt Innsbruck - Begutachtungsverfahren 742. Reform des neuen Studienplanes fr das

Middeldorp, Aart

246

2004 01 12 2004 11 26  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Liu, T. K., Y. G. Chen, W. S. Chen, and S. H. Jiang 2000 "Rates of CoolingandDenudationofthe Early-Glacial Sea-Level Rise from a Coral Recordat HounPeninsula,Papua New Guinea." Nature 349: 147-149. Chen, W. S 1 2 3 #12; 41 () (regression) (transgression) 1 0.5 (Liu et al., 2000, 2001

Chen, Wen-Shan

247

CURRICULUM VITAE Nov. 2008 NAME: Albert Mei-chu Cheh  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and repair) Sabbatical leaves 1987, 1993-94 and 2000-2001 - Laboratory of Bioorganic Chemistry, NIDDK, NIH.M. Chang, eds. CRC Press, Boca Raton, FL, pp. 61-76 (1980). 7. Cheh, A.M.*, Skochdopole, J., Koski, P

Lansky, Joshua

248

Christopher A Klausmeier Kellogg Biological Station  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Incoming International Fellowship 20092014 NSF CAREER Award 20002001 NSF International Research, PI: CK, co-PIs: Elena Litchman and Leonid Bunimovich, $350,000 plus REU Supplement ($8,850). 2005 REU Supplement ($8,850). 20052011 Plankton Community Assembly: Theory and Practice, James S. Mc

249

*Weldon School of Biomedical Engineering, Purdue University, West Lafayette, Indiana, USA Department of Chemistry, Purdue University, West Lafayette, Indiana, USA  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of particular targets for effective interven- tion are of great interest. Recent evidence suggests that acrolein and Klaidman 1993; Luo and Shi 2004). Aldehydes, such as acrolein and other related compounds have been shown to the nervous tissue (Lovell et al. 2000, 2001; Shi et al. 2002; Luo and Shi 2004, 2005). Acrolein

Cheng, Ji-Xin

250

Proceedings of ICRC 2001: 1 c Copernicus Gesellschaft 2001 Search for Diffuse TeV Gamma-Ray Emission from the Galactic  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Collaboration Department of Physics, New York University, New York, NY 10003, USA Abstract. Diffuse high energy up to GeV energies by space-based detectors. Observations at higher energies, for which the flux in the overhead sky at energies near 1 TeV. We have used a 2000-2001 data set from Milagro to search

California at Santa Cruz, University of

251

University of Maryland Center for Environmental Science An Assessment of SAV Epiphyte Loading and Local Water  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Research Assistant E.M. Bailey, Sr. Faculty Research Assistant W.R. Boynton, Professor Chesapeake of three permanent transects (PR05, BP03, and KC01) at Blossom Point Maryland in 2000, 2001, and 2002. Each compared to the other stations BP03, and KC01 where SAV beds were much more dense and composed primarily

Boynton, Walter R.

252

Bonneville Power Administration Stephen J. (Steve) Wright, Administrator  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Administrator) on the eve of the West Coast energy crisis of 2000-2001. His tenure has spanned someBonneville Power Administration Stephen J. (Steve) Wright, Administrator Stephen J. Wright at the Bonneville Power Administration in the agency's conservation office as an entry-level GS-9. Today, he is BPA

253

FEDERAL ENERGY REGULATORY COMMISSION  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

FEDERAL ENERGY REGULATORY COMMISSION WASHINGTON, D.C. 20426 NEWS RELEASE NEWS MEDIA CONTACT AND FERC STAFF The Federal Energy Regulatory Commission today accepted a settlement, valued at nearly $500 stemming from the 2000-2001 energy crisis in California and other Western states. The global settlement

Laughlin, Robert B.

254

FEDERAL ENERGY REGULATORY COMMISSION  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

FEDERAL ENERGY REGULATORY COMMISSION WASHINGTON, D.C. 20426 NEWS RELEASE NEWS MEDIA CONTACT-95-191 COMMISSION APPROVES TWO WESTERN POWER SETTLEMENTS The Federal Energy Regulatory Commission today approved two markets during the Western energy crisis of 2000-2001. The first case involves a settlement agreement

Laughlin, Robert B.

255

Qiu & al. Basal angiosperm phylogeny55 (4) November 2006: 837856 INTRODUCTION  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Qiu & al. · Basal angiosperm phylogeny55 (4) · November 2006: 837­856 837 INTRODUCTION The basal & Dowd, 1991; Hamby & Zimmer, 1992; Chase & al., 1993; Qiu & al., 1993, 1999, 2000, 2001, 2005; D. Soltis & al., 1997, 2000; Hoot & al., 1999; Mathews & Donoghue, 1999, 2000; Parkinson & al., 1999; Renner

256

Chevak School Content Literacy Inquiry, April 2009 Chevak is the single school in the  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

your logic model worked? Mary McMahon (2000-2001) implemented a Reading Program, Reading Apprentice (RA and instructional practice to teach reading comprehension. Reading Apprentice was supported by the administration about my concerns recommendations to keep Reading Apprentice (RA) alive. I recommend hiring

Pantaleone, Jim

257

University of Wisconsin Faculty Document 1622 Madison 4 March 2002  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, the Committee on Women in the University has adopted a document specifying its operating procedures: "Current;-2- III. 2000-2001 Activities Climate Initiative. A joint work group of the Committee on Women work to raise the visibility of climate issues and promote a positive work and learning environ

Sheridan, Jennifer

258

Water Resources Research Institute of the University of North Carolina  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Water Resources Research Institute of the University of North Carolina Annual Technical Report FY 2000 Introduction SUMMARY The North Carolina Water Resources Research Institute program for 2000-2001 (Federal Fiscal Year 2000) continued to focus on three broad areas of concern: surface waters, groundwater

259

Research paper Impact of the eruptive activity on glacier evolution at Popocatpetl Volcano  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, Colombia, the eruption melted, fractured and destabilized the ice cap (Thouret, 1990). On the other hand to melting processes. The most important loss occurred over 20002001 when 19% of the glacier-covered area and low activity. Pyroclastic flow generation, ejection of incandescent material, and tephra fall affected

Kb, Andreas

260

Magnitude of 1999 release to the ORR truly unique Record of the 14C-Pulse in Tree Rings  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

be exploited for carbon cycle studies. )/1( 2000 2001 t- = e N N 0 200 400 600 31-Dec-93 1-Jan-95 2-Jan-96 2 Isotope Study at ORNL. Quantify the mechanisms that control enhanced carbon accumulation within deep subsoils of forested Ultisols and Inceptisols. Transport and Sequestration of Organic C in Contrasting

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "2000-2001 2001-2002 2002-2003" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Instructions for use 179 632178476  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, 1994; 1994 #12; 184632173471 1999: 159 Anderson 1991; 1983 Bartelson 1995; Biggs 1999; Kantorowicz 1957 Thongchai Winichakul Geo-bodyThongchai, 1994 Mary Elizabeth Berry #12; 185 632172470 20014 Benedict Anderson Barrow 2003, 2008; Elliott 2000; Fortna 2002; Hostetler 2000, 2001

Tachizawa, Kazuya

262

NERI Report Commissioned by Tech-wise A/S  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to an offshore wind farm at Horns Rev: results and conclusions 2000/2001 #12;National Environmental Research-line investigations of birds in relation to an offshore wind farm at Horns Rev: results and conclusions 2000 Title: Base-line investigations of birds in relation to an offshore wind farm at Horns Rev: results

263

851 S.W. Sixth Avenue, Suite 1100 Steve Crow 503-222-5161 Portland, Oregon 97204-1348 Executive Director 800-452-5161  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Petroleum & 10,000 15,000 20,000 25,000 30,000 Energy (MWa) Pet Coke Wind Nuclear Natural Gas Hydro Geothermal 5,000 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Coal Biomass Excludes small projects 26, 2012 2 #12;3/5/2013 2 Average Annual Generation Dispatch* Nuclear, 4% Coal, 12%Coal, 12% Gas, 6

264

The Italian Academy for Advanced Studies in America  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Italian Academy for Advanced Studies in America at Columbia University Annual Report 2002 Academy for Advanced Studies in America at Columbia University Annual Report 20022003 n e w y o r k 2 0 0 Activities of the Academy 65 f i l m s e r i e s e x h i b i t i o n s f e l l ow s ' s e m i na rs #12

Qian, Ning

265

Tracking Progress Last updated 10/7/2013 Installed Capacity 1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Capacity (MW) Wind Solar Small Hydro Large Hydro,813 Large Hydro 11,890 11,755 11,755 12,114 12,103 12,194 11,945 12,226 12,226 12,257 12,297 12,297 Small 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Energy (GWh) Wind Solar Small Hydro Large Hydro Natural Gas Nuclear Geothermal

266

Study of Mrk 501 above 60 GeV with CELESTE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The CELESTE atmospheric Cherenkov detector, running until June 2004 at the Themis solar facility, has taken data on compact sources such as pulsars and blazars. We will take stock of the experiment, in particular regarding the latest improvements of the detector simulation and data analysis. These changes provide us with a new analysis of old data with smaller uncertainties. We present here the evidence for a weak signal from Mrk 501 in 2000-2001.

E. Brion; the CELESTE collaboration

2005-09-16T23:59:59.000Z

267

Nuclear Power: a Hedge against Uncertain Gas and Carbon Prices?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

conducted in Belgium (Ampere, 2000), the U.K. (RAE, 2004), Finland (Tarjanne and Rissanen, 2000), France (Dideme, 2003), and the USA (Deutch et al., 2003, and Tolley et al., 2004). The table shows wide differences in the results, arising mainly from... Belgium (Ampere) Finland (Tarjanne) France (DGEMP) UK (RAE) USA (Deutch et al., MIT) USA (Tolley et al., University of Chicago) Date 2000 2001 2003 2004 2003 2004 Nuclear CCGT Nuclear CCGT Nuclear CCGT Nuclear CCGT Nuclear CCGT...

Roques, Fabien A; Nuttall, William J; Newbery, David; de Neufville, Richard

2006-03-14T23:59:59.000Z

268

TRANSVERSE SPIN AT PHENIX AND FUTURE PLANS.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The PHENIX experiment took data with transversely polarized proton beams in 2001-2002 and measured the transverse single spin asymmetries in inclusive neutral pion and non-identified charge hadrons at midrapidity and {radical} s = 200 GeV. The data near X{sub F} {approx} 0 cover a transverse momentum range from 0.5 to 5.0 GeV/c. The observed asymmetries are consistent with zero with good statistical accuracy. This paper presents the current work in light of earlier measurements at lower energies in this kinematic region and the future plans of the PHENIX detector.

MAKDISI,Y. (FOR THE PHENIX COLLABORATION)

2005-01-28T23:59:59.000Z

269

Baseline Report for the Fort Hood Army Base: Sept. 1, 2001 To Aug. 31, 2002  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ESL-TR-02/12-02 BASELINE REPORT FOR THE FORT HOOD ARMY BASE: SEPT. 1, 2001 TO AUG. 31, 2002 A Research Project for the U.S. Army C.E.R.L. and the Ft. Hood Energy Office Jeff S. Haberl, Ph.D., P.E. Juan... REPORT, P. 1 December 2002 Energy Systems Laboratory, Texas A&M University PREFACE This report is the 2001/2002 baseline report for a multi-year Research Project performed for the U.S. Army Construction Engineering Research Laboratory...

Haberl, J. S.; Baltazar, J. C.; Sung, Y. H.; Claridge, D. E.; Turner, W. D.

270

Breeding biology and habitat associations of the Altamira Oriole and Northern Beardless-Tyrannulet in the Lower Rio Grande Valley, Texas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of the nest camera. Personnel at the Santa Ana/Lower Rio Grande National Wildlife Refuge Complex provided helpful information on the focal species, logistical support, and housing for myself and my field assistants. I would particularly like to thank... Species with the five greatest importance values determined by foliage hits in the shrub and tree layers at Altamira Oriole nest plots and non-use plots at Santa Ana National Wildlife Refuge, Texas, 2002-2003????????. 52 12 Species with the five greatest...

Werner, Scott Michael

2004-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

271

Ogmios 36  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of the North play a special role. There are nearly thirty different groups, all living in the northern parts of the country bordering the Arctic Ocean from Scandinavia to the Bering Sea and the Pacific. The Peoples of the North were the last ones to be put... Materials of the Nivkh Language I - III (Shiraishi and Lok 2002, 2003, 2004) appeared as a result of the Japanese program on Endangered Languages of the Pacific Rim (ELPR) and the research program Voices from Tundra and Taiga. This unique material which...

Ostler, Nicholas D M

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

272

Direct measurement of the W boson decay width in proton-antiproton collisions at s**(1/2) = 1.96-TeV  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This dissertation describes a direct measurement of the W boson total decay width, {Lambda}{sub W}, using the D0 detector at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider. The measurement uses an integrated luminosity of 177.3 pb{sup -1} data, collected during the 2002-2003 run. The width is determined from the shape of the transverse mass distribution, M{sub T}, by fitting the data in the tail region 100 < M{sub T} < 200 GeV. The result if {Lambda}{sub W} = 2.011 {+-} 0.093(stat) {+-} 0.107(syst) GeV.

Zhu, Jun-jie

2004-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

273

MiniBooNE at All Experimenter's Meeting  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: VegetationEquipment SurfacesResource Program PreliminaryA3,0 AlabamaYear [2002] [2003] [2004] [2005]

274

MiniBooNE at First Physics E. D. Zimmerman  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: VegetationEquipment SurfacesResource Program PreliminaryA3,0 AlabamaYear [2002] [2003] [2004] [2005]at

275

MiniBooNE nu/nubar combined data set Release  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: VegetationEquipment SurfacesResource Program PreliminaryA3,0 AlabamaYear [2002] [2003] [2004]

276

MiniBooNE's First Oscillation Result Morgan Wascko Imperial College London  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: VegetationEquipment SurfacesResource Program PreliminaryA3,0 AlabamaYear [2002] [2003] [2004]MiniBooNE's

277

MiniBooNE/LSND Neutrino Oscillation Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: VegetationEquipment SurfacesResource Program PreliminaryA3,0 AlabamaYear [2002] [2003]

278

MiniBooNE:  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: VegetationEquipment SurfacesResource Program PreliminaryA3,0 AlabamaYear [2002] [2003]6 Months Later ...

279

MiniBooNE: Up and Running Morgan Wascko Morgan Wascko Louisiana State University  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: VegetationEquipment SurfacesResource Program PreliminaryA3,0 AlabamaYear [2002] [2003]6 Months Later

280

MiniBooNE_LoNu_Shaevitz.ppt  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: VegetationEquipment SurfacesResource Program PreliminaryA3,0 AlabamaYear [2002] [2003]6 Months

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "2000-2001 2001-2002 2002-2003" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Miniature Integrated Nuclear Detection System (MINDS) | Princeton Plasma  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: VegetationEquipment SurfacesResource Program PreliminaryA3,0 AlabamaYear [2002] [2003]6 MonthsPhysics

282

Miniaturized Mass Spectrometer - Energy Innovation Portal  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: VegetationEquipment SurfacesResource Program PreliminaryA3,0 AlabamaYear [2002] [2003]6

283

Minimal Proton Channel Enables H2 Oxidation and Production with a  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: VegetationEquipment SurfacesResource Program PreliminaryA3,0 AlabamaYear [2002] [2003]6Water-Soluble

284

A model for predicting the evolution of damage in the plastic bonded explosive LX17  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Of particular interest, Chan et al. (1997a, 1997b) observed grain boundary fracture in argillaceous salt. Along the same lines, Helms et al. (1999) employed the Tvergaard (1990) cohesive zone model in an implicit finite element code to predict grain boundary... implemented into a finite element code. The model, developed in part by Yoon and Allen (1999) and Allen and Searcy (2000, 2001a, 2001b), will use material parameters for the plastic bonded explosive LX17 in order to compare computational results...

