National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for 2000-2001 2001-2002 2002-2003

  1. engineering (coe) 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dyer, Bill

    s by gender College of engineering (coe) Enrollment 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Male 1,888 1,901 1 Engineering (ChBE) Civil Engineering (CE) · Local Technical Assistance Program (LTAP) Computer Science (CS) Electrical & Computer Engineering (ECE) Mechanical & Industrial Engineering (M&IE) Air Force ROTC Army ROTC

  2. 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004... 2005 2006 gasoline diesel

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bierlaire, Michel

    1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004... 2005 2006 gasoline diesel price +10% gasolinegasoline gasoline diesel... ... 2007 20081998 2009 ...2010 home work home work diesel diesel ... gasoline diesel price -7 of a dynamic discrete-continuous choice model (DDCCM) of car ownership, usage and fuel type. The approach

  3. Alabama Blood Lead Surveillance Report 1997 -2005 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 NumberofChildrenTested 0.00% 1.00% 2.00% 3.00% 4.00% 5.00% 6 Tested #12;Alaska Blood Lead Surveillance Report 1997 - 2006 0 50 100 150 200 250 300 1997 1998 1999 2000 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 NumberofChildrenTested 0.00% 5.00% 10.00% 15.00% 20.00% 25

  4. Table 6. Energy intensity by State (2000-2011

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Energy intensity by State (2000-2011)" "thousand Btu per dollar of GDP" ,,,"Change" ,,,"2000 to 2011" "State",1997,1998,1999,2000,2001,2002,2003,2004,2005...

  5. Colorado State University Summary of Salary Increases Education and General 1997-98 1998-99 1999-2000 2000-2001 2001-2002 2002-2003 2003-2004 2004-2005 2005-2006 2006-2007 2007-2008 2008-2009 2009-2010 2010-2011 2011-2012 2012-2013 2013-2014 2014-2015

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Collett Jr., Jeffrey L.

    Colorado State University Summary of Salary Increases Education and General 1997-98 1998-99 1999-2010 2010-2011 2011-2012 2012-2013 2013-2014 2014-2015 Faculty Salaries 3.5% 3.3% 3.0% 4.0% 5.0% 5.0% 0.0% 2.0% 4.3% 3.0% 5.0% 5.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 3.0% 3.0% 2.5% State Classified Salaries 3.7%1 5.4%2 5.9%3 6

  6. UNECE TIMBER COMMITTEE Sixty-first session, 7-10 October 2003

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    the production, consumption and trade dynamics of sawn softwood. · The recent competitive price advantages 100 000 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 1000m3 Production Consumption #12;UNECE 120 000 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 1000m3 Production Consumption #12;UNECE

  7. PHILADELPHIA UNIVERSITY 2000/2001

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    PHILADELPHIA UNIVERSITY : : : :- 1. 2. 3. 4. 2000/2001 . 2005/2006. . #12;PHILADELPHIA UNIVERSITY 63 4/3/2009 19/1/2009 276205 95 27/5/2002 64/3/2009 19/1/2009 165131 992822 : : 1. : #12;PHILADELPHIA

  8. Council on Student Services 2000 -2001

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boonstra, Rudy

    ÆVO ARBOR VELUT Council on Student Services Motions 2000 - 2001 1. ENHANCEMENT FUND RESUBMISSION ­ ($2,000 + $886.63 = $2,886.63) - Motion Carried Be it resolved that an additional $886 that Gaurav Singh will serve as Chair for the 2000-2001 year. 4. COSS REPRESENTATIVE - Motion Carried

  9. Ontario's Response to the Challenges Facing the Forest

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    demand and prices U.S. housing market crash #12;5 Ontario Pulp and Paper Industry Sales (Billion CN$) 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 #12;6 Ontario Pulp and Paper Industry Capital;7 Ontario Pulp and Paper Industry Employees (,000) 20 22 24 26 28 30 32 34 36 38 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004

  10. European Forum 2001-2002 5 October 2001

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Feigon, Brooke

    European Forum 2001-2002 5 October 2001 M. Bowker, R. Crockatt, N. Macmaster, P. Chilton, V on the USA' 19 October 2001 Dr. Philip Dine, Loughborough University 'Sport, Media Representations and the Making of Europe' 16 November 2001 Dr. Annemarie van Heerikhuizen, University of Amsterdam 'Dutch

  11. Mecanica Geometrica 2 # Semestre de 2001/2002

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Natário, José

    Mecâ??anica Geomâ??etrica 2 # Semestre de 2001/2002 De uma forma simplificada, pode dizer­se que a Mecâ??anica resoluâ?ºcâ?ao de problemas de Mecâ??anica Clâ??assica. De acordo com os eventuais interesses dos alunos, oâ?ºcotempos estacionâ??arios 4. Mecâ??anica Hamiltoniana ­ mecâ??anica Lagrangeana em variedades ­ formalismo canâ??onico e

  12. Mecanica Geometrica 2 o Semestre de 2000/2001

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Natário, José

    Mecâ??anica Geomâ??etrica 2 o Semestre de 2000/2001 De uma forma simplificada, pode dizer­se que a Mecâ??anica resoluâ?ºcâ?ao de problemas de Mecâ??anica Clâ??assica. De acordo com os eventuais interesses dos alunos, oâ?ºcotempos estacionâ??arios 4. Mecâ??anica Hamiltoniana ­ mecâ??anica Lagrangeana em variedades ­ formalismo canâ??onico e

  13. U.S. Geological Survey China's Growing Appetite for Minerals

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    (markets) · National security USGS research on minerals in development cycle-- o Based on 1929 work of USGS: Coal 45 1 Oil 4.7 6 Industrial minerals: Cement 42 1 Fluorspar 55 1 Rare earths 85 1 Metals: Aluminum 1991 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 Year Millionmetrictons Canada China

  14. Performance of slash pine (Pinus elliottii Engelm.) containerized rooted cuttings and bare-root seedlings established on five planting dates in the flatlands of western Louisiana 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Akgul, Alper

    2005-08-29

    -root seedlings (BRS) and containerized rooted cuttings (CRC) were hand planted in September, November, January, March and April in three consecutive planting seasons (2000-2001, 2001-2002 and 2002-2003) on three sites with silt loam topsoils in southwestern...

  15. Preventing CO poisoning: Tracking the impact of legislative and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Preventing CO poisoning: Tracking the impact of legislative and regulatory changes in New York City data partners ­ NYCDOHMH - Office of Vital Statistics, Injury Epidemiology, and the NYC Poison Control Poisoning Surveillance: Unintentional deaths 0 2 4 6 8 10 12 14 16 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Frequency

  16. World Wide Wood Network, Ltd. 2001-2002 Forest Products e-Commerce

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    World Wide Wood Network, Ltd. © 2001-2002 Forest Products e-Commerce An Oxymoron or Wave of the Future Presented by: Thomas J. Westbrook, JD President & CEO World Wide Wood Network, Ltd. http Collapsing time and space Communication World Wide Wood Network, Ltd. © 2001-2002 The Promise of the Internet

  17. Council on East Asian Libraries Statistics 2000-2001 For North American Institutions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Doll, Vickie; Simpson, Fung-yin Kuo

    2002-02-01

    stream_size 107760 stream_content_type text/plain stream_name cealstats_2000_2001.pdf.txt stream_source_info cealstats_2000_2001.pdf.txt Content-Encoding ISO-8859-1 Content-Type text/plain; charset=ISO-8859-1 council...

  18. A Time Series Analysis of Food Price and Its Input Prices 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Routh, Kari 1988-

    2012-11-27

    2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 4.4 4.6 4.8 5.0 5.2 5.4 5.6 Log US Monthly Dollar Index 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 4.52 4.56 4.60 4.64 4.68 4.72 4.76 4.80 4.84 4.88 17... ........................................................... 39 Discussion ....................................................................................................... 42 Comparison of Results from Other DAGs .......................................................... 44 CHAPTER V...

  19. 2 2001-2002 Annual ScheduleofClasses FFFFaaaallllllll 2222000000001111 iiiinnnnssssttttrrrruuuuccccttttiiiioooonnnn bbbbeeeeggggiiiinnnnssss TTTTuuuueeeessssddddaaaayyyy SSSSeeeepppptttteeeemmmmbbbbeeeerrrr 22225555

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grether, Gregory

    2 2001-2002 Annual ScheduleofClasses FFFFaaaallllllll 2222000000001111 22225555 As announced in the Spring 2001 Schedule of Classes, instruction for Fall Quarter 2001 begins mmmmaaaannnnddddaaaattttoooorrrryyyy ffffoooorrrr aaaallllllll ssssttttuuuuddddeeeennnnttttssss Beginning Fall Quarter 2001, all UCLA

  20. International Journal of Fracture 118: 303337, 2002. 2003 Kluwer Academic Publishers. Printed in the Netherlands.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    International Journal of Fracture 118: 303­337, 2002. © 2003 Kluwer Academic Publishers. Printed in the Netherlands. Choice of standard fracture test for concrete and its statistical evaluation ZDENEK P. BAZANT of the cohesive (or fictitious) crack model, which is now generally accepted as the best simple fracture model

  1. Flow, Turbulence and Combustion 65: 393415, 2000. 2001 Kluwer Academic Publishers. Printed in the Netherlands.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pierce, Niles A.

    Flow, Turbulence and Combustion 65: 393­415, 2000. © 2001 Kluwer Academic Publishers. Printed research groups have developed adjoint CFD codes for de- sign optimisation [3, 4, 6, 8, 22, 29, 30, 44 the adjoint code from an original CFD code; both of these approaches will be discussed further in this paper

  2. Trends in Regional Electricity Demands 1995-2012

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Trends in Regional Electricity Demands 1995-2012 January 29, 2014 #12;In Today's Conversation Average Megawatts y = 98.985x + 18714 R² = 0.7287 0 5,000 10,000 15,000 20,000 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Actual Load Net of DSI (MWA) 1995

  3. Copyright 2001, 2002 Baltimore Technologies Ltd. This document may be reproduced and distributed providing such a reproduction is complete and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Copyright © 2001, 2002 Baltimore Technologies Ltd. This document may be reproduced and distributed providing such a reproduction is complete and unmodified. Baltimore ACCE Family 010387 FIPS 140-1 Security Policy #12;#12;Table of Contents 3 Baltimore ACCE Family - 010387 FIPS 140-1 Security Policy - 2

  4. Outlook 2002/2003 Secure POP Configuration Settings for PC For Harvard Medical School Local and Remote Usage

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Yi

    Outlook 2002/2003 Secure POP Configuration Settings for PC For Harvard Medical School Local and Remote Usage Updated April 19, 2007 Overview Harvard Medical School supports Microsoft Outlook as a POP: With Outlook installed and open, select the Tools > E-mail accounts menu option. Step 2: Choose the "Add a new

  5. Should one incorporate Mobile-ware in Parallel and Distributed Computation?* Mustafa Sanver, Sathya Priya Durairaju, Ajay Gupta

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gupta, Ajay

    Worldwide wireless LAN equipment shipments (1000s of units) Product Segment 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006

  6. Journal of Fusion Energy, Vol. 19, No. 1, March 2000 ( 2001) Review of the Fusion Materials Research Program

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abdou, Mohamed

    , Livermore, CA 94551. 6 University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI 53706. 7 Columbia University, New York, NY 10027Journal of Fusion Energy, Vol. 19, No. 1, March 2000 ( 2001) Review of the Fusion Materials.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Fusion Energy Sciences Advisory Committee Panel on the Review of the Fusion

  7. Louisiana Tech Strategic Plan 2001-2002 to 2005-2006 Goal 1: Increase opportunities for student access and success

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Selmic, Sandra

    Louisiana Tech Strategic Plan 2001-2002 to 2005-2006 Goal 1: Increase opportunities for student.12, 2.14, and 3.1 BoR Strategic Plan 2001-2005 Link: Objective 1.1, 1.3, 1.4 UL System Strategic Plan Link: Objective 1.1, 1.3, 1.4 BoR/Louisiana Tech University Strategic Plan Link: Objective 1.1, 1.3, 1

  8. Drought and the 2002-2003 El Nio in the Southwest U.S. Glenn A. Tootle1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Piechota, Thomas C.

    following the 11 identified El Nino events during 1923- 2002 are evaluated to determine if currentDrought and the 2002-2003 El Niño in the Southwest U.S. Glenn A. Tootle1 and Thomas C. Piechota2 1 of drought causing water shortages and low lake levels, and now an El Niño event is occurring. This study

  9. Nonradioactive Ambient Air Monitoring at Los Alamos National Laboratory 2001--2002

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    E. Gladney; J.Dewart, C.Eberhart; J.Lochamy

    2004-09-01

    During the spring of 2000, the Cerro Grande forest fire reached Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) and ignited both above-ground vegetation and disposed materials in several landfills. During and after the fire, there was concern about the potential human health impacts from chemicals emitted by the combustion of these Laboratory materials. Consequently, short-term, intensive air-monitoring studies were performed during and shortly after the fire. Unlike the radiological data from many years of AIRNET sampling, LANL did not have an adequate database of nonradiological species under baseline conditions with which to compare data collected during the fire. Therefore, during 2001 the Meteorology and Air Quality Group designed and implemented a new air-monitoring program, entitled NonRadNET, to provide nonradiological background data under normal conditions. The objectives of NonRadNET were to: (1) develop the capability for collecting nonradiological air-monitoring data, (2) conduct monitoring to develop a database of typical background levels of selected nonradiological species in the communities nearest the Laboratory, and (3) determine LANL's potential contribution to nonradiological air pollution in the surrounding communities. NonRadNET ended in late December 2002 with five quarters of data. The purpose of this paper is to organize and describe the NonRadNET data collected over 2001-2002 to use as baseline data, either for monitoring during a fire, some other abnormal event, or routine use. To achieve that purpose, in this paper we will: (1) document the NonRadNET program procedures, methods, and quality management, (2) describe the usual origins and uses of the species measured, (3) compare the species measured to LANL and other area emissions, (4) present the five quarters of data, (5) compare the data to known typical environmental values, and (6) evaluate the data against exposure standards.

  10. Developed Countries' Imposed Standards on Trade of Agricultural Imports from Developing Countries 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cabrera, Raul; Cochran, Matt; Dangelmayr, Lauren; D'Aguilar, Gavin; Lee, Jeongwoo; Speir, Ian; Weigand, Courtney

    2007-01-01

    by the EU has been declining. From being the largest exporter of beef for years, it is now a lesser competitor. Third, occupying a distinct and competitive second tier is the set of smaller exporters that include Argentina, New Zealand, Canada, and India... countries9 0 200 400 600 800 1000 1200 1400 1600 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 ' 0 0 0 m e t r i c t o n s Argentina Australia Brazil Canada EU-15/25 India New Zealand United States Source: USDA PSD Online, available...

  11. Investigation of factors influencing feedlot performance and profitability in the 2001-2002 Texas A&M ranch to rail program- south 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harborth, Karl Walter

    2004-09-30

    Data from the 2001-2002 Texas A&M University Ranch to Rail Program-South were used to determine factors that influence cattle feedlot performance and profitability. Steers (n=860) were classified according to sire (SBIO) and dam (DBIO) biological...

  12. Arrow Lakes Reservoir Fertilization Experiment; Years 4 and 5, Technical Report 2002-2003.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schindler, E.

    2007-02-01

    This report presents the fourth and fifth year (2002 and 2003, respectively) of a five-year fertilization experiment on the Arrow Lakes Reservoir. The goal of the experiment was to increase kokanee populations impacted from hydroelectric development on the Arrow Lakes Reservoir. The impacts resulted in declining stocks of kokanee, a native land-locked sockeye salmon (Oncorhynchus nerka), a key species of the ecosystem. Arrow Lakes Reservoir, located in southeastern British Columbia, has undergone experimental fertilization since 1999. It is modeled after the successful Kootenay Lake fertilization experiment. The amount of fertilizer added in 2002 and 2003 was similar to the previous three years. Phosphorus loading from fertilizer was 52.8 metric tons and nitrogen loading from fertilizer was 268 metric tons. As in previous years, fertilizer additions occurred between the end of April and the beginning of September. Surface temperatures were generally warmer in 2003 than in 2002 in the Arrow Lakes Reservoir from May to September. Local tributary flows to Arrow Lakes Reservoir in 2002 and 2003 were generally less than average, however not as low as had occurred in 2001. Water chemistry parameters in select rivers and streams were similar to previous years results, except for dissolved inorganic nitrogen (DIN) concentrations which were significantly less in 2001, 2002 and 2003. The reduced snow pack in 2001 and 2003 would explain the lower concentrations of DIN. The natural load of DIN to the Arrow system ranged from 7200 tonnes in 1997 to 4500 tonnes in 2003; these results coincide with the decrease in DIN measurements from water samples taken in the reservoir during this period. Water chemistry parameters in the reservoir were similar to previous years of study except for a few exceptions. Seasonal averages of total phosphorus ranged from 2.11 to 7.42 {micro}g/L from 1997 through 2003 in the entire reservoir which were indicative of oligo-mesotrophic conditions. Dissolved inorganic nitrogen concentrations have decreased in 2002 and 2003 compared to previous years. These results indicate that the surface waters in Arrow Lakes Reservoir were approaching nitrogen limitation. Results from the 2003 discrete profile series indicate nitrate concentrations decreased significantly below 25 {micro}g/L (which is the concentration where nitrate is considered limiting to phytoplankton) between June and July at stations in Upper Arrow and Lower Arrow. Nitrogen to phosphorus ratios (weight:weight) were also low during these months indicating that the surface waters were nitrogen deficient. These results indicated that the nitrogen to phosphorus blends of fertilizer added to the reservoir need to be fine tuned and closely monitored on a weekly basis in future years of nutrient addition. Phytoplankton results shifted during 2002 and 2003 compared to previous years. During 2002, there was a co-dominance of potentially 'inedible' diatoms (Fragilaria spp. and Diatoma) and 'greens' (Ulothrix). Large diatom populations occurred in 2003 and these results indicate it may be necessary to alter the frequency and amounts of weekly loads of nitrogen and phosphorus in future years to prevent the growth of inedible diatoms. Zooplankton density in 2002 and 2003, as in previous years, indicated higher densities in Lower Arrow than in Upper Arrow. Copepods and other Cladocera (mainly tiny specimens such as Bosmina sp.) had distinct peaks, higher than in previous years, while Daphnia was not present in higher numbers particularly in Upper Arrow. This density shift in favor to smaller cladocerans was mirrored in a weak biomass increase. In Upper Arrow, total zooplankton biomass decreased from 1999 to 2002, and in 2003 increased slightly, while in Lower Arrow the biomass decreased from 2000-2002. In Lower Arrow the majority of biomass was comprised of Daphnia throughout the study period except in 2002, while in Upper Arrow the total biomass was comprised of copepods from 2000-2003.

  13. Research on Captive Broodstock Programs for Pacific Salmon, 2002-2003 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Berejikian, Barry A. (National Marine Fisheries Service)

    2004-01-01

    The success of captive broodstock programs depends on high in-culture survival, appropriate development of the reproductive system, and the behavior and survival of cultured salmon after release, either as adults or juveniles. Continuing captive broodstock research designed to improve technology is being conducted to cover all major life history stages of Pacific salmon. Current velocity in rearing vessels had little if any effect on reproductive behavior of captively reared steelhead. However, males and females reared in high velocity vessels participated a greater number of spawning events than siblings reared in low velocity tanks. Observations of nesting females and associated males in a natural stream (Hamma Hamma River) were consistent with those observed in a controlled spawning channel. DNA pedigree analyses did not reveal significant differences in the numbers of fry produced by steelhead reared in high and low velocity vessels. To determine the critical period(s) for imprinting for sockeye salmon, juvenile salmon are being exposed to known odorants at key developmental stages. Subsequently they will be tested for development of long-term memories of these odorants. In 2002-2003, the efficacy of EOG analysis for assessing imprinting was demonstrated and will be applied in these and other behavioral and molecular tools in the current work plan. Results of these experiments will be important to determine the critical periods for imprinting for the offspring of captively-reared fish destined for release into natal rivers or lakes. By early August, the oocytes of all of Rapid River Hatchery chinook salmon females returning from the ocean had advanced to the tertiary yolk globule stage; whereas, only some of the captively reared Lemhi River females sampled had advanced to this stage, and the degree of advancement was not dependent on rearing temperature. The mean spawning time of captive Lemhi River females was 3-4 weeks after that of the Rapid River fish. Captive Lemhi River females produced smaller and fewer eggs than the Rapid River females; however, relative fecundity was higher than that of the Rapid River fish. Female coho salmon that ceased or slowed oocyte development in the spring had lower body growth from the previous August onward compared with females that continued oocyte growth. This indicates that growth during the late summer and fall, one year prior to spawning, can determine the decision to mature the following spring. Therefore it is important to maintain the growth of broodstock during the summer/fall period to ensure the continuation of ovary development in the subsequent spring. A combined whole cell vaccine of Renogen with killed R. salmoninarum strain MT239 may be effective in reducing the occurrence of BKD during the period immediately after seawater transfer, but not in yearling seawater-adapted chinook salmon. Control of BKD is likely to require an integrated disease management plan, utilizing three components, namely broodstock segregation, antibiotics, and vaccination. Vaccine results incorporated with antibiotic treatment will be used to work toward an integrated disease management plan to help to reduce the cycle of BKD transmission in the captive stocks to increase survival safely. Patterns of estimated survival in one chinook salmon stock (Grovers Creek)were generally consistent with inbreeding depression: progeny of fish that were full siblings (approximate increment in F of 0.25) survived to return at much lower rates than did progeny of fish that were half siblings (F {approx} 0.125) or unrelated individuals (F {approx} 0). Growth at sea of Grovers Creek Hatchery stock study fish was lower than that of UWH stock fish. Among the inbreeding groups alone, no clear differences in growth were detectable. However, preliminary results suggest the general pattern of growth was opposite that expected if inbreeding depression reduced growth: the highest growth was in progeny of related parents.

  14. Evaluate Bull Trout Movements in the Tucannon and Lower Snake Rivers, 2002-2003 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Faler, Michael P.; Mendel, Glen W.; Fulton, Carl

    2004-04-01

    We collected 279 adult bull trout (Salvelinus confluentus) in the Tucannon River during the Spring and Fall of 2003. Passive Integrated Transponder (PIT) tags were inserted in 191 of them, and we detected existing PIT tags in an additional 31bull trout. Thirty five of these were also surgically implanted with radio-tags, and we monitored the movements of these fish throughout the year. Fourteen radio-tags were recovered shortly after tagging, and as a result, 21 remained in the river through December 31, 2003. Four bull trout that were radio-tagged in spring 2002 were known to survive and carry their tags through the spring and/or summer of 2003. One of these fish spent the winter near river mile (RM) 13.0; the other 3 over-wintered in the vicinity of the Tucannon Hatchery between RM 34 and 36. Twenty-one radio tags from bull trout tagged in 2002 were recovered during the spring and summer, 2003. These tags became stationary the winter of 2002/2003, and were recovered between RM 11 and 55. We were unable to recover the remaining 15 tags from 2002. During the month of July, radio-tagged bull trout exhibited a general upstream movement into the upper reaches of the Tucannon subbasin. We observed some downstream movements of radio-tagged bull trout in mid to late September and throughout October. By late November and early December, radio tagged bull trout were relatively stationary, and were distributed from the headwaters downstream to river mile 6.4, near Lower Monumental Pool. As in 2002, we did not conduct work associated with objectives 2, 3, or 4 of this study, because we were unable to monitor migratory movement of radio-tagged bull trout into the Federal hydropower system on the mainstem Snake River. Transmission tests of submerged ATS model F1830 radio-tags in Lower Granite Pool showed that audible detection and individual tag identification was possible at depths of 20 and 30 ft. Tests were conducted using an ATS R-4000 Receiver equipped with an ''H'' antenna at 200 and 700 feet above water surface from a helicopter. Audible detection and frequency separation were possible at both elevations. Two years of high tag loss, particularly after spawning, has prevented us from documenting fall and winter movements with an adequate sample of radio tagged bull trout. The high transmitter loss after spawning may be a reflection of high natural mortality for large, older age fish that we have been radio tagging to accommodate the longer life transmitters. Therefore, we are planning to reduce the size of the radio tags that we implant, and delay most of our collection and tagging of bull trout until after spawning. These changes are a new approach to try to maximize the number of radio tagged bull trout available post spawning to adequately document fall and winter movements and any use of the Snake River by bull trout from the Tucannon River.