Seidel, Gary Don

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

285

School quality and wages  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to a College Degree Over a High School Degree...........................................................................................133 1 CHAPTER I#0;#3;#0;#3; #0;#3;#0;#3; INTRODUCTION Introduction During the 2000-2001 school year, $738 billion... that we believe that spending matters and the presumption must be that extra spending buys something of value, i.e., higher quality schools.3 #0;#3;#0;#3;#0;#3;#0;#3;#0;#3;#0;#3;#0;#3;#0;#3; This dissertation follows the style and format of the Journal...

Speakman, Robert B., Jr.

2007-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

286

Havre, MT Natural Gas Imports by Pipeline from Canada  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelines About U.S.30Natural Gas Glossary529 6330 0 1 0 058.588,219 719,4351998 1999 2000 2001

287

 

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia:FAQ <Information Administration (EIA) 10 MECSPropane (Consumer1.29,220.973.4 66.1477.2 7.6 PAD2000 2001

288

 

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia:FAQ <Information Administration (EIA) 10 MECSPropane (Consumer1.29,220.973.4 66.1477.2 7.6 PAD2000 2001

289

 

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia:FAQ <Information Administration (EIA) 10 MECSPropane (Consumer1.29,220.973.4 66.1477.2 7.6 PAD2000 2001

290

 

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia:FAQ <Information Administration (EIA) 10 MECSPropane (Consumer1.29,220.973.4 66.1477.2 7.6 PAD2000 2001

291

 

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia:FAQ <Information Administration (EIA) 10 MECSPropane (Consumer1.29,220.973.4 66.1477.2 7.6 PAD2000 2001

292

The Democratic Window of Opportunity: Evidence from Riots in sub-Saharan Africa  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Par- ticipation and Public Finance in 20th Century Latin America." European Journal of Political Economy 27(1), 181-200. 22 [6] Aidt, Toke S. and Facundo Albornoz, 2011. "Political Regimes and Foreign Inter- vention."Journal of Development Economics 94... causal way to democratic change has a long history in political economy, and has recently gained renewed cur- 5 rency through the work of Acemoglu and Robinson (2000, 2001, 2006) and Boix (2003). The formalization of this idea in the work by Acemoglu...

Aidt, Toke S.; Leon, Gabriel

2014-07-11T23:59:59.000Z

293

The Chemical Hazards Assessments Prior to D&D of the Plutonium Finishing Plant Hanford Nuclear Reservation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

All Hanford facilities, including the Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP) were evaluated for chemical hazards in 1997, 1998 and 2000. The hazard evaluation, known as the PFP Facility Vulnerability Assessment (FVA), was prompted when chemicals in Tank A-109 in the Plutonium Reclamation Facility (PRF) exploded in May 1997. Actions were undertaken to eliminate or reduce what were thought to be the worst hazards following that evaluation. In 2001, a new PFP team was organized to review the progress to date in reducing hazards and to reassess hazards that might still remain within the facility. This reassessment continued into 2002 and is referred to as the 2002 PFP Residual Chemical Hazards Reassessment (RCHR). This report explains the results of the 2001/2002 reassessment of the chemical hazards at PFP. This reassessment effort forms the basis of the RCHR. The RCHR relied on previous assessments as the starting point for the 2001/2002 evaluation and used ranking criteria very similar to previous efforts. The RCHR team was composed of professionals representing Industrial Hygiene, Chemical Engineering, Mechanical Engineering, Hazardous Materials Handling Specialists, Solid Waste Management Specialists and Environmental Specialists. All areas of concern that could be accessed were physically examined and photographed where possible. Information from processing records, facility drawings and documents, design engineers, process engineers and work packages were compiled. The PFP vessel inventory was examined and expanded where required. New items listed in the vessel inventory were investigated. All items investigated were ranked using the hazard ranking criteria developed. This information was put on data sheets and compiled in a database.

FITCH, L.R.; HOPKINS, A.M.

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

294

HCCI Engine Optimization and Control  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The goal of this project was to develop methods to optimize and control Homogeneous-Charge Compression Ignition (HCCI) engines, with emphasis on diesel-fueled engines. HCCI offers the potential of nearly eliminating IC engine NOx and particulate emissions at reduced cost over Compression Ignition Direct Injection engines (CIDI) by controlling pollutant emissions in-cylinder. The project was initiated in January, 2002, and the present report is the final report for work conducted on the project through December 31, 2004. Periodic progress has also been reported at bi-annual working group meetings held at USCAR, Detroit, MI, and at the Sandia National Laboratories. Copies of these presentation materials are available on CD-ROM, as distributed by the Sandia National Labs. In addition, progress has been documented in DOE Advanced Combustion Engine R&D Annual Progress Reports for FY 2002, 2003 and 2004. These reports are included as the Appendices in this Final report.

Rolf D. Reitz

2005-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

295

Characterization of Field Exposed Thin Film Modules: Preprint  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Test arrays of thin film modules have been deployed at the Solar Energy Centre near New Delhi, India since 2002-2003. Performances of these arrays were reported by O.S. Sastry [1]. This paper reports on NREL efforts to support SEC by performing detailed characterization of selected modules from the array. Modules were selected to demonstrate both average and worst case power loss over the 8 years of outdoor exposure. The modules characterized included CdTe, CIS and three different types of a-Si. All but one of the a-Si types were glass-glass construction. None of the modules had edge seals. Detailed results of these tests are presented along with our conclusions about the causes of the power loss for each technology.

Wohlgemuth, J. H.; Sastry, O. S.; Stokes, A.; Singh, Y. K.; Kumar, M.

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

296

Calculating the Financial Benefits of an Energy Efficiency Project: The Building Owner's and Invester's Perspective  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

(617l 1999 2000 122 122 (1,305) (1,370) 138 145 (1,167) (1,2251 (5231 (552) (6441 (674) 2001 122 (1,438) 152 (1,2871 (5831 (704) 2002 2003 122 122 (1,510) 11,5861 159 167 (1,351) (1,419) 16151 (648) (736) mOl 2004 ? (1... 122 (I,IB3) 125 (1,059) {46BI (5901 1998 122 (1,243) 131 (1,11ll {49S1 (6171 1999 122 (1,305) 13B (1,1671 (S231 (6441 2000 122 (1,370) 145 (I,22S1 {5S21 (674) 2001 122 (1,43B) 152 (1,2871 (583) l7041 2002 122 (1,510) 159 (1,351l (6151 (736) 2003...

Watson, J. K.

297

Searching for flickering variability in several symbiotic stars and related objects: BX Mon, V471 Per, RS Oph, V627 Cas, CI Cam V886 Her, Z And, T CrB, MWC 560, V407 Cyg  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

UBVRI photometry observations of 10 symbiotic stars and related objects obtained in the period 2002-2003 are presented. Analysing differential light curves we found rapid light variations with timescales of tens of minutes and significant amplitudes in the well-known flickerers MWC 560, RS Oph, V407 Cyg and T CrB. MWC 560 and V407 Cyg demonstrate quasi periodic oscillations (QPO) with similar amplitudes and timescales. Flickering and unusual flare in V627 Cas as well as some indications of flickering presence in BX Mon are detected. The existence of 29 minutes oscillations in Z And with an amplitude about 0.02 mag in U band is confirmed. Only one symbiotic star, V471 Per, and both non symbiotic, CI Cam and V886 Her seem to be constant on flickering timescales. Nevertheless, small night to night changes in the brightness of V886 Her were observed as well.

M. Gromadzki; M. Mikolajewski; T. Tomov; I. Bellas-Velidis; A. Dapergolas; C. Galan

2006-04-05T23:59:59.000Z

298

CERAMIC MEMBRANE ENABLING TECHNOLOGY FOR IMPROVED IGCC EFFICIENCY  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This yearly technical progress report will summarize work accomplished for Phase 1 Program during the program year 2000/2001. In task 1, the lead material composition was modified to enable superior fluxes and its mechanical properties improved. In task 2, composite OTM elements were fabricated that enable oxygen production at the commercial target purity and 75% of the target flux. In task 3, manufacturing development demonstrated the technology to fabricate an OTM tube of the size required for the multi-tube tester. The work in task 4 has enabled a preferred composite architecture and process conditions to be predicted. In task 5, the multi-tube reactor is designed and fabrication almost complete.

Ravi Prasad

2001-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

299

Documenting Western Burrowing Owl Reproduction and Activity Patterns Using Motion-Activated Cameras  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We used motion-activated cameras to monitor the reproduction and patterns of activity of the Burrowing Owl (Athene cunicularia) above ground at 45 burrows in south-central Nevada during the breeding seasons of 1999, 2000, 2001, and 2005. The 37 broods, encompassing 180 young, raised over the four years represented an average of 4.9 young per successful breeding pair. Young and adult owls were detected at the burrow entrance at all times of the day and night, but adults were detected more frequently during afternoon/early evening than were young. Motion-activated cameras require less effort to implement than other techniques. Limitations include photographing only a small percentage of owl activity at the burrow; not detecting the actual number of eggs, young, or number fledged; and not being able to track individual owls over time. Further work is also necessary to compare the accuracy of productivity estimates generated from motion-activated cameras with other techniques.

Hall, Derek B. [NSTec; Greger, Paul D. [NSTec

2014-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

300

Historical Perspective on Subsurface Contaminants Focus Area (SCFA) Success: Counting the Things That Really Count  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Subsurface Contaminants Focus Area, (SCFA) is committed to, and has been accountable for, identifying and providing solutions for the most pressing subsurface contamination problems in the DOE Complex. The SCFA program is a DOE end user focused and problem driven organization that provides the best technical solutions for the highest priority problems. This paper will discuss in some detail specific examples of the most successful, innovative technical solutions and the DOE sites where they were deployed or demonstrated. These solutions exhibited outstanding performance in FY 2000/2001 and appear poised to achieve significant success in saving end users money and time. They also provide a reduction in risk to the environment, workers, and the public while expediting environmental clean up of the sites.

Wright, J. A. Jr.; Middleman, L. I.

2002-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "2000-2001 2001-2002 2002-2003" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Electrical Network Supervisor Status Report  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

During year 2000 CERN has installed the Electrical Network Supervisor (ENS) for the monitoring and control of the equipment of the electrical distribution network located in about 100 substations throughout the different sites. In the first phase the system has been installed in parallel with the original CERN-developed system and databases and mimic diagrams have been prepared to cover parts of the distribution network. The system has been integrated with the general ST supervision systems for alarms monitoring and measurement logging, and the data from the ENS are gradually being integrated. In the second phase an extension of the system has been tested to include a direct industrial interface with the electrical equipment without the need for the existing CERN equipment interfaces. During the 2000-2001 shutdown the supervision will be renovated in a number of zones to operate a complete industrial system covering all aspects of the supervision from equipment interfaces to end-user applications.

Poulsen, S

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

302

The Walla Walla Basin Natural Production Monitoring and Evaluation Project : Progress Report, 1999-2002.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Walla Walla Basin Natural Production Monitoring and Evaluation Project (WWNPME) was funded by Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) as directed by section 4(h) of the Pacific Northwest Electric Power Planning and Conservation Act of 1980 (P. L. 96-501). This project is in accordance with and pursuant to measures 4.2A, 4.3C.1, 7.1A.2, 7.1C.3, 7.1C.4 and 7.1D.2 of the Northwest Power Planning Council's (NPPC) Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program (NPPC 1994). Work was conducted by the Fisheries Program of the Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation (CTUIR) under the Walla Walla Basin Natural Production Monitoring and Evaluation Project (WWNPME). Chapter One provides an overview of the entire report and how the objectives of each statement of work from 1999, 2000, 2001, and 2002 contract years are organized and reported. Chapter One also provides background information relevant to the aquatic resources of the Walla Walla River Basin. Objectives are outlined below for the statements of work for the 1999, 2000, 2001 and 2002 contract years. The same objectives were sometimes given different numbers in different years. Because this document is a synthesis of four years of reporting, we gave objectives letter designations and listed the objective number associated with the statement of work for each year. Some objectives were in all four work statements, while other objectives were in only one or two work statements. Each objective is discussed in a chapter. The chapter that reports activities and findings of each objective are listed with the objective below. Because data is often interrelated, aspects of some findings may be reported or discussed in more than one chapter. Specifics related to tasks, approaches, methods, results and discussion are addressed in the individual chapters.

Contor, Craig R.; Sexton, Amy D.

2003-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

303

Changes in the American Interventional Radiology Literature: Comparison over a 10-Year Time Period  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose. To determine the changes that occurred regarding interventional radiologic research in the major American radiology journals between 1992-1993 and 2002-2003. Methods. Articles published in three major American radiology journals (Journal of Vascular and Interventional Radiology, American Journal of Roentgenology, and Radiology) during two distinct 24-month time periods (1992-1993 and 2002-2003) were evaluated. All articles judged to be pertinent to the interventional radiologic community were included. Investigations included in journal subheadings other than 'interventional' or 'vascular radiology' were included if the emphasis of the article was on a vascular imaging modality or peripheral intervention. Exclusions included: case reports, technical reports, letters to the editor, breast interventions, and primary neurointerventions. Data were collected regarding the affiliations of the primary author (nationality, hospital type, department); primary category of interest of the investigation; funding information; and study design variables. Two-by-two chi-squared statistical analyses were performed comparing the variables from the early and late data sets. Results. A total of 405 articles met the inclusion criteria for the early data set (1992-1993); 488 articles met the inclusion criteria for the late data set (2002-2003). Variables that demonstrated a statistically significant decrease from the early data set to the late data set included: articles in which the primary author was from a department of radiology (91.1% vs. 86.3%; p < 0.025); articles written by a primary author who was American (69.4% vs. 44.6%; p < 0.001); and articles with a primary category of investigation that had a nonvascular intervention focus (22.7% vs. 11.9%; p < 0.001). Variables that demonstrated a statistically significant increase from the early data set to the late data set included primary authors from Western Europe (18.0% vs. 30.1%; p < 0.001) and Asia (6.6% vs. 18.4%; p < 0.001), the primary field of investigation, with significant increases noted for primary cancer interventions (6.5% vs. 13.3%; p < 0.001), gynecologic interventions (0.2% vs. 4.5%; p < 0.001), stent-grafts (0 vs. 2.9%; p < 0.001), and spine interventions (0 vs. 1.8%; p < 0.01). Studies receiving funding also demonstrated a significant increase when comparing the early and late data sets (11.3% vs. 23.0%, respectively; p < 0.001). Conclusions. Articles published in the American radiologic literature have changed significantly over the past 10 years. Primary authors are more likely to be nonradiologists and less likely to be American. Investigations dealing primarily with nonvascular interventions are less common; however, some forms of intervention (particularly cancer interventions) are seen more frequently in the literature. The percentage of funded projects has more than doubled in the same time frame.