  15. Table 1. State energy-related carbon dioxide emissions by year...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    State energy-related carbon dioxide emissions by year (2000-2011)" "million metric tons of carbon dioxide" ,,,"Change" ,,,"2000 to 2011" "State",2000,2001,2002,...

  16. Annual Report 2002 -2003

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    to graduate top-notch business students, well-versed in business technology, sustainability, entrepreneurship and the global economy. We plan to continue our partner- ship with other OSU academic units, particularly forging

  17. Research on Captive Broodstock Programs for Pacific Salmon; Assessment of Captive Broodstock Technologies, Annual Report 2002-2003.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Berejikian, Barry

    2004-01-01

    The success of captive broodstock programs depends on high in-culture survival, appropriate development of the reproductive system, and the behavior and survival of cultured salmon after release, either as adults or juveniles. Continuing captive broodstock research designed to improve technology is being conducted to cover all major life history stages of Pacific salmon. Current velocity in rearing vessels had little if any effect on reproductive behavior of captively reared steelhead. However, males and females reared in high velocity vessels participated a greater number of spawning events than siblings reared in low velocity tanks. Observations of nesting females and associated males in a natural stream (Hamma Hamma River) were consistent with those observed in a controlled spawning channel. DNA pedigree analyses did not reveal significant differences in the numbers of fry produced by steelhead reared in high and low velocity vessels. To determine the critical period(s) for imprinting for sockeye salmon, juvenile salmon are being exposed to known odorants at key developmental stages. Subsequently they will be tested for development of long-term memories of these odorants. In 2002-2003, the efficacy of EOG analysis for assessing imprinting was demonstrated and will be applied in these and other behavioral and molecular tools in the current work plan. Results of these experiments will be important to determine the critical periods for imprinting for the offspring of captively-reared fish destined for release into natal rivers or lakes. By early August, the oocytes of all of Rapid River Hatchery chinook salmon females returning from the ocean had advanced to the tertiary yolk globule stage; whereas, only some of the captively reared Lemhi River females sampled had advanced to this stage, and the degree of advancement was not dependent on rearing temperature. The mean spawning time of captive Lemhi River females was 3-4 weeks after that of the Rapid River fish. Captive Lemhi River females produced smaller and fewer eggs than the Rapid River females; however, relative fecundity was higher than that of the Rapid River fish. Female coho salmon that ceased or slowed oocyte development in the spring had lower body growth from the previous August onward compared with females that continued oocyte growth. This indicates that growth during the late summer and fall, one year prior to spawning, can determine the decision to mature the following spring. Therefore it is important to maintain the growth of broodstock during the summer/fall period to ensure the continuation of ovary development in the subsequent spring. A combined whole cell vaccine of Renogen with killed R. salmoninarum strain MT239 may be effective in reducing the occurrence of BKD during the period immediately after seawater transfer, but not in yearling seawater-adapted chinook salmon. Control of BKD is likely to require an integrated disease management plan, utilizing three components, namely broodstock segregation, antibiotics, and vaccination. Vaccine results incorporated with antibiotic treatment will be used to work toward an integrated disease management plan to help to reduce the cycle of BKD transmission in the captive stocks to increase survival safely. Patterns of estimated survival in one chinook salmon stock (Grovers Creek) were generally consistent with inbreeding depression: progeny of fish that were full siblings (approximate increment in F of 0.25) survived to return at much lower rates than did progeny of fish that were half siblings (F {approx} 0.125) or unrelated individuals (F {approx} 0). Growth at sea of Grovers Creek Hatchery stock study fish was lower than that of UWH stock fish. Among the inbreeding groups alone, no clear differences in growth were detectable. However, preliminary results suggest the general pattern of growth was opposite that expected if inbreeding depression reduced growth: the highest growth was in progeny of related parents.

  18. INFRARED OBSERVATIONS OF THE MILLISECOND PULSAR BINARY J1023+0038: EVIDENCE FOR THE SHORT-TERM NATURE OF ITS INTERACTING PHASE IN 2000-2001

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Xuebing; Wang, Zhongxiang [Key Laboratory for Research in Galaxies and Cosmology, Shanghai Astronomical Observatory, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 80 Nandan Road, Shanghai 200030 (China)] [Key Laboratory for Research in Galaxies and Cosmology, Shanghai Astronomical Observatory, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 80 Nandan Road, Shanghai 200030 (China); Morrell, Nidia [Las Campanas Observatory, Observatories of the Carnegie Institution of Washington, La Serena (Chile)] [Las Campanas Observatory, Observatories of the Carnegie Institution of Washington, La Serena (Chile)

    2013-02-20

    We report our multi-band infrared (IR) imaging of the transitional millisecond pulsar system J1023+0038, a rare pulsar binary known to have an accretion disk in 2000-2001. The observations were carried out with ground-based and space telescopes from near-IR to far-IR wavelengths. We detected the source in near-IR JH bands and Spitzer 3.6 and 4.5 {mu}m mid-IR channels. Combined with the previously reported optical spectrum of the source, the IR emission is found to arise from the companion star, with no excess emission detected in the wavelength range. Because our near-IR fluxes are nearly equal to those obtained by the 2MASS all-sky survey in 2000 February, the result indicates that the binary did not contain the accretion disk at the time, whose existence would have raised the near-IR fluxes to twice larger values. Our observations have thus established the short-term nature of the interacting phase seen in 2000-2001: the accretion disk existed for at most 2.5 yr. The binary was not detected by the WISE all-sky survey carried out in 2010 at its 12 and 22 {mu}m bands and our Herschel far-IR imaging at 70 and 160 {mu}m. Depending on the assumed properties of the dust, the resulting flux upper limits provide a constraint of <3 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 22}-3 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 25} g on the mass of the dust grains that possibly exist as the remnants of the previously seen accretion disk.

  19. UNECE Timber Committee Market Discussions 8th October 2003

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1994 1996 1998 2000 Million m 3 European Overseas Trade (excl. Russia &CIS) Exports Imports Europe 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 Million m3 Domestic supply Exports Imports Production in net exports -15 -10 -5 0 5 10 15 20 25 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 Million m3

  20. PHILADELPHIA UNIVERSITY (2000-2001)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    PHILADELPHIA UNIVERSITY 1115 : : (2000/2006. (Smart Rooms). . #12;PHILADELPHIA UNIVERSITY : : 2009/2010 (658) (29 2009/2010: 2009/2010 (10) : 3 #12;PHILADELPHIA UNIVERSITY 3 1 3 2009

  1. School of Mines 2002 2003

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Programs.........................................35 Chemical Engineering .........................................37 Chemistry and Geochemistry ...............................39 Economics and Business .....................................41 Engineering..........................................................45 Environmental Science

  2. Origin State Destination State

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    rates for coal, state to state, STB data Origin State Destination State 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2001-2009 2008-2009 Alabama Alabama W W W W W W W W W W W...

  3. HALF EMPTY As Men Surge Back into Computing, Women are Left Behind

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Female Male 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Change the Equation is a nonprofit, nonpartisan, CEO-led initiative that is mobilizing the business...

  4. B.Sc.)(-M.Sc. )1989,1996.(Ph.D. )2001.( -,.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rimon, Elon

    " " " B.Sc.)(-M.Sc. )1989,1996.(Ph.D. )2001.( - ,. : - , , . - ,DTM;" Diplome d' Lngeneur)1990( - -Brussels Free University)1995( -Ph.D.)2000( . - )2001-2002( )2002( .-M.S.),1996( .M.S.)1998(-Ph.D.)2001( +) (-CALTECH. - -MIT)2001-2002(, Irvine

  5. Rapport annuel Novembre 2001

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Charette, André

    Rapport annuel 2000-2001 Novembre 2001 Direction des bibliothèques Direction générale #12;RAPPORT ANNUEL 2000-2001 Direction des bibliothèques Université de Montréal2 TABLE DES MATIÈRES 1. Résumé des. Perspectives pour l'année 2001-2002 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20 8.1 Projets d

  6. South Carolina Academic Year 2001-2002

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kunkle, Tom

    in Cohort Type of Assessment Test Code Total Pass % Pass Total Pass % Pass Academic Content Area Education 96% 814 775 95% Elementary Ed.: Content Area Exercises 0012 430 409 95% Early Childhood Education 0020 28 28 100% 401 400 100% Biology and General Science 0030 1 1 100% 54 51 94% English Language

  7. Analise Matematica III Semestre 2000/2001

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ferreira dos Santos, Pedro

    . Teoremas da Diverg^encia e de Stokes e Aplica¸c~oes VII. Complementos de C´alculo Integral VIII. Aplica.Magalh~aes, "Integrais em Variedades e Aplica¸c~oes", Texto Ed., 1993. [M3] - L.Magalh~aes, "Complementos de C´alculo Diferencial", AEIST, 1984. [S] - M.Spivak, "Calculus on Manifolds", Benjamin, 1965. As refer^encias principais

  8. PNNL: Breakthroughs Magazine - Winter 2000-2001

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    0-2001 issue Spotlight on nanotechnology Breakthroughs Magazine Breakthroughs Archive In this issue... Cover Editor's Screen Contents At A Glance Special Report (cover story)...

  9. Analise Matematica III Semestre 2000/2001

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Natário, José

    por arcos. Teorema fundamental do c´alculo para integrais de linha. Conserva¸c~ao de energia mec^anica vectorial seja gradiente. C´alculo de fun¸c~oes potenciais. 12. Homotopia. Invari^ancia de integrais de

  10. NATIONAL ASTRONOMY & IONOSPHERE CENTER

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    60 80 100 120 140 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 Fiscal year NumberofPublications Astronomy Program SAS2005 Radio Astronomy Program Passive Astronomy Planetary Radar Subtotal SAS Program TOTAL FY2001NATIONAL ASTRONOMY & IONOSPHERE CENTER Publication Statistics FY2001 ­ FY2005 September 2005

  11. Prudhoe Bay Oil Production Optimization: Using Virtual

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mohaghegh, Shahab

    1 Prudhoe Bay Oil Production Optimization: Using Virtual Intelligence Techniques, Stage One: Neural total field oil production by optimizing the gas discharge rates and pressures at the separation handling capacity and subsequent oil production. 10 YEAR AVERAGE AMBIENT 1990-2000 & 2001, 2002 Averages

  12. ESD Publications 1995-2002 Sorted by year, pub type, first author

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ESD Publications 1995-2002 Sorted by year, pub type, first author 1995 | 1996 | 1997 | 1998 | 1999 | 2000 | 2001 | 2002 1995 Book Sections 1. Hill, W.R., A.D. Steinman, and B.H. McFarland, BOOK SECTION: Periphyton and Bryophytes. 1995, North American Benthological Soc. p. 1-4. 2. Hunsaker, C.T., BOOK SECTION

  13. A review of the European particleboard market

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    % 30% Others Switzerland Norway Finland Greece Sweden Portugal Czech Republic Turkey Austria UK Belgium Spain Italy France Germany Source: E.P.F. Top 7 countries = 80% #12;Production Breakdown per CountryProduction Breakdown per Country 0 2 4 6 8 10 Germany France Italy Spain Belgium UK Austria 1999 2000 2001 2002

  14. Annual Report for the Year 2001-2002

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cambridge University Library

    2002-01-01

    …???? #2; A survey of the entrance of Sierra Leona River, by Capt’n Thompson, of His Majesty’s Ship Nautilas (London ????) #2; A new map of Ireland. Drawn from the survey made by Sr Wm Petty… [????] Music #2; Mendelssohn, An anthem… to Charles Bayles...

  15. Annual Report for the Year 2001-2002

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cambridge University Library

    2002-01-01

    to receive, catalogue and store these publications for the use of current and future generations of students and scholars. With the 4 300 250 200 150 100 50 0 1986 1987 1988 1989 1990 1991 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997... bequest from the late Mr F. C. Goodyear, a new project was started in January ???? to convert the list into electronic form and mount it on a database compatible with that being used for other Cambridge archives. The project is expected to be completed...

  16. Forrest Ranch Acquisition, Annual Report 2001-2002.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, Brent

    2003-08-01

    Through their John Day Basin Office, the Confederated Tribes of Warm Springs Reservation of Oregon (Tribes) acquired the Forrest Ranch during July of 2002. The property consists of two parcels located in the John Day subbasin within the Columbia basin. The mainstem parcel consists of 3,503 acres and is located 1/2 mile to the east of Prairie City, Oregon on the mainstem of the John Day River. The middle fork parcel consists of 820 acres and is located one mile to the west of the town of Austin, OR on the middle fork John Day River. The Forrest Ranch Project is under a memorandum of agreement with the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) to provide an annual written report generally describing the real property interests of the project and management activities undertaken or in progress. The Forrest Ranch acquisition was funded by BPA as part of their program to protect, mitigate, and enhance fish and wildlife habitat affected by the operation of their hydroelectric facilities on the Columbia River and its tributaries. Following lengthy negotiations with the BPA and property owner, the Tribes were able to conclude the acquisition of the Forrest Ranch in July of 2002. The intent of the acquisition project was to partially mitigate fish and wildlife impacts for the John Day Dam on the Columbia River as outlined in the Northwest Power Planning Council's Wildlife Program (NPPC 1994, section 11.1, section 7.6). While the Tribes hold fee-title to the property, the BPA has assured a level of program funding through a memorandum of agreement and annual statement of work. As early as 1997, the Tribes identified this property as a priority for restoration in the John Day basin. In 2000, the Tribes arranged an agreement with the landowner to seek funds for the acquisition of both the Middle Fork and upper Mainstem John Day River holdings of Mr. John Forrest. This property had been a priority of not only the Tribes, but of many other basin natural resource agencies. The contract period was the first year of the program with December 2001 through July 2nd 2002 being previous to acquisition of the property. The majority of the activities conducted under the contract period were spent on O&M and pre acquisition activities.

  17. REPORT TO CONGRESS FOR FISCAL YEARS 2001-2002

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Development (HUD) and the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). CDC-funded state and local childhood lead

  18. Analise Matematica III 1 o Semestre 2001/2002

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ferreira dos Santos, Pedro

    por arcos. Teorema fundamental do câ??alculo para integrais de linha. Conservaâ?ºcâ?ao de energia mecâ??anica vectorial seja gradiante. Câ??alculo de funâ?ºcâ?oes potenciais. 12. Homotopia. Invariâ??ancia de integrais de

  19. Analise Matematica III 1 o semestre de 2000/2001

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ferreira dos Santos, Pedro

    # 3}, estâ??a imerso numa corrente de â?? agua cujo campo de velocidades â??e dado pela fâ??ormula F(x, y, z) = (2yz cos(y 2 ), 2xz cos(x 2 ), 1). a) Mostre que a quantidade de â?? agua no interior do filtro se mantâ??em constante, supondo que a densidade da â??agua â??e constante igual a 1. b) Usando o teorema de Stokes, calcule o

  20. Analise Matematica III semestre de 2000/2001

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nunes, João Pimentel

    }, est´a imerso numa corrente de ´agua cujo campo de velocidades ´e dado pela f´ormula F(x, y, z) = (2yz cos(y2 ), 2xz cos(x2 ), 1). a) Mostre que a quantidade de ´agua no interior do filtro se mant´em constante, supondo que a densidade da ´agua ´e constante igual a 1. b) Usando o teorema de Stokes, calcule o

  1. Common Data Set 2000-2001 A. GENERAL INFORMATION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Selmic, Sandra

    application site on the Internet? If so, please specify: no A2. Source of institutional control (check one of the following categories as of the institution's official fall reporting date or as of October 15, 2000. FULL of undergraduate students for each of the following categories as of the institution's official fall reporting date

  2. Analise Matematica III 1 o semestre de 2000/2001

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Natário, José

    sen # z cos # # z 2 + 1 # z 2 + 1 cos # z sen # # z 2 + 1 0 1 # # # # # . Esta matriz tem caracterâ??�tica

  3. Analise Matematica III 1 o semestre de 2000/2001

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Natário, José

    cos(#) 0 0 1 # # . Esta matriz tem caracterâ??�tica 2 pois o produto externo (- sen #, cos #, 0) Ã? (0, 0

  4. Analise Matematica III 1 o Semestre 2000/2001

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Natário, José

    por arcos. Teorema fundamental do câ??alculo para integrais de linha. Conservaâ?ºcâ?ao de energia mecâ??anica vectorial seja gradiente. Câ??alculo de funâ?ºcâ?oes potenciais. 12. Homotopia. Invariâ??ancia de integrais de

  5. Fifteenmile Creek Riparian Buffers Project, Annual Report 2002-2003.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Graves, Ron

    2004-02-01

    This project implements riparian buffer systems in the Mid-Columbia, addressing limiting factors identified in the Fifteenmile Subbasin Summary, June 30, 2000. The project is providing the technical planning support needed to implement at least 36 riparian buffer system contracts on approximately 872 acres covering an estimated 40 miles of anadromous fish streams over a three year period. During this second year of the project, 11 buffer contracts were implemented on 10.9 miles of stream. Buffer widths averaged 132 ft. on each side of the stream. Implementation included prescribed plantings, fencing, and related practices. Actual implementation costs, lease payments, and maintenance costs are borne by existing USDA programs: Conservation Reserve and Conservation Reserve Enhancement Programs. The lease period of each contract may vary between 10 to 15 years. During this year the average was 14.6 years. The total value of contracts established this year is $666,121 compared with $71,115 in Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) contract costs to provide the technical support needed to get the contracts implemented. This project provides technical staffing to conduct assessments and develop plans to help keep pace with the growing backlog of potential riparian buffer projects. Word of mouth from satisfied customers has brought in many new sign-ups during the year. In addition, specific outreach efforts targeting the orchard areas of the county began to bear fruit with orchardists sign-ups as the project year ended. Progress this second year of project includes only work accomplished in the Fifteenmile subbasin. A similar but separate effort to implement buffers in the Columbia Plateau Province was initiated during the year under project number 2002-019-00. This project supports RPA 150 and 153 as required under the Federal Hydropower System biological opinion.

  6. CALCULO NUMERICO II Curso 2002/2003 (2 o

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Quirós, Fernando

    de m´etodos lineales multipaso. B. M´etodos num´ericos para ecuaciones en derivadas parciales. 4 ordinarias y el segundo a m´etodos para ecuaciones en derivadas parciales. La fecha l´imite para entregar las ecuaciones diferenciales ordinarias (PVI). 1. M´etodos de un paso. 1.1. M´etodo de Euler. Regla del trapecio

  7. Forrest Ranch Management and Implementation, Annual Report 2002-2003.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, Brent

    2004-01-01

    Through their John Day Basin Office, the Confederated Tribes of Warm Springs Reservation of Oregon (Tribes) acquired the Forrest Ranch during July of 2002. The property consists of two parcels located in the John Day subbasin within the Columbia basin. The mainstem parcel consists of 3,503 acres and is located 1/2 mile to the east of Prairie City, Oregon on the mainstem of the John Day River. The middle fork parcel consists of 820 acres and is located one mile to the west of the town of Austin, OR on the middle fork John Day River. The Forrest Ranch Project is under a memorandum of agreement with the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) to provide an annual written report generally describing the real property interests of the project and management activities undertaken or in progress. The Forrest Ranch acquisition was funded by BPA as part of their program to protect, mitigate, and enhance fish and wildlife habitat affected by the operation of their hydroelectric facilities on the Columbia River and its tributaries. Following lengthy negotiations with the BPA and property owner, the Tribes were able to conclude the acquisition of the Forrest Ranch in July of 2002. The intent of the acquisition project was to partially mitigate fish and wildlife impacts for the John Day Dam on the Columbia River as outlined in the Northwest Power Planning Council's Wildlife Program (NPPC 1994, section 11.1, section 7.6). While the Tribes hold fee-title to the property, the BPA has assured a level of program funding through a memorandum of agreement and annual statement of work. As early as 1997, the Tribes identified this property as a priority for restoration in the John Day basin. In 2000, the Tribes arranged an agreement with the landowner to seek funds for the acquisition of both the Middle Fork and upper Mainstem John Day River holdings of Mr. John Forrest. This property had been a priority of not only the Tribes, but of many other basin natural resource agencies. The contract period was the first year of the program with December 2001 through July 2nd 2002 being previous to acquisition of the property. The majority of the activities conducted under the contract period were spent on O&M and pre acquisition activities.

  8. 2001-2003 CATALOG UPDATE Changes effective 2002-2003

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gering, Jon C.

    . Area I LLFL 429 Studies in Chinese: 3rd Year I LLFL 429 Studies in Chinese: 3rd Year II JAPN 301 Chinese I CHIN 213 Intermediate Chinese II LLFL 429 Studies in Chinese: 3rd Year I LLFL 429 Studies in Chinese: 3rd Year II JAPN 201 Intermediate Japanese I JAPN 202 Intermediate Japanese II JAPN 301 Advanced

  9. Hangman Restoration Project, Annual Report 2002-2003.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Coeur d'Alene Tribe

    2003-10-01

    Progress has been made in defining the level of work that needs to be accomplished in the Hangman Watershed in order to restore a viable riparian system and hydrology. The end goal is to use wildlife habitat to protect streams and provide water for instream fish habitats. In order to define the most expedient means of attaining that goal an Instream Flow/Watershed Hydrology Study was initiated. The study is intended to be comprehensive in order to determine the potential of increasing base flow with Hangman Watershed Streams and predict available fish habitats for the range of flow level possibilities. The Study Plan and work for the first field season was contracted and the Plan and end of field season reports are included with this Annual Report. The initial draft of the wildlife portion of the Monitoring and Evaluation Plan was completed and presented to the Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife Authority Wildlife Committee. The Committee felt that the Basin Hydrology Study needed to be closer to completion before the bulk of wildlife monitoring should be implemented. The extent of the landscape that must be restored in order to facilitate the needed stream flows may not be large enough to affect the population levels of the Plan's target species. The main result of the Committee review of the Monitoring and Evaluation Plan however, was that since the Hangman Restoration Project is not a HU driven wildlife mitigation project than the Wildlife Committee does not have a role to play since their focus is wildlife HU crediting projects. Further work on the wildlife portion of the Monitoring and Evaluation Plan is suspended until the crediting issues surrounding the Hangman Restoration Project are settled. Certain aspects of the Plan, such as the land bird, amphibian, reptile and beaver monitoring can be implemented in the spring of the coming year because monitoring these species and groups needs to be accomplished regardless of crediting status and baseline data is needed for these. Data from the Hangman Creek Watershed from portions upstream and east of the Coeur d'Alene Indian Reservation were included in the Second Iteration of the Habitat Prioritization Plan. These data were gathered both by the Coeur d'Alene Tribe and Idaho's Department of Environmental Quality. The addition of this portion of the Watershed in the Prioritization Plan fills a gap that the lack of data left in the first draft of the Plan. The streams in these upper headwaters support remnant salmonid populations and are close enough to be integrated with the streams and trout populations on the Reservation. The addition of this area strengthens the base from which the Hangman Restoration Project can work to secure and expand resident fish populations. An extensive 2-year search for historic photos of the upper portion of the Hangman Watershed was completed during this annual funding cycle. The disappointing result is that few photographs were acquired. One excellent panoramic view of the Upper Hangman Watershed from Tekoa Mountain was recovered and photos of this view were taken for comparison. The task of finding historic photos has been removed from future Scopes of Work, however search for photos will continue as part of the Project's public outreach. The notable exception to the lack of historic photos is the purchase, digitizing and GIS registry of 1947 aerial photo coverage of the entire Hangman Creek Watershed east of the Washington/Idaho State Boarder. In addition, 1933 aerial photo coverage of most of this same area is being registered to our GIS system. These 1933 photos were available to the Tribe prior to the initiation of this Project; however these photos are being registered partly as a result of requests made from this Project. The process of developing a map of potential vegetation types for the Hangman Watershed has benefited from establishment of an Interagency Agreement with the U.S. Geologic Survey to hire a Scientific Advisor. The Scientific Advisor has assisted with the design of a scheme to sample remnant native vegetation within an

  10. Earth Sciences Division Research Summaries 2002-2003

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bodvarsson, G.S.