Ray, Charles E., E-mail: cray@dhha.org; Gupta, Rajan; Blackwell, John [Denver Health Medical Center, Department of Radiology (United States)

2006-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

304

AISI/DOE Technology Roadmap Program: Characterization of Fatigue and Crash Performance of New Generation High Strength Steels for Automotive Applications  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A 2-year project (2001-2002) to generate fatigue and high strain data for a new generation of high strength steels (HSS) has been completed in December 2002. The project tested eleven steel grades, including Dual Phase (DP) steels, Transformation-Induced Plasticity (TRIP) steels, Bake Hardenable (BH) steels, and conventional High Strength Low Alloy (HSLA) steels. All of these steels are of great interest in automotive industry due to the potential benefit in weight reduction, improved fuel economy, enhanced crash energy management and total system cost savings. Fatigue behavior includes strain controlled fatigue data notch sensitivity for high strength steels. High strain rate behavior includes stress-strain data for strain rates from 0.001/s to 1000/s, which are considered the important strain rate ranges for crash event. The steels were tested in two phases, seven were tested in Phase 1 and the remaining steels were tested in Phase. In a addition to the fatigue data and high st rain rate data generated for the steels studied in the project, analyses of the testing results revealed that Advanced High Strength Steels (AHSS) exhibit significantly higher fatigue strength and crash energy absorption capability than conventional HSS. TRIP steels exhibit exceptionally better fatigue strength than steels of similar tensile strength but different microstructure, for conditions both with or without notches present

Brenda Yan; Dennis Urban

2003-04-21T23:59:59.000Z

305

GOLD Mine: A new Galaxy Database on the WEB  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The galaxy database "GOLDmine" (http://goldmine.mib.infn.it/) has been significantly updated (Sept/1/2003) The new features include: a) Sample extension:the GOLDmine sample has been extended from the original Virgo cluster + Coma supercluster regions to include the clusters: A262, Cancer, A2147, A2151, A2197, A2199. 382 galaxies from the GCGC (with m_p<15.7) have been added in these regions. b) New query keys: 1) query by near position (and near name). 2) query by available images. c) Routinary image update: 1) 59 (B). 72 (V) and 70 (H_alpha) new frames from observations carried on by the GOLDmine team in spring 2003. 2) 157 new optical (drift-scan) spectra from observations carried on by the GOLDmine team in 2002-2003. 3) 225 B frames of VCC galaxies taken with the INT (kindly provided by S. Sabatini). 4) 56 B frames of galaxies in A1367 taken with the CFHT (kindly provided by M. Treyer). 5) 20 (H), 32 (K) band frames of bright Virgo members (from 2MASS). The new numbers in GOLDmine are: 3649 galaxies, 706 V-band frames, 858 B-band frames, 385 H_alpha frames (NET), 385 H_alpha frames (OFF-band), 1241 H-band frames, 114 K-band frames, 323 Spectra All frames are available in FITS (and jpg) format.

G. Gavazzi; A. Boselli; A. Donati; P. Franzetti; M. Scodeggio

2003-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

306

U.S. Nuclear Power Plant Operating Cost and Experience Summaries  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The ''U.S. Nuclear Power Plant Operating Cost and Experience Summaries'' (NUREG/CR-6577, Supp. 2) report has been prepared to provide historical operating cost and experience information on U.S. commercial nuclear power plants during 2000-2001. Costs incurred after initial construction are characterized as annual production costs, which represent fuel and plant operating and maintenance expenses, and capital expenditures related to facility additions/modifications, which are included in the plant capital asset base. As discussed in the report, annual data for these two cost categories were obtained from publicly available reports and must be accepted as having different degrees of accuracy and completeness. Treatment of inconclusive and incomplete data is discussed. As an aid to understanding the fluctuations in the cost histories, operations summaries for each nuclear unit are provided. The intent of these summaries is to identify important operating events; refueling, major maintenance, and other significant outages; operating milestones; and significant licensing or enforcement actions. Information used in the summaries is condensed from operating reports submitted by the licensees, the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) database for enforcement actions, and outage reports.

Reid, RL

2003-09-18T23:59:59.000Z

307

Year 5 Post-Remediation Biomonitoring of Pesticides and other Contaminants in Marine Waters near the United Heckathorn Superfund Site, Richmond, California  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Marine sediment remediation at the United Heckathorn Superfund Site in Richmond, California, was completed in April 1997. The Record of Decision included a requirement for five years of post-remediation monitoring be conducted in the waterways near the site. The present monitoring year, 2001? 2002, is the fifth and possibly final year of post-remediation monitoring. In March 2002, water and mussel tissues were collected from the four stations in and near Lauritzen Channel that have been routinely monitored since 1997-98. A fifth station in Parr Canal was sampled in Year 5 to document post-remediation water and tissue concentrations there. Dieldrin and dichlorodiphenyl trichloroethane (DDT) were analyzed in water samples and in tissue samples from resident (i.e., naturally occurring) mussels. As in Years 3 and 4, mussels were not transplanted to the study area in Year 5. Year 5 concentrations of dieldrin and total DDT in water and total DDT in tissue were compared with those from Years 1 through 4 of post-remediation monitoring, and with preremediation data from the California State Mussel Watch Program and the Ecological Risk Assessment for the United Heckathorn Superfund Site. Year 5 water samples and mussel tissues were also analyzed for polychlorinated biphenyls (PCB), which were detected in sediment samples during Year 2 monitoring and were added to the water and mussel tissue analyses in 1999. Contaminants of concern in Year 5 water samples were analyzed in both bulk (total) phase and dissolved phase, as were total suspended solids, to evaluate the contribution of particulates to the total contaminant concentration.

Kohn, Nancy P.; Kropp, Roy K.

2002-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

308

Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program facilities newsletter, November 2002.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Fall 2002 Intensive Operation Periods: Single Column Model and Unmanned Aerospace Vehicle--In an Intensive Operation Period (IOP) on November 3-23, 2002, researchers at the SGP CART site are collecting a detailed data set for use in improving the Single Column Model (SCM), a scaled-down climate model. The SCM represents one vertical column of air above Earth's surface and requires less computation time than a full-scale global climate model. Researchers first use the SCM to efficiently improve submodels of clouds, solar radiation transfer, and atmosphere-surface interactions, then implement the results in large-scale global models. With measured values for a starting point, the SCM predicts atmospheric variables during prescribed time periods. A computer calculates values for such quantities as the amount of solar radiation reaching the surface and predicts how clouds will evolve and interact with incoming light from the sun. Researchers compare the SCM's predictions with actual measurements made during the IOP, then adjust the submodels to make predictions more reliable. A second IOP conducted concurrently with the SCM IOP involves high-altitude, long-duration aircraft flights. The original plan was to use an unmanned aerospace vehicle (UAV), but the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) aircraft Proteus will be substituted because all UAVs have been deployed elsewhere. The UAV is a small, instrument-equipped, remote-control plane that is operated from the ground by a computer. The Proteus is a manned aircraft, originally designed to carry telecommunications relay equipment, that can be reconfigured for uses such as reconnaissance and surveillance, commercial imaging, launching of small space satellites, and atmospheric research. The plane is designed for two on-board pilots in a pressurized cabin, flying to altitudes up to 65,000 feet for as long as 18 hours. The Proteus has a variable wingspan of 77-92 feet and is 56 feet long. The plane can carry up to 7,260 pounds of equipment, making it a versatile research tool. The Proteus is making measurements at the very top of the cirrus cloud layer to characterize structures of these clouds. These new measurements will provide more accurate, more abundant data for use in improving the representation of clouds in the SCM. 2002-2003 Winter Weather Forecast--Top climate forecasters at the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's (NOAA's) Climate Prediction Center say that an El Nino condition in the tropical Pacific Ocean will influence our winter weather this year. Although this El Nino is not as strong as the event of the 1997-1998 winter season, the United States will nevertheless experience some atypical weather. Strong impacts could be felt in several areas. Nationally, forecasters are predicting warmer-than-average temperatures over the northern tier of states and wetter-than-average conditions in the southern tier of states during the 2002-2003 winter season. Kansas residents should expect warmer and wetter conditions, while Oklahoma will be wetter than average.

Holdridge, D. J.

2002-12-03T23:59:59.000Z

309

Characterization of Fine Particulate Matter (PM) and Secondary PM Precursor Gases in the Mexico City Metropolitan Area  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This project was one of three collaborating grants funded by DOE/ASP to characterize the fine particulate matter (PM) and secondary PM precursors in the Mexico City Metropolitan Area (MCMA) during the MILAGRO Campaign. The overall effort of MCMA-2006, one of the four components, focused on i) examination of the primary emissions of fine particles and precursor gases leading to photochemical production of atmospheric oxidants and secondary aerosol particles; ii) measurement and analysis of secondary oxidants and secondary fine PM production, with particular emphasis on secondary organic aerosol (SOA), and iii) evaluation of the photochemical and meteorological processes characteristic of the Mexico City Basin. The collaborative teams pursued the goals through three main tasks: i) analyses of fine PM and secondary PM precursor gaseous species data taken during the MCMA-2002/2003 campaigns and preparation of publications; ii) planning of the MILAGRO Campaign and deployment of the instrument around the MCMA; and iii) analysis of MCMA-2006 data and publication preparation. The measurement phase of the MILAGRO Campaign was successfully completed in March 2006 with excellent participation from the international scientific community and outstanding cooperation from the Mexican government agencies and institutions. The project reported here was led by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology/Molina Center for Energy and the Environment (MIT/MCE2) team and coordinated with DOE/ASP-funded collaborators at Aerodyne Research Inc., University of Colorado at Boulder and Montana State University. Currently 24 papers documenting the findings from this project have been published. The results from the project have improved significantly our understanding of the meteorological and photochemical processes contributing to the formation of ozone, secondary aerosols and other pollutants. Key findings from the MCMA-2003 include a vastly improved speciated emissions inventory from on-road vehicles: the MCMA motor vehicles produce abundant amounts of primary PM, elemental carbon, particle-bound polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, carbon monoxide and a wide range of air toxics; the feasibility of using eddy covariance techniques to measure fluxes of volatile organic compounds in an urban core and a valuable tool for validating local emissions inventory; a much better understanding of the sources and atmospheric loadings of volatile organic compounds; the first spectroscopic detection of glyoxal in the atmosphere; a unique analysis of the high fraction of ambient formaldehyde from primary emission sources; characterization of ozone formation and its sensitivity to VOCs and NOx; a much more extensive knowledge of the composition, size distribution and atmospheric mass loadings of both primary and secondary fine PM, including the fact that the rate of MCMA SOA production greatly exceeded that predicted by current atmospheric models; evaluations of significant errors that can arise from standard air quality monitors for O3 and NO2; and the implementation of an innovative Markov Chain Monte Carlo method for inorganic aerosol modeling as a powerful tool to analyze aerosol data and predict gas phase concentrations where these are unavailable. During the MILAGRO Campaign the collaborative team utilized a combination of central fixed sites and a mobile laboratory deployed throughout the MCMA to representative urban and boundary sites to measure trace gases and fine particles. Analysis of the extensive 2006 data sets has confirmed the key findings from MCMA-2002/2003; additionally MCMA-2006 provided more detailed gas and aerosol chemistry and wider regional scale coverage. Key results include an updated 2006 emissions inventory; extension of the flux system to measure fluxes of fine particles; better understanding of the sources and apportionment of aerosols, including contribution from biomass burning and industrial sources; a comprehensive evaluation of metal containing particles in a complex urban environment; identification of a close correlation between

Luisa T. Molina, Rainer Volkamer, Benjamin de Foy, Wenfang Lei, Miguel Zavala, Erik Velasco; Mario J. Molina

2008-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

310

Hydraulic Characteristics of the Lower Snake River During Periods of Juvenile Fall Chinook Migration  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report documents a four-year study to assess hydraulic conditions in the lower Snake River. The work was conducted for the Bonneville Power Administration, U.S. Department of Energy, by the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. Cold water released from the Dworshak Reservoir hypolimnion during mid- to late-summer months cools the Clearwater River far below equilibrium temperature. The volume of released cold water augments the Clearwater River, and the combined total discharge is on the order of the Snake River discharge when the two rivers meet at their confluence near the upstream edge of Lower Granite Reservoir. With typical temperature differences between the Clearwater and Snake rivers of 10C or more during July and August, the density difference between the two rivers during summer flow augmentation periods is sufficient to stratify Lower Granite Reservoir as well as the other three reservoirs downstream. Because cooling of the river is desirable for migrating juvenile fall Chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) during this same time period, the amount of mixing and cold water entrained into Lower Granite Reservoirs epilimnion at the Clearwater/Snake River confluence is of key biological importance to juvenile fall Chinook salmon. Data collected during this project indicates the three reservoirs downstream of Lower Granite also stratify as direct result of flow augmentation from Dworshak Reservoir. These four lower Snake reservoirs are also heavily influenced by wind forcing at the waters surface, and during periods of low river discharge, often behave like a two-layer lake. During these periods of stratification, lower river discharge, and wind forcing, the water in the upper layer of the reservoir is held in place or moves slightly upstream. This upper layer is also exposed to surface heating and may warm up to temperatures close to equilibrium temperature. The depth of this upper warm layer and its direction of travel may also be of key biological importance to juvenile fall Chinook salmon. This report describes field data collection, modeling, and analysis of hydrodynamic and temperature conditions in the Lower Granite Reservoir during the summer flow augmentation periods of 2002, 2003, and 2004 plus a brief one-week period in 2005 of Lower Monumental, Little Goose, and Lower Granite Reservoirs. Circulation patterns in all four lower Snake River reservoirs were numerically simulated for periods of 2002, 2003, 2004, and 2005 using CE-QUAL-W2. Simulation results show that these models are sufficiently capable of matching diurnal and long term temperature and velocity changes in the reservoirs. In addition, the confluence zone of the Clearwater and Snake rivers was modeled using the 3-D model Flow3-D. This model was used to better understand mixing processing and entrainment. Once calibrated and validated, the reservoir models were used to investigate downstream impacts of alternative reservoir operation schemes, such as increasing or decreasing the ratio of Clearwater to Snake discharge. Simulation results were also linked with the particle tracking model FINS to better understand alterations of integrated metrics due to alternative operation schemes. These findings indicate that significant alterations in water temperature throughout the lower Snake River are possible by altering hypolimnetic discharges from Dworshak Reservoir and may have a significant impact on the behavior of migrating juvenile fall Chinook salmon during periods of flow augmentation.