    2003-11-01

    Research in earth and atmospheric sciences is becoming increasingly important in light of the energy, climate change, and environmental issues facing the United States and the world. The development of new energy resources other than hydrocarbons and the safe disposal of nuclear waste and greenhouse gases (such as carbon dioxide and methane) are critical to the future energy needs and environmental safety of this planet. In addition, the cleanup of many contaminated sites in the U.S., along with the preservation and management of our water supply, remain key challenges for us as well as future generations. Addressing these energy, climate change, and environmental issues requires the timely integration of earth sciences' disciplines (such as geology, hydrology, oceanography, climatology, geophysics, geochemistry, geomechanics, ecology, and environmental sciences). This integration will involve focusing on fundamental crosscutting concerns that are common to many of these issues. A primary focus will be the characterization, imaging, and manipulation of fluids in the earth. Such capabilities are critical to many DOE applications, from environmental restoration to energy extraction and optimization. The Earth Sciences Division (ESD) of the Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab) is currently addressing many of the key technical issues described above. In this document, we present summaries of many of our current research projects. While it is not a complete accounting, it is representative of the nature and breadth of our research effort. We are proud of our scientific efforts, and we hope that you will find our research useful and exciting. Any comments on our research are appreciated and can be sent to me personally. This report is divided into five sections that correspond to the major research programs in the Earth Sciences Division: (1) Fundamental and Exploratory Research; (2) Nuclear Waste; (3) Energy Resources; (4) Environmental Remediation Technology; and (5) Climate Variability and Carbon Management. These programs draw from each of ESD's disciplinary departments: Microbial Ecology and Environmental Engineering, Geophysics and Geomechanics, Geochemistry, and Hydrogeology and Reservoir Dynamics. Short descriptions of these departments are provided as introductory material. A list of publications for the period from January 2002 to June 2003, along with a listing of our personnel, are appended to the end of this report.

  11. Kootenai River Focus Watershed Coordination, 2002-2003 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Munson, Bob; Munson, Vicki; Rogers, Rox

    2003-10-01

    The Kootenai River Network Inc. (KRN) was incorporated in Montana in early 1995 with a mission ''to involve stakeholders in the protection and restoration of the chemical, physical and biological integrity of the Kootenai River Basin waters''. The KRN operates with funding from donations, membership dues, private, state and federal grants, and with funding through the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) for a Focus Watershed Coordinator Program. The Focus Watershed Program is administered to KRN as of October 2001, through a Memorandum of Understanding. Katie Randall resigned her position as Watershed Coordinator in late January 2003 and Munson Consulting was contracted to fill that position through the BPA contract period ending May 30, 2003. To improve communications with in the Kootenai River watershed, the board and staff engaged watershed stakeholders in a full day KRN watershed conference on May 15 and 16 in Bonners Ferry, Idaho. This Annual General Meeting was a tremendous success with over 75 participants representing over 40 citizen groups, tribes and state/provincial/federal agencies from throughout northern Montana and Idaho as well as British Columbia and Alberta. Membership in the KRN increased during the course of the BPA 02/03 grant period. The board of directors grew in numbers during this same time frame and an Advisory Council was formed to assist in transboundary efforts while developing two reorganized KRN committees (Habitat/Restoration/Monitoring (HRM) and Communication/Education/Outreach (CEO)). These committees will serve pivotal roles in communications, outreach, and education about watershed issues, as well as habitat restoration work being accomplished throughout the entire watershed. During this BPA grant period, the KRN has capitalized on the transboundary interest in the Kootenai River watershed. Jim and Laura Duncan of Kimberley, British Columbia, have been instrumental volunteers who have acted as Canadian liaisons to the KRN. As a result, restoration work is in the planning stages for Canadian tributaries that flow into the Moyie River in northern Idaho and the Yaak River in northwest Montana.

  12. Lake Pend Oreille Predation Research, Annual Report 2002-2003.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bassista, Thomas

    2004-02-01

    During August 2002 we conducted a hydroacoustic survey to enumerate pelagic fish >406 mm in Lake Pend Oreille, Idaho. The purpose of this survey was to determine a collective lakewide biomass estimate of pelagic bull trout Salvelinus confluentus, rainbow trout Oncorhynchus mykiss, and lake trout S. namaycush and compare it to pelagic prey (kokanee salmon O. nerka) biomass. By developing hydroacoustic techniques to determine the pelagic predator to prey ratio, we can annually monitor their balance. Hydroacoustic surveys were also performed during December 2002 and February 2003 to investigate the effectiveness of autumn and winter surveys for pelagic predators. The inherent problem associated with hydroacoustic sampling is the inability to directly identify fish species. Therefore, we utilized sonic tracking techniques to describe rainbow trout and lake trout habitat use during our winter hydroacoustic survey to help identify fish targets from the hydroacoustic echograms. During August 2002 we estimated there were 39,044 pelagic fish >406 mm in Lake Pend Oreille (1.84 f/ha). Based on temperature and depth utilization, two distinct groups of pelagic fish >406 mm were located during August; one group was located between 10 and 35 m and the other between 40 and 70 m. The biomass for pelagic fish >406 mm during August 2002 was 73 t (metric ton). This would account for a ratio of 1 kg of pelagic predator for every 2.63 kg of kokanee prey, assuming all pelagic fish >406 mm are predators. During our late fall and winter hydroacoustic surveys, pelagic fish >406 mm were observed at lake depths between 20 and 90 m. During late fall and winter, we tracked three rainbow trout (168 habitat observations) and found that they mostly occupied pelagic areas and predominantly stayed within the top 10 m of the water column. During late fall (one lake trout) and winter (four lake trout), we found that lake trout (184 habitat observations) utilized benthic-nearshore areas 65% of the time and were found in the pelagic area only 35% of the time. Lake trout were found at depths between 10 and 90 m (average was approximately 30 m). Based on hydroacoustic surveys of pelagic fish >406 mm and habitat use of sonic tagged rainbow trout and lake trout during late fall and winter, we conclude that hydroacoustic sampling during those times would be ineffective at acquiring an accurate pelagic predator population estimate and recommend conducting abundance estimates for pelagic predators when Lake Pend Oreille is thermally stratified (i.e. August).

  13. VXS, A High Speed Cu Switch Fabric

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kepner, Jeremy

    interconnects ­ PCI-X chip to chip interconnect ­ PCI-X mezzanines ­ Point to point intra-connects ­ Point 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005-10 · 8X speed improvement · Backwards compatible · VITA 1.5 2eSST/PCI-X VMEbus 2eSST/PCI-X VMEbus · PCI-X Mezzanine Cards · PMCX & PrPMCX · 64b/133MHz based · VITA 39 PMCXPMCX

  14. Mississippi Floods - Designing a Shifting Landscape [EDRA / Places Awards, 2001-2002 -- Research

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Horwitz, Jamie; Bressi, Todd W

    2002-01-01

    da Cunha, Mississippi Floods (New Haven: Yale UniversityMississippi Floods: Designing aShifting Landscape “Mississippi Floods” investigates how

  15. Colorado School of Mines Graduate Bulletin 2001-2002 1 School of Mines

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ................................................. 11 Facilities and Academic Support ................ 14 Arthur Lakes Library Classification ...... 18 General Registration Requirements................... 18 Research Registration ...................................

  16. Council on East Asian Libraries Statistics 2001-2002 For North American Institutions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Doll, Vickie; Simpson, Fung-yin Kuo

    2003-02-01

    amzJPNx03 850lootca0 121cm m r 10000 CM 8472CM wem106e0t law131wawT www1144T- COeco314 2 0 0 0 0 0 io 0 io r 0 h r oi 0 0 0 05.5 ozzCHNXu 780 8162CM nee200meCM 4501ame 4461T r 50m 25cm gam978f0 143cr bno225880cmCM 68722bbsCCM 27CM 910 4671t nam279h... amzJPNx03 850lootca0 121cm m r 10000 CM 8472CM wem106e0t law131wawT www1144T- COeco314 2 0 0 0 0 0 io 0 io r 0 h r oi 0 0 0 05.5 ozzCHNXu 780 8162CM nee200meCM 4501ame 4461T r 50m 25cm gam978f0 143cr bno225880cmCM 68722bbsCCM 27CM 910 4671t nam279h...

  17. An alise Matem atica III 2 o semestre de 2001/2002

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Granja, Gustavo

    ; y; u; v) = (0; 0). As derivadas parciais das fun#24;c~oes u(x; y) e v(x; y) calculam-se derivando estas equa#24;c~oes; obtem-se um sistema em que as inc#19;ognitas s~ao as derivadas parciais. Para (ou vice-versa). No sistema que se obtem quando se deriva pela segunda vez aparecem todas as derivadas

  18. Technology and Space - Sustainable Architecture and the Blueprint Farm [EDRA / Places Awards, 2001-2002 -- Research

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moore, Steven A

    2002-01-01

    orien- tation toward architecture, technology or place willTechnology and Place: Sustainable Architecture and thebook Technology and Place: Sustainable Architecture and the

  19. Technology and Space - Sustainable Architecture and the Blueprint Farm [EDRA / Places Awards, 2001-2002 -- Research

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moore, Steven A

    2002-01-01

    and Place: Sustainable Architecture and the Blueprint Farmand Place: Sustainable Architecture and the Blueprint Farm,no common vision of sustainable architecture, agriculture or

  20. Biological Invasions 3: 201210, 2001. 2002 Kluwer Academic Publishers. Printed in the Netherlands.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boudouresque, Charles F.

    Technologie, l'Energia e l'Ambiente, Centro Ricerche Ambiente Marino, C.P. 224, 19100 La Spezia, Italy; 12 ­ Ente per le Nuove Technologie, l'Energia e l'Ambiente (National-Italian-Committee for Research, Campus de Luminy, 13288 Marseille Cedex 9, France; 6 Dipartimento di Scienze dell'Uomo e dell'Ambiente

  1. Doppler Sodar Report, 2001/2002 Season Ian Renfrew and Russ Ladkin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Renfrew, Ian

    , ten solar panels and ten wind generators. A Tattletale logger monitors the APS along with a standard cracked glass. This was probably due to impact or from excessive vibration of the wind generators. It has in the array to send sound pulses in different directions and thus obtain a three dimensional wind profile from

  2. Technology and Space - Sustainable Architecture and the Blueprint Farm [EDRA / Places Awards, 2001-2002 -- Research

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moore, Steven A

    2002-01-01

    and Place: Sustainable Architecture and the Blueprint Farmand Place: Sustainable Architecture and the Blueprint Farm,and Place: Sustainable Architecture and the Blueprint Farm,

  3. Hydrologic Resources Management Program and Underground Test Area Project FY 2001-2002 Progress Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rose, T P; Kersting, A B; Harris, L J; Hudson, G B; Smith, D K; Williams, R W; Loewen, D R; Nelson, E J; Allen, P G; Ryerson, F J; Pawloski, G A; Laue, C A; Moran, J E

    2003-08-15

    This report contains highlights of FY 2001 and 2002 technical studies conducted by the Analytical and Nuclear Chemistry Division (ANCD) at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) in support of the Hydrologic Resources Management Program (HRMP) and the Underground Test Area (UGTA) Project. These programs are administered by the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration, Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO) through the Defense Programs and Environmental Restoration Divisions, respectively. HRMP-sponsored work emphasizes the Defense Programs goal of responsible management of natural resources at the NTS, while UGTA-funded work focuses on defining the extent of radionuclide contamination in NTS groundwater resulting from underground nuclear testing. The report is organized on a topical basis, and contains eight chapters that reflect the range of technical work performed by LLNL-ANCD in support of HRMP and UGTA. Chapter 1 describes recent hot well sampling efforts at the NTS, and presents the results of chemical and isotopic analyses of groundwater samples from six near-field wells. These include the Cambric (UE-5n), Bilby (U-3cn PS No.2), Bourbon (UE-7nS), Nash (UE-2ce), Tybo/Benham (ER-20-5 No.3), and Almendro (U-19v PS No.1ds) sites. The data generated by the hot well program is vital to the development and validation of contaminant transport models at the NTS. Chapter 2 discusses the results of xenon isotope measurements of groundwater samples from the six near-field wells described in Chapter 1. This work demonstrates that fission xenon is present in the water at levels that are readily measurable and highlights the significant differences in xenon concentrations and isotopic abundances at different sites. These differences provide insight into the early cooling history of nuclear test cavities, and may assist in predicting the distribution of the source term in the near-field environment. Chapter 3 is an investigation of the distribution and abundance of actinides in a nuclear test cavity and chimney. This work demonstrates that early-time processes can widely disperse actinides at low concentrations outside the melt glass, implying that melt glass dissolution may not be the sole mechanism for the release of actinides to groundwater. The study also provides evidence for the isotopic fractionation of plutonium under the extreme conditions accompanying nuclear explosions. In Chapter 4, X-ray absorption spectroscopy measurements were used to determine the redox state of Fe and U in nuclear melt glass samples from the NTS. Both elements were found to occur in mixed valence states (Fe{sup 2+}/Fe{sup 3+} and U{sup 5+}/U{sup 6+}) in all samples. Comparison of the Fe and U redox states with published redox studies of synthetic glasses suggests that plutonium is predominantly in the Pu{sup 4+} oxidation state in the melt glasses. In Chapter 5, alpha autoradiography is used in a NTS field study to investigate the spatial distribution and transport of actinides in soils, and to help identify the size distribution and morphology of the actinide particles. It was found that {alpha}-emitting radionuclides have moved to at least 39 cm depth in the soil profile, far deeper than expected. The methodology that was developed could easily be applied to other field locations where actinides are dispersed in the soil zone. Chapter 6 summarizes the development of a method for measuring environmental levels of {sup 241}Am on the multi-collector inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometer. The method detection limit of 0.017 pCi/L is about two times lower than the best analyses possible by alpha spectrometry. Chapter 7 describes a chlorine-36 study of vertical groundwater transport processes in Frenchman Flat. Mass balance calculations developed from a {sup 36}Cl mixing model at well ER-5-3 No.2 are used to estimate vertical transport fluxes and average vertical flow velocities through the thick volcanic section underlying the basin. The study also documents the variations in {sup 36}Cl/Cl ratios within the three princ

  4. Mitigation for the Construction and Operation of Libby Dam, 2001-2002 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dunnigan, James L.; Marotz, Brian L.; DeShazer, Jay (Montana Department of Fish, Wildlife and Parks, Libby, MT)

    2003-06-01

    Libby Reservoir was created under an International Columbia River Treaty between the United States and Canada for cooperative water development of the Columbia River Basin (Columbia River Treaty 1964). Libby Reservoir inundated 109 stream miles of the mainstem Kootenai River in the United States and Canada, and 40 miles of tributary streams in the U.S. that provided habitat for spawning, juvenile rearing, and migratory passage (Figure 1). The authorized purpose of the dam is to provide power (91.5%), flood control (8.3%), and navigation and other benefits (0.2%; Storm et al. 1982). The Pacific Northwest Power Act of 1980 recognized possible conflicts stemming from hydroelectric projects in the northwest and directed Bonneville Power Administration to ''protect, mitigate, and enhance fish and wildlife to the extent affected by the development and operation of any hydroelectric project of the Columbia River and its tributaries...'' (4(h)(10)(A)). Under the Act, the Northwest Power Planning Council was created and recommendations for a comprehensive fish and wildlife program were solicited from the region's federal, state, and tribal fish and wildlife agencies. Among Montana's recommendations was the proposal that research be initiated to quantify acceptable seasonal minimum pool elevations to maintain or enhance the existing fisheries (Graham et al. 1982). Research to determine how operations of Libby Dam affect the reservoir and river fishery and to suggest ways to lessen these effects began in May, 1983. The framework for the Libby Reservoir Model (LRMOD) was completed in 1989. Development of Integrated Rule Curves (IRCs) for Libby Dam operation was completed in 1996 (Marotz et al. 1996). The Libby Reservoir Model and the IRCs continue to be refined (Marotz et al 1999). Initiation of mitigation projects such as lake rehabilitation and stream restoration began in 1996. The primary focus of the Libby Mitigation project now is to redevelop fisheries and fisheries habitat in basin streams and lakes.

  5. Photosynthesis Research 70: 325328, 2001. 2002 Kluwer Academic Publishers. Printed in the Netherlands.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Govindjee

    for breakthroughs in understanding the molecular ma- chinery of the largest solar power plant on the planet prize was awarded jointly to Petra Fromme and Norbert Krauß of Berlin. The Melvin Calvin Award

  6. New Land Marks, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania [EDRA / Places Awards, 2001-2002 -- Planning

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Unknown, Author

    2002-01-01

    2001). New•Land•Marks, Philadelphia, Pa. Sponsor: FairmountPenn Foundation, Philadelphia Exhibitions Initiative (PewLowe (right) and West Philadelphia resident discuss ideas

  7. Evaluate Bull Trout Movements in the Tucannon and Lower Snake Rivers, 2001-2002 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Faler, Michael P.; Mendel, Glen W.; Fulton, Carl

    2003-06-01

    We collected, radio-tagged, and PIT-tagged 41 bull trout at the Tucannon River Hatchery trap from May 17, through June 14, 2002. An additional 65 bull trout were also collected and PIT tagged by June 24, at which time we ceased PIT tagging operations because water temperatures were reaching 16.0 C or higher on a regular basis. Six radio-tags were recovered shortly after tagging, and as a result, 35 remained in the river through November 30, 2002. During the month of July, radio-tagged bull trout exhibited a general upstream movement into the upper reaches of the Tucannon Subbasin. We began to observe some downstream movements of radio-tagged bull trout in mid to late September and throughout October. These movements appeared to be associated with post spawning migrations. As of November 30, radio tagged bull trout were relatively stationary, and distributed from the headwaters downstream to river mile 11.3, near Pataha Creek. None of the radio-tagged bull trout left the Tucannon Subbasin and entered the federal hydropower system on the mainstem Snake River. We conducted some initial transmission tests of submerged radio tags at depths of 25, 35, 45, and 55 ft. in Lower Monumental Pool to test our capability of detection at these depths. Equipment used included Lotek model MCFT-3A transmitters, an SRX 400 receiver, a 4 element Yagi antenna, and a Lotek ''H'' antenna. Test results indicated that depth transmission of these tags was poor; only the transmitter placed at 25 ft. was audibly detectable.

  8. An alise Matem atica IV o semestre de 2001/2002

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Godinho, Leonor

    (anal#19;#16;tica) em C , que #19;e um con- junto aberto simplesmente conexo. Ent~ao, pelo Teorema de#24;c~ao f(z) = cos z #19;e holomorfa (anal#19;#16;tica) em C e L #19;e um caminho seccionalmente

  9. Colorado School of Mines Undergraduate Bulletin 2001-2002 1 School of Mines

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    This Bulletin is for your use as a source of continuing reference. Please save it. Published by Colorado School

  10. 2001-2002 Long Range Plan Working Group Members | U.S. DOE Office of

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power AdministrationRobust,Field-effectWorkingLosThe 26thI D- 6 0GrantsThe Life of Enrico's The Ernest

  11. NSAC Members 2001 2002 | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power AdministrationRobust,Field-effectWorkingLosThe 26thIWalter H.4 » Inside Ice Under2ScienceStudentsMs.Van0 20011

  12. Hood River and Pelton Ladder Evaluation Studies, Annual Report 2000-2001.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Olsen, Erik

    2009-09-01

    The Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) funded the development of two master plans which outline the rationale, and general approach, for implementing a defined group of projects that are an integral part of a comprehensive watershed goal to 'Protect, enhance and restore wild and natural populations of anadromous and resident fish within the Hood River Subbasin'. The Hood River Production Master Plan and the Pelton Ladder Master Plan were completed in 1991 and subsequently approved by the Northwest Power Planning Council in 1992. Action items identified in the two master plans, as well as in a later document entitled 'Hood River/Pelton Ladder Master Agreement' (ODFW and CTWSRO Undated), are designed to achieve two biological fish objectives: (1) to increase production of wild summer and winter steelhead (Oncorhynchus mykiss) to levels commensurate with the subbasins current carrying capacity and (2) re-establishing a self-sustaining population of spring chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha). Numerical fish objectives for subbasin escapement, spawner escapement, and subbasin harvest are defined for each of these species in Coccoli (2000). Several projects are presently funded by the BPA to achieve the Hood River subbasin's numerical fish objectives for summer and winter steelhead and spring chinook salmon. They include BPA project numbers 1998-021-00 (Hood River Fish Habitat), 1998-053-03 (Hood River Production Program - CTWSRO: M&E), 1998-053-07 (Parkdale Fish Facility), 1998-053-08 (Powerdale/Oak Springs O&M), and 1998-053-12 (Hood River Steelhead Genetics Study). Collectively, they are implemented under the umbrella of what has come to be defined as the Hood River Production Program (HRPP). The HRPP is jointly implemented by the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife (ODFW) and The Confederated Tribes of the Warm Springs Reservation of Oregon (CTWSRO). Strategies for achieving the HRPP's biological fish objectives for the Hood River subbasin were initially devised based on various assumptions about (1) subbasin carrying capacity, (2) survival rates for selected life history stages, and (3) historic and current escapements of wild, natural, and hatchery stocks of anadromous salmonids to the Hood River subbasin. The Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife began funding a monitoring and evaluation (M&E) project in December 1991 to collect the quantitative biological information needed to (1) more accurately assess the validity of these assumptions and (2) evaluate the proposed hatchery supplementation component of the HRPP. Bonneville Power Administration assumed funding of the M&E project in August 1992. The M&E project was initially confined to sampling anadromous salmonids escaping to an adult trapping facility operated at Powerdale Dam; which is located at River Mile (RM) 4.5 on the mainstem of the Hood River. Stock specific life history and biological data was collected to (1) monitor subbasin spawner escapements and (2) collect pre-implementation data critical to evaluating the newly proposed HRPP's potential biological impact on indigenous populations of resident fish. The scope of the M&E project was expanded in 1994 to collect the data needed to quantify (1) subbasin smolt production and carrying capacity, (2) smolt to adult survival rates, and (3) the spatial distribution of indigenous populations of summer and winter steelhead, spring and fall chinook salmon, and coho salmon. A creel was incorporated into the M&E project in December 1996 to evaluate the HRPP with respect to its defined subbasin and spawner escapement objectives for Hood River stocks of wild and hatchery summer and winter steelhead and for natural and Deschutes stock hatchery spring chinook salmon. In 1996, the M&E project also began monitoring streamflow at various locations in the Hood River subbasin. Streamflow data will be used to correlate subbasin smolt production with summer streamflows. Data collected from 1991-1999 is reported in the following annual progress reports: Olsen et al. (1994), Olsen et al

  13. An alise Matem atica III 1 o semestre de 2000/2001

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nunes, João Pimentel

    ) 2 R 3 : p x 2 + y 2 #20; z #20; 3g; est#19;a imerso numa corrente de #19; agua cujo campo de a quantidade de #19; agua no interior do #12;ltro se mant#19;em constante, supondo que a densidade da #19;agua #19;e constante igual a 1. b) Usando o teorema de Stokes, calcule o uxo de #19;agua que entra atrav

  14. Status of Natural Gas Pipeline System Capacity Entering the 2000-2001 Heating Season

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2000-01-01

    This special report looks at the capabilities of the national natural gas pipeline network in 2000 and provides an assessment of the current levels of available capacity to transport supplies from production areas to markets throughout the United States during the upcoming heating season. It also examines how completion of currently planned expansion projects and proposed new pipelines would affect the network.

  15. Biological Invasions 2: 279288, 2000. 2001 Kluwer Academic Publishers. Printed in the Netherlands.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rundell, Rebecca J.

    resource, it has also been proposed as a possible biocontrol agent against aquatic weeds. Various factors as a biological control agent for aquatic weeds. Introduction Human-mediated biological invasions are initiatedHawaiiBiologicalSurvey. effects(e.g., Cowie, inpressa). Organismsperceivedas having value as food resources or as biocontrol

  16. Annals of Operations Research 100, 251272, 2000 2001 Kluwer Academic Publishers. Manufactured in The Netherlands.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Römisch, Werner

    , of generator failures, of flows to hydro reservoirs or plants, and of fuel or electricity prices (cf. [12, Institute of Mathematics, 10099 Berlin, Germany Abstract. A dynamic (multi-stage) stochastic programming model for the weekly cost-optimal generation of electric power in a hydro-thermal generation system

  17. Universit Louis Pasteur 2000/2001 U.F.R. de Mathmatique et Informatique

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cannas da Silva, Ana

    N, on dé#28;nit 'n+1 : [a; b] ! R par 'n+1 (x) = Z b a K(x; t) 'n (t) dt : (a) Montrer que, pour que F est bien dé#28;nie et continue sur [1; +1[. 2. Montrer que F est C 1 sur ]1; +1[. 3. Pour tout x'application dé#28;nie par K(x; y) = ( x(1 y) si x y . 1. (a) Montrer que K est continue. (b

  18. A Journal of Newar Studies - Number 4, NS 1121 / 2000-2001

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shakya, Daya R; Manandhar, Gaurishankar

    2001-01-01

    , OR 97212, USA Ph. (503) 282-0447 Fax (503) 774-7554 E-mail: drasha@aol.com From South Asian Countries Siddhi R. Shakya P. a Box 571 Kathmandu, Nepal Ph: 977-1- 265348 AD 2000/01 ~@~~g~ (Newal) Vijiiana) The Journal Of Newar Studies ISSN 1536-866 1 Number -4... ' 59 Newah Organization of America (NOA) 60 News Report on Nepal Sambat 62 NepaIi flP1Ic:q))"l 65 'li'i'tlS«il ~~ ~ !f1qj

  19. An alise Matem atica III 1 o semestre de 2000/2001

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nunes, João Pimentel

    (#18;) 0 0 1 3 5 : Esta matriz tem caracter#19;#16;tica 2 pois o produto externo ( sen #18;; cos #18

  20. An alise Matem atica III 1 o semestre de 2000/2001

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nunes, João Pimentel

    ;#16;tica 2 pois o produto externo ( p z 2 + 1 sen #18;; p z 2 + 1 cos #18;; 0) #2; ( z cos #18; p z 2 + 1

  1. NSAC Members 2000 2001 | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power AdministrationRobust,Field-effectWorkingLosThe 26thIWalter H.4 » Inside Ice Under2ScienceStudentsMs.Van0 2001

  2. Faculty of Arts and Sciences 2002-2003 Student Prize Recipients

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wolfe, Patrick J.