Cook, Chris B.; Dibrani, Berhon; Richmond, Marshall C.; Bleich, Matthew D.; Titzler, P. Scott; Fu, Tao

2006-01-30T23:59:59.000Z

311

Hydraulic Characteristics of the Lower Snake River during Periods of Juvenile Fall Chinook Salmon Migration, 2002-2006 Final Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report documents a four-year study to assess hydraulic conditions in the lower Snake River. The work was conducted for the Bonneville Power Administration, U.S. Department of Energy, by the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. Cold water released from the Dworshak Reservoir hypolimnion during mid- to late-summer months cools the Clearwater River far below equilibrium temperature. The volume of released cold water augments the Clearwater River, and the combined total discharge is on the order of the Snake River discharge when the two rivers meet at their confluence near the upstream edge of Lower Granite Reservoir. With typical temperature differences between the Clearwater and Snake rivers of 10 C or more during July and August, the density difference between the two rivers during summer flow augmentation periods is sufficient to stratify Lower Granite Reservoir as well as the other three reservoirs downstream. Because cooling of the river is desirable for migrating juvenile fall Chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) during this same time period, the amount of mixing and cold water entrained into Lower Granite Reservoir's epilimnion at the Clearwater/Snake River confluence is of key biological importance. Data collected during this project indicates the three reservoirs downstream of Lower Granite also stratify as direct result of flow augmentation from Dworshak Reservoir. These four reservoirs are also heavily influenced by wind forcing at the water's surface and during periods of low river discharge often behave like a two-layer lake. During these periods of stratification, lower river discharge, and wind forcing, the water in the upper layer of the reservoir is held in place or moves slightly upstream. This upper layer is also exposed to surface heating and may warm up to temperatures close to equilibrium temperature. The thickness (depth) of this upper warm layer and its direction of travel may be of key biological importance to juvenile fall Chinook salmon. This report describes field data collection, modeling, and analysis of hydrodynamic and temperature conditions in the Lower Granite Reservoir during the summer flow augmentation periods of 2002, 2003, and 2004. Although temperature, and hence density, differences during flow augmentation periods between the Clearwater and Snake rivers were approximately equal (7-12 C) for all four years, the discharge ratio varied which resulted in significant differences in entrainment of cooler Clearwater River water into the Lower Granite Reservoir epilimnion. However, as a direct result of system management, Lower Granite Dam tailrace temperatures were maintained near 20 C during all years. Primary differences in the other three lower Snake River reservoirs were therefore a result of meteorological conditions and dam operations, which produced variations in wind setup and surface heating. Circulation patterns in all four lower Snake River reservoirs were numerically simulated for periods of 2002, 2003, 2004, and 2005 using CE-QUAL-W2. Simulation results show that these models are capable of matching diurnal and long-term temperature and velocity changes in the reservoirs. In addition, the confluence zone of the Clearwater and Snake rivers was modeled using the three-dimensional non-hydrostatic model Flow3D. Once calibrated and validated, the reservoir models were used to investigate downstream impacts of alternative reservoir operation schemes, such as increasing or decreasing the ratio of Clearwater to Snake river discharge. Simulation results were linked with the particle tracking model FINS to develop reservoir-integrated metrics that varied due to these alternative operation schemes. Findings indicate that significant alterations in water temperature throughout the lower Snake River are possible by altering hypolimnetic discharges from Dworshak Reservoir, which may also impact the behavior of migrating juvenile fall Chinook salmon during periods of flow augmentation.

Cook, C.; Dibrani, B.; Richmond, M.; Bleich, M.; Titzler, P..; Fu, T. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

312

Characterization of Fine Particulate Matter (PM) and Secondary PM Precursor Gases in Mexico City  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This project was one of three collaborating grants designed to understand the atmospheric chemistry and aerosol particle microphysics impacting air quality in the Mexico City Metropolitan Area (MCMA) and its urban plume. The overall effort, titled MCMA- 2006, focused on: 1) the primary emissions of fine particles and precursor gases leading to photochemical production of atmospheric oxidants and secondary aerosol particles and 2) the measurement and analysis of secondary oxidants and secondary fine particular matter (PM) production, with particular emphasis on secondary organic aerosol (SOA). MCAM-2006 pursued it goals through three main activities: 1) performance and publication of detailed analyses of extensive MCMA trace gas and fine PM measurements made by the collaborating groups and others during earlier MCMA field campaigns in 2002 and 2003; 2) deployment and utilization of extensive real-time trace gas and fine PM instrumentation at urban and downwind MCMA sites in support of the MAX-Mex/MILAGRO field measurements in March, 2006; and, 3) analyses of the 2006 MCMA data sets leading to further publications that are based on new data as well as insights from analysis and publication of the 2002/2003 field data. Thirteen archival publications were coauthored with other MCMA-2003 participants. Documented findings included a significantly improved speciated emissions inventory from on-road vehicles, a greatly enhanced understanding of the sources and atmospheric loadings of volatile organic compounds, a unique analysis of the high fraction of ambient formaldehyde from primary emission sources, a much more extensive knowledge of the composition, size distributions and atmospheric mass loadings of both primary and secondary fine PM, including the fact that the rate of MCMA SOA production greatly exceeded that predicted by current atmospheric models, and evaluations of significant errors that can arise from standard air quality monitors for ozone and nitrogen dioxide. Deployment of the Aerodyne mobile laboratory, equipped with instruments from five collaborating laboratories, at the T0 urban supersite, four downwind sites and the Tula industrial area yielded unique trace gas and fine PM data sets during the March 2006 MAXMex/MILAGRO campaign. In addition, on-road measurements as the mobile laboratory moved between sites provided extensive data on 2006 MCMA fleet averaged vehicle emissions. Analyses of 2006 data sets have yielded the identification of a close correlation between the rate of production of SOA and Odd Oxygen (O3 + NO2) and primary organic PM with CO in the MCMA urban plume, a more sophisticated understanding of the interplay between nitrogen oxide speciation and ozone production, the identification of significant vehicular emission sources of HCN and CH3CN (usually associated with biomass burning), characterization of the aging of primary carbonaceous PM, and updated 2006 MCMA fleet on-road trace gas and fine PM emissions. Results from analyses of 2002/2003 and 2006 emissions and ambient measurements have conveyed to Mexican air quality managers who are using these data to devise and assess air quality management strategies. All data sets and published analyses are available to DOE/ASP researchers evaluating the impact of urban emissions on regional climate.

Dr. Charles E. Kolb

2008-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

313

Effects of Hyporheic Exchange Flows on Egg Pocket Water Temperature in Snake River Fall Chinook Salmon Spawning Areas  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The development of the Snake River hydroelectric system has affected fall chinook salmon smolts by shifting their migration timing to a period when downstream reservoir conditions are unfavorable for survival. Subsequent to the Snake River chinook salmon fall-run Evolutionary Significant Unit being listed as Threatened under the Endangered Species Act, recovery planning has included changes in hydrosystem operations to improve water temperature and flow conditions during the juvenile chinook salmon summer migration period. In light of the limited water supplies from the Dworshak reservoir for summer flow augmentation, and the associated uncertainties regarding benefits to migrating fall chinook salmon smolts, additional approaches for improved smolt survival need to be evaluated. This report describes research conducted by PNNL that evaluated relationships among river discharge, hyporheic zone characteristics, and egg pocket water temperature in Snake River fall chinook salmon spawning areas. The potential for improved survival would be gained by increasing the rate at which early life history events proceed (i.e., incubation and emergence), thereby allowing smolts to migrate through downstream reservoirs during early- to mid-summer when river conditions are more favorable for survival. PNNL implemented this research project throughout 160 km of the Hells Canyon Reach (HCR) of the Snake River. The hydrologic regime during the 2002?2003 sampling period exhibited one of the lowest, most stable daily discharge patterns of any of the previous 12 water years. The vertical hydraulic gradients (VHG) between the river and the riverbed suggested the potential for predominantly small magnitude vertical exchange. The VHG also showed little relationship to changes in river discharge at most sites. Despite the relatively small vertical hydraulic gradients at most sites, the results from the numerical modeling of riverbed pore water velocity and hyporheic zone temperatures suggested that there was significant vertical hydrologic exchange during all time periods. The combined results of temperature monitoring and numerical modeling indicate that only two sites were significantly affected by short-term (hourly to daily) large magnitude changes in discharge. Although the two sites exhibited acute flux reversals between river water and hyporheic water resulting from short-term large magnitude changes in discharge, these flux reversals had minimal effect on emergence timing estimates. Indeed, the emergence timing estimates at all sites was largely unaffected by the changes in river stage resulting from hydropower operations at Hells Canyon Dam. Our results indicate that the range of emergence timing estimates due to differences among the eggs from different females can be as large as or larger than the emergence timing estimates due to site differences (i.e., bed temperatures within and among sites). We conclude that during the 2002-2003 fall chinook salmon incubation period, hydropower operations of Hells Canyon Dam had an insignificant effect on fry emergence timing at the study sites. It appears that short-term (i.e., hourly to daily) manipulations of discharge from the Hells Canyon Complex during the incubation period would not substantially alter egg pocket incubation temperatures, and thus would not affect fry emergence timing at the study sites. However, the use of hydropower operational manipulations at the Hells Canyon Complex to accelerate egg incubation and fry emergence should not be ruled out on the basis of only one water year's worth of study. Further investigation of the incubation environment of Snake River fall chinook salmon is warranted based on the complexity of hyporheic zone characteristics and the variability of surface/subsurface interactions among dry, normal, and wet water years.

Hanrahan, Timothy P.; Geist, David R.; Arntzen, Evan V.; Abernethy, Cary S.

2004-09-24T23:59:59.000Z

314

In Situ Community Control of the Stability of Bioreduced Uranium  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The overall objective of this research is to understand the mechanisms for maintenance of bio-reduced uranium in an aerobic to microaerophylic aquifer under actual field conditions after electron donor addition for biostimulation has ended. Primary Objectives: (1) Determine the relative importance of microbial communities and/or chemical and physical environments mediating uranium reduction/oxidation after cessation of donor addition in an aerobic aquifer. (2) Determine, after cessation of donor addition, the linkages between microbial functions and abiotic processes mediating. Initial Hypotheses: (1) The typical bio-reduced subsurface environments that maintain U(VI) reduction rates after biostimulation contain limited amounts of oxidized iron on mineral surfaces. Therefore, the non sulfate-reducing dissimilatory iron reducing bacteria will move to more conducive areas or be out-competed by more versatile microbes. (2) Microbes capable of sulfate reduction play an important role in the post-treatment maintenance of bio-reduced uranium because these bacteria either directly reduce U(VI) or generate H2S, and/or FeS0.9 which act as oxygen sinks maintaining U(IV) in a reduced state. (3) The presence of bioprecipitated amorphous FeS0.9 in sediments will maintain low U(IV) reoxidation rates under conditions of low biomass, but FeS0.9 by itself is not sufficient to remove U(VI) from groundwater by abiotic reduction. FIELD SCALE EXPERIMENTS: Field-scale electron donor amendment experiments were conducted in 2002, 2003, and 2004 at the Old Rifle Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) site in Rifle, Colorado.

White, David C.

2006-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

315

DEVELOPMENT OF A LOW COST INFERENTIAL NATURAL GAS ENERGY FLOW RATE PROTOTYPE RETROFIT MODULE  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In 1998, Southwest Research Institute began a multi-year project to develop a working prototype instrument module for natural gas energy measurement. The module will be used to retrofit a natural gas custody transfer flow meter for energy measurement, at a cost an order of magnitude lower than a gas chromatograph. Development and evaluation of the prototype energy meter in 2002-2003 included: (1) refinement of the algorithm used to infer properties of the natural gas stream, such as heating value; (2) evaluation of potential sensing technologies for nitrogen content, improvements in carbon dioxide measurements, and improvements in ultrasonic measurement technology and signal processing for improved speed of sound measurements; (3) design, fabrication and testing of a new prototype energy meter module incorporating these algorithm and sensor refinements; and (4) laboratory and field performance tests of the original and modified energy meter modules. Field tests of the original energy meter module have provided results in close agreement with an onsite gas chromatograph. The original algorithm has also been tested at a field site as a stand-alone application using measurements from in situ instruments, and has demonstrated its usefulness as a diagnostic tool. The algorithm has been revised to use measurement technologies existing in the module to measure the gas stream at multiple states and infer nitrogen content. The instrumentation module has also been modified to incorporate recent improvements in CO{sub 2} and sound speed sensing technology. Laboratory testing of the upgraded module has identified additional testing needed to attain the target accuracy in sound speed measurements and heating value.

E. Kelner; D. George; T. Morrow; T. Owen; M. Nored; R. Burkey; A. Minachi

2005-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

316

High-resolution emissions of CO{sub 2} from power generation in the USA - article no. G04008  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Electricity generation accounts for close to 40% of the U.S. CO{sub 2} emissions from fossil fuel burning, making it the economic sector with the largest source of CO{sub 2}. Since the late 1990s, the Environmental Protection Agency Clean Air Markets Division (EPA CAMD) has kept a repository of hourly CO{sub 2} emission data for most power plants in the conterminous United States. In this study, the CAMD CO{sub 2} data are used to derive a high spatiotemporal resolution CO{sub 2} emissions inventory for the electricity generation sector (inventory available on request). Data from 1998 to 2006 have been processed. This unique inventory can be used to improve the understanding of the carbon cycle at fine temporal and spatial scales. The CAMD data set provides the first quantitative estimates of the diurnal and seasonal cycles of the emissions as well as the year to year variability. Emissions peak in the summertime owing to the widespread use of air conditioning. Summertime emissions are in fact highly correlated with the daily average temperature. In conjunction with the EPA Emissions and Generation Resource Integrated Database (eGRID), we have derived high-resolution maps of CO{sub 2} emissions by fossil fuel burned (coal, gas, oil) for the year 2004. The CAMD data set also reflects regional anomalies in power generation such as the August 2003 blackout in the northeastern United States and the 2000-2001 increase in production in California. We recommend that all sectors of the economy report similar high-resolution CO{sub 2} emissions because of their great usefulness both for carbon cycle science and for greenhouse gases emissions mitigation and regulation.

Petron, G.; Tans, P.; Frost, G.; Chao, D.L.; Trainer, M. [NOAA, Boulder, CO (United States). Earth Systems Research Laboratory

2008-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

317

Umatilla Basin Natural Production Monitoring and Evaluation; 1998-2002 Summary Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Umatilla Basin Natural Production Monitoring and Evaluation Project (WWNPME) was funded by Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) as directed by section 4(h) of the Pacific Northwest Electric Power Planning and Conservation Act of 1980 (P. L. 96-501). This project is in accordance with and pursuant to measures 4.2A, 4.3C.1, 7.1A.2, 7.1C.3, 7.1C.4 and 7.1D.2 of the Northwest Power Planning Council's (NPPC) Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program (NPPC 1994). Work was conducted by the Fisheries Program of the Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation (CTUIR) under the Umatilla Basin Natural Production Monitoring and Evaluation Project (UBNPME). Chapter One provides an overview of the entire report and shows how the objectives of each statement of work from 1999, 2000, 2001, and 2002 contract years are organized and reported. This chapter also provides background information relevant to the aquatic resources of the Umatilla River Basin. (Figure 1-1, Tables 1-1 and 1-2). Data and reports from this and previous efforts are available on the CTUIR website http://www.umatilla.nsn.us. This project was one of several subprojects of the Umatilla River Basin Fisheries Restoration Master Plan (CTUIR 1984, ODFW 1986) orchestrated to rehabilitate salmon and steelhead runs in the Umatilla River Basin. Subprojects in additions to this project include: Watershed Enhancement and Rehabilitation; Hatchery Construction and Operation; Hatchery Monitoring and Evaluation; Satellite Facility Construction and Operations for Juvenile Acclimation and Adult Holding and Spawning; Fish Passage Construction and Operation; Juvenile and Adult Passage Facility Evaluations; Evaluation of Juvenile Salmonid Outmigration and Survival in the Lower Umatilla River Basin, and Flow Augmentation to Increase Stream Flows below Irrigation Diversions.