    Haas Finley, a prize of $1,000 Joseph L. Barrett Award - to Tabatha L. George - to Caitlin A. Harrington - to Emily R. Van Dyke Helen Choate Bell Prize - to Zoe Trodd, a prize of $2,500 James Gordon

  3. LISTE DES THESES DE DOCTORAT PUBLIEES DURANT LE SEMESTRE D'HIVER 2002/2003

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schibler, Ueli

    PHYSIQUE Resistive behavior from low to high current density in high Tc superconducting thin films. 3317

  4. ..Urban Ecosystems, 6: 183-203, 2002 .~ @ 2003 Kluwer Academic Publishers. Manufactured in The Netherlands.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McIntyre, Nancy E.

    heat island in Phoenix, Arizona (USA). At Sky Harbor Airport, urbanization has increased the nighttime: urban ecosystems, urban heat island, feedbacks, temperature, heat index #12;184 BAKER ET AL include (I) increased energy consumption for heating and cooling of buildings, (2) increased heat stress

  5. Ecological Studies of Wolves on Isle Royale Annual Report 2002-2003*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    .Parker,Rolf and Carolyn Peterson,Ruth S.J.Peterson,Tony Peterle,Darcy R.and Robert Rutkowski,Loyd G.Schemenauer,Billie E (DEB-9903671),Earthwatch,Inc.,and the Robert Bateman endowment at the Michigan Tech Fund. Additional pilots Wayne Erickson, Dean Lee, and Pat Lowe safely flew several supply flights to Isle Royale from

  6. Resident Fish Stock Status above Chief Joseph and Grand Coulee Dams; 2002-2003 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Connor, Jason M.; McLellan, Jason G.; Butler, Chris

    2006-02-01

    In 1980, the United States Congress enacted the Northwest Power Planning and Conservation Act (PL 96-501, 1980), which established the Northwest Power and Conservation Council (NPCC), formerly the Northwest Power Planning Council. The NPCC was directed by Congress to develop a regional Power Plan and also the Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program (FWP) to restore or replace losses of fish caused by construction and operation of hydroelectric dams in the Columbia River Basin. In developing the FWP, Congress specifically directed NPCC to solicit recommendations for measures to be included in the Program from the region's fish and wildlife agencies and Indian tribes. All measures adopted by the Council were also required to be consistent with the management objectives of the agencies and tribes [Section 4.(h)(6)(A)], the legal rights of Indian tribes in the region [Section 4.(h)(6)(D)] and be based upon and supported by the best available scientific knowledge [Section 4.(h)(6)(B)]. The Resident Fish Stock Status above Chief Joseph and Grand Coulee Dams Project, also known as the Joint Stock Assessment Project (JSAP) specifically addresses NPPC Council measure 10.8B.26 of the 1994 program. The Joint Stock Assessment Project is a management tool using ecosystem principles to manage artificial and native fish assemblages in altered environments existing in the Columbia River System above Chief Joseph and Grand Coulee Dams (Blocked Area). A three-phase approach of this project will enhance the fisheries resources of the Blocked Area by identifying data gaps, filling data gaps with research, and implementing management recommendations based on research results. The Blocked Area fisheries information is housed in a central location, allowing managers to view the entire system while making decisions, rather than basing management decisions on isolated portions of the system. The JSAP is designed and guided jointly by fisheries managers in the Blocked Area. The initial year of the project (1997) identified the need for a central data storage and analysis facility, coordination with the StreamNet project, compilation of Blocked Area fisheries information, and a report on the ecological condition of the Spokane River System. These needs were addressed in 1998 by acquiring a central location with a data storage and analysis system, coordinating a pilot project with StreamNet, compiling fisheries distribution data throughout the Blocked Area, identifying data gaps based on compiled information, and researching the ecological condition of the Spokane River. In order to ensure that any additional information collected throughout the life of this project will be easily stored and manipulated by the central storage facility, it was necessary to develop standardized methodologies between the JSAP fisheries managers. Common collection and analytical methodologies were developed in 1999. The project began addressing identified data gaps throughout the Blocked Area in 1999. Data collection of established projects and a variety of newly developed sampling projects are ongoing. Projects developed and undertaken by JSAP fisheries managers include investigations of the Pend Orielle River and its tributaries, the Little Spokane River and its tributaries, and water bodies within and near the Spokane Indian Reservation. Migration patterns of adfluvial and reservoir fish in Box Canyon Reservoir and its tributaries, a baseline assessment of Boundary Reservoir and its tributaries, ecological assessment of mountain lakes in Pend Oreille County, and assessments of streams and lakes on the Spokane Indian Reservation were completed by 2001. Assessments of the Little Spokane River and its tributaries, Spokane River below Spokane Falls, tributaries to the Pend Oreille River, small lakes in Pend Oreille County, WA, and water bodies within and near the Spokane Indian Reservation were conducted in 2002 and 2003. This work was done in accordance with the scope of work approved by Bonneville Power Administration (BPA).

  7. Second-Tier Database for Ecosystem Focus, 2002-2003 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Van Holmes, Chris; Muongchanh, Christine; Anderson, James J. (University of Washington, School of Aquatic and Fishery Sciences, Seattle, WA)

    2003-11-01

    The Second-Tier Database for Ecosystem Focus (Contract 00004124) provides direct and timely public access to Columbia Basin environmental, operational, fishery and riverine data resources for federal, state, public and private entities. The Second-Tier Database known as Data Access in Realtime (DART) integrates public data for effective access, consideration and application. DART also provides analysis tools and performance measures helpful in evaluating the condition of Columbia Basin salmonid stocks.

  8. Yakima Tributary Access and Habitat Program, 2002-2003 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Myra, D.; Ready, C.

    2003-12-01

    The Yakima Tributary Access and Habitat Program (YTAHP) was organized to restore salmonid passage to Yakima tributaries that historically supported salmonids and to improve habitat in areas where access is restored. This program intends to (a) screen unscreened diversion structures to prevent fish entrainment into artificial waterways; (b) provide for fish passage at man-made barriers, such as diversion dams, culverts, siphons and bridges; and (c) provide information and assistance to landowners interested in to contributing to the improvement of water quality, water reliability and stream habitat. The YTAHP developed from a number of groups actively engaged in watershed management, and/or habitat restoration within the Yakima River Basin. These groups include the Washington State Fish and Wildlife (WDFW), Kittitas County Conservation District (KCCD), North Yakima Conservation District (NYCD), Kittitas County Water Purveyors (KCWP), and Ahtanum Irrigation District (AID). The US Bureau of Reclamation (Reclamation) and Yakama Nation (YN) both participated in the development of the objectives of YTAHP. Other entities that will be involved during permitting or project review may include the YN, the federal Natural Resources Conservation Service (NRCS), the US Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS), the National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS), and US Army Corps of Engineers (COE). The objectives of YTAHP are listed below and also include subtasks detailed in the report: (1) Conduct Early Action Projects; (2) Review Strategic Plan; (3) Restore Access, including stream inventory, prioritization, implementation; and (4) Provide opportunities to improve habitat and conserve resources. The BPA YTAHP funding supported activities of the program which are described in this report. These activities are primarily related to objective 1 (conduct early action projects) and parts of objectives 2-4. The work supported by YTAHP funding will support a series of scheduled projects and be made larger by complementary funding through NRSC EQIP, Irrigation Efficiencies, WA State Salmon Recovery Funding Board and other local, state and federal programs. Projects completed FY-03: The Cooke Creek siphon and screen/bypass was completed on time and within budget. The Rosbach Farms project was completed in cooperation with the NRCS Environmental Quality Incentives Program and the KCCD's Irrigation Efficiencies Program. Tributary survey teams were trained and surveys of tributaries in Yakima and Kittitas counties commenced in December of 2002. By the end of September 2003 Cowiche Creek in Yakima County was completed as well as Coleman, Reecer, Currier, Dry, Cabin, Indian, and Jack Creeks in Kittitas County. A screen was installed on the Hernandez/Ringer diversion in cooperation with the NRCS office in Kittitas County. YTAHP submitted six applications to the Salmon Recovery Funding Board and three were selected and funded. Another Salmon Recovery Funding Board project awarded in 2000 to the Yakama Nation was transferred to the KCCD. Two miles of fencing of riparian zones on the north fork Ahtanum was completed by the North Yakima Conservation District in cooperation with the Department of Natural Resources and the Ahtanum Irrigation District and funded by US fish and Wildlife as part of YTAHP's outreach partnering. Completion of this year's effort has provided significant inroads to working on the private lands in two counties which will be vital to future efforts by YTAHP and others to protect and enhance Yakima River Basin habitat. 2003 saw the migration of the WEB site from MWH to the Kittitas County Conservation District and can be accessed at www.kccd.net.

  9. Kootenay Lake Fertilization Experiment; Years 11 and 12, Technical Report 2002-2003.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schindler, E.

    2007-02-01

    This report examines the results from the eleventh and twelfth years (2002 and 2003) of the Kootenay Lake fertilization experiment. Experimental fertilization has occurred with an adaptive management approach since 1992 in order to restore productivity lost as a result of upstream dams. One of the main objectives of the experiment is to restore kokanee (Oncorhynchus nerka) populations, which are a main food source for Gerrard rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss). Kootenay Lake is located between the Selkirk and Purcell mountains in southeastern British Columbia. It has an area of 395 km2, a maximum depth of 150 m, a mean depth of 94 m, and a water renewal time of approximately two years. The quantity of agricultural grade liquid fertilizer (10-34-0, ammonium polyphosphate and 28-0-0, urea ammonium nitrate) added to Kootenay Lake in 2002 and 2003 was similar to that added from 1992 to 1996. After four years of decreased fertilizer loading (1997 to 2000), results indicated that kokanee populations had declined, and the decision was made to increase the loads again in 2001. The total load of fertilizer in 2002 was 47.1 tonnes of phosphorus and 206.7 tonnes of nitrogen. The total fertilizer load in 2003 was 47.1 tonnes of phosphorus and 240.8 tonnes of nitrogen. Additional nitrogen was added in 2003 to compensate for nitrogen depletion in the epilimnion. The fertilizer was applied to a 10 km stretch in the North Arm from 3 km south of Lardeau to 3 km south of Schroeder Creek. The maximum surface water temperature in 2002, measured on July 22, was 22 C in the North Arm and 21.3 C in the South Arm. In 2003, the maxima were recorded on August 5 at 20.6 C in the North Arm and on September 2 at 19.7 C in the South Arm. The maximum water temperature in the West Arm was 18.7 C on September 2, 2003. Kootenay Lake had oxygen-saturated water throughout the sampling season with values ranging from about 11-16 mg/L in 2002 and 2003. In both years, Secchi depth followed the expected pattern for an oligo-mesotrophic lake of decreasing in May, June, and early July, concurrent with the spring phytoplankton bloom, and clearing again as the summer progressed. Total phosphorus (TP) ranged from 2-11 {micro}g/L in 2002 and 2-21 {micro}g/L in 2003. With average TP values generally in the range of 3-10 {micro}g/L, Kootenay Lake is considered to be an oligotrophic to oligo-mesotrophic lake. Total dissolved phosphorus (TDP) followed the same seasonal trends as TP in 2002 and 2003 and ranged from 2-7 {micro}g/L in 2002 and from 2-10 {micro}g/L in 2003. Total nitrogen (TN) ranged from 90-380 {micro}g/L in 2002 and 100-210 {micro}g/L in 2003. During both the 2002 and 2003 sampling seasons, TN showed an overall decline in concentration with mid-summer and fall increases at some stations, which is consistent with previous years results. Dissolved inorganic nitrogen (DIN) concentrations showed a more pronounced declining trend over the sampling season compared with TN, corresponding to nitrate (the dominant component of DIN) being used by phytoplankton during summer stratification. DIN ranged from 7-176 {micro}g/L in 2002 and from 8-147 {micro}g/L in 2003. During 2003, discrete depth sampling occurred, and a more detailed look at the nitrate concentrations in the epilimnion was undertaken. There was a seasonal decline in nitrate concentrations, which supports the principle of increasing the nitrogen loading and the nitrogen to phosphorus (N:P) ratio during the fertilizer application period. Chlorophyll a (Chl a) concentrations in Kootenay Lake were in the range of 1.4-5.1 {micro}g/L in 2002 and 0.5-4.9 {micro}g/L in 2003. Over the sampling season, Chl a at North Arm stations generally increased in spring corresponding with the phytoplankton bloom, decreased during the summer, and increased again in the fall with mixing of the water column. The trend was similar, but less pronounced, at South Arm stations in these years, and spring Chl a concentrations were lower. During 2002, total algal biomass averaged during June, July and August was lower in the North

  10. Coeur d'Alene Tribal Production Facility, Volume II of III, 2002-2003 Progress Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anders, Paul

    2003-01-01

    This appendices covers the following reports: (1) Previous ISRP Reviews (Project 199004400) Implement Fisheries Enhancement Opportunities-Coeur d'Alene Reservation; (2) Step 1 review of the hatchery master plan (Memorandum from Mark Fritsch, Fish Production Coordinator, Draft version March 10, 2000); (3) Coeur d'Alene Tribe response to ISRP comments on Project No. 199004402; includes attachment A Water Quantity Report. This is an incomplete document Analysis of Well Yield Potential for a Portion of the Coeur d'Alene Reservation near Worley, Idaho, February 2001; (4) Coeur d'Alene Tribe Fisheries Program, Rainbow Trout Feasibility Report on the Coeur d'Alene Indian Reservation prepared by Ronald L. Peters, February 2001; (5) Coeur d'Alene Tribe response letter pursuant to the questions raised in the Step 1 review of the Coeur d'Alene Tribe Trout Production Facility from Ronald L. Peters, March 27, 2001 ; includes attachments Water quantity report (this is the complete report), Appendix A Logs for Test Wells and 1999 Worley West Park Well, letters from Ralston, Appendix B Cost of Rainbow Purchase Alternative; (6) NPPC response (memorandum from Mark Fritsch, March 28, 2001); (7) Response to NPPC (letter to Frank Cassidy, Jr., Chair, from Ernest L. Stensgar, April 18, 2001); (8) Final ISRP review (ISRP 2001-4: Mountain Columbia Final Report); (9) Response to ISRP comment (letter to Mark Walker, Director of Public Affairs, from Ronald Peters, May 7, 2001); (10) Final comments to the Fish 4 committee; (11) Scope of Work/Budget FY 2001-2004; (12) Letter from City of Worley concerning water service; (13) Letter to BPA regarding status of Step 1 package; (14) Fisheries Habitat Evaluation on Tributaries of the Coeur d'Alene Indian Reservation, 1990 annual report; (15) Fisheries Habitat Evaluation on Tributaries of the Coeur d'Alene Indian Reservation, 1991 annual report; and (16) Fisheries Habitat Evaluation on Tributaries of the Coeur d'Alene Indian Reservation, 1992 annual report.

  11. International Journal of Applied Electromagnetics and Mechanics 15 (2001/2002) 291294 291 Feature extraction techniques for ultrasonic

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Polikar, Robi

    acquired from weld inspection regions of boiling water reactor piping of nuclear power plants of piping in boiling water reactors to detect intergranular stress corrosion cracking [4,7]. The received

  12. Tobacco Control Highlights: Ontario and Beyond [Special Reports : Monitoring the Ontario Tobacco Strategy 2001/2002 (Vol. 8)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ontario Tobacco Research Unit

    2002-01-01

    Tobacco.org. Documents: Arthur D. Little report commissionedRepublic, in which the Arthur D. Little consulting firm

  13. The New York City Privately Owned Public Space Project, New York, New York [EDRA / Places Awards, 2001-2002 -- Research

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bressi, Todd W

    2002-01-01

    The New York City Privately Owned Public Space Project Newmore than forty years, New York City developers have beenOwned Public Space: The New York City Experience, published

  14. Tobacco Control Highlights: Ontario and Beyond [Special Reports : Monitoring the Ontario Tobacco Strategy 2001/2002 (Vol. 8)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ontario Tobacco Research Unit

    2002-01-01

    Accessed on August 21, 2002. Ontario Tobacco Research Uniton June 19, 2002. Ontario Tobacco Control Conference.Control Highlights: Ontario and Beyond Ontario Tobacco

  15. Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife Fish Program Hatcheries Division: Ford Hatchery, Annual Report 2001-2002.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lewis, Mike; Polacek, Matt; Knuttgen, Kamia

    2002-11-01

    The Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife implemented the Banks Lake Fishery Evaluation Project (BLFEP) in September 2001 with funds from the Bonneville Power Administration. The first year of the BLFEP was used to gather historic information, establish methods and protocols, collect limnology data, and conduct the first seasonal fish surveys. Water quality parameters were collected monthly from February to May and bi-monthly from June to August. Banks Lake water temperatures began to increase in April and stratification was apparent by June at all 3 limnology collection sites. By late August, the thermocline had dropped to nearly 20 m deep, with 19-20 C temperatures throughout the epilimnion. Dissolved oxygen levels were generally above 10 mg/L until mid summer when dissolved oxygen dropped near or below 5 mg/L below 20-m deep. Secchi depths ranged from 3-10 m and varied by location and date. Nearshore and offshore fish surveys were conducted in May and July using boat electrofishing, fyke net, gill net, and hydroacoustic surveys. Smallmouth bass Micropterous dolomieui (24%) and lake whitefish Coregonus clupeaformis (20%) dominated the nearshore species composition in May; however, by July yellow perch Perca flavescens (26%) were the second most common species to smallmouth bass (30%). Lake whitefish dominated the offshore catch during May (72%) and July (90%). The May hydroacoustic survey revealed highest densities of fish in the upper 1/3 of the water column in the mid- to northern sections of the reservoir near Steamboat Rock. In the future, data from seasonal surveys will be used to identify potential factors that may limit the production and harvest of kokanee, rainbow trout, and various spiny-rayed fishes in Banks Lake. The limiting factors that will be examined consist of: abiotic factors including water temperature, dissolved oxygen levels, habitat, exploitation and entrainment; and biotic factors including food limitation and predation. The BLFEP will also evaluate the success of several rearing and stocking strategies for hatchery kokanee in Banks Lake.

  16. White Sturgeon Mitigation and Restoration in the Columbia and Snake Rivers Upstream from Bonneville Dam; 2001-2002 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ward, David L.; Kern, J. Chris; Hughes, Michele L.

    2003-12-01

    We report on our progress from April 2001 through March 2002 on determining the effects of mitigative measures on productivity of white sturgeon populations in the Columbia River downstream from McNary Dam, and on determining the status and habitat requirements of white sturgeon populations in the Columbia and Snake rivers upstream from McNary Dam.

  17. UFR de Math'ematiques et Informatique Universit'e Bordeaux I Ann'ee 2000--2001

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cohen, Henri

    polynâ??omes P et Q de R[X], on pose ! P; Q ?= P (0)Q(0) + Z 1 0 P 0 (x)Q 0 (x) dx ; o`u P 0 (x) et Q 0 (x). 3) Pour n â?? 0, on pose Q n (X) = d n dX n i (X(1 \\Gamma X)) n+1 j : a) D'emontrer que Q n (X) est un valeurs explicites de v n et w n . Exercice II (5 points) 1) On pose A = 0 @ 1 1 1 4 4 4 9 9 9 1 A : a

  18. Application of an ASHRAE 152-2004 Duct Model for Simulating Code-Compliant 2000/2001 IECC Residences 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haberl, J.S.; Kim, S.

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents the results of the application of the duct model based on ASHRAE 152-2004 - Method of Test for Determining the Design and Seasonal Efficiencies of Residential Thermal Distribution Systems (ASHRAE 2004) to the code compliant 2001...

  19. John Day Basin Spring Chinook Salmon Escapement and Productivity Monitoring; Fish Research Project Oregon, 2000-2001 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carmichael, Richard W.; Claire, Glenda M.; Seals, Jason

    2002-01-01

    The four objectives of this report are: (1) Estimate annual spawner escapement and number of spring chinook salmon redds in the John Day River basin; (2) Determine sex ratio, age composition, length-at-age of spawners, and proportion of natural spawners that are hatchery origin strays; (3) Determine adequacy of historic index surveys for indexing spawner abundance and for detecting changes in spawner distribution through time; and (4) Estimate smolt-to-adult survival for spring chinook salmon emigrating from the John Day River basin.

  20. High-Resolution Spectroscopy of the Yellow Hypergiant Rho Cassiopeiae from 1993 Through the Outburst of 2000-2001

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Lobel; A. K. Dupree; R. P. Stefanik; G. Torres; G. Israelian; N. Morrison; C. de Jager; H. Nieuwenhuijzen; I. Ilyin; F. Musaev

    2003-01-14

    We present an overview of the spectral variability of the peculiar F-type hypergiant Rho Cas, obtained from our long-term monitoring campaigns over the past 8.5 years with four spectrographs in the northern hemisphere. Between 2000 June and September an exceptional variability phase occurred when the V-brightness dimmed by about a full magnitude. The star recovered from this deep minimum by 2001 April. It is the third outburst of Rho Cas on record in the last century. We observe TiO absorption bands in high-resolution near-IR spectra obtained with the Utrecht Echelle Spectrograph during the summer of 2000. TiO formation in the outer atmosphere occurred before the deep brightness minimum. Atmospheric models reveal that the effective temperature decreases by at least 3000 K, and the TiO shell is driven supersonically with Mdot ~= 5.4 10^{-2} Msun/yr. Strong episodic mass loss and TiO have also been observed during the outbursts of 1945-47 and 1985-86. A detailed analysis of the exceptional outburst spectra is provided, by comparing with high-resolution optical spectra of the early M-type supergiants Mu Cep (Ia) and Betelgeuse (Iab). The outburst spectra indicate the formation of a low-temperature, optically thick circumstellar gas shell of 3 10^{-2} Msun during ~200 d, caused by dynamic instability of the upper atmosphere of this pulsating massive supergiant near the Eddington luminosity limit. We observe that the mass-loss rate during the outburst is of the same order of magnitude as has been proposed for the outbursts of Eta Carinae. We present calculations that correctly predict the outburst time-scale, whereby the shell ejection is driven by the release of hydrogen ionization-recombination energy.