Contor, Craig R. (Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation, Department of Natural Resources, Pendleton, OR)

2004-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

318

Quantifying the value that energy efficiency and renewable energy provide as a hedge against volatile natural gas prices  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Advocates of energy efficiency and renewable energy have long argued that such technologies can mitigate fuel price risk within a resource portfolio. Such arguments--made with renewed vigor in the wake of unprecedented natural gas price volatility during the winter of 2000/2001--have mostly been qualitative in nature, however, with few attempts to actually quantify the price stability benefit that these sources provide. In evaluating this benefit, it is important to recognize that alternative price hedging instruments are available--in particular, gas-based financial derivatives (futures and swaps) and physical, fixed-price gas contracts. Whether energy efficiency and renewable energy can provide price stability at lower cost than these alternative means is therefore a key question for resource acquisition planners. In this paper we evaluate the cost of hedging gas price risk through financial hedging instruments. To do this, we compare the price of a 10-year natural gas swap (i.e., what it costs to lock in prices over the next 10 years) to a 10-year natural gas price forecast (i.e., what the market is expecting spot natural gas prices to be over the next 10 years). We find that over the past two years natural gas users have had to pay a premium as high as $0.76/mmBtu (0.53/242/kWh at an aggressive 7,000 Btu/kWh heat rate) over expected spot prices to lock in natural gas prices for the next 10 years. This incremental cost to hedge gas price risk exposure is potentially large enough - particularly if incorporated by policymakers and regulators into decision-making practices - to tip the scales away from new investments in variable-price, natural gas-fired generation and in favor of fixed-price investments in energy efficiency and renewable energy.

Bolinger, Mark; Wiser, Ryan; Bachrach, Devra; Golove, William

2002-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

319

The role of coarse woody debris in southeastern pine forests; preliminary results from a large-scale experiment.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

McCay, Timothy S., James L. Hanula, Susan C. Loeb, Steven M. Lohr, James W. McMinn, and Bret D. Wright-Miley. 2002. The role of coarse woody debris in southeastern pine forests; preliminary results from a large-scale experiment. 135-144. In: Proceedings of the symposium on the ecology and management of dead wood in western forests. 1999 November 2-4; Reno, NV. Gen. Tech. Rep. PSW-GTR-181. Albany, CA: Pacific Southwest Research Station, Forest Service, U.S. Department of Agriculture 949 p. ABSTRACT: We initiated a long-term experiment involving manipulation of coarse woody debris (CWD) at the Savannah River National Environmental Research Park in the upper Coastal Plain of South Carolina. Each of four 9.3-ha plots in each of four blocks was subject to one of the following treatments: removal of all snags and fallen logs, removal of fallen logs only, felling and girdling to simulate a catastrophic pulse of CWD, and control. Removal treatments were applied in 1996, and the felling or snag-creation treatment will be applied in 2000-2001. Monitoring of invertebrate, herptile, avian, and mammalian assemblages and CWD dynamics began immediately after CWD removal and continues through the present. Removal treatments resulted in a fivefold to tenfold reduction in CWD abundance. To date, significant differences among treatments have only been detected for a few animal taxa. However, preliminary results underscore the benefits of large-scale experiments. This experiment allowed unambiguous tests of hypotheses regarding the effect of CWD abundance on fauna. Coupled with studies of habitat use and trophic interactions, the experimental approach may result in stronger inferences regarding the function of CWD than results obtained through natural history observation or uncontrolled correlative studies.

McCay Timothy, S.; Hanula, James, L.; Loeb, Susan, C.; Lohr, Steven, M.; McMinn, James, W.; Wright-Miley. Bret, D.

2002-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

320

Snowmass 2002: The Fusion Energy Sciences Summer Study  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Fusion Summer Study 2002 will be a forum for the critical technical assessment of major next-steps in the fusion energy sciences program, and will provide crucial community input to the long-range planning activities undertaken by the DOE [Department of Energy] and the FESAC [Fusion Energy Sciences Advisory Committee]. It will be an ideal place for a broad community of scientists to examine goals and proposed initiatives in burning plasma science in magnetic fusion energy and integrated research experiments in inertial fusion energy. This meeting is open to every member of the fusion energy science community and significant international participation is encouraged. The objectives of the Fusion Summer Study are three: (1) Review scientific issues in burning plasmas to establish the basis for the following two objectives and to address the relations of burning plasma in tokamaks to innovative magnetic fusion energy (MFE) confinement concepts and of ignition in inertial fusion energy (IFE) to integrated research facilities. (2) Provide a forum for critical discussion and review of proposed MFE burning plasma experiments (e.g., IGNITOR, FIRE, and ITER) and assess the scientific and technological research opportunities and prospective benefits of these approaches to the study of burning plasmas. (3) Provide a forum for the IFE community to present plans for prospective integrated research facilities, assess present status of the technical base for each, and establish a timetable and technical progress necessary to proceed for each. Based on significant preparatory work by the fusion community prior to the July Snowmass meeting, the Snowmass working groups will prepare a draft report that documents the scientific and technological benefits of studies of burning plasmas. The report will also include criteria by which the benefits of each approach to fusion science, fusion engineering/technology, and the fusion development path can be assessed. Finally, the report will present a uniform technical assessment of the benefits of the three approaches. The draft report will be presented and extensively discussed during the July meeting, leading to a final report. This report will provide critical fusion community input to the decision process of FESAC and DOE in 2002-2003, and to the review of burning plasma science by the National Academy of Sciences called for by FESAC and Energy Legislation which was passed by the House of Representatives [H.R. 4]. Members of the fusion community are encouraged to participate in the Snowmass working groups.

N. Sauthoff; G. Navratil; R. Bangerter

2002-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

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321

RUBBER BEARINGS FOR DOWN-HOLE PUMPS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Synopsis of project activity: 1998--Awarded cost share grant from DOE. 1st Qtr 1999--Developed fail safe lubricating system. 2nd Qtr 1999--Performed first large scale test with nitrile based bearings. It failed due to material swelling. Failure was blamed on improper tolerance. 3rd Qtr 1999--Material tests were performed with autoclaves and exposure tests to Casa Diablo fluids. Testing of Viton materials began. Alternate bearing designs were developed to limit risk of improper tolerances. 4th Qtr 1999--Site testing indicated a chemical attack on the bearing material caused the test failure and not improper bearing tolerance. 1st Qtr 2000--The assistance of Brookhaven National Laboratory was obtained in evaluating the chemical attack. The National Laboratory also began more elaborate laboratory testing on bearing materials. 2nd Qtr 2000--Testing indicated Viton was an inappropriate material due to degradation in Casa Diablo fluid. Testing of EPDM began. 3rd Qtr 2001--EPDM bearings were installed for another large scale test. Bearings failed again due to swelling. Further testing indicated that larger then expected oil concentrations existed in lubricating water geothermal fluid causing bearing failure. 2002-2003--Searched for and tested several materials that would survive in hot salt and oil solutions. Kalrez{reg_sign}, Viton{reg_sign}ETP 500 and Viton{reg_sign}GF were identified as possible candidates. 2003-2005--Kalrez{reg_sign}has shown superior resistance to downhole conditions at Casa Diablo from among the various materials tested. Viton ETP-500 indicated a life expectancy of 13 years and because it is significantly less expensive then Kalrez{reg_sign}, it was selected as the bearing material for future testing. Unfortunately during the laboratory testing period Dupont Chemical chose to stop manufacturing this specific formulation and replaced it with Viton ETP 600S. The material is available with six different fillers; three based on zinc oxide and three based on silicon oxide. Samples of all six materials have been obtained and are being tested at the National Laboratory in Brookhaven, New York. This new material's properties as a bearing material and its ability to adhere to a bearings shell must be reviewed, but cost information deemed the material to be too expensive to be economical.

Bob Sullivan Mammoth Pacific, L.P.

2005-09-07T23:59:59.000Z

322

Off-Highway Gasoline Consuption Estimation Models Used in the Federal Highway Administration Attribution Process: 2008 Updates  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report is designed to document the analysis process and estimation models currently used by the Federal Highway Administration (FHWA) to estimate the off-highway gasoline consumption and public sector fuel consumption. An overview of the entire FHWA attribution process is provided along with specifics related to the latest update (2008) on the Off-Highway Gasoline Use Model and the Public Use of Gasoline Model. The Off-Highway Gasoline Use Model is made up of five individual modules, one for each of the off-highway categories: agricultural, industrial and commercial, construction, aviation, and marine. This 2008 update of the off-highway models was the second major update (the first model update was conducted during 2002-2003) after they were originally developed in mid-1990. The agricultural model methodology, specifically, underwent a significant revision because of changes in data availability since 2003. Some revision to the model was necessary due to removal of certain data elements used in the original estimation method. The revised agricultural model also made use of some newly available information, published by the data source agency in recent years. The other model methodologies were not drastically changed, though many data elements were updated to improve the accuracy of these models. Note that components in the Public Use of Gasoline Model were not updated in 2008. A major challenge in updating estimation methods applied by the public-use model is that they would have to rely on significant new data collection efforts. In addition, due to resource limitation, several components of the models (both off-highway and public-us models) that utilized regression modeling approaches were not recalibrated under the 2008 study. An investigation of the Environmental Protection Agency's NONROAD2005 model was also carried out under the 2008 model update. Results generated from the NONROAD2005 model were analyzed, examined, and compared, to the extent that is possible on the overall totals, to the current FHWA estimates. Because NONROAD2005 model was designed for emission estimation purposes (i.e., not for measuring fuel consumption), it covers different equipment populations from those the FHWA models were based on. Thus, a direct comparison generally was not possible in most sectors. As a result, NONROAD2005 data were not used in the 2008 update of the FHWA off-highway models. The quality of fuel use estimates directly affect the data quality in many tables published in the Highway Statistics. Although updates have been made to the Off-Highway Gasoline Use Model and the Public Use Gasoline Model, some challenges remain due to aging model equations and discontinuation of data sources.

Hwang, Ho-Ling [ORNL; Davis, Stacy Cagle [ORNL

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

323

Development and evaluation of fully automated demand response in large facilities  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes the results of a research project to develop and evaluate the performance of new Automated Demand Response (Auto-DR) hardware and software technology in large facilities. Demand Response (DR) is a set of activities to reduce or shift electricity use to improve electric grid reliability, manage electricity costs, and ensure that customers receive signals that encourage load reduction during times when the electric grid is near its capacity. The two main drivers for widespread demand responsiveness are the prevention of future electricity crises and the reduction of electricity prices. Additional goals for price responsiveness include equity through cost of service pricing, and customer control of electricity usage and bills. The technology developed and evaluated in this report could be used to support numerous forms of DR programs and tariffs. For the purpose of this report, we have defined three levels of Demand Response automation. Manual Demand Response involves manually turning off lights or equipment; this can be a labor-intensive approach. Semi-Automated Response involves the use of building energy management control systems for load shedding, where a preprogrammed load shedding strategy is initiated by facilities staff. Fully-Automated Demand Response is initiated at a building or facility through receipt of an external communications signal--facility staff set up a pre-programmed load shedding strategy which is automatically initiated by the system without the need for human intervention. We have defined this approach to be Auto-DR. An important concept in Auto-DR is that a facility manager is able to ''opt out'' or ''override'' an individual DR event if it occurs at a time when the reduction in end-use services is not desirable. This project sought to improve the feasibility and nature of Auto-DR strategies in large facilities. The research focused on technology development, testing, characterization, and evaluation relating to Auto-DR. This evaluation also included the related decisionmaking perspectives of the facility owners and managers. Another goal of this project was to develop and test a real-time signal for automated demand response that provided a common communication infrastructure for diverse facilities. The six facilities recruited for this project were selected from the facilities that received CEC funds for new DR technology during California's 2000-2001 electricity crises (AB970 and SB-5X).

Piette, Mary Ann; Sezgen, Osman; Watson, David S.; Motegi, Naoya; Shockman, Christine; ten Hope, Laurie

2004-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

324

NORTH HILL CREEK 3-D SEISMIC EXPLORATION PROJECT  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Wind River Resources Corporation (WRRC) received a DOE grant in support of its proposal to acquire, process and interpret fifteen square miles of high-quality 3-D seismic data on non-allotted trust lands of the Uintah and Ouray (Ute) Indian Reservation, northeastern Utah, in 2000. Subsequent to receiving notice that its proposal would be funded, WRRC was able to add ten square miles of adjacent state and federal mineral acreage underlying tribal surface lands by arrangement with the operator of the Flat Rock Field. The twenty-five square mile 3-D seismic survey was conducted during the fall of 2000. The data were processed through the winter of 2000-2001, and initial interpretation took place during the spring of 2001. The initial interpretation identified multiple attractive drilling prospects, two of which were staked and permitted during the summer of 2001. The two initial wells were drilled in September and October of 2001. A deeper test was drilled in June of 2002. Subsequently a ten-well deep drilling evaluation program was conducted from October of 2002 through March 2004. The present report discusses the background of the project; design and execution of the 3-D seismic survey; processing and interpretation of the data; and drilling, completion and production results of a sample of the wells drilled on the basis of the interpreted survey. Fifteen wells have been drilled to test targets identified on the North Hill Creek 3-D Seismic Survey. None of these wildcat exploratory wells has been a dry hole, and several are among the best gas producers in Utah. The quality of the data produced by this first significant exploratory 3-D survey in the Uinta Basin has encouraged other operators to employ this technology. At least two additional 3-D seismic surveys have been completed in the vicinity of the North Hill Creek Survey, and five additional surveys are being planned for the 2004 field season. This project was successful in finding commercial oil, natural gas and natural gas liquids production on a remote part of the Uintah & Ouray Reservation. Much of the natural gas and natural gas liquids are being produced from the Wingate Formation, which to our knowledge has never produced commercially anywhere. Another large percentage of the natural gas is being produced from the Entrada Formation which has not previously produced in this part of the Uinta Basin. In all, at least nine geologic formations are contributing hydrocarbons to these wells. This survey has clearly established the fact that high-quality data can be obtained in this area, despite the known obstacles.

Marc T. Eckels; David H. Suek; Denise H. Harrison; Paul J. Harrison

2004-05-06T23:59:59.000Z

325

ON THE NATURE OF THE PROTOTYPE LUMINOUS BLUE VARIABLE AG CARINAE. II. WITNESSING A MASSIVE STAR EVOLVING CLOSE TO THE EDDINGTON AND BISTABILITY LIMITS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We show that the significantly different effective temperatures (T{sub eff}) achieved by the luminous blue variable AG Carinae during the consecutive visual minima of 1985-1990 (T{sub eff} {approx_equal} 22,800 K) and 2000-2001 (T{sub eff} {approx_equal} 17,000 K) place the star on different sides of the bistability limit, which occurs in line-driven stellar winds around T{sub eff} {approx} 21,000 K. Decisive evidence is provided by huge changes in the optical depth of the Lyman continuum in the inner wind as T{sub eff} changes during the S Dor cycle. These changes cause different Fe ionization structures in the inner wind. The bistability mechanism is also related to the different wind parameters during visual minima: the wind terminal velocity was 2-3 times higher and the mass-loss rate roughly two times smaller in 1985-1990 than in 2000-2003. We obtain a projected rotational velocity of 220 {+-} 50 km s{sup -1} during 1985-1990 which, combined with the high luminosity (L{sub *} = 1.5 x 10{sup 6} L{sub sun}), puts AG Car extremely close to the Eddington limit modified by rotation ({Omega}{Gamma} limit): for an inclination angle of 90{sup 0}, {Gamma}{sub {Omega}} {approx}> 1.0 for M{sub sun} {approx}< 60. Based on evolutionary models and mass budget, we obtain an initial mass of {approx}100 M{sub sun} and a current mass of {approx}60-70 M{sub sun} for AG Car. Therefore, AG Car is close to, if not at, the {Omega}{Gamma} limit during visual minimum. Assuming M = 70 M{sub sun}, we find that {Gamma}{sub {Omega}} decreases from 0.93 to 0.72 as AG Car expands toward visual maximum, suggesting that the star is not above the Eddington limit during maximum phases.