  1. Monitoring the Ontario Tobacco Strategy: Progress Toward Our Goals 2000/2001: 7th Annual Monitoring Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ontario Tobacco Research Unit

    2001-01-01

    Monitoring the Ontario Tobacco Strategy Progress toward Our7th Annual Monitoring Report Ontario Tobacco Research Unit2001 Suggested Citation: Ontario Tobacco Research Unit. (

  2. Prova scritta intercorso 2 gioved 29 maggio 2003 Laurea in Scienza e Ingegneria dei Materiali anno accademico 2002-2003

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marrucci, Lorenzo

    lo stato stazionario di numero quantico n = 4. Calcolate (a) l'energia dell'elettrone, in eV, e (b'ultima domanda). [punti: a = 3/10; b = 3/10; c=2/10; d=2/10] 2) Un elettrone di energia E = 1 eV inizialmente: pregi (rispetto al modello classico a sistema solare) e difetti (perché non poteva essere considerato

  3. Tobacco Control Highlights: Ontario and Beyond [Special Reports: Monitoring and Evaluation Series, 2002-2003 (vol. 9, No. 1)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ontario Tobacco Research Unit

    2003-01-01

    Accessed on April 16, 2003. Ontario Tobacco Research UnitOttawa Sun. May 29, 2002. 25 Ontario Tobacco Research Unit.on April 16, 2003. 33 Ontario Tobacco Research Unit. Ontario

  4. Assessment of Salmonids and Their Habitat Conditions in the Walla Walla River Basin within Washington, Annual Report 2002-2003.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mendel, Glen; Trump, Jeremy; Gembala, Mike

    2003-09-01

    This study began in 1998 to assess salmonid distribution, relative abundance, genetics, and the condition of salmonid habitats in the Walla Walla River basin. Stream flows in the Walla Walla Basin continue to show a general trend that begins with a sharp decline in discharge in late June, followed by low summer flows and then an increase in discharge in fall and winter. Manual stream flow measurements at Pepper bridge showed an increase in 2002 of 110-185% from July-September, over flows from 2001. This increase is apparently associated with a 2000 settlement agreement between the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) and the irrigation districts to leave minimum flows in the river. Stream temperatures in the Walla Walla basin were similar to those in 2001. Upper montane tributaries maintained maximum summer temperatures below 65 F, while sites in mid and lower Touchet and Walla Walla rivers frequently had daily maximum temperatures well above 68 F (high enough to inhibit migration in adult and juvenile salmonids, and to sharply reduce survival of their embryos and fry). These high temperatures are possibly the most critical physiological barrier to salmonids in the Walla Walla basin, but other factors (available water, turbidity or sediment deposition, cover, lack of pools, etc.) also play a part in salmonid survival, migration, and breeding success. The increased flows in the Walla Walla, due to the 2000 settlement agreement, have not shown consistent improvements to stream temperatures. Rainbow/steelhead (Oncorhynchus mykiss) trout represent the most common salmonid in the basin. Densities of Rainbow/steelhead in the Walla Walla River from the Washington/Oregon stateline to Mojonnier Rd. dropped slightly from 2001, but are still considerably higher than before the 2000 settlement agreement. Other salmonids including; bull trout (Salvelinus confluentus), chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha), mountain whitefish (Prosopium williamsoni), and brown trout (Salmo trutta) had low densities, and limited distribution throughout the basin. A large return of adult spring chinook to the Touchet River drainage in 2001 produced higher densities of juvenile chinook in 2002 than have been seen in recent years, especially in the Wolf Fork. The adult return in 2002 was substantially less than what was seen in 2001. Due to poor water conditions and trouble getting personnel hired, spawning surveys were limited in 2002. Surveyors found only one redd in four Walla Walla River tributaries (Cottonwood Ck., East Little Walla Walla, West Little Walla Walla, and Mill Ck.), and 59 redds in Touchet River tributaries (10 in the North Fork Touchet, 30 in the South Fork Touchet, and 19 in the Wolf Fork). Bull trout spawning surveys in the upper Touchet River tributaries found a total of 125 redds and 150 live fish (92 redds and 75 fish in the Wolf Fork, 2 redds and 1 fish in the Burnt Fork, 0 redds and 1 fish in the South Fork Touchet, 29 redds and 71 fish in the North Fork Touchet, and 2 redds and 2 fish in Lewis Ck.). A preliminary steelhead genetics analysis was completed as part of this project. Results indicate differences between naturally produced steelhead and those produced in the hatchery. There were also apparent genetic differences among the naturally produced fish from different areas of the basin. Detailed results are reported in Bumgarner et al. 2003. Recommendations for assessment activities in 2003 included: (1) continue to monitor the Walla Walla River (focusing from the stateline to McDonald Rd.), the Mill Ck system, and the Little Walla Walla System. (2) reevaluate Whiskey Ck. for abundance and distribution of salmonids, and Lewis Ck. for bull trout density and distribution. (3) select or develop a habitat survey protocol and begin to conduct habitat inventory and assessment surveys. (4) summarize bull trout data for Mill Ck, South Fork Touchet, and Lewis Ck. (5) begin to evaluate temperature and flow data to assess if the habitat conditions exist for spring chinook in the Touchet River.

  5. White Sturgeon Mitigation and Restoration in the Columbia and Snake Rivers Upstream from Bonneville Dam; 2002-2003 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ward, David L.; Kern, J. Chris; Hughes, Michele L.

    2004-02-01

    We report on our progress from April 2002 through March 2003 on determining the effects of mitigative measures on productivity of white sturgeon populations in the Columbia River downstream from McNary Dam, and on determining the status and habitat requirements of white sturgeon populations in the Columbia and Snake rivers upstream from McNary Dam.

  6. Quantification of Energy and Emissions Saved in Energy Efficiency/ Renewable Energy (EE/RE) Programs in Texas 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haberl, J. S.; Baltazar, J. C.; Mao, C.

    2012-01-01

    (6.0 tons/OSD) 1,772 tons/yr for SO2 2,286,012 tons/yr for CO2 * Note $0.095/kWh, $0.65/therm p. 64 Energy Systems Laboratory © 2011 RENEWABLES: WHAT ARE THEY? Wind energy is the largest portion. 0 5,000,000 10,000,000 15...,000,000 20,000,000 25,000,000 30,000,000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 E le ct ri ci ty G en er at ed in M W h Year Annual Electricity Generated in Texas by Renewable Sources Solar Biomass Landfill gas Hydro Wind p. 65 Energy Systems...

  7. PHY 140Y Foundations of Physics 2001-2002 (K. Strong) Tutorial 7 Solutions, page 1 PHY 140Y FOUNDATIONS OF PHYSICS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Strong, Kimberly

    )t(v o += Therefore, the power output as a function of time is: [ ] [ ]c)atv(bmc)t(bvm)t(P o -+=-= #12;______________________________________________________________________________

  8. PHY 140Y Foundations of Physics 2001-2002 (K. Strong) Tutorial 10, page 1 PHY 140Y FOUNDATIONS OF PHYSICS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Strong, Kimberly

    and o is the natural frequency. When this system is driven at frequencies 10% above and below o, how before the tutorials! Damped and Driven Harmonic Motion, Resonance 1. A mass of 220 g is connected are the natural frequency and the period of its motion? [T =1.3 s] (b) What are the maximum speed and acceleration

  9. Journal of Fusion Energy, Vol. 20, No. 3, September 2001 ( 2002) Report of the FESAC Panel on a Burning Plasma Program

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Najmabadi, Farrokh

    Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. 16 Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. 4 University of Texas at Austin. 11 University of Washington. 17 Oak Ridge National Laboratory. 5 University of Rochester. 12 of Technology. 13 Naval Research Laboratory. 19 University of Alaska at Fairbanks. 7 Fusion Power Associates. 14

  10. Assess Current and Potential Salmonid Production in Rattlesnake Creek Associated with Restoration Efforts; US Geological Survey Reports, 2001-2002 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Connolly, Patrick J. (US Geological Survey, Western Fisheries Research Center, Columbia River Research Laboratory, Cook, WA)

    2003-01-01

    This project was designed to document existing habitat conditions and fish populations within the Rattlesnake Creek watershed (White Salmon River subbasin, Washington) before major habitat restoration activities are implemented and prior to the reintroduction of salmon and steelhead above Condit Dam. Returning adult salmon Oncorhynchus spp. and steelhead O. mykiss have not had access to Rattlesnake Creek since 1914. An assessment of resident trout populations should serve as a good surrogate for evaluation of factors that would limit salmon and steelhead production in the watershed. Personnel from United States Geological Survey's Columbia River Research Laboratory (USGS-CRRL) attend to three main objectives of the Rattlesnake Creek project. The first is to characterize stream and riparian habitat conditions. This effort includes measures of water quality, water quantity, stream habitat, and riparian conditions. The second objective is to determine the status of fish populations in the Rattlesnake Creek drainage. To accomplish this, we derived estimates of salmonid population abundance, determined fish species composition, assessed distribution and life history attributes, obtained tissue samples for future genetic analysis, and assessed fish diseases in the watershed. The third objective is to use the collected habitat and fisheries information to help identify and prioritize areas in need of restoration. As this report covers the first year of a three-year study, this report is restricted to describing our work on the first two objectives only.

  11. PHY 140Y Foundations of Physics 2001-2002 (K. Strong) Tutorial 4 Solutions, page 1 PHY 140Y FOUNDATIONS OF PHYSICS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Strong, Kimberly

    of 370 km/hr flies perpendicular across the jet stream. To achieve this flight, the airplane must be pointed into the jet stream at an angle of 35° from the perpendicular direction of its flight. What is the speed of the jet stream? Answer: First, define the velocities. Let: air groundv = velocity of the jet

  12. PHY 140Y Foundations of Physics 2001-2002 (K. Strong) Tutorial 4, page 1 PHY 140Y FOUNDATIONS OF PHYSICS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Strong, Kimberly

    with an air speed of 370 km/hr flies perpendicular across the jet stream. To achieve this flight, the airplane must be pointed into the jet stream at an angle of 35° from the perpendicular direction of its flight. What is the speed of the jet stream? Newton's Laws of Motion 3. (a) What is the normal force felt

  13. Effects of Cougar Predation and Nutrition on Mule Deer Population Declines in the Intermountain Province of the Columbia Basin, 2001-2002 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wielgus, Robert B.; Shipley, Lisa

    2002-07-01

    Construction of the Grand Coulee and Chief Joseph dams has resulted in inundation and loss of 29,125 total habitat units for mule deer and irrigation agriculture in many parts the Intermountain Province (IM) of the Columbia Basin. Mule deer in the Shrub-Steppe are ranked high priority target species for mitigation and management and are declining in most portions of the subbasins of the IM. Reasons for the decline are unknown but believed to be related to habitat changes resulting from dams and irrigation agriculture. White-tailed deer are not ranked as target species and are believed to be increasing throughout the basin because of habitat changes brought about by the dams and irrigation agriculture. Recent research (1997-2000) in the NE IM and adjacent Canadian portions of the Columbia Basin (conducted by this author and funded by the Columbia Basin Fish & Wildlife Compensation Program B.C.), suggest that the increasing white-tailed deer populations (because of dams and irrigation agriculture) are resulting in increased predation by cougars on mule deer (apparent competition or alternate prey hypothesis). The apparent competition hypothesis predicts that as alternate prey (white-tailed deer) densities increase, so do densities of predators, resulting in increased incidental predation on sympatric native prey (mule deer). Apparent competition can result in population declines and even extirpation of native prey in some cases. Such a phenomenon may account for declines of mule deer in the IM and throughout arid and semi-arid West where irrigation agriculture is practiced. We will test the apparent competition hypothesis by conducting a controlled, replicated ''press'' experiment in at least 2 treatment and 2 control areas of the IM subbasins by reducing densities of white-tailed deer and observing any changes in cougar predation on mule deer. Deer densities will be monitored by WADFW personnel using annual aerial surveys and/or other trend indices. Predation rates and population growth rates of deer will be determined using radio telemetry. Changes in cougar functional (kills/unit time), aggregative (cougars/unit area), numerical (offspring/cougar), and total (predation rate) responses on deer will also be monitored using radio telemetry. The experiment will be conducted and completed over a period of 5 years. Results will be used to determine the cause and try to halt the mule deer population declines. Results will also guide deer mitigation and management in the IM and throughout the North American West.

  14. Impact of the Implementation of the 2000/2001 IECC on Residential Energy Use in Texas: Preliminary Verification of Residential Energy Savings 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baltazar-Cervantes, J. C.; Haberl, J. S.; Culp, C.; Yazdani, B.

    2006-01-01

    requirements during a power outage. Depending on the type of facility, other systems and equipment may also be considered critical. Batteries may be used to provide power for emergency lighting as well as computers, telephone and intercom systems. However...

  15. Evaluation of the Life History of Native Salmonids in the Malheur River Basin; Cooperative Bull Trout/Redband Trout Research Project, 2000-2001 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gonzales, Dan; Schwabe, Lawrence; Wenick, Jess (Burns Paiute Tribe, Department of Fish and Wildlife, Burns, OR)

    2001-08-01

    The Malheur basin lies within southeastern Oregon. The Malheur River is a tributary to the Snake River, entering at about River Kilometer (RK) 595. The hydrological drainage area of the Malheur River is approximately 12,950 km{sup 2} and is roughly 306 km in length. The headwaters of the Malheur River originate in the Blue Mountains at elevations of 6,500 to 7,500 feet, and drops to an elevation of 2000 feet at the confluence with the Snake River near Ontario, Oregon. The climate of the Malheur basin is characterized by hot dry summers, occasionally exceeding 38 C and cold winters that may drop below -29 C. Average annual precipitation is 300 centimeters and ranges from 100 centimeters in the upper mountains to less than 25 centimeters in the lower reaches (Gonzalez 1999). Wooded areas consist primarily of mixed fir and pine forest in the higher elevations. Sagebrush and grass communities dominate the flora in the lower elevations. Efforts to document salmonid life histories, water quality, and habitat conditions have continued in fiscal year 2000. The Burns Paiute Tribe (BPT), United States Forest Service (USFS), and Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife (ODFW), have been working cooperatively to achieve this common goal. Bull trout ''Salvenlinus confluentus'' have specific environmental requirements and complex life histories making them especially susceptible to human activities that alter their habitat (Howell and Buchanan 1992). Bull trout are considered to be a cold-water species and are temperature dependent. This presents a challenge for managers, biologists, and private landowners in the Malheur basin. Because of the listing of bull trout under the Endangered Species Act as threatened and the current health of the landscape, a workgroup was formed to develop project objectives related to bull trout. This report will reflect work completed during the Bonneville Power contract period starting 1 April 2000 and ending 31 March 2001. The study area will include the North Fork Malheur River and the Upper Malheur River from Warm Springs Reservoir upstream to the headwaters.

  16. Impact of the Implementation of the 2000/2001 IECC on Commercial Energy Use in Texas: Analysis of Commercial Energy Savings 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yazdani, B.; Im, P.; Culp, C.; Haberl, J. S.; Chongcharoensuk, C.; Kim, S.; Ahmad, M.

    2006-01-01

    of ASHRAE 90.1- 1999 for entire United States was used. ? The energy saving numbers for this analysis were then mapped to the published characteristics of new construction from F.W. Dodge for Texas. ? The commercial DOE-2.1e simulation model....0339 ~ Education 9.17 0.0201 Calculate Ozone Season Day(OSD) energy consumption Food 29.84 0.0349 f-- Use eCaic to eslimato OSD % using I office building Lodging 11.92 0.0159 - Annual electricity energy consumption * OSD % ~o Office 12.94 0.0063 - Annual gas...

  17. Lake Roosevelt Fisheries Evaluation Program : Meadow Creek vs. Lake Whatcom Stock Kokanee Salmon Investigations in Lake Roosevelt Annual Report 2000-2001.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McLellan, Holly J.; Scholz, Allan T.

    2001-07-01

    Lake Roosevelt has been stocked with Whatcom stock kokanee since 1989 to mitigate for anadromous salmon losses caused by the construction of Grand Coulee Dam. The primary objective of the hatchery plantings was to create a self-sustaining recreational fishery. Due to low return numbers, it was hypothesized a native stock of kokanee might perform better than the coastal Whatcom strain. Therefore, kokanee from Meadow Creek, a tributary of Kootenay Lake, British Columbia were selected as an alternative stock. Matched pair releases of Whatcom stock and Meadow Creek kokanee were made from Sherman Creek in late June 2000. Stock performance between Lake Whatcom and Meadow Creek kokanee was evaluated through three performance measures (1) returns to Sherman Creek, the primary egg collection facility, (2) returns to other tributaries, indicating availability for angler harvest, and (3) returns to the creel. A secondary objective was to evaluate the numbers collected at downstream fish passage facilities. Age 2 kokanee were collected during five passes through the reservoir, which included 89 tributaries between August 17th and November 7th, 2000. Sherman Creek was sampled once a week because it was the primary egg collection location. A total of 2,789 age 2 kokanee were collected, in which 2,658 (95%) were collected at Sherman Creek. Chi-square analysis indicated the Meadow Creek kokanee returned to Sherman Creek in significantly higher numbers compared to the Whatcom stock ({chi}{sup 2} = 734.4; P < 0.01). Reservoir wide recoveries indicated similar results ({chi}{sup 2} = 733.1; P < 0.01). No age 2 kokanee were collected during creel surveys. Age 3 kokanee are expected to recruit to the creel in 2001. No age 2 kokanee were collected at the fish passage facilities due to a 170 mm size restriction at the fish passage centers. Age 3 kokanee are expected to be collected at the fish passage centers during 2001. Stock performance cannot be properly evaluated until 2001, when age 3 kokanee are expected to return to Sherman Creek.

  18. Impact of the Implementation of the 2000/2001 IECC on Residential Energy Use in Texas: Analysis of Residential Energy Savings 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Im, P.; Culp, C.; Ahmad, M.; Malhotra, M.; Haberl, J. S.; Yazdani, B.; Mukhopadhyay, J.

    2006-01-01

    \\electric, all electric and electric heat-pump. Methodology ESL-HH-06-07-03a Proceedings of the Fifteenth Symposium on Improving Buildling Systems in Hot and Humid Climates, Orlando, Florida, July 24-26, 2006 PARAMETER 110: DESCRIPTIO.. DEFAULT S...

  19. Chief Joseph Kokanee Enhancement Project; Strobe Light Deterrent Efficacy Test and Fish Behavior Determination at the Grand Coulee Dam Third Powerplant Forebay, 2002-2003 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, R.; McKinstry, C.; Simmons, C. (Pacific Northwest National Laboratory)

    2003-01-01

    Since 1995, the Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation (Colville Confederated Tribes) have managed the Chief Joseph Kokanee Enhancement Project as part of the Northwest Power Planning Council (NWPPC) Fish and Wildlife Program. Project objectives have focused on understanding natural production of kokanee (a land-locked sockeye salmon) and other fish stocks in the area above Grand Coulee and Chief Joseph Dams on the Columbia River. A 42-month investigation concluded that entrainment at Grand Coulee Dam ranged from 211,685 to 576,676 fish annually. Further analysis revealed that 85% of the total entrainment occurred at the dam's third powerplant. These numbers represent a significant loss to the tribal fisheries upstream of the dam. In response to a suggestion by the NWPPC Independent Scientific Review Panel, the scope of work for the Chief Joseph Kokanee Enhancement Project was expanded to include a multiyear pilot test of a strobe light system to help mitigate fish entrainment. This report details the work conducted during the second year of the study by researchers of the Colville Confederated Tribes in collaboration with the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. The 2002 study period extended from May 18 through July 30. The objective of the study was to determine the efficacy of a prototype strobe light system to elicit a negative phototactic response in kokanee and rainbow trout. The prototype system consisted of six strobe lights affixed to an aluminum frame suspended vertically underwater from a barge secured in the center of the entrance to the third powerplant forebay. The lights, controlled by a computer, were aimed to illuminate a specific region directly upstream of the barge. Three light level treatments were used: 6 of 6 lights on, 3 of 6 lights on, and all lights off. These three treatment conditions were applied for an entire 24-hr day and were randomly assigned within a 3-day block throughout the study period. A seven-transducer splitbeam hydroacoustic system was used to evaluate the effectiveness of the strobe lights in eliciting a negative phototactic response in fish. The transducers were deployed so they tracked fish entering and within the region illuminated by the strobe lights. Two of the seven transducers were mounted to the frame containing the strobe lights and were oriented horizontally. The remaining five transducers were spaced approximately 4 m apart on individual floating frames upstream of the barge, with the transducers looking vertically downward.

  20. Evaluation of the Life History of Native Salmonids in the Malheur River Basin; Cooperative Bull Trout/Redband Trout Research Project, 2002-2003 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miller, Alan; Soupir, Jim (US Forest Service, Prairie City Ranger District, Prairie City, OR); Schwabe, Lawrence (Burns Paiute Tribe, Department of Fish and Wildlife, Burns, OR)

    2003-08-01

    The Malheur River is a 306-kilometer tributary to the Snake River, which drains 12,950 square kilometers. The Malheur River originates in the Blue Mountains and flows into the Snake River near Ontario, Oregon. The climate of the basin is characterized by hot dry summers, occasionally exceeding 38 C, and cold winters that may drop below -29 C. Average annual precipitation is 30 centimeters in the lower reaches. Wooded areas consist primarily of mixed fir and pine forest in the higher elevations. Sagebrush and grass communities dominate the flora in the lower elevations. Efforts to document salmonid life histories, water quality, and habitat conditions have continued in fiscal year 2002. Bull trout Salvelinus confluentus are considered to be cold water species and are temperature-dependant. Due to the interest of bull trout from various state and Federal agencies, a workgroup was formed to develop project objectives related to bull trout. Table 1 lists individuals that participated in the 2002 work group. This report will reflect work completed during the Bonneville Power Administration contract period starting April 1, 2002, and ending March 31, 2003. All tasks were conducted within this timeframe, and a more detailed timeframe may be referred to in each individual report.

  1. Assess Current and Potential Salmonid Production in Rattlesnake Creek Associated with Restoration Efforts; US Geological Survey Reports, 2002-2003 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Connolly, Patrick J. (US Geological Survey, Columbia River Research Laboratory, Western Fisheries Research Center, Cook, WA)

    2003-12-01

    This project was designed to document existing habitat conditions and fish populations within the Rattlesnake Creek watershed (White Salmon River subbasin, Washington) before major habitat restoration activities are implemented and prior to the reintroduction of salmon and steelhead above Condit Dam. Returning adult salmon Oncorhynchus spp. and steelhead O. mykiss have not had access to Rattlesnake Creek since 1913. An assessment of resident trout populations should serve as a good surrogate for evaluation of factors that would limit salmon and steelhead production in the watershed. Personnel from United States Geological Survey's Columbia River Research Laboratory (USGS-CRRL) attend to three main objectives of the Rattlesnake Creek project. The first is to characterize stream and riparian habitat conditions. This effort includes measures of water quality, water quantity, stream habitat, and riparian conditions. The second objective is to determine the status of fish populations in the Rattlesnake Creek drainage. To accomplish this, we derived estimates of salmonid population abundance, determined fish species composition, assessed distribution and life history attributes, obtained tissue samples for genetic analysis, and assessed fish diseases in the watershed. The third objective is to use the collected habitat and fisheries information to help identify and prioritize areas in need of restoration. As this report covers the second year of at least a three-year study, it is largely restricted to describing our efforts and findings for the first two objectives.

  2. Journal of Fusion Energy, Vol. 21, No. 2, June 2002 ( 2003) 0164-0313/02/06000061/0 2003 Plenum Publishing Corporation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Najmabadi, Farrokh

    while significantly reducing air pollution and emissions of greenhouse gases." President George W. Bush

  3. Conceptual Spawning Habitat Model to Aid in ESA Recovery Plans for Snake River Fall Chinook Salmon, 2002-2003 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Geist, David

    2005-09-01

    The goal of this project is to develop a spawning habitat model that can be used to determine the physical habitat factors that are necessary to define the production potential for fall chinook salmon that spawn in large mainstem rivers like the Columbia River's Hanford Reach and Snake River. This project addresses RPA 155 in the NMFS 2000 Biological Opinion: Action 155: BPA, working with BOR, the Corps, EPA, and USGS, shall develop a program to: (1) Identify mainstem habitat sampling reaches, survey conditions, describe cause-and-effect relationships, and identify research needs; (2) Develop improvement plans for all mainstem reaches; and (3) Initiate improvements in three mainstem reaches. During FY 2003 we continued to collect and analyze information on fall chinook salmon spawning habitat characteristics in the Hanford Reach that will be used to address RPA 155, i.e., items 1-3 above. For example, in FY 2003: (1) We continued to survey spawning habitat in the Hanford Reach and develop a 2-dimensional hydraulic and habitat model that will be capable of predicting suitability of fall chinook salmon habitat in the Hanford Reach; (2) Monitor how hydro operations altered the physical and chemical characteristics of the river and the hyporheic zone within fall chinook salmon spawning areas in the Hanford Reach; (3) Published a paper on the impacts of the Columbia River hydroelectric system on main-stem habitats of fall chinook salmon (Dauble et al. 2003). This paper was made possible with data collected on this project; (4) Continued to analyze data collected in previous years that will ultimately be used to identify cause-and-effect relationships and identify research needs that will assist managers in the improvement of fall chinook habitat quality in main-stem reaches. During FY 2004 we plan to: (1) Complete preliminary reporting and submit papers based on the results of the project through FY 2004. Although we have proposed additional analysis of data be conducted in FY 2005, we anticipate a significant number of key papers being prepared and submitted in FY 2004 which will go toward identifying the data gaps this RPA is intended to address; (2) Make available data from this project for use on Project 2003-038-00 ('Evaluate restoration potential of Snake River fall chinook salmon') which is a BPA-funded project that will start in FY 2004; and (3) Present results of our work at regional and national meetings in order to facilitate technology transfer and information sharing. The objective of this project is to define the production potential of fall chinook salmon that spawn in the Hanford Reach. We will provide fisheries and resource managers with the information they need to determine if the Hanford Reach fall chinook salmon population is indeed healthy, and whether this population will be capable of seeding other satellite populations in the future. We will accomplish this purpose by continuing our on-going research at determining the carrying capacity of the Hanford Reach for producing fall chinook salmon under current operational scenarios, and then begin an assessment of whether the Reach is functioning as a model of a normative river as is widely believed. The product of our research will be a better understanding of the key habitat features for mainstem populations of anadromous salmonids, as well as a better understanding of the measures that must be taken to ensure long-term protection of the Hanford Reach fall chinook population. Although the project was originally funded in FY 1994, it was significantly redefined in FY 2000. At that time five tasks were proposed to accomplish the project objective. The purpose of this progress report is to briefly describe the activities that have been completed on each of the five tasks from FY 2000 through FY 2003.

  4. Effects of Cougar Predation and Nutrition on Mule Deer Population Declines in the IM Province of the Columbia Basin, Annual Report 2002-2003.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wielgus, Robert; Shipley, Lisa; Myers, Woodrow

    2003-09-01

    Construction of the Grand Coulee and Chief Joseph dams has resulted in inundation and loss of 29,125 total habitat units for mule deer and irrigation agriculture in many parts the Intermountain Province (IM) of the Columbia Basin. Mule deer in the Shrub-Steppe are ranked high priority target species for mitigation and management and are declining in most portions of the sub basins of the IM. Reasons for the decline are unknown but believed to be related to habitat changes resulting from dams and irrigation agriculture. White-tailed deer are believed to be increasing throughout the basin because of habitat changes brought about by the dams and irrigation agriculture. Recent research (1997-2000) in the NE IM and adjacent Canadian portions of the Columbia Basin (conducted by this author and funded by the Columbia Basin Fish & Wildlife Compensation Program B.C.), suggest that the increasing white-tailed deer populations (because of dams and irrigation agriculture) are resulting in increased predation by cougars on mule deer (apparent competition or alternate prey hypothesis). The apparent competition hypothesis predicts that as alternate prey (white-tailed deer) densities increase, so do densities of predators, resulting in increased incidental predation on sympatric native prey (mule deer). Apparent competition can result in population declines and even extirpation of native prey in some cases. Such a phenomenon may account for declines of mule deer in the IM and throughout arid and semi-arid West where irrigation agriculture is practiced. We will test the apparent competition hypothesis by conducting a controlled, replicated 'press' experiment in at least 2 treatment and 2 control areas of the IM sub basins by reducing densities of white-tailed deer and observing any changes in cougar predation on mule deer. Deer densities will be monitored by WADFW personnel using annual aerial surveys and/or other trend indices. Predation rates and population growth rates of deer will be determined using radio telemetry. Changes in cougar functional (kills/unit time), aggregative (cougars/unit area), numerical (offspring/cougar), and total (predation rate) responses on deer will also be monitored using radio telemetry. The experiment will be conducted and completed over a period of 5 years. Results will be used to determine the cause and try to halt the mule deer population declines. Results will also guide deer mitigation and management in the IM and throughout the North American West.

  5. Taxpayer Privacy and Tax Compliance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mazza, Stephen W.

    2003-12-01

    HeinOnline -- 51 U. Kan. L. Rev. 1065 2002-2003 HeinOnline -- 51 U. Kan. L. Rev. 1066 2002-2003 HeinOnline -- 51 U. Kan. L. Rev. 1067 2002-2003 HeinOnline -- 51 U. Kan. L. Rev. 1068 2002-2003 HeinOnline -- 51 U. Kan. L. Rev. 1069 2002-2003 Hein...Online -- 51 U. Kan. L. Rev. 1070 2002-2003 HeinOnline -- 51 U. Kan. L. Rev. 1071 2002-2003 HeinOnline -- 51 U. Kan. L. Rev. 1072 2002-2003 HeinOnline -- 51 U. Kan. L. Rev. 1073 2002-2003 HeinOnline -- 51 U. Kan. L. Rev. 1074 2002-2003 HeinOnline -- 51 U. Kan...

  6. Administrative Procedure and the Decline of the Trial

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Levy, Richard E.

    2003-05-01

    HeinOnline -- 51 U. Kan. L. Rev. 473 2002-2003 HeinOnline -- 51 U. Kan. L. Rev. 474 2002-2003 HeinOnline -- 51 U. Kan. L. Rev. 475 2002-2003 HeinOnline -- 51 U. Kan. L. Rev. 476 2002-2003 HeinOnline -- 51 U. Kan. L. Rev. 477 2002-2003 Hein...Online -- 51 U. Kan. L. Rev. 478 2002-2003 HeinOnline -- 51 U. Kan. L. Rev. 479 2002-2003 HeinOnline -- 51 U. Kan. L. Rev. 480 2002-2003 HeinOnline -- 51 U. Kan. L. Rev. 481 2002-2003 HeinOnline -- 51 U. Kan. L. Rev. 482 2002-2003 HeinOnline -- 51 U. Kan. L...

  7. A Proposed Third-Party Visitation Statute: A Recommendation for Legislative Change in Kansas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Valdez, Suzanne

    2002-01-01

    HeinOnline -- 11 Kan. J.L. & Pub. Pol?y 485 2001-2002 HeinOnline -- 11 Kan. J.L. & Pub. Pol?y 486 2001-2002 HeinOnline -- 11 Kan. J.L. & Pub. Pol?y 487 2001-2002 HeinOnline -- 11 Kan. J.L. & Pub. Pol?y 488 2001-2002 HeinOnline -- 11 Kan. J.L. & Pub.... Pol?y 489 2001-2002 HeinOnline -- 11 Kan. J.L. & Pub. Pol?y 490 2001-2002 HeinOnline -- 11 Kan. J.L. & Pub. Pol?y 491 2001-2002 HeinOnline -- 11 Kan. J.L. & Pub. Pol?y 492 2001-2002 HeinOnline -- 11 Kan. J.L. & Pub. Pol?y 493 2001-2002 HeinOnline -- 11...

  8. CURRICULUM VITAE Sarah Amie Newland Pearce

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , Bethlehem, PA. 2000 - 2001 Teaching Assistant ­ Process Sedimentology, Stratigraphy, and Surficial Processes

  9. Property Rights in Groundwater - Some Lessons from the Kansas Experience

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peck, John C.

    2002-01-01

    HeinOnline -- 12 Kan. J.L. & Pub. Pol?y 493 2002-2003 HeinOnline -- 12 Kan. J.L. & Pub. Pol?y 494 2002-2003 HeinOnline -- 12 Kan. J.L. & Pub. Pol?y 495 2002-2003 HeinOnline -- 12 Kan. J.L. & Pub. Pol?y 496 2002-2003 HeinOnline -- 12 Kan. J.L. & Pub.... Pol?y 497 2002-2003 HeinOnline -- 12 Kan. J.L. & Pub. Pol?y 498 2002-2003 HeinOnline -- 12 Kan. J.L. & Pub. Pol?y 499 2002-2003 HeinOnline -- 12 Kan. J.L. & Pub. Pol?y 500 2002-2003 HeinOnline -- 12 Kan. J.L. & Pub. Pol?y 501 2002-2003 HeinOnline -- 12...

  10. ECE/FAO Forest Products Annual Market Review, 2000-2001 __________________________________________________________ 1 Note: the basis of information in this chapter is not the UNECE TIMBER database built on country-supplied

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    to several new certification systems now operational, notably Pan European Forest Certification (PEFC as in the past, but also increasingly with a PEFC label. · Forest certification remains highly controversial

  11. ECE/FAO Forest Products Annual Market Review, 2000-2001 __________________________________________________________ 1 Note: the basis of information in this chapter is not the UNECE TIMBER database built on country-supplied

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , with conflicting stakeholder interests, divergent views on certification as well as differences of opinionECE/FAO Forest Products Annual Market Review, 2000, it is based on the author's experience, claims by certification organizations and a partial survey of a new

  12. Forest Research Annual Report and Accounts 20012002

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Forest Research Annual Report and Accounts 2001­2002 An Agency of the Forestry Commission #12;#12;Forest Research Annual Report and Accounts 2001­2002 Together with the Comptroller and Auditor General

  13. Consumer Arbitration in the EU and the US

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Drahozal, Christopher R.

    2003-01-01

    HeinOnline -- 28 N.C. J. Int?l L. & Comm. Reg. 357 2002-2003 HeinOnline -- 28 N.C. J. Int?l L. & Comm. Reg. 358 2002-2003 HeinOnline -- 28 N.C. J. Int?l L. & Comm. Reg. 359 2002-2003 HeinOnline -- 28 N.C. J. Int?l L. & Comm. Reg. 360 2002-2003 Hein...Online -- 28 N.C. J. Int?l L. & Comm. Reg. 361 2002-2003 HeinOnline -- 28 N.C. J. Int?l L. & Comm. Reg. 362 2002-2003 HeinOnline -- 28 N.C. J. Int?l L. & Comm. Reg. 363 2002-2003 HeinOnline -- 28 N.C. J. Int?l L. & Comm. Reg. 364 2002-2003 HeinOnline -- 28 N.C...

  14. Curriculum Vitae Franck Polleux, Ph.D.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Polleux, Franck

    L. Lehninger Research Prize for Post-doctoral Research - Johns Hopkins University 2000-2001 INSERM-CFB

  15. FEDERAL ENERGY REGULATORY COMMISSION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Laughlin, Robert B.

    in bringing closure to the 2000-2001 energy crisis. Settlements are in the best interests of all parties and I the 2000-2001 energy crisis valued at more than $6.3 billion. Additional information on the Commission's comprehensive actions in response to the 2000-2001 Western energy crisis, along with a list of the related

  16. Transportation and its Infrastructure

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2007-01-01

    Council for Sustainable Development) Mobility 2001 (2002),and mode Sustainable Development, ‘Mobility 2030’, alsoCouncil on Sustainable Development’s Mobility 2030 (WBCSD,

  17. Contraction-induced elevation of heat shock protein 72 mRNA content in isolated single skeletal muscle fibers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stary, Creed Michael

    2006-01-01

    and Samaja M. (1998) Bioenergetics of contracting skeletalto investigate muscle bioenergetics (Hogan et al. , 2005;2002, 2003) and muscle bioenergetics during contractions (

  18. download here my CV

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Author

    2012-03-19

    Jan 18, 2012 ... 2002-2003: Postdoctoral position at the technical university of Vienna (Austria) .... Invitation to the University of Connecticut , April 4-7 (2012). 6 ...

  19. CURRICULUM VITAE JUN KORENAGA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Korenaga, Jun

    Berkeley, Miller Research Fellow, 2001-2002. PROFESSIONAL HISTORY: 2003-2007, Assistant Professor-1996) Miller Research Fellowship (2001-2002) NSF CAREER Award (2005) AGU James B. Macelwane Medal (2006) AGU/2010-9/2010, R/V Marcus G. Langseth, Chief scientist. Shatsky Rise, 3/2012-4/2012, R/V Marcus G. Langseth, Chief

  20. USC Visiting Fulbright Scholars from Abroad 2000 -Present

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Almor, Amit

    Health 2000-2001 Haggag, Salah Eldin Egypt; Physics and Astronomy #12;Barry, Michael Ireland; Electrical-2006 Bouzidi, Hassan Morocco; English Programs for Internationals Lilov, Stanislav Bulgaria; Electrical

  1. Short Bio Nora Noffke Professional Preparation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Noffke, Nora

    . Geology & Paleontology Area: Paleontology, Sedimentology, Geobiology Inclusive Data: 1998 ­ 1999, Biology, Sedimentology Inclusive Data: 2000-2001 Appointments 2009 - present Visiting Scholar, Carnegie

  2. B U L L E T I N O F GRADUATE CATALOG

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rock, Chris

    90 countries are drawn to Texas Tech by its personalized, high-quality graduate education. Texas TechB U L L E T I N O F GRADUATE CATALOG 2002-2003 #12;1 BULLETIN OF Texas Tech University Vol. LXXIX program requirements for students who enter Texas Tech University during the 2002-2003 school year must

  3. Bishop's University Energy Efficiency Action Plan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    global energy consumption by 14% relative to 2002-2003. By 2010 Action 6: Cost evaluation of investments% reduction in energy consumption (GJ / m²) for higher education buildings from 2002-2003 until 2010- 2011 ways to save energy March 2008 Action 3: Snapshot of current energy consumption. Send energy

  4. VIGRE Program

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Other members of the Graduate Committee. 1998-2001. L. Lempert, A. Sa Barreto, W. Heinzer, J. Smith, J. S. P. Wang, S. K. Yeung. 2001-2002. J. Brown, Z. Cai, ...

  5. The "visual word form area" is involved in successful memory encoding of both words and faces

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mei, L; Xue, G; Chen, C; Xue, F; Zhang, M; Dong, Q

    2010-01-01

    and learning of visual word forms. For instance, severalencoding of both familiar words (Otten et al. , 2001, 2002;to learn novel visual word forms (Chen et al. , 2007; Dong

  6. NonInitiality within Spell-Out Domains: Unifying the Post-Syntactic Behavior of Bulgarian Dative Clitics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harizanov, Boris

    2011-01-01

    Slavic Publications. Schick, I. 2000. The phenomenon ofFranks c and King 2000; Schick 2000; Embick and Noyer 2001;Franks and King 2000; Schick 2000; Boškovi´ 2001, 2002). It

  7. Purdue VIGRE Credits - Department of Mathematics, Purdue ...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    $author.value

    Other members of the Graduate Committee. 1998-2001. L. Lempert, A. Sa Barreto, W. Heinzer, J. Smith, J. S. P. Wang, S. K. Yeung. 2001-2002. J. Brown, Z. Cai, ...

  8. INTRODUCTION The obliquebanded leafroller, Choristoneura rosaceana

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Burns, Jacqueline K.

    , increasing incidence of resistance to these toxins (Pree et al., 2001, 2002) and U.S. government alone. Virgin females of each spe- cies (2­4 d old) were placed into 1-liter plastic assay chambers

  9. Solidarity at the margins : literature, film, and justice in neoliberal Argentina, Brazil and Chile

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Daniels, Jennie Irene

    2012-01-01

    2001-2002), and Luíz Inácio “Lula” da Silva’s election inand ending in 2003, the year of Lula’s inauguration. If thepresident, Luis Ignácio Lula de Silva, or Lula (2003-2010).

  10. Prediction of External Corrosion for Steel Cylinders--2007 Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schmoyer, Richard L [ORNL

    2008-01-01

    Depleted uranium hexafluoride (DUF{sub 6}) is stored in over 62,000 containment cylinders at the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PGDP) in Paducah, Kentucky, and at the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PORTS) in Portsmouth, Ohio. Over 4,800 of the cylinders at Portsmouth were recently moved there from the East Tennessee Technology Park (ETTP) in Oak Ridge, Tennessee. The cylinders range in age up to 56 years and come in various models, but most are 48-inch diameter 'thin-wall'(312.5 mil) and 'thick-wall' (625 mil) cylinders and 30-inch diameter '30A' (including '30B') cylinders with 1/2-inch (500 mil) walls. Most of the cylinders are carbon steel, and they are subject to corrosion. The United States Department of Energy (DOE) manages the cylinders to maintain them and the DUF{sub 6} they contain. Cylinder management requirements are specified in the System Requirements Document (LMES 1997a), and the activities to fulfill them are specified in the System Engineering Management Plan (LMES 1997b). This report documents activities that address DUF{sub 6} cylinder management requirements involving measuring and forecasting cylinder wall thicknesses. As part of these activities, ultrasonic thickness (UT) measurements are made on samples of cylinders. For each sampled cylinder, multiple measurements are made in an attempt to find, approximately, the minimum wall thickness. Some cylinders have a skirt, which is an extension of the cylinder wall to protect the head (end) and valve. The head/skirt interface crevice is thought to be particularly vulnerable to corrosion, and for some skirted cylinders, in addition to the main body UT measurements, a separate suite of measurements is also made at the head/skirt interface. The main-body and head/skirt minimum thickness data are used to fit models relating minimum thickness to cylinder age, nominal thicknesses, and cylinder functional groups defined in terms of plant site, storage yard, top or bottom row storage positions, etc. These models are then used to compute projections of numbers of cylinders expected to fail various minimum wall thickness criteria. The minimum wall thickness criteria are as follows. For thin-wall cylinders: 0 (breach), 62.5, and 250 mils. For thick-wall cylinders: 0, 62.5, and 500 mils. For 30A cylinders: 0, 62.5, and 100 mils. Each of these criteria triplets are based respectively on (1) loss of DUF{sub 6} (breaching), (2) safe handling and stacking operations, and (3) ANSI N14.1 standards for off-site transport and contents transfer. This report complements and extends previous editions of the cylinder corrosion report by Lyon (1995, 1996, 1997, 1998, 2000), by Schmoyer and Lyon (2001, 2002, 2003), and by Schmoyer (2004). These reports are based on UT data collected in FY03 and before. In this report UT data collected after FY03 but before FY07 is combined with the earlier data, and all of the UT data is inventoried chronologically and by the various functional groups. The UT data is then used to fit models of maximum pit depth and minimum wall thickness, statistical outliers are investigated, and the fitted models are used to extrapolate minimum thickness estimates into the future and in turn to compute projections of numbers of cylinders expected to fail various thickness criteria. A model evaluation is performed comparing UT measurements made after FY05 with model-fitted projections based only on data collected in FY05 and before. As in previous reports, the projections depend on the treatment of outliers.

  11. Press Pass - Press Releases

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    21, the Fermilab Arts Series for 2002-2003 gets off to a rousing start this weekend at Ramsey Auditorium in Wilson Hall. Due to security measures enacted by the U.S. Department of...

  12. , 7 2011, 7 2011 FP6 EUMOP

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Psarrakos, Panayiotis

    and Physical Model Testing», EU GD Energy, 2002 ­ 2003). · Coordination action on Ocean Energy", EU GD : : : . (OWC's) ' (heaving devices) . / , /. , , , & , RAMBOLL, DHI, IST, UCC, Queens University · "Offshore Wave Energy Converters (OWEC1)", EU, GD Research, OULE II, 19931995. · LABBUOY

  13. (OWC's) ' (heaving devices) (heaving devices)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Psarrakos, Panayiotis

    Testing», EU GD Energy, 2002 ­ 2003). ­ Coordination action on Ocean Energy", EU GD Research, 2004 ­ 2007 ` ' : ­ ­ : ­ ­ #12;: : : · : · : . (OWC's) ' (heaving devices University · ­ "Offshore Wave Energy Converters (OWEC1)", EU, GD Research, OULE II, 19931995. ­ LABBUOY

  14. Study of popular Hong Kong cinema from 2001 to 2004 as resource for a contextual approach to expressions of christian faith in the public realm after the reversion to Chinese sovereignty in 1997 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yam, Chi-Keung

    2008-01-01

    In this thesis I study popular Hong Kong cinema through analysing specific films produced between 2001 and 2004. They are Shaolin Soccer (2001), The Infernal Affairs Trilogy (2002-2003), and Kung Fu Hustle (2004). My aim ...

  15. State and Power after Neoliberalism in Bolivarian Venezuela

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kingsbury, Donald V.

    2012-01-01

    of coup attempts (in 2002), lockout strikes (2002-2003),by Chávez after the 2003 lockout, merchants in the importwho supported the 2003 bosses’ lockout of the industry, a

  16. Two Phase Flow Measurements by Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Altobelli, Stephen A; Fukushima, Eiichi

    2006-08-14

    In concentrated suspensions, there is a tendency for the solid phase to migrate from regions of high shear rate to regions of low shear (Leighton & Acrivos, 1987). In the early years that our effort was funded by the DOE Division of Basic Energy Science, quantitative measurement of this process in neutrally buoyant suspensions was a major focus (Abbott, et al., 1991; Altobelli, et al., 1991). Much of this work was used to improve multi-phase numerical models at Sandia National Laboratories. Later, our collaborators at Sandia and the University of New Mexico incorporated body forces into their numerical models of suspension flow (Rao, Mondy, Sun, et al., 2002). We developed experiments that allow us to study flows driven by buoyancy, to characterize these flows in well-known and useful engineering terms (Altobelli and Mondy, 2002) and to begin to explore the less well-understood area of flows with multiple solid phases (Beyea, Altobelli, et al., 2003). We also studied flows that combine the effects of shear and buoyancy, and flows of suspensions made from non-Newtonian liquids (Rao, Mondy, Baer, et al, 2002). We were able to demonstrate the usefulness of proton NMR imaging of liquid phase concentration and velocity and produced quantitative data not obtainable by other methods. Fluids flowing through porous solids are important in geophysics and in chemical processing. NMR techniques have been widely used to study liquid flow in porous media. We pioneered the extension of these studies to gas flows (Koptyug, et al, 2000, 2000, 2001, 2002). This extension allows us to investigate a wider range of Peclet numbers, and to gather data on problems of interest in catalysis. We devised two kinds of NMR experiments for three-phase systems. Both experiments employ two NMR visible phases and one phase that gives no NMR signal. The earlier method depends on the two visible phases differing in a NMR relaxation property. The second method (Beyea, Altobelli, et al., 2003) uses two different nuclei, protons and 19F. It also uses two different types of NMR image formation, a conventional spin-echo and a single-point method. The single-point method is notable for being useful for imaging materials which are much more rigid than can usually be studied by NMR imaging. We use it to image “low density” polyethylene (LDPE) plastic in this application. We have reduced the imaging time for this three-phase imaging method to less than 10 s per pair of profiles by using new hardware. Directly measuring the solid LDPE signal was a novel feature for multi-phase flow studies. We also used thermally polarized gas NMR (as opposed to hyper-polarized gas) which produces low signal to noise ratios because gas densities are on the order of 1000 times smaller than liquid densities. However since we used multi-atom molecules that have short T1's and operated at elevated pressures we could overcome some of the losses. Thermally polarized gases have advantages over hyperpolarized gases in the ease of preparation, and in maintaining a well-defined polarization. In these studies (Codd and Altobelli, 2003), we used stimulated echo sequences to successfully obtain propagators of gas in bead packs out to observation times of 300 ms. Zarraga, et al. (2000) used laser-sheet profilometry to investigate normal stress differences in concentrated suspensions. Recently we developed an NMR imaging analog for comparison with numerical work that is being performed by Rekha Rao at Sandia National Laboratories (Rao, Mondy, Sun, et al, 2002). A neutrally buoyant suspension of 100 mm PMMA spheres in a Newtonian liquid was sheared in a vertical Couette apparatus inside the magnet. The outer cylinder rotates and the inner cylinder is fixed. At these low rotation rates, the free-surface of the Newtonian liquid shows no measurable deformation, but the suspension clearly shows its non-Newtonian character.