Groh, J. H. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Radioastronomie, Auf dem Huegel 69, D-53121 Bonn (Germany); Hillier, D. J. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Pittsburgh, 3941 O'Hara Street, Pittsburgh, PA 15260 (United States); Damineli, A., E-mail: jgroh@mpifr.de [Instituto de Astronomia, Geofisica e Ciencias Atmosfericas, Universidade de Sao Paulo, Rua do Matao 1226, Cidade Universitaria, 05508-900, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

2011-07-20T23:59:59.000Z

326

Kelt Reconditioning: A Research Project to Enhance Iteroparity in Columbia Basin Steelhead (Oncorhynchus mykiss), 2002 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Repeat spawning is a life history strategy that is expressed by some species from the family Salmonidae. Rates of repeat spawning for post-development Columbia River steelhead Oncorhynchus mykiss populations range from 1.6 to 17%. It is expected that currently observed iteroparity rates for wild steelhead in the Basin are severely depressed due to development and operation of the hydropower system and various additional anthropogenic factors. Increasing the natural expression of historical repeat spawning rates using fish culturing means could be a viable technique to assist the recovery of depressed steelhead populations. Reconditioning is the process of culturing post-spawned fish (kelts) in a captive environment until they are able to reinitiate feeding, growth, and again develop mature gonads. Kelt reconditioning techniques were initially developed for Atlantic salmon Salmo salar and sea-trout S. trutta. The recent Endangered Species Act listing of many Columbia Basin steelhead populations has prompted interest in developing reconditioning methods for wild steelhead populations within the Basin. To test kelt steelhead reconditioning as a potential recovery tool, we captured wild emigrating steelhead kelts from the Yakima River and evaluated reconditioning (short and long-term) success and diet formulations at Prosser Hatchery on the Yakima River. Steelhead kelts from the Yakima River were collected at the Chandler Juvenile Evaluation Facility (CJEF, located at Yakima River kilometer 48) from March 12 to June 13, 2002. In total, 899 kelts were collected for reconditioning at Prosser Hatchery. Captive specimens represented 19.8% (899 of 4,525) of the entire 2001-2002 Yakima River wild steelhead population, based on fish ladder counts at Prosser Dam. Kelts were reconditioned in circular tanks and were fed freeze-dried krill, Moore-Clark pellets, altered Moore-Clark pellets (soaked in krill extract and dyed), or a combination of the altered Moore-Clark/unaltered Moore-Clark pellets. Formalin was used to prevent outbreaks of fungus and we also intubated the fish that were collected with Ivermectin{trademark} to control internal parasites (e.g., Salmincola spp.). Captured kelts were separated into two experimental groups: short-term and long-term reconditioning. Success indicators for the short-term experiment include the proportion of fish that survived the reconditioning process and the proportion of fish that initiated a feeding response. Short-term kelts were then subsequently split into two groups for either 1 or 2-month reconditioning. Surviving specimens were released for natural spawning in two groups, corresponding with reconditioning duration, with releases on May 20/28, 2002. Survival rates for both short-term experiments were high. Long-term reconditioned kelts were subsequently split into three groups that were given three different diet formulations and then released on December 10, 2002. Long-term success indicators include the proportion of fish that survived the reconditioning process and the proportion of surviving fish that successfully remature. A total of 60 reconditioned kelts were radio tagged to assess their spawning migration behavior and success following release from Prosser Hatchery and to evaluate in-season homing fidelity. As in previous years, the kelts reconditioned during this project will substantially bolster the number of repeat spawners in the Yakima River. Valuable knowledge regarding kelt husbandry, food preferences, condition, and rearing environments were obtained during this research endeavor. Although survival rates were higher in 2002, even higher survival rates would be desirable; overall the authors were encouraged by the positive results of this innovative project. Information collected during this feasibility study has been significantly incorporated into the experimental design for upcoming years of research, and is expected to continue to increase survival and successful expression of iteroparity.

Hatch, Douglas R.; Branstetter, Ryan (Columbia River Inter-Trial Fish Commission, Portland, OR); Blodgett, Joe (Yakama Nation, Toppenish, WA)

2003-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

327

The CEBAF II/ELIC Upgrade of CEBAF  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A strong physics case has been established for constructing an extremely high luminosity ({approx} 10{sup 38} cm{sup -2} sec{sup -1}), CEBAF-like accelerator with energies in the 20-30 GeV range. There have also been a series of studies investigating the scientific potential of an electron-light ion collider (ELIC) operating in the 20-65 GeV center-of-mass energy range. The facility at Jefferson Lab can be upgraded to provide either (or both) of these options in a straightforward manner. An energy upgrade of CEBAF to 25 GeV would support extensions of the CEBAF 12 GeV program to smaller x and higher Q{sup 2}, and, in particular, support a program of deeply virtual meson production that would permit the flavor separation of the Generalized Parton Distributions that characterize the nucleon's properties. A high-luminosity electron light ion collider (ELIC) in the center-of-mass energy range {radical}s of 20-65 GeV, would build on the physics insights obtained from the CEBAF 12 GeV upgrade, and expand on our understanding of the structure of the nucleon and nuclear binding. While questions remain on the details of the science program and on technical aspects of the facility design, we expect that the facility's research program will be absolutely central to the field of nuclear physics. In particular, such a facility will provide a unique tool to: (1) Complete our quantitative understanding of how quarks and gluons provide the binding and the spin of the nucleon; (2) Understand how quarks and gluons evolve into hadrons via the dynamics of confinement; and (3) Refine our understanding of how the nuclear binding arises from QCD. The April 2002 Long-Range Plan for the Next Decade, developed by the 2001-2002 Nuclear Sciences Advisory Committee (NSAC) Long Range Planning Process, noted that a 'ring-linac option where a linear electron beam is incident on a stored ion beam' is one of two classes of machine design for an electron-ion collider (the other is a ring-ring design). Since then, conceptual design studies for the facility have continued, and our latest results indicate that luminosities of up to 10{sup 35} cm{sup -2} sec{sup -1} are within reach, with a combination of a high-intensity, energy-recovered linac and a ring that has been optimized for this physics. A number of technical challenges remain, and several R&D projects have been started. These include: electron cooling of protons/ions (in collaboration with BNL/BINP); the design of an interaction region and detector that, taken together, support the combination of the very high luminosity and very high detector acceptance and resolution essential to carry out this physics program; and the demonstration of the feasibility of energy recovery at high current and high energy. For the latter, an early test on the GeV scale will occur at JLab in March, 2003. Given the level of R&D remaining to be done, the readiness of this project should be categorized as 'scientific and engineering issues still need to be resolved'.

Jefferson Lab

2003-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

328

FY2004 CORROSION SURVEILLANCE RESULTS FOR L-BASIN  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report documents the results of the L-Basin Corrosion Surveillance Program for the fiscal year 2004. Test coupons were removed from the basin on February 12, 2004, shipped to Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL), and visually examined in a contaminated laboratory hood. Selected coupons were metallurgically characterized to establish the extent of general corrosion and pitting. Pitting was observed on galvanically coupled and on intentionally creviced coupons, thus demonstrating that localized concentration cells were formed during the exposure period. In these cases, the susceptibility to pitting was not attributed to aggressive basin water chemistry but to localized conditions (intentional crevices and galvanic coupling) that allowed the development of oxygen and/or metal ion concentration cells that produced locally aggressive waters. General oxidation was also observed on all of the coupons with localized corrosion observed on some of the coupons. These coupons were not pretreated to produce a protective oxide layer prior to exposure in the basin water. Non-protected coupons are more susceptible to corrosion than fuel cladding which has developed a protective oxide layer from high temperature reactor operations. However, the oxide on spent nuclear fuel (SNF) stored in L-Basin is not necessarily in pristine condition. Some of the oxide may have spalled off or been mechanically damaged prior to arrival at SRS. These areas on the fuel cladding would have the same susceptibility to corrosion as the coupons. Current observations from the test coupons demonstrate that, even with rigorously controlled basin water chemistry, localized aggressive conditions can develop in intentional crevice and galvanic samples. These results do illustrate the potential for corrosion induced degradation and thus the importance of a routine surveillance program similar to that conducted on the Uruguay fuel and on the surveillance coupons stored in L-Basin and future in-service inspections proposed for additional SNF in L-Basin. The 2004 results are compared to previous results on coupons removed from SRS basins in fiscal years 2001, 2002 and 2003. The extent of corrosion is correlated with sample and storage conditions as well as the water chemistry during the storage period. Coupon weight gains from 2004 coupons are similar to those from 2003. Oxides were removed from furniture rack coupons from 2003 and 2004 and comparable pit depths were found in the filler metal. Corrosion induced-degradation of the spent nuclear fuels stored in L-Basin could potentially impact the storage process by causing cladding penetration, exposing fuel core material, and allowing release of radionuclides to the basin waters. Such releases could potentially lead to high water activity levels which could impact fuel integrity and present problems in future fuel handling and transfer operations. However, the collective results (to date) of the coupon and water chemistry evaluations and Uruguay spent fuel inspections indicate that the fuel in the SRS storage basins has not experienced corrosion-induced degradation that will limit the time for interim storage in the basin waters. Continued surveillance and inspection is essential due to the potential for corrosion induced degradation. The next withdrawal of surveillance coupons from L-Basin occurred on March 29, 2005.

VORMELKER, P

2005-09-05T23:59:59.000Z

329

Characterizing the formation of secondary organic aerosols  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Organic aerosol is an important fraction of the fine particulate matter present in the atmosphere. This organic aerosol comes from a variety of sources; primary organic aerosol emitted directly from combustion process, and secondary aerosol formed in the atmosphere from condensable vapors. This secondary organic aerosol (SOA) can result from both anthropogenic and biogenic sources. In rural areas of the United States, organic aerosols can be a significant part of the aerosol load in the atmosphere. However, the extent to which gas-phase biogenic emissions contribute to this organic load is poorly understood. Such an understanding is crucial to properly apportion the effect of anthropogenic emissions in these rural areas that are sometimes dominated by biogenic sources. To help gain insight on the effect of biogenic emissions on particle concentrations in rural areas, we have been conducting a field measurement program at the University of California Blodgett Forest Research Facility. The field location includes has been used to acquire an extensive suite of measurements resulting in a rich data set, containing a combination of aerosol, organic, and nitrogenous species concentration and meteorological data with a long time record. The field location was established in 1997 by Allen Goldstein, a professor in the Department of Environmental Science, Policy and Management at the University of California at Berkeley to study interactions between the biosphere and the atmosphere. The Goldstein group focuses on measurements of concentrations and whole ecosystem biosphere-atmosphere fluxes for volatile organic compounds (VOC's), oxygenated volatile organic compounds (OVOC's), ozone, carbon dioxide, water vapor, and energy. Another important collaborator at the Blodgett field location is Ronald Cohen, a professor in the Chemistry Department at the University of California at Berkeley. At the Blodgett field location, his group his group performs measurements of the concentrations of important gas phase nitrogen compounds. Experiments have been ongoing at the Blodgett field site since the fall of 2000, and have included portions of the summer and fall of 2001, 2002, and 2003. Analysis of both the gas and particle phase data from the year 2000 show that the particle loading at the site correlates with both biogenic precursors emitted in the forest and anthropogenic precursors advected to the site from Sacramento and the Central Valley of California. Thus the particles at the site are affected by biogenic processing of anthropogenic emissions. Size distribution measurements show that the aerosol at the site has a geometric median diameter of approximately 100 nm. On many days, in the early afternoon, growth of nuclei mode particles (<20 nm) is also observed. These growth events tend to occur on days with lower average temperatures, but are observed throughout the summer. Analysis of the size resolved data for these growth events, combined with typical measured terpene emissions, show that the particle mass measured in these nuclei mode particles could come from oxidation products of biogenic emissions, and can serve as a significant route for SOA partitioning into the particle phase. During periods of each year, the effect of emissions for forest fires can be detected at the Blodgett field location. During the summer of 2002 emissions from the Biscuit fire, a large fire located in Southwest Oregon, was detected in the aerosol data. The results show that increases in particle scattering can be directly related to increased black carbon concentration and an appearance of a larger mode in the aerosol size distribution. These results show that emissions from fires can have significant impact on visibility over large distances. The results also reinforce the view that forest fires can be a significant source of black carbon in the atmosphere, which has important climate and visibility. Continuing work with the 2002 data set, particularly the combination of the aerosol and gas phase data, will continue to provide important information o

Lunden, Melissa; Black, Douglas; Brown, Nancy

2004-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

330

Kelt Reconditioning: A Research Project to Enhance Iteroparity in Columbia Basin Steelhead (Oncorhynchus mykiss), 2003 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Repeat spawning is a life history strategy that is expressed by some species from the family Salmonidae. Rates of repeat spawning for post-development Columbia River steelhead Oncorhynchus mykiss populations range from 1.6 to 17%. It is expected that currently observed iteroparity rates for wild steelhead in the Basin are severely depressed due to development and operation of the hydropower system and various additional anthropogenic factors. Increasing the natural expression of historical repeat spawning rates using fish culturing methods could be a viable technique to assist the recovery of depressed steelhead populations. Reconditioning is the process of culturing post-spawned fish (kelts) in a captive environment until they are able to reinitiate feeding, growth, and redevelop mature gonads. Kelt reconditioning techniques were initially developed for Atlantic salmon Salmo salar and sea-trout S. trutta. The recent Endangered Species Act listing of many Columbia Basin steelhead populations has prompted interest in developing reconditioning methods for wild steelhead populations within the Basin. To test kelt steelhead reconditioning as a potential recovery tool, we captured wild emigrating steelhead kelts from the Yakima River and evaluated reconditioning (short and long-term) success and diet formulations at Prosser Hatchery on the Yakima River. Steelhead kelts from the Yakima River were collected at the Chandler Juvenile Monitoring Facility (CJMF, located on the Yakima River at river kilometer 75.6) from 12 March to 28 May 2003. In total, 690 kelts were collected for reconditioning at Prosser Hatchery. Captive specimens represented 30.8% (690 of 2,235) of the entire 2002-2003 Yakima River wild steelhead population, based on fish ladder counts at Prosser Dam. All steelhead kelts were reconditioned in circular tanks, fed freeze-dried krill and received hw-wiegandt multi vit dietary supplement; long-term steelhead kelts also received Moore-Clark pellets. Oxytetracycline was administered to reconditioned fish to boost immune system response following the stress of initial capture. Formalin was also administered to prevent outbreaks of fungus and we also intubated the fish that were collected with Ivermectin{trademark} to control internal parasites (e.g., Salmincola spp.). Captured kelts were separated into two experimental groups: short-term and long-term reconditioning. Success indicators for the short-term experiment include the proportion of fish that survived the reconditioning process and the proportion of fish that initiated a feeding response. Short-term kelts were reconditioned for 3 to 7 weeks. Surviving specimens were released for natural spawning on June 4, 2003. Survival-to-release was very good for the short-term experiment, with a rate of 89.9%. Long-term steelhead kelts were held for 5-9 months then released on December 8, 2003. Long-term success indicators include the proportion of fish that survived the reconditioning process and the proportion of surviving fish that successfully remature. Survival and rematuration for long-term kelts increased as well with 62.4% surviving to release and 91.7% rematuring. A total of 47 reconditioned kelts were radio tagged to assess their spawning migration behavior and success following release from Prosser Hatchery and to evaluate in-season homing fidelity. As in previous years, the kelts reconditioned during this project will substantially bolster the number of repeat spawners in the Yakima River. Valuable knowledge regarding kelt husbandry, condition, and rearing environments were obtained during this research endeavor. The authors were very pleased with the high survival rates. Information collected during this feasibility study has been significantly incorporated into the experimental design for upcoming years of research, and is expected to continue to increase survival of long-term reconditioned fish and successful expression of iteroparity.