  17. Joel R. Primack Distinguished Professor of Physics, University of California, Santa Cruz

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Santa Cruz, University of

    advisory panel to DOE/NSF 2000-2001; NSF Astronomy Theory Review Panel 2000; DOE Lehman Review of SNAP of Natural History, Washington, DC, April 14-16, 1999. Over 100 public lectures on cosmology, including

  18. Copyright 2003 by the Genetics Society of America Molecular and Cytological Analyses of Large Tracks of Centromeric DNA Reveal

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    et al. 1998; Henning et al. 1999), sug- meres (Fransz et al. 2000; Kumekawa et al. 2000, 2001 and serve meres were cloned and analyzed (Copenhaver et al. 1999; as the sites for kinetochore assembly

  19. The Market Value and Cost of Solar Photovoltaic Electricity Production

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Borenstein, Severin

    2008-01-01

    a wholesale electricity market in which capacity costs arecapacity would have helped to undermine market power during the California electricityCapacity shortages and the exercise of market power that occurred during the 2000-2001 California electricity

  20. Dietary breadth and overlap among five sympatric prairie F. C. C. Azevedo1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    8. Received 23 February 2005; accepted 6 September 2005 doi:10.1111/j.1469-7998.2006.00075.x of a predator control program in southern Sas- katchewan, Canada (2000­2001). Carnivores consumed a total of 25

  1. School of Engineering | University of Connecticut Annual Report School of Engineering Annual Report 1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alpay, S. Pamir

    2000 2001 School of Engineering | University of Connecticut Annual Report #12;School of Engineering Annual Report 1 University of ConnecticutUniversity of Connecticut School of Engineering Annual Report

  2. Patterns and Trends of Chlorinated Hydrocarbons in Nestling Bald Eagle (Haliaeetus leucocephalus) Plasma in British Columbia

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , 1995; Elliott et al. 1996a, 1996c; Elliott and Norstrom 1998; Garcelon and Thomas 1997; Gill Æ John E. Elliott Received: 21 June 2007 / Accepted: 20 December 2007 / Published online: 6 February al. 1999; Elliott and Harris 2001/2002; Elliott and Norstrom 1998). Since the 1960's, levels

  3. University of South Carolina Columbia Campus

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    University of South Carolina Columbia Campus 2001-2002 Mini Fact Book Office of Institutional: http://kudzu.ipr.sc.edu/index.htm The University of South Carolina provides equal opportunity, South Carolina College was chartered as one of the nation's first publicly supported institutions

  4. SARDINIA2003_2_Infrastructure.doc 1 Waste Treatment Infrastructure in North Rhine-Westphalia,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Columbia University

    commercial and industrial waste management sector. For the turn of the year 2001/2002, this infrastructure Environmental Office of NRW (www.lua.nrw.de). 1. Introduction, characteristics of waste management in North responsibility and investment risk for appropriate waste management facilities. Favorable for the development

  5. An Artist's depiction of the International Space Station. Photo courtesy of NASA COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Saskatchewan, University of

    OF ENGINEERING RESEARCH REPORT 2001-2002 Executive Summary 1. Division of Biomedical Engineering 2. Division of Environmental Engineering 3. Department of Agricultural and Bioresource Engineering 4. Department of Chemical Engineering 5. Department of Civil and Geological Engineering 6. Department of Electrical Engineering 7

  6. Adaptive systems for foreign exchange trading

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fernandez, Thomas

    - cal analysis. Technical analysis attempts to predict markets by identifying patterns in the price;FinancialMarkets Jones CM (2001 & 2002). Much of it has concen- trated on high frequency (intraday) trading exchange markets. Professor Michael Dempster and Graham Bates, both of the Centre for Financial Research

  7. Basketball - Mens- 2001-2010 - 24 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Allen Pearson

    2011-08-17

    . Hood Army base. The baselines developed for this report include data measured during 2001/2002 for the thermal plant, 87000 block buildings, and III Corp building and natural gas data recorded over a several year period. Baseline analyses are presented...

  8. Collection of Digital Imagery in Support of Aquatic Invasive Species Program and CERP Sponsor: U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, $100,000, 2011-2012. CESU Agreement

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hill, Jeffrey E.

    : The US Army Corps of Engineers. $330,000. 2006-Present. · Development of the IFAS Vegetation Mobile. $130,000. 2001-2002. Mapping and Monitoring of Sedimentation and Sand Dune Encroachment in Lake Nasser in the Southeastern Lower Coastal Plain Region of the U.S. Sponsor: NASA. $370,000. 1999-2002. Biological Diversity

  9. The University of Vermont Burlington, Vermont 05405

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hayden, Nancy J.

    Catalogue 2001-2002 The University of Vermont Burlington, Vermont 05405 www.uvm.edu #12;The University of Vermont Equal Opportunity in Educational Programs and Activities Policy The University of Vermont and State Agricultural College is committed to a policy of equal educational op- portunity

  10. climate research and seismology department Biennial Scientific Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stoffelen, Ad

    climate research and seismology department Biennial Scientific Report 2001­2002 #12;2 #12;3 Contents Preface Foreword Recent highlights On the role of cirrus clouds in climate 11 Pathways in the ocean 19 Monitoring of tropical processes relevant to climate change 29 Current projects Climate

  11. (Robert P. Biuk-Aghai), , , : robertb@umac.mo

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Biuk-Aghai, Robert P.

    1 * (Robert P. Biuk-Aghai), , , : robertb@umac.mo (GIS) TM 30 1111 (PC) (PDAs) (ITU) 2002 [1] (PDAs) (GIS) (GIS)- 2 34 5 * . #12;2 2222 2001 2002 (PDA) PalmOS Pocket Telecommunication Union, 2003. http://www.itu.org/. 2. Robert P. Biuk-Aghai. A mobile GIS application for heavily

  12. Bottle Rock Power Corporation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Power Plant and Steamfield during suspended operations of the geothermal facility in accordance). That Order was extended to DWR and that extension expired on 26 April 2001. On 30 May 2001, the CEC approved for calendar years 2001, 2002, and 2003. The BRPC has also submitted the requisite annual reports for those

  13. UNIVERSITY of CALIFORNIA Santa Barbara

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hespanha, João Pedro

    with Andy. Nathan introduce me to the tracking problem discussed in Chapter 7 during his sabbatical at UCSB, and Spedieh and my bother in laws, Alireza and Arta. I want to acknowledge my aunt Nosrat and her family who of Southern California, 2001 - 2002. R&D Engineer Heating Company, Iran, 1998 - 2000. R&D Engineer Sazeh

  14. Climate Center Atmospheric Science Department

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Averages-1971-2000 Max Year - 1957 Min Year - 2002 Period of Record Average - 1949 - 2002 2003 Water Year 2nd Min Year - 1950 #12;Division 3 Mesa Verde NP 2003 Water Year (through October '02-December '02) 0 Center in Boulder #12;Division 1 Taylor Park 2003 Water Year (through October '02-December '02) 0 5 10 15

  15. Jeong-Im Yi 2004 San Francisco Art Institute, San Francisco, CA. Master of Fine Arts, Painting

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jeong-Im Yi Education 2004 San Francisco Art Institute, San Francisco, CA. Master of Fine Arts Korean Cultural Center Annual Juried Exhibition, LA, CA 2002-2003 San Francisco Art Institute Graduate Fellowship, San Francisco, CA 2001 Diplome D'honneur, Biennale Des Artistes Haute-Marnais 2001, Chaumont

  16. Planetary and Space Science ] (

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vassiliadis, Dimitrios

    energized by the solar wind­magnetosphere interac- tion. Using measurements from the IMAGE near-mer- idional distribution and response to solar wind velocity time variations D. Vassiliadisa,Ã, I.R. Mannb , S.F. Fungc , X at geosynchronous orbit, taken over 2 years of solar-maximum activity (2002­2003). We find that the ground ULF wave

  17. Room 5115, Harold Frank Hall katiebyl@ece.ucsb.edu Dept. of Electrical & Computer Engineering http://robotics.ece.ucsb.edu

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liebling, Michael

    to the fact that absolute guarantees of stability (continuous walking, forever) are instead replaced. (DARPA Learning Locomotion project.) · Approximate optimal control solutions for (compass gait) biped defects in a pipeline wall. Research Assistant 2002-2003 Rich Mittleman (MIT) MIT, Kavli Inst. for Astr

  18. This chapter is a guide to the web services available for institutions to submit data to the RAE 2008. The web services provide a programmable interface to the main RAE 2008 data collection system.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abrahams, I. David

    This chapter is a guide to the web services available for institutions to submit data to the RAE 2008. The web services provide a programmable interface to the main RAE 2008 data collection system. Using web services Using the web services with Visual Studio 2002, 2003 and 2005 To use the web services

  19. University of South Carolina Columbia Campus

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    University of South Carolina Columbia Campus 2002-2003 Mini Fact Book Office of Institutional: http://kudzu.ipr.sc.edu/index.htm The University of South Carolina provides equal opportunity gallery. #12;Table of Contents History of the University of South Carolina

  20. Strategic Plan The School of Engineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    10-Year Strategic Plan 2003-2013 The School of Engineering at the University of Kansas KU School of Engineering 1 Eaton Hall (785) 864-2930 (voice) (785) 864-5445 (fax) sbell@ku.edu #12;Executive Summary In 2002-2003,The KU School of Engineering identified, and has since refined, four specific objectives

  1. 851 S.W. Sixth Avenue, Suite 1100 Steve Crow 503-222-5161 Portland, Oregon 97204-1348 Executive Director 800-452-5161

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ­ Flexibility Resource Type Can be Dispatched Energy Capacity Flexibility Hydro Yes Yes Yes Yes Coal Yes needs. In particular, more detail about different types of natural gas-fired generation was requested Geothermal 5,000 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Coal Biomass Excludes small projects

  2. . .. . , 60-.. . 2005. .14.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pelinovsky, Dmitry

    . Curtis, G.D. Evaluation of tsunami risk for mitigation and warning / G.D. Curtis, E.N. Pelinovsky // Sci. Tsunamis; ed. S. Tinti, E. Pelinovsky // Natural Hazards and Earth System Sciences. 2001. V. 1. N. 4. 7- ence Tsunami Hazards. 1999. V. 17. No. 3. P. 187 ­ 192. 10., .. // - 2002. ­ . : , 2003. P. 199

  3. -Spreading of the invaSive CarpobrotuS aff. acinaciformis in Mediterranean eCoSySteMS -45 Applied Vegetation Science 11: 45-54, 2008

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Traveset, Anna

    two years (2002-2003) , comparing two habitats (rocky coast vs. coastal dune) and two different light Vegetation Science 11: 45-54, 2008 doi: 10.3170/2007-7-18303, published online 20 November 2007 © IAVS colo- nization of heterogeneous coastal Mediterranean environments spreading well beyond the open sand

  4. PHILADELPHIA UNIVERSITY PHILADELPHIA UNIVERSITY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    PHILADELPHIA UNIVERSITY : 626 25/9/1991 137 28/10/2007 195164 626 25/9/1991 10/1/2010 --- 1062 : : #12;PHILADELPHIA UNIVERSITY : 2009/2010 11221245 16171952 1211730 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 #12;PHILADELPHIA UNIVERSITY : : : #12

  5. An assessment of regional climate trends and changes to the Mt. Jaya glaciers of Irian Jaya 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kincaid, Joni L.

    2007-09-17

    on the Mt. Jaya glaciers has been lacking since the early 1970s. Using IKONOS satellite images, the ice extents of the Mt. Jaya glaciers in 2000, 2002, 2003, 2004, and 2005 were mapped. The mapping indicates that the recessional trend which began in the mid...

  6. Atmos. Chem. Phys., 9, 91879196, 2009 www.atmos-chem-phys.net/9/9187/2009/

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Meskhidze, Nicholas

    Introduction Formaldehyde, HCHO, is one of the key substances in the photochemical production of radicals and Physics On the distribution of formaldehyde in the western Po-Valley, Italy, during FORMAT 2002/2003 W December 2009 Abstract. Formaldehyde was measured in the area of Mi- lano, Italy, during the 2002 and 2003

  7. The University of Vermont Burlington, Vermont 05405

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hayden, Nancy J.

    1 Catalogue 2002-2003 The University of Vermont Burlington, Vermont 05405 www.uvm.edu #12 of Admissions University of Vermont 194 South Prospect Street Burlington, Vermont 05401-3596 (802) 656-3370 admissions@uvm.edu www.uvm.edu Students at The University of Vermont are responsible for knowing

  8. September 20, 2002: Last Day to Pay Fees September 26, 2002: Instruction Begins

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Classes A r c h i v a l E d i t i o n #12;2 UCLA Schedule of Classes Annual 2002-2003 What's New? College the University's motto, Fiat Lux (Let There Be Light), the nationally acclaimed seminar series mounted after

  9. MATH AND COMPUTER SCIENCE DIVISION 2001-2003 CATALOG UPDATE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gering, Jon C.

    1 MATH AND COMPUTER SCIENCE DIVISION 2001-2003 CATALOG UPDATE Changes effective 2002-2003 COMPUTER-3 Required Support 5-17 MATH 198 Analytical Geometry and Calculus I** MATH 263 Analytical Geometry** **May be used to fulfill Liberal Studies Program Requirements Bachelor of Science Requirements 6-8 MATH

  10. Structure, Vol. 13, 15451557, October, 2005, 2005 Elsevier Ltd All rights reserved. DOI 10.1016/j.str.2005.07.012 Features of Reovirus Outer Capsid Protein 1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baker, Timothy S.

    that accompany perforation of target membranes, and contributing directly to membrane penetration during cell kDa, 600 copies per virion), has been implicated in membrane perforation (reviewed in Chandran conformational changes in 1, which precede membrane perforation (Chandran et al., 2002, 2003; Odegard et al

  11. Second Edition OCTOBER 2000

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    CALIFORNIA ENERGY COMMISSION Volume 2A NEW RENEWABLE RESOURCES ACCOUNT Second Edition OCTOBER 2000 11, 2000, pursuant to Senate Bill 90 (Chp. 905, Stats. 97). This Guidebook contains general Technologies4 Account 1998 1999 2000 2001 Overall (in millions) Existing Technologies 57% 49% 41% 33% 45% $243

  12. INSTRUCTIONAL POLICIES COMMITTEE September 12, 2000

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Selmic, Sandra

    INSTRUCTIONAL POLICIES COMMITTEE MINUTES September 12, 2000 The IPC met for its regular monthly meeting at 1:30 p.m. on Tuesday, September 12, 2000, in Wyly Tower 1647 with the following members present (Cowling/Wibker) to modify the agenda to include the election of officers for 2000- 2001 was APPROVED

  13. IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON SMART GRID, VOL. 6, NO. 4, JULY 2015 1785 Heuristic Optimization for an Aggregator-Based

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maciejewski, Anthony A. "Tony"

    during the California energy crisis of 2000­2001 would have reduced the highest wholesale prices by 50. To encour- age customer participation in the residential DR program, a new pricing structure named customer consisting of 5555 residential customer households and 56 642 schedulable assets using real- pricing data

  14. Water Resources Research Institute of the University of North Carolina

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Water Resources Research Institute of the University of North Carolina Annual Technical Report FY 2000 Introduction SUMMARY The North Carolina Water Resources Research Institute program for 2000-2001 (Federal Fiscal Year 2000) continued to focus on three broad areas of concern: surface waters, groundwater

  15. MethodologicalMethodological ApproachesApproaches forfor WildfireWildfire DamagesDamages

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pettenella, Davide

    problems in economic valuation; social importance) Forest fires statistics - ITALY 0 2000 4000 6000 8000 fire dimension (ha) Forest fires statistics - VENETO 0 200 400 600 800 1000 1200 1400 1600 2000 2001 12 14 16 18 20 n.offires-VENETO ITALY VENETO Forest fires statistics - CALABRIA 0 2000 4000 6000 8000

  16. Lena Qiying Ma Page 1 Total publications 177

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Balser, Teri C.

    Society of America (2002) Chair, Soil Science Applied Research Award Committee, Soil Science Society of America (2000-2001) Board of director, Soil Crop Sci. Soc. Florida Award Committee (2003-2006) Summary) 1. Ma, L.Q. J.C. Bonzongo and B. Gao. Environmental impacts of coal combustion residues in Florida

  17. UNIVERSITY OF NORTH CAROLINA AT WILMINGTON C E N T E R F O R M A R I N E S C I E N C E

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mallin, Michael

    UNIVERSITY OF NORTH CAROLINA AT WILMINGTON C E N T E R F O R M A R I N E S C I E N C E UNIVERSITY OF NORTH CAROLINA AT WILMINGTON Center for Marine Science Emergency Management Guide 2000 ­ 2001 Edition a comprehensive Emergency Management Guide. We are particularly vulnerable to hurricanes in coastal North Carolina

  18. University of South Carolina Columbia Campus

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    University of South Carolina Columbia Campus 2000-2001 Mini Fact Book Office of Institutional: http://kudzu.ipr.sc.edu/index.htm The University of South Carolina provides equal opportunity pertaining to South Carolina, and was renamed South Caroliniana Library when McKissick Memorial Library

  19. J2.3 USING SPATIOTEMPORAL RELATIONAL DATA MINING TO IDENTIFY THE KEY PARAMETERS FOR ANTICIPATING ROTATION INITIATION IN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McGovern, Amy

    1 and cause, in part, the $13B (Pielke and Carbone, 2002) of economic impact due to mesoscale storms. The current primary instrumentation for observing mesoscale convection is the WSR- 88D NEXRAD radar system system for mesoscale data (Xue et al. 2000, 2001, 2003). When assimilated data is available in larger

  20. he Northwest Power and Conservation Council

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    in the wake of the West Coast energy crisis of 2000/2001, is designed to help the region's utilities Power Plan in December, the fifth plan since the Council was created in 1980. The new plan, developed the energy crisis. "The primary message of the power plan is a familiar one from the Council: energy

  1. Publications of the Hawaii Institute of Geophysics and Planetology University of Hawaii

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . Lucey, D. T. Blewett], 2002, Lunar Prospector neutron spectrometer constraints on TiO2, J. Geophys. Res, Global Thermal Alert System Using MODIS: Initial Results from 2000-2001 Advances in Environmental Monitoring and Modeling, (http://www.kcl.ac.uk/ kis/ schools/ hums/ geog/ advemm/ vol1no3.html) 1(3), 37

  2. Forest Research Annual Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Forest Research Annual Report and Accounts 2000-2001 An agency of the Forestry Commission #12-SMITH Chief Research Officer Forest Research Members DR A.R. GRIFFIN Renewable Resources Division Shell Research Organisation Spring 2001 Advisory Committee on Forest Research Chief Executive Chief Research

  3. COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING RESEARCH REPORT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Saskatchewan, University of

    1 #12;2 COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING RESEARCH REPORT 2000-2001 Executive Summary 1. Division of Biomedical Engineering 2. Division of Environmental Engineering 3. Department of Agricultural and Bioresource Engineering 4. Department of Chemical Engineering 5. Department of Civil and Geological Engineering 6

  4. ANNUAL REPORT TO CONGRESS STATUS OF THE HARBOR MAINTENANCE TRUST FUND

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    ANNUAL REPORT TO CONGRESS STATUS OF THE HARBOR MAINTENANCE TRUST FUND FISCAL YEARS 2000, 2001 AND 2002 #12;ii #12;iii ANNUAL REPORT TO CONGRESS STATUS OF THE HARBOR MAINTENANCE TRUST FUND FISCAL YEARS, Fiscal Year 2002 (Actual, $000) #12;vi #12;vii ANNUAL REPORT TO CONGRESS STATUS OF THE HARBOR MAINTENANCE

  5. Celebrating 65th birthday of Rick Heller The rate of heating in vibrating billiards

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cohen, Doron

    -Gurion University Alex Stotland (BGU) Lou Pecora (NRL) Nir Davidson (Weizmann) Alex Barnett (Harvard 2000-2001) Rick, Swiatecki, Koonin The Wall formula (II): Barnett, Cohen, Heller [1] - regarding gc Semi Linear response Lx [1] A. Barnett, D. Cohen, E.J. Heller (PRL 2000, JPA 2000) [2] D. Cohen, T. Kottos, H. Schanz (JPA

  6. The rate of heating in vibrating billiards Doron Cohen

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cohen, Doron

    ) Lou Pecora (NRL) Nir Davidson (Weizmann) Alex Barnett (Harvard 2000-2001) Rick Heller (Harvard): Blocki, Boneh, Nix, Randrup, Robel, Sierk, Swiatecki, Koonin The Wall formula (II): Barnett, Cohen = E / L = 2/(kEL) = function of E R Ly Lx [1] A. Barnett, D. Cohen, E.J. Heller (PRL 2000, JPA 2000

  7. 2009 IECC Recommendations 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yazdani, Bahman; Culp, Charles; Haberl, Jeff

    2009-01-01

    .D. Jeff Haberl, P.E., Ph.D. Associate Director Associate Director Associate Director cc: David Claridge, P.E., Ph.D., Director ? ESL Table 1: 2000/2001 IECC Performance Path vs. 2009 IECC Performance Path County IECC 2009 Weather Zones Energy...

  8. WORLD DATA CENTER for Oceanography, Silver Spring

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    0 WORLD DATA CENTER for Oceanography, Silver Spring CATALOGUE OF DATA and REPORT OF DATA EXCHANGE 2000 - 2001 #12;World Data Centers conduct international exchange of geophysical observations are established in the United States under the auspices of the National Academy of Sciences. #12;WORLD DATA CENTER

  9. An Analysis of Building Envelope Upgrades for Residential Energy Efficiency in Hot and Humid Climates 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Malhotra, M.; Haberl, J.

    2006-01-01

    and exterior walls, and windows. A DOE-2 simulation model of a 2000/2001 IECC code-compliant house in Houston, Texas, was used for the analysis. The results demonstrated the effect of incremental changes in these properties on the building's energy use...

  10. Federal Energy Regulatory Commission January 8, 2008

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Laughlin, Robert B.

    energy market crisis of 2000-2001 today by approving the $18 million settlement agreement between EnronFederal Energy Regulatory Commission FACT SHEET January 8, 2008 Enron-Snohomish PUD No.1 Docket No.FERC.gov The Federal Energy Regulatory Commission took another step in resolving the issues surrounding the Western

  11. FEDERAL ENERGY REGULATORY COMMISSION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Laughlin, Robert B.

    . AGREEMENT ACCEPTED BETWEEN ENRON AND NEVADA COMPANIES SETTLING MATTERS STEMMING FROM WESTERN ENERGY CRISIS the 2000-2001 Western energy crisis. "This is another in a long line of settlements the Commission has approved in the wake of the Western energy crisis. Further settlement of issues still outstanding from

  12. FEDERAL ENERGY REGULATORY COMMISSION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Laughlin, Robert B.

    Enron's activities during the 2000-2001 Western energy crisis, and approved three other settlementsFEDERAL ENERGY REGULATORY COMMISSION WASHINGTON,D.C.20426 NEWS RELEASE NEWS MEDIA CONTACT JURISDICTION UNDER SECTION 1290 OF EPACT The Federal Energy Regulatory Commission today approved a settlement

  13. FEDERAL ENERGY REGULATORY COMMISSION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Laughlin, Robert B.

    markets during the Western energy crisis of 2000-2001. The first case involves a settlement agreement Marketing LP in FERC proceedings arising from the Western energy crisis. The El Paso settlement is sponsored to finally resolving the lingering issues from the Western energy crisis and returning money to consumers

  14. Word Wide Cooperation on Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) PIV CHALLENGE 2001 Gttingen, Germany, September 14-15, 2001

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gui, Lichuan

    of Hydraulic Research (IIHR) at the University of Iowa in the United States by adding window masks for reducing the bias errors and increasing spatial resolution in the turbulent flow measurement (Gui et al 2000, 2001a). A 3-D median filter is constructed in the post processing procedure to reduce the measurement uncerta

  15. Greed and Good Intentions: What Really Happened in California's Electricity Markets

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Warwick, William M.; Grover, Stephen

    2002-03-01

    This article gives a detailed account of the 2000-2001 energy crisis in California. Deregulation of California's electric power industry is described and factors leading up to the failure of retail power markets are explained. The current state of the power market in California is also reported.

  16. Curriculum Vitae Name: Arthur F. Hebard Marital Status: Single

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hebard, Arthur F.

    of Materials Physics Focus Session on Buckyballs (March '92 and March '93 APS Meetings), Physics and Chemistry Matter Physics (DCMP) of the APS (elected, 1998-2001). APS Executive Council (2000-2001). Chair, APS at Large of the Division of Materials Physics (DMP) of the APS (elected, 2004-2007). DMP Fellowship

  17. Predicting scorpion sting incidence in an endemic region using climatological variables*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hyman, James "Mac"

    -Haro 1998). Also, in the South-western United States and adjacent Mexico, stings from Centruroides in several regions of the world. The highest mortality, with over 1000 deaths per year, has been reported stings in humans in the state of Colima (Mexico) for the years 2000 ­ 2001. The pluvial precipitation (mm

  18. RHex: A Biologically Inspired Hexapod Runner1 R. Altendorfer2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Saranlý, Uluç

    RHex: A Biologically Inspired Hexapod Runner1 R. Altendorfer2 , N. Moore3 , H. Komsuo¯glu2 , M is an untethered, compliant leg hexapod robot that travels at better than one body length per second over terrain., 2000; 2001). Our breadbox sized, compliant leg hexapod, RHex (Fig. 1), travels at speeds better than

  19. Journal of Biomechanics 41 (2008) 22462252 Functional analysis of Fontan energy dissipation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pekkan, Kerem

    2008-01-01

    in the physiological range. Furthermore, non-dimensional energy dissipation, which is a measure of resistance to the patient (Senzaki et al., 2002, Sundareswaran et al., 2007). To illustrate the importance of energy savings al., 1998; Walker et al., 2000, 2001). Factors such as PA stenosis degrade the flow efficiency

  20. The University of Vermont Burlington, Vermont 05405

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hayden, Nancy J.