Hatch, Douglas R.; Branstetter, Ryan (Columbia River Inter-Tribal Fish Commission, Portland, OR); Blodgett, Joe (Yakama Nation, Toppenish, WA)

2004-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

331

Xyce Parallel Electronic Simulator - Users' Guide Version 2.1.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This manual describes the use of theXyceParallel Electronic Simulator.Xycehasbeen designed as a SPICE-compatible, high-performance analog circuit simulator, andhas been written to support the simulation needs of the Sandia National Laboratorieselectrical designers. This development has focused on improving capability over thecurrent state-of-the-art in the following areas:%04Capability to solve extremely large circuit problems by supporting large-scale par-allel computing platforms (up to thousands of processors). Note that this includessupport for most popular parallel and serial computers.%04Improved performance for all numerical kernels (e.g., time integrator, nonlinearand linear solvers) through state-of-the-art algorithms and novel techniques.%04Device models which are specifically tailored to meet Sandia's needs, includingmany radiation-aware devices.3 XyceTMUsers' Guide%04Object-oriented code design and implementation using modern coding practicesthat ensure that theXyceParallel Electronic Simulator will be maintainable andextensible far into the future.Xyceis a parallel code in the most general sense of the phrase - a message passingparallel implementation - which allows it to run efficiently on the widest possible numberof computing platforms. These include serial, shared-memory and distributed-memoryparallel as well as heterogeneous platforms. Careful attention has been paid to thespecific nature of circuit-simulation problems to ensure that optimal parallel efficiencyis achieved as the number of processors grows.The development ofXyceprovides a platform for computational research and de-velopment aimed specifically at the needs of the Laboratory. WithXyce, Sandia hasan %22in-house%22 capability with which both new electrical (e.g., device model develop-ment) and algorithmic (e.g., faster time-integration methods, parallel solver algorithms)research and development can be performed. As a result,Xyceis a unique electricalsimulation capability, designed to meet the unique needs of the laboratory.4 XyceTMUsers' GuideAcknowledgementsThe authors would like to acknowledge the entire Sandia National Laboratories HPEMS(High Performance Electrical Modeling and Simulation) team, including Steve Wix, CarolynBogdan, Regina Schells, Ken Marx, Steve Brandon and Bill Ballard, for their support onthis project. We also appreciate very much the work of Jim Emery, Becky Arnold and MikeWilliamson for the help in reviewing this document.Lastly, a very special thanks to Hue Lai for typesetting this document with LATEX.TrademarksThe information herein is subject to change without notice.Copyrightc 2002-2003 Sandia Corporation. All rights reserved.XyceTMElectronic Simulator andXyceTMtrademarks of Sandia Corporation.Orcad, Orcad Capture, PSpice and Probe are registered trademarks of Cadence DesignSystems, Inc.Silicon Graphics, the Silicon Graphics logo and IRIX are registered trademarks of SiliconGraphics, Inc.Microsoft, Windows and Windows 2000 are registered trademark of Microsoft Corporation.Solaris and UltraSPARC are registered trademarks of Sun Microsystems Corporation.Medici, DaVinci and Taurus are registered trademarks of Synopsys Corporation.HP and Alpha are registered trademarks of Hewlett-Packard company.Amtec and TecPlot are trademarks of Amtec Engineering, Inc.Xyce's expression library is based on that inside Spice 3F5 developed by the EECS De-partment at the University of California.All other trademarks are property of their respective owners.ContactsBug Reportshttp://tvrusso.sandia.gov/bugzillaEmailxyce-support%40sandia.govWorld Wide Webhttp://www.cs.sandia.gov/xyce5 XyceTMUsers' GuideThis page is left intentionally blank6

Hutchinson, Scott A; Hoekstra, Robert J.; Russo, Thomas V.; Rankin, Eric; Pawlowski, Roger P.; Fixel, Deborah A; Schiek, Richard; Bogdan, Carolyn W.; Shirley, David N.; Campbell, Phillip M.; Keiter, Eric R.

2005-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

332

Advanced Oil Recovery Technologies for Improved Recovery from Slope Basin Clastic Reservoirs, Nash Draw Brushy Canyon Pool, Eddy County, NM  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Nash Draw Brushy Canyon Pool in Eddy County New Mexico was a cost-shared field demonstration project in the U.S. Department of Energy Class III Program. A major goal of the Class III Program was to stimulate the use of advanced technologies to increase ultimate recovery from slope-basin clastic reservoirs. Advanced characterization techniques were used at the Nash Draw Pool (NDP) project to develop reservoir management strategies for optimizing oil recovery from this Delaware reservoir. The objective of the project was to demonstrate that a development program, which was based on advanced reservoir management methods, could significantly improve oil recovery at the NDP. Initial goals were (1) to demonstrate that an advanced development drilling and pressure maintenance program can significantly improve oil recovery compared to existing technology applications and (2) to transfer these advanced methodologies to other oil and gas producers. Analysis, interpretation, and integration of recently acquired geological, geophysical, and engineering data revealed that the initial reservoir characterization was too simplistic to capture the critical features of this complex formation. Contrary to the initial characterization, a new reservoir description evolved that provided sufficient detail regarding the complexity of the Brushy Canyon interval at Nash Draw. This new reservoir description was used as a risk reduction tool to identify 'sweet spots' for a development drilling program as well as to evaluate pressure maintenance strategies. The reservoir characterization, geological modeling, 3-D seismic interpretation, and simulation studies have provided a detailed model of the Brushy Canyon zones. This model was used to predict the success of different reservoir management scenarios and to aid in determining the most favorable combination of targeted drilling, pressure maintenance, well stimulation, and well spacing to improve recovery from this reservoir. An Advanced Log Analysis technique developed from the NDP project has proven useful in defining additional productive zones and refining completion techniques. This program proved to be especially helpful in locating and evaluating potential recompletion intervals, which has resulted in low development costs with only small incremental increases in lifting costs. To develop additional reserves at lower costs, zones behind pipe in existing wells were evaluated using techniques developed for the Brushy Canyon interval. These techniques were used to complete uphole zones in thirteen of the NDP wells. A total of 14 recompletions were done: four during 1999, four during 2000, two during 2001, and four during 2002-2003. These workovers added reserves of 332,304 barrels of oil (BO) and 640,363 MCFG (thousand cubic feet of gas) at an overall weighted average development cost of $1.87 per BOE (barrel of oil equivalent). A pressure maintenance pilot project in a developed area of the field was not conducted because the pilot area was pressure depleted, and the reservoir in that area was found to be compartmentalized and discontinuous. Economic analyses and simulation studies indicated that immiscible injection of lean hydrocarbon gas for pressure maintenance was not warranted at the NDP and would need to be considered for implementation in similar fields very soon after production has started. Simulation studies suggested that the injection of miscible carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) could recover significant quantities of oil at the NDP, but a source of low-cost CO{sub 2} was not available in the area. Results from the project indicated that further development will be under playa lakes and potash areas that were beyond the regions covered by well control and are not accessible with vertical wells. These areas, covered by 3-D seismic surveys that were obtained as part of the project, were accessed with combinations of deviated/horizontal wells. Three directional/horizontal wells have been drilled and completed to develop reserves under surface-restricted areas and potash mines. The third

Mark B. Murphy

2005-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

333

Dynamic context discrimination : psychological evidence for the Sandia Cognitive Framework.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Human behavior is a function of an iterative interaction between the stimulus environment and past experience. It is not simply a matter of the current stimulus environment activating the appropriate experience or rule from memory (e.g., if it is dark and I hear a strange noise outside, then I turn on the outside lights and investigate). Rather, it is a dynamic process that takes into account not only things one would generally do in a given situation, but things that have recently become known (e.g., there have recently been coyotes seen in the area and one is known to be rabid), as well as other immediate environmental characteristics (e.g., it is snowing outside, I know my dog is outside, I know the police are already outside, etc.). All of these factors combine to inform me of the most appropriate behavior for the situation. If it were the case that humans had a rule for every possible contingency, the amount of storage that would be required to enable us to fluidly deal with most situations we encounter would rapidly become biologically untenable. We can all deal with contingencies like the one above with fairly little effort, but if it isn't based on rules, what is it based on? The assertion of the Cognitive Systems program at Sandia for the past 5 years is that at the heart of this ability to effectively navigate the world is an ability to discriminate between different contexts (i.e., Dynamic Context Discrimination, or DCD). While this assertion in and of itself might not seem earthshaking, it is compelling that this ability and its components show up in a wide variety of paradigms across different subdisciplines in psychology. We begin by outlining, at a high functional level, the basic ideas of DCD. We then provide evidence from several different literatures and paradigms that support our assertion that DCD is a core aspect of cognitive functioning. Finally, we discuss DCD and the computational model that we have developed as an instantiation of DCD in more detail. Before commencing with our overview of DCD, we should note that DCD is not necessarily a theory in the classic sense. Rather, it is a description of cognitive functioning that seeks to unify highly similar findings across a wide variety of literatures. Further, we believe that such convergence warrants a central place in efforts to computationally emulate human cognition. That is, DCD is a general principle of cognition. It is also important to note that while we are drawing parallels across many literatures, these are functional parallels and are not necessarily structural ones. That is, we are not saying that the same neural pathways are involved in these phenomena. We are only saying that the different neural pathways that are responsible for the appearance of these various phenomena follow the same functional rules - the mechanisms are the same even if the physical parts are distinct. Furthermore, DCD is not a causal mechanism - it is an emergent property of the way the brain is constructed. DCD is the result of neurophysiology (cf. John, 2002, 2003). Finally, it is important to note that we are not proposing a generic learning mechanism such that one biological algorithm can account for all situation interpretation. Rather, we are pointing out that there are strikingly similar empirical results across a wide variety of disciplines that can be understood, in part, by similar cognitive processes. It is entirely possible, even assumed in some cases (i.e., primary language acquisition) that these more generic cognitive processes are complemented and constrained by various limits which may or may not be biological in nature (cf. Bates & Elman, 1996; Elman, in press).

Speed, Ann Elizabeth

2004-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

334

Annual Site Environmental Report: 2003  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report provides information about environmental programs during 2003 at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC). Seasonal activities that span calendar years are also included. Production of an annual site environmental report (ASER) is a requirement established by the DOE for all management and operating (M&O) contractors throughout the DOE complex. This summary demonstrates the effective application of SLAC environmental management to meet the site's integrated safety management system (ISMS) goals. For normal daily activities, all SLAC managers and supervisors are responsible for ensuring proper procedures are followed so that worker safety and health are protected; the environment is protected; and compliance is ensured. Throughout 2003, SLAC focused on these activities through the SLAC management systems (described in Chapter 3). These systems were utilized by SLAC to implement such ''greening of the government'' initiatives like Executive Order 13148. The management systems at SLAC are effective, supporting compliance with all relevant statutory and regulatory requirements. There were no reportable releases to the environment from SLAC operations during 2003. In addition, many improvements were continued during 2003 in waste minimization, recycling, decreasing air emission rates, stormwater drain system, groundwater restoration, and planning for a system to better manage chemical use. Program-specific details discussed are: (1) Air Quality--SLAC operates its air quality management program in compliance with established permit conditions; 2003 was the sixth consecutive year the air quality management program operated without any NOVs issued by regulators. Nevertheless, SLAC has an active program to improve its environmental performance in air quality. (2) Hazardous Waste--The Environmental Health Division of the San Mateo County Health Services Agency is the California certified unified permitting agency (CUPA) responsible for overseeing hazardous materials and waste management at SLAC. The CUPA made facility enforcement inspections of SLAC in August and September of 2003. These inspections covered SLAC's hazardous materials and waste management, business plan, California Accidental Release Prevention Program (CalARP), and tiered permitting/permit-by-rule programs. No notices of violation were issued as a result of either inspection. (3) Stormwater and Industrial Wastewater--SLAC operates its industrial and sanitary wastewater management program in compliance with established permit conditions; 2003 was the seventh consecutive year the program operated without any NOVs issued by regulators. SLAC actively pursues projects to reduce flow to the wastewater system, and through a variety of measures, has managed to keep its facility-wide wastewater discharge constant during a period in which many new connections were made to the system. SLAC continues to make the transition to a new facility-wide sanitary sewer flow-monitoring scheme, and made substantial progress towards completing the project during 2003. SLAC discharges stormwater with the potential to come into contact with industrial activities. SLAC has an extensive monitoring program in place at the eight discharge locations where the greatest potential for contact exists. During the 2002-2003 wet season, SLAC met all the requirements of its monitoring plan, with the exception of consistent sample collection within the first hour of discharge. For the eleventh consecutive year, the surface water program operated in 2003 without receiving any NOVs from program regulators. After expenditures of more than $1 million, SLAC was nearly complete with its Unauthorized Stormwater Connection Project at year-end; only 32 connections (less than 10 percent of the original total) remained to be replumed. SLAC actively pursued several other BMP-related performance improvements during the year. (4) Hazardous Materials Program--Although SLAC has been successful in meeting regulatory requirements for managing hazardous materials, it has decided to pursue a more activ

Nuckolls, H.; /SLAC

2006-04-19T23:59:59.000Z

335

TOUGHREACT User's Guide: A Simulation Program for Non-isothermal Multiphase Reactive Geochemical Transport in Variably Saturated Geologic Media, V1.2.1  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Coupled modeling of subsurface multiphase fluid and heat flow, solute transport, and chemical reactions can be applied to many geologic systems and environmental problems, including geothermal systems, diagenetic and weathering processes, subsurface waste disposal, acid mine drainage remediation, contaminant transport, and groundwater quality. TOUGHREACT has been developed as a comprehensive non-isothermal multi-component reactive fluid flow and geochemical transport simulator to investigate these and other problems. A number of subsurface thermo-physical-chemical processes are considered under various thermohydrological and geochemical conditions of pressure, temperature, water saturation, and ionic strength. TOUGHREACT can be applied to one-, two- or three-dimensional porous and fractured media with physical and chemical heterogeneity. The code can accommodate any number of chemical species present in liquid, gas and solid phases. A variety of equilibrium chemical reactions are considered, such as aqueous complexation, gas dissolution/exsolution, and cation exchange. Mineral dissolution/precipitation can take place subject to either local equilibrium or kinetic controls, with coupling to changes in porosity and permeability and capillary pressure in unsaturated systems. Chemical components can also be treated by linear adsorption and radioactive decay. The first version of the non-isothermal reactive geochemical transport code TOUGHREACT was developed (Xu and Pruess, 1998) by introducing reactive geochemistry into the framework of the existing multi-phase fluid and heat flow code TOUGH2 (Pruess, 1991). TOUGHREACT was further enhanced with the addition of (1) treatment of mineral-water-gas reactive-transport under boiling conditions, (2) an improved HKF activity model for aqueous species, (3) gas species diffusion coefficients calculated as a function of pressure, temperature, and molecular properties, (4) mineral reactive surface area formulations for fractured and porous media, and (5) porosity, permeability, and capillary pressure changes owing to mineral precipitation/dissolution (Sonnenthal et al., 1998, 2000, 2001; Spycher et al., 2003a). Subsequently, TOUGH2 V2 was released with additional EOS modules and features (Pruess et al., 1999). The present version of TOUGHREACT includes all of the previous extensions to the original version, along with the replacement of the original TOUGH2 (Pruess, 1991) by TOUGH2 V2 (Pruess et al., 1999). TOUGHREACT has been applied to a wide variety of problems, some of which are included as examples, such as: (1) Supergene copper enrichment (Xu et al., 2001); (2) Mineral alteration in hydrothermal systems (Xu and Pruess, 2001a; Xu et al., 2004b; Dobson et al., 2004); (3) Mineral trapping for CO{sub 2} disposal in deep saline aquifers (Xu et al., 2003b and 2004a); (4) Coupled thermal, hydrological, and chemical processes in boiling unsaturated tuff for the proposed nuclear waste emplacement site at Yucca Mountain, Nevada (Sonnenthal et al., 1998, 2001; Sonnenthal and Spycher, 2000; Spycher et al., 2003a, b; Xu et al., 2001); (5) Modeling of mineral precipitation/dissolution in plug-flow and fracture-flow experiments under boiling conditions (Dobson et al., 2003); (6) Calcite precipitation in the vadose zone as a function of net infiltration (Xu et al., 2003); and (7) Stable isotope fractionation in unsaturated zone pore water and vapor (Singleton et al., 2004). The TOUGHREACT program makes use of 'self-documenting' features. It is distributed with a number of input data files for sample problems. Besides providing benchmarks for proper code installation, these can serve as a self-teaching tutorial in the use of TOUGHREACT, and they provide templates to help jump-start new applications. The fluid and heat flow part of TOUGHREACT is derived from TOUGH2 V2, so in addition to the current manual, users must have the manual of the TOUGH2 V2 (Pruess et al., 1999). The present version of TOUGHREACT provides the following TOUGH2 fluid property or 'EOS' (equation-of-state) modules: (1) EOS1 for

Xu, Tianfu; Sonnenthal, Eric; Spycher, Nicolas; Pruess, Karsten

2008-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

336

Kelt Reconditioning: A Research Project to Enhance Iteroparity in Columbia Basin Steelhead (Oncorhynchus mykiss), 2001 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Repeat spawning is a life history strategy that is expressed by some species from the family Salmonidae. Rates of repeat spawning for post-development Columbia River steelhead (Oncorhynchus mykiss) populations range from 1.6 to 17%. It is expected that currently observed iteroparity rates for wild steelhead in the Basin are artificially and in some cases severely depressed due to development and operation of the hydropower system and various additional anthropogenic factors. Increasing the natural expression of historical repeat spawning rates using fish culturing means could be a viable technique to assist the recovery of depressed steelhead populations. Reconditioning is the process of culturing post-spawned fish (kelts) in a captive environment until they are able to reinitiate feeding, growth, and again develop mature gonads. Kelt reconditioning techniques were initially developed for Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar) and sea-trout (S. trutta). The recent Endangered Species Act listing of many Columbia Basin steelhead populations has prompted interest in developing reconditioning methods for wild steelhead populations within the Basin. To address recovery, we captured wild emigrating steelhead kelts from the Yakima River and tested reconditioning and the effects of several diet formulations on its success at Prosser Hatchery on the Yakama Reservation. Steelhead kelts from the Yakima River were collected at the Chandler Juvenile Evaluation Facility (CJEF, located at Yakima River kilometer 48) from 12 March to 5 July 2001. Kelts were reconditioned in circular tanks and fed a mixed diet of starter paste, adult sized trout pellets, and freeze-dried krill. Formalin was used to control outbreaks of fungus and we tested the use of Ivermectin{trademark}to control internal parasites (e.g., Salmincola spp.). Surviving specimens were released for natural spawning in two groups on 15 November 2001 and 18 January 2002. Overall success of the reconditioning process was based on the proportion of fish that survived in captivity, gained weight, and the number of fish that successfully underwent gonadal recrudescence. Many of the reconditioned kelts were radio tagged to assess their spawning migration behavior and success following release from Prosser Hatchery. In total, 551 kelts were collected for reconditioning at Prosser Hatchery. Captive specimens represented 18.7% (551 of 2,942) of the entire 2000-2001Yakima River wild steelhead population, based on fish ladder counts at Prosser Dam. At the conclusion of the experiments (208-323 days from capture), 108 fish (19.6%) had survived and were released to spawn in the wild. Ultrasound examination--to determine sex and reproductive development--determined that 100 (94.3%) of 106 sex-identified specimens were female and we estimated that 96% of the reconditioned releases gained weight and developed mature gonads. Nearly one quarter (24.3%) of all reconditioned kelts survived for the duration of the experiment. As in previous years, the kelts reconditioned during this project will substantially bolster the number of repeat spawners in the Yakima River. Valuable knowledge regarding Kelt husbandry, food type preferences, condition, and rearing environments were obtained during this research endeavor. Although higher survival rates would have been desirable, the authors were encouraged by the positive results of this innovative project. Nearly 20% of the kelts collected were successfully reconditioned, and radio telemetry allowed us to track some of these fish to the spawning grounds and to obtain documentation of successful redd construction. Information collected during this feasibility study has been significantly incorporated into the experimental design for upcoming years of research, and is expected to continue to increase survival and successful expression of iteroparity.

Hatch, Douglas R.; Anders, Paul J., Evans, Allen F. (Columbia River Inter-Tribal Fish Commission, Portland, OR)

2002-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

337

Scanning Hall Probe Microscopy of Magnetic Vortices inVery Underdoped yttrium-barium-copper-oxide  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Since their discovery by Bednorz and Mueller (1986), high-temperature cuprate superconductors have been the subject of intense experimental research and theoretical work. Despite this large-scale effort, agreement on the mechanism of high-T{sub c} has not been reached. Many theories make their strongest predictions for underdoped superconductors with very low superfluid density n{sub s}/m*. For this dissertation I implemented a scanning Hall probe microscope and used it to study magnetic vortices in newly available single crystals of very underdoped YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 6+x} (Liang et al. 1998, 2002). These studies have disproved a promising theory of spin-charge separation, measured the apparent vortex size (an upper bound on the penetration depth {lambda}{sub ab}), and revealed an intriguing phenomenon of ''split'' vortices. Scanning Hall probe microscopy is a non-invasive and direct method for magnetic field imaging. It is one of the few techniques capable of submicron spatial resolution coupled with sub-{Phi}{sub 0} (flux quantum) sensitivity, and it operates over a wide temperature range. Chapter 2 introduces the variable temperature scanning microscope and discusses the scanning Hall probe set-up and scanner characterizations. Chapter 3 details my fabrication of submicron GaAs/AlGaAs Hall probes and discusses noise studies for a range of probe sizes, which suggest that sub-100 nm probes could be made without compromising flux sensitivity. The subsequent chapters detail scanning Hall probe (and SQUID) microscopy studies of very underdoped YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 6+x} crystals with T{sub c} {le} 15 K. Chapter 4 describes two experimental tests for visons, essential excitations of a spin-charge separation theory proposed by Senthil and Fisher (2000, 2001b). We searched for predicted hc/e vortices (Wynn et al. 2001) and a vortex memory effect (Bonn et al. 2001) with null results, placing upper bounds on the vison energy inconsistent with the theory. Chapter 5 discusses imaging of isolated vortices as a function of T{sub c}. Vortex images were fit with theoretical magnetic field profiles in order to extract the apparent vortex size. The data for the lowest T{sub c}'s (5 and 6.5 K) show some inhomogeneity and suggest that {lambda}{sub ab} might be larger than predicted by the T{sub c} {proportional_to} n{sub s}(0)/m* relation first suggested by results of Uemura et al. (1989) for underdoped cuprates. Finally, Chapter 6 examines observations of apparent ''partial vortices'' in the crystals. My studies of these features indicate that they are likely split pancake vortex stacks. Qualitatively, these split stacks reveal information about pinning and anisotropy in the samples. Collectively these magnetic imaging studies deepen our knowledge of cuprate superconductivity, especially in the important regime of low superfluid density.

Guikema, Janice Wynn; /SLAC, SSRL

2005-12-02T23:59:59.000Z

338

Final report on the project entitled "The Effects of Disturbance & Climate on Carbon Storage & the Exchanges of CO2 Water Vapor & Energy Exchange of Evergreen Coniferous Forests in the Pacific Northwest: Integration of Eddy Flux, Plant and Soil Measurements at a Cluster of Supersites"  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This is the final technical report containing a summary of all findings with regard to the following objectives of the project: (1) To quantify and understand the effects of wildfire on carbon storage and the exchanges of energy, CO2, and water vapor in a chronosequence of ponderosa pine (disturbance gradient); (2) To investigate the effects of seasonal and interannual variation in climate on carbon storage and the exchanges of energy, CO2, and water vapor in mature conifer forests in two climate zones: mesic 40-yr old Douglas-fir and semi-arid 60-yr old ponderosa pine (climate gradient); (3) To reduce uncertainty in estimates of CO2 feedbacks to the atmosphere by providing an improved model formulation for existing biosphere-atmosphere models; and (4) To provide high quality data for AmeriFlux and the NACP on micrometeorology, meteorology, and biology of these systems. Objective (1): A study integrating satellite remote sensing, AmeriFlux data, and field surveys in a simulation modeling framework estimated that the pyrogenic carbon emissions, tree mortality, and net carbon exchange associated with four large wildfires that burned ~50,000 hectares in 2002-2003 were equivalent to 2.4% of Oregon statewide anthropogenic carbon emissions over the same two-year period. Most emissions were from the combustion of the forest floor and understory vegetation, and only about 1% of live tree mass was combusted on average. Objective (2): A study of multi-year flux records across a chronosequence of ponderosa pine forests yielded that the net carbon uptake is over three times greater at a mature pine forest compared with young pine. The larger leaf area and wetter and cooler soils of the mature forest mainly caused this effect. A study analyzing seven years of carbon and water dynamics showed that interannual and seasonal variability of net carbon exchange was primarily related to variability in growing season length, which was a linear function of plant-available soil moisture in spring and early summer. A multi-year drought (2001-2003) led to a significant reduction of net ecosystem exchange due to carry-over effects in soil moisture and carbohydrate reserves in plant-tissue. In the same forest, the interannual variability in the rate carbon is lost from the soil and forest floor is considerable and related to the variability in tree growth as much as it is to variability in soil climatic conditions. Objective (3): Flux data from the mature ponderosa pine site support a physical basis for filtering nighttime data with friction velocity above the canopy. An analysis of wind fields and heat transport in the subcanopy at the mesic 40-year old Douglas site yielded that the non-linear structure and behavior of spatial temperature gradients and the flow field require enhanced sensor networks to estimate advective fluxes in the subcanopy of forest to close the surface energy balance in forests. Reliable estimates for flux uncertainties are needed to improve model validation and data assimilation in process-based carbon models, inverse modeling studies and model-data synthesis, where the uncertainties may be as important as the fluxes themselves. An analysis of the time scale dependence of the random and flux sampling error yielded that the additional flux obtained by increasing the perturbation timescale beyond about 10 minutes is dominated by random sampling error, and therefore little confidence can be placed in its value. Artificial correlation between gross ecosystem productivity (GEP) and ecosystem respiration (Re) is a consequence of flux partitioning of eddy covariance flux data when GEP is computed as the difference between NEE and computed daytime Re (e.g. using nighttime Re extrapolated into daytime using soil or air temperatures). Tower-data must be adequately spatially averaged before comparison to gridded model output as the time variability of both is inherently different. The eddy-covariance data collected at the mature ponderosa pine site and the mesic Douglas fir site were used to develop and evaluate a new method to extra

Beverly E. Law (PI), Christoph K. Thomas (CoI)

2011-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

339

Iron Reduction and Radionuclide Immobilization: Kinetic, Thermodynamic and Hydrologic controls & Reaction-Based Modeling - Final Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Our research focused on (1) microbial reduction of Fe(III) and U(VI) individually, and concomitantly in natural sediments, (2) Fe(III) oxide surface chemistry, specifically with respect to reactions with Fe(II)and U(VI), (3) the influence of humic substances on Fe(III) and U(VI) bioreduction, and on U(VI) complexation, and (4) the development of reaction-based reactive transport biogeochemical models to numerically simulate our experimental results. We have continued our investigations on microbial reduction of Fe(III) oxides. Modeling our earlier experimental results required assumption of a hydrated surface for hematite, more reactive than predicted based on theoretical solubility (Burgos et al.2002). Subsequent studies with Shewanella putrefaciens and Geobacter sulfurreducens confirmed the rates of Fe(III) bioreduction depend on oxide surface area rather than oxide thermodynamic properties (Roden,2003a,b;2004; Burgos et al,2003). We examined the potential for bioreduction of U(VI) by Geobacter sulfurreducens in the presence of synthetic Fe(III) oxides and natural Fe(III) oxide-containing solids (Jeon et al,2004a,b) in which more than 95% of added U(VI) was sorbed to mineral surfaces. The results showed a significant portion of solid-associated U(VI) was resistant to both enzymatic and abiotic (Fe(II)-driven) reduction, but the rate and extent of bioreduction of U(VI) was increased due to the addition of anthraquinone-2,6-disulfonate (AQDS). We conducted long-term semicontinuous culture and column experiments on coupled Fe(III) oxide/U(VI) reduction. These experiments were conducted with natural subsurface sediment from the Oyster site in Virginia, whose Fe content and microbial reducibility are comparable to ORNL FRC sediments (Jeon et al, 2004b). The results conclusively demonstrated the potential for sustained removal of U(VI) from solution via DMRB activity in excess of the U(VI) sorption capacity of the natural mineral assemblages. Jang (2004) demonstrated that the hydrated surface of nano-particles of hematite (prepared according to well-cited recipes and confirmed to be 100% hematite by Mossbauer spectroscopy and XRD) exhibited the solubility of hydrous ferric oxide (HFO). Jang (2004) also demonstrated that the sorptive reactivity of hematite and HFO were identical except for different specific surface area and pHzpc, and that the reduction of U(VI) by sorbed Fe(II) in the presence of the two phases was also similar in spite of theoretical predictions of large differences in Nernst potential. These results are consistent with the modeling of hematite bioreduction experiments where the thermodynamic potential of hematite had to be adjusted to represent a more disordered surface phase in order to accurately model bioreduction kinetics (Burgos et al, 2002, 2003). We have demonstrated that humic substances enhance solid-phase Fe(III) bioreduction via both electron shuttling and Fe(II) complexation(Royer et al, 2002a, b). We have found that humic substances were shown to inhibit the bioreduction of dissolved U(VI) and that soluble humic-U(IV) complexes were likely formed (Burgos et al, 2004). Kirkham (2004) measured and modeled complexation of U(VI) by humic substances as a function of pH, pCO2, U(VI) concentration, and humic concentration, and demonstrated that humic substances can complex U(VI) even at neutral pH values and in the presence of high (ca.30 mM) carbonate concentrations. Jang(2004) measured the abiotic reduction of U(VI) by Fe(II) sorbed to Fe(III) oxides in the presence/absence of humic substances and demonstrated that humic substances inhibited the heterogeneous reduction of U(VI). We have recently developed, validated, and documented a series of diagonalized reaction-based reactive transport computer models (HYDROGEOCHEM; Yeh et al,2004a,b). We demonstrated that parallel kinetic reactions could be modeled if separate experiments are used to independently measure each contributing kinetic reaction (Burgos et al, 2003). We have demonstrated the use of a reaction-based reactive transport model (HYDROGE

William D. Burgos

2004-06-18T23:59:59.000Z