    Catalogue 2000-2001 The University of Vermont Burlington, Vermont 05405 #12;The University of Vermont Equal Opportunity inEducational Programs and Activities Policy The University of Vermont and State, University of Vermont, 41­43 South Prospect Street, Burlington, VT 05405 (802- 656-3380) or Wanda Heading

  1. UNM online course enrollments by college: 2003-2005 SU 03 FA 03 SP 04 SU 04 FA 04 SP 05 SU 05 FA 05

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1989 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2004-2005 2006 Long before the Internet and broadcast television Correspondence Courses, birth of distance education at UNM. Birth of ARPANET which "grew" to be the INTERNET Instructional Systems Design. WebCT is adopted as the University of New Mexico's learning management system (LMS

  2. FERC Approves $85.7 Million Western Energy Settlement The Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) today approved an $85.7 million settlement

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Laughlin, Robert B.

    markets during the Western energy crisis of 2000-2001. The settlement between Midway Sunset Cogeneration Independent System Operator harmless for actions taken to implement the settlement. The California Parties are Pacific Gas and Electric Co., Southern California Edison Co., San Diego Gas & Electric Co., the state

  3. Dreamers. Thinkers. Doers. Herff College of Engineering Experience

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dasgupta, Dipankar

    , the University of Memphis had established itself as a source of quality graduates to Shell Oil Company, Shell Pipe Line Corporation, 1993 - 1996 · Engineer, Shell Oil Company, 1991 ­ 1993 Significant - 2002 · General Manager, TopTier Software, Inc., 2000 - 2001 · Business Information Manager, Equilon

  4. STATISTICAL AND 3D NONLINEAR FINITE ELEMENT ANALYSIS OF SCHLEGEIS DAM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Balaji, Rajagopalan

    STATISTICAL AND 3D NONLINEAR FINITE ELEMENT ANALYSIS OF SCHLEGEIS DAM VICTOR SAOUMA, ERIC HANSEN is composed of two parts. First a statistical analysis of the dam crest displacement is performed, along with a prediction for the years 2000-2001. Then a 3D finite element analysis of Schlegeis dam is performed using

  5. Virtual Reality in Brain Damage Rehabilitation: Review F. DAVID ROSE, Ph.D.,1 BARBARA. M. BROOKS, Ph.D.,1 and ALBERT A. RIZZO, Ph.D.2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rizzo, Albert "Skip"

    of Evidence of a Select Committee on Health, Session 2000­2001, there is a lack of reliable up-to- date data care in the United States for disorders of the brain and nervous system than for any other health prob to date has been to investigate the use of VR in the assessment of cognitive abilities, but there is now

  6. MATHEW M. MAYE, PH.D. ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR OF CHEMISTRY SYRACUSE UNIVERSITY, DEPARTMENT OF CHEMISTRY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McConnell, Terry

    (MRS-UMRI) Award (2000 & 2001). ACS Analytical Chemistry Award (SUNY-Binghamton, 2000). SUPPORT AFOSR- 1 - MATHEW M. MAYE, PH.D. ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR OF CHEMISTRY SYRACUSE UNIVERSITY, DEPARTMENT OF CHEMISTRY 1-014 CENTER FOR SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY, SYRACUSE, NEW YORK 13244-4100 (315) 443-2146, MMMAYE

  7. A new seismic analysis of Alpha Centauri

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Thoul; R. Scuflaire; A. Noels; B. Vatovez; M. Briquet; M. -A. Dupret; J. Montalban

    2003-03-20

    Models of alpha Cen A & B have been computed using the masses determined by Pourbaix et al. (2002) and the data derived from the spectroscopic analysis of Neuforge and Magain (1997). The seismological data obtained by Bouchy and Carrier (2001, 2002) do help improve our knowledge of the evolutionary status of the system. All the constraints are satisfied with a model which gives an age of about 6 Gyr for the binary.

  8. A new seismic analysis of Alpha Centauri

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thoul, A; Noels, A; Vatovez, B; Briquet, M; Dupret, M A; Montalban, J

    2003-01-01

    Models of alpha Cen A & B have been computed using the masses determined by Pourbaix et al. (2002) and the data derived from the spectroscopic analysis of Neuforge and Magain (1997). The seismological data obtained by Bouchy and Carrier (2001, 2002) do help improve our knowledge of the evolutionary status of the system. All the constraints are satisfied with a model which gives an age of about 6 Gyr for the binary.

  9. Tracking Progress Last updated 10/7/2013 Installed Capacity 1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Capacity (MW) Wind Solar Small Hydro Large Hydro,813 Large Hydro 11,890 11,755 11,755 12,114 12,103 12,194 11,945 12,226 12,226 12,257 12,297 12,297 Small 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Energy (GWh) Wind Solar Small Hydro Large Hydro Natural Gas Nuclear Geothermal

  10. Noticing in text-based computer-mediated communication: a study of a task-based telecommunication between native and nonnative English speakers 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Wen-Chun

    2009-05-15

    , 3 Fujiwara, & Fearnow, 1999; Lai & Zhao, 2006; Loewen, 2002, 2003a, 2003b, 2004, 2005; Long, 1991; Mackey, 2006; Smith, 2003a, 2003b). Noticing 1 is an internal operation through which a learner processes input and transforms it into knowledge..., 2002; Skehan, 2003), interlocutors (native vs. nonnative speaking interlocutors of different language proficiency, or teacher vs. student) (Fernandez-Garcia & Martinez-Arbelaiz., 2002; Gass & Varonis, 1985; Long, 1983a, 1983b; Mackey, 2006; Pica...

  11. 851 S.W. Sixth Avenue, Suite 1100 Steve Crow 503-222-5161 Portland, Oregon 97204-1348 Executive Director 800-452-5161

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    9/10/2010 2 #12;New hydropower* represents about 1% ofy p p 2002-11 new installed capacity GeothermalGeothermal, 16Coal, 132 Hydro, 85 Wind, 5723 Natural gas, 4780 Solar, 15 Petroleum, 10 * Excluding) 25 30 35 acity(MW 15 20 25 ledCapa 5 10 15 Install 0 5 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010

  12. Nano-Bio-Genesis: Tracing the rise of nanotechnology and nanobiotechnology as 'big science'

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kulkarni, Rajan P

    2007-07-14

    of the University of California system. Then-governor Gray Davis formally introduced these research centers in his 2000–2001 budget, which were enacted in California Assembly Bill 2883 of 2000. The impetus for the establishment of these institutes, which came... Money With great fanfare, President William J. Clinton announced the National Nanotechnology Initiative (NNI) to a packed audience at Caltech on January 21, 2000 [14]. Through this initiative, President Clinton more than doubled the federal funding...

  13. Natural Gas Storage in the United States in 2001: A Current Assessment and Near-Term Outlook

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2001-01-01

    This report examines the large decline of underground natural gas storage inventories during the 2000-2001 heating season and the concern that the nation might run out of working gas in storage prior to the close of the heating season on March 31, 2001. This analysis also looks at the current profile and capabilities of the U.S. natural gas underground storage sector.

  14. Chandra X-ray Observations of Cygnus A and Pictor A

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. S. Wilson; A. J. Young; P. L. Shopbell

    2001-01-23

    We describe observations of the two nearest, powerful radio galaxies with the Chandra X-ray Observatory: Cygnus A (z = 0.0562) and Pictor A (z = 0.035). Since the early results from these observations are published elsewhere (Wilson, Young & Shopbell 2000, 2001), we here confine ourselves to a summary of the main conclusions and a few remarks about other aspects of the results on Cygnus A, which will be amplified in a future paper.

  15. Development of a Web-Based Code-Compliant ASHRAE 90.1-1999 Commercial Simulation for Texas 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haberl, J.; Culp, C.; Yazdani, B.

    2009-01-01

    Emissions Reduction Plan (TERP), the Texas State Legislature adopted the 2000 International Energy Conservation Code (IECC), as amended by the 2001 Supplement (IECC, 2000; 2001), which remains as the state building code for those counties determined... characteristics and interior loads defined by Standard 90.1-1989. From DOE-2?s verification report (PV-A), from the plant portion of the DOE-2 simulation output, the number and type of chillers were determined. For this example, the chiller size was 1...

  16. Magnitude of 1999 release to the ORR truly unique Record of the 14C-Pulse in Tree Rings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Magnitude of 1999 release to the ORR truly unique Record of the 14C-Pulse in Tree Rings The 14C signature in the local tree ring record demonstrates the unique and unprecedented nature of the 1999 event-Jan-97 full leaves buds-oak buds-maple 1988 1999 2000 2001 Expected with no label N2000 N2001 D14C

  17. Granulometric characterization of sediments transported by surface runoff generated by moving storms 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    de Lima, J. L. M. P.; Souza, C. C. S.; Singh, V. P.

    2008-12-16

    transported by surface runoff generated by moving storms J. L. M. P. de Lima1,2, C. S. Souza2, and V. P. Singh3 1Department of Civil Engineering, Faculty of Science and Technology ? Campus 2, University of Coimbra, 3030-788 Coimbra, Portugal 2Institute...- tion of wind on runoff. Failure to consider the movement of rainfall (i.e., the combined action of wind and rain) can result in under- or over-estimation of peak discharge (e.g., Jensen, 1984; Singh, 1998; de Lima and Singh, 2002, 2003). The im...

  18. Examining causes of poverty in Latin America and Sub-Saharan Africa 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anderson, Garnett Murphy, II

    2009-06-02

    staggering: Niger (85.3 percent), Rwanda (84.6 percent), the Central African Republic (84.0 percent), Mali (90.6 percent), and Zambia (87.4 percent) (see World Bank Development Report, 2000/2001, Box 1.2, p. 17 and Table 4, pp. 280 - 281). Recently, a new... in the region have become net importers of food commodities? (Ehui and Pender 2005, p. 225). Other possible causes include factors such as low population density, which possibly leads to higher costs of transport, poor market integration, high natural...

  19. Opening Pandora's Box - Sovereign Bonds in International Arbitration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Waibel, Michael

    FERGUSON, THE CASH NEXUS: MONEY AND POWER IN THE MODERN WORLD, 1700–2000 (2001). 4 This figure excludes domestic debt (owed to nationals). In 2005, the stock of international debt securities amounted to more than U.S.$15.3 trillion, International Monetary... Cartago, 757 F.2d 516 (2d Cir. 1985) (finding in favor of a holdout bank after a rehearing where the U.S. government intervened as amicus curiae); see Pravin Bankers Assocs., Ltd. v. Banco Popular del Peru, 109 F.3d 850, 854 (2d Cir. 1997); Elliott...

  20. Space Weather Application Using Projected Velocity Asymmetry of Halo CMEs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    G. Michalek; N. Gopalswamy; S. Yashiro

    2008-01-13

    Halo coronal mass ejections (HCMEs) originating from regions close to the center of the Sun are likely to be responsible for severe geomagnetic storms. It is important to predict geo-effectiveness of HCMEs using observations when they are still near the Sun. Unfortunately, coronagraphic observations do not provide true speeds of CMEs due to the projection effects. In the present paper, we present a new technique allowing estimate the space speed and approximate source location using projected speeds measured at different position angles for a given HCME (velocity asymmetry). We apply this technique to HCMEs observed during 2001-2002 and find that the improved speeds are better correlated with the travel times of HCMEs to Earth and with the magnitudes ensuing geomagnetic storms.

  1. Search for second-generation scalar leptoquarks in p anti-p collisions at s**(1/2) = 1.96-TeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abulencia, A.; Acosta, D.; Adelman, J.; Affolder, Anthony A.; Akimoto, T.; Albrow, M.G.; Ambrose, D.; Amerio, S.; Amidei, D.; Anastassov, A.; Anikeev, K.; Annovi, A.; Antos, J.; Aoki, M.; Apollinari, G.; Arguin, J.-F.; Arisawa, T.; Artikov, A.; Ashmanskas, W.; Attal, A.; Azfar, F.; /Taiwan, Inst. Phys. /Argonne /Barcelona, IFAE /Baylor U. /INFN, Bologna /Bologna U. /Brandeis U. /UC, Davis /UCLA /UC, San Diego /UC, Santa Barbara /Cantabria Inst. of Phys. /Carnegie Mellon U. /Chicago U., EFI /Dubna, JINR /Duke U. /Fermilab /Florida U. /Frascati /Geneva U. /Glasgow U.

    2005-12-01

    Results on a search for pair production of second generation scalar leptoquark in p{bar p} collisions at {radical}s=1.96 TeV are reported. The data analyzed were collected by the CDF detector during the 2002-2003 Tevatron Run II and correspond to an integrated luminosity of 198 pb{sup -1}. Leptoquarks (LQ) are sought through their decay into (charged) leptons and quarks, with final state signatures represented by two muons and jets and one muon, large transverse missing energy and jets. We observe no evidence for LQ production and derive 95% C.L. upper limits on the LQ production cross sections as well as lower limits on their mass as a function of {beta}, where {beta} is the branching fraction for LQ {yields} {mu}q.

  2. Scientific Results from High-precision Astrometry at the Palomar Testbed Interferometer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Matthew W. Muterspaugh; Benjamin F. Lane; Maciej Konacki; B. F. Burke; M. M. Colavita; S. R. Kulkarni; M. Shao

    2006-05-31

    A new observing mode for the Palomar Testbed Interferometer was developed in2002-2003 which enables differential astrometry at the level of 20 micro-arcseconds for binary systems with separations of several hundred milli-arcseconds (mas). This phase-referenced mode is the basis of the Palomar High-precision Astrometric Search for Exoplanet Systems (PHASES), a search for giant planets orbiting either the primary or secondary star in fifty binary systems. We present the first science results from the PHASES search. The properties of the stars comprising binary systems are determined to high precision. The mutual inclinations of several hierarchical triple star systems have been determined. We will present upper limits constraining the the existence of giant planets in a few of the target systems.

  3. Dr. Smith Goes to Washington: A Physicist Wanders the Halls of Congress

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tannenbaum, Benn (American Association for the Advancement of Science, Center for Science, Technology, and Security Policy) [American Association for the Advancement of Science, Center for Science, Technology, and Security Policy

    2005-03-23

    Dr. Tannenbaum was the 2002-2003 APS Congressional Science Fellow. He worked in the office of U.S. Rep. Edward Markey (D-MA) on nuclear nonproliferation issues. His work in Congressman Markey's office focused on issues including missile defense, the nuclear program in Iran, prevention of the transfer of U.S. nuclear technology to North Korea, and the security of nuclear sites in Iraq. Dr. Tannenbaum will discuss this experience and observations concerning 'underinformed and uninformed' decision-making in Congress. He will also briefly discuss goals of the Center for Science, Technology and Security Policy at the American Association for the Advancement of Science. Finally, he will discuss ways in which physicists can get more involved in the political process.

  4. HCCI Engine Optimization and Control

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rolf D. Reitz

    2005-09-30

    The goal of this project was to develop methods to optimize and control Homogeneous-Charge Compression Ignition (HCCI) engines, with emphasis on diesel-fueled engines. HCCI offers the potential of nearly eliminating IC engine NOx and particulate emissions at reduced cost over Compression Ignition Direct Injection engines (CIDI) by controlling pollutant emissions in-cylinder. The project was initiated in January, 2002, and the present report is the final report for work conducted on the project through December 31, 2004. Periodic progress has also been reported at bi-annual working group meetings held at USCAR, Detroit, MI, and at the Sandia National Laboratories. Copies of these presentation materials are available on CD-ROM, as distributed by the Sandia National Labs. In addition, progress has been documented in DOE Advanced Combustion Engine R&D Annual Progress Reports for FY 2002, 2003 and 2004. These reports are included as the Appendices in this Final report.

  5. Precise determination of the deuteron spin structure at low to moderate Q2 with CLAS and extraction of the neutron contribution

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Guler, N.; Fersch, R. G.; Kuhn, S. E.; Bosted, P.; Griffioen, K. A.; Keith, C.; Minehart, R.; Prok, Y.; Adhikari, K. P.; Adikaram, D.; et al

    2015-11-02

    In this study, we present the final results for the deuteron spin structure functions obtained from the full data set collected with Jefferson Lab's CLAS in 2000-2001. Polarized electrons with energies of 1.6, 2.5, 4.2 and 5.8 GeV were scattered from deuteron (15ND3) targets, dynamically polarized along the beam direction, and detected with CLAS. From the measured double spin asymmetry, the virtual photon absorption asymmetry Ad1 and the polarized structure function gd1 were extracted over a wide kinematic range (0.05 GeV2 more »a parametrization of the corresponding proton results to extract from these data the polarized structure functions An1 and g1n of the (bound) neutron, which are so far unknown in the resonance region, W « less

  6. Documenting Western Burrowing Owl Reproduction and Activity Patterns Using Motion-Activated Cameras

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hall, Derek B. [NSTec; Greger, Paul D. [NSTec

    2014-08-01

    We used motion-activated cameras to monitor the reproduction and patterns of activity of the Burrowing Owl (Athene cunicularia) above ground at 45 burrows in south-central Nevada during the breeding seasons of 1999, 2000, 2001, and 2005. The 37 broods, encompassing 180 young, raised over the four years represented an average of 4.9 young per successful breeding pair. Young and adult owls were detected at the burrow entrance at all times of the day and night, but adults were detected more frequently during afternoon/early evening than were young. Motion-activated cameras require less effort to implement than other techniques. Limitations include photographing only a small percentage of owl activity at the burrow; not detecting the actual number of eggs, young, or number fledged; and not being able to track individual owls over time. Further work is also necessary to compare the accuracy of productivity estimates generated from motion-activated cameras with other techniques.

  7. Accelerating universe from gravitational leakage into extra dimensions: confrontation with SNeIa

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zong-Hong Zhu; Jailson S. Alcaniz

    2004-11-01

    There is mounting observational evidence that the expansion of our universe is undergoing an acceleration. A dark energy component has usually been invoked as the most feasible mechanism for the acceleration. However, it is desirable to explore alternative possibilities motivated by particle physics before adopting such an untested entity. In this work, we focus our attention on an acceleration mechanism: one arising from gravitational leakage into extra dimensions. We confront this scenario with high-$z$ type Ia supernovae compiled by Tonry et al. (2003) and recent measurements of the X-ray gas mass fractions in clusters of galaxies published by Allen et al. (2002,2003). A combination of the two databases gives at a 99% confidence level that $\\Omega_m=0.29^{+0.04}_{-0.02}$, $\\Omega_{rc}=0.21^{+0.08}_{-0.08}$, and $\\Omega_k=-0.36^{+0.31}_{-0.35}$, indicating a closed universe. We then constrain the model using the test of the turnaround redshift, $z_{q=0}$, at which the universe switches from deceleration to acceleration. We show that, in order to explain that acceleration happened earlier than $z_{q=0} = 0.6$ within the framework of gravitational leakage into extra dimensions, a low matter density, $\\Omega_m < 0.27$, or a closed universe is necessary.

  8. Self-potential, soil co2 flux, and temperature on masaya volcano, nicaragua

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lewicki, J.L.; Connor, C.; St-Amand, K.; Stix, J.; Spinner, W.

    2003-07-01

    We investigate the spatial relationship between self-potential (SP), soil CO{sub 2} flux, and temperature and the mechanisms that produce SP anomalies on the flanks of Masaya volcano, Nicaragua. We measured SP, soil CO{sub 2} fluxes (<1 to 5.0 x 10{sup 4} g m{sup -2} d{sup -1}), and temperatures (26 to 80 C) within an area surrounding a normal fault, adjacent to Comalito cinder cone (2002-2003). These variables are well spatially correlated. Wavelengths of SP anomalies are {le}100 m, and high horizontal SP gradients flank the region of elevated flux and temperature. Carbon isotopic compositions of soil CO{sub 2} ({delta}{sup 13}C = -3.3 to -1.1{per_thousand}) indicate a deep gas origin. Given the presence of a deep water table (100 to 150 m), high gas flow rates, and subsurface temperatures above liquid boiling points, we suggest that rapid fluid disruption is primarily responsible for positive SP anomalies here. Concurrent measurement of SP, soil CO{sub 2} flux, and temperature may be a useful tool to monitor intrusive activity.

  9. Transverse spin azimuthal asymmetries in SIDIS at COMPASS: Multidimensional analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bakur Parsamyan

    2015-04-08

    COMPASS is a high-energy physics experiment operating at the SPS at CERN. Wide physics program of the experiment comprises study of hadron structure and spectroscopy with high energy muon and hadrons beams. As for the muon-program, one of the important objectives of the COMPASS experiment is the exploration of the transverse spin structure of the nucleon via spin (in)dependent azimuthal asymmetries in single-hadron production in deep inelastic scattering of polarized leptons off transversely polarized target. For this purpose a series of measurements were made in COMPASS, using 160 GeV/c longitudinally polarized muon beam and transversely polarized $^{6}LiD$ (in 2002, 2003 and 2004) and $NH_{3}$ (in 2007 and 2010) targets. The experimental results obtained by COMPASS for unpolarized target azimuthal asymmetries, Sivers and Collins effects and other azimuthal observables play an important role in the general understanding of the three-dimensional nature of the nucleon. Giving access to the entire "twsit-2" set of transverse momentum dependent parton distribution functions and fragmentation functions COMPASS data triggers constant theoretical interest and is being widely used in phenomenological analyses and global data fits. In this review main focus is given to the very recent results obtained by the COMPASS collaboration from first ever multi-dimensional extraction of transverse spin asymmetries.

  10. Final Report on ASU Research Funded through Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Grant ASU XAJ9991/CO

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Calhoun, R; Sommer, J

    2004-01-21

    The line of inquiry which the ASU lidar group has been investigating, with collaboration and support from LLNL, is to create approaches and algorithms for better utilizing the rich information available through modern remote sensors in dispersion modeling systems. In particular, our goal is to create a lidar-data-driven dispersion model mode in ADAPT/LODI. This report describes progress towards this goal during the 2002/2003 academic year. Because of the nature of lidar data and the necessity to utilize additional information, both numerical and measured, this is essentially a data retrieval and data fusion project. With the current generation of commercially available lidar, the scope of the domain in which we are interested is initially 4 to 14 kilometers in radius, where the potentially scanned domain is roughly hemispherical. Figure 1, for example, taken from a recent lidar deployment in Oklahoma City, shows visually the most typical range of the domain that can be probed with the ASU lidar. Ranges 2 or 3 times the distance to the cluster of buildings in the photograph can be probed with a properly functioning, commercially available lidar. This could be of significant value for protecting key buildings with roof-top located remote sensors coupled with dispersion models.

  11. Transverse spin asymmetries at COMPASS: beyond Collins and Sivers effects

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Parsamyan, Bakur

    2013-01-01

    One of the important objectives of the COMPASS experiment (SPS, CERN) \\cite{Abbon:2007pq} is the exploration of the transverse spin structure of the nucleon via spin dependent azimuthal asymmetries in single-hadron production in deep inelastic scattering of polarized leptons off transversely polarized targets. For this purpose a series of measurements were made in COMPASS, using 160 GeV/c longitudinally polarized muon beam and transversely polarized $^6LiD$ (in 2002, 2003 and 2004) and $NH_3$ (in 2007 and 2010) targets. In the past few years considerable theoretical interest and experimental efforts were focused on the study of Collins and Sivers transverse spin asymmetries. The experimental results obtained so far play an important role in the general understanding of the three-dimensional nature of the nucleon in terms of transverse momentum dependent parton distribution functions. In addition to these two measured leading-twist effects, the SIDIS cross-section includes six more target transverse spin depen...

  12. CARBON SEQUESTRATION ON SURFACE MINE LANDS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Donald H. Graves; Christopher Barton; Richard Sweigard; Richard Warner

    2003-10-30

    The 2002-2003 Department of Energy plantings amounted to 164 acres containing 111,520 tree seedlings in eastern and western Kentucky. Data gathered on these trees included an inventory to determine survival of all planted species. A sub-sample of seedlings was selected to assess the height and diameter of individual species of seedlings established. Additional efforts involved collection of soil sample and litter samples, analysis of herbaceous ground cover from vegetation clip plots and leaf area on each tree species, and development of tissue collections. All areas were sampled for penetration resistance, penetration depth (or depth to refusal), and bulk density at various depths. Rain fall events and flow rates were recorded. The water quality of runoff samples involved the determination of total and settleable solids and particle size distribution. A study was initiated that will focus on the colonization of small mammals from forest edges to various areas located on reclaimed surface mines. This effort will provide a better understanding of the role small mammals and birds have in the establishment of plant communities on mine lands that will be useful in developing and improving reclamation techniques.

  13. Quantifying the value that wind power provides as a hedge against volatile natural gas prices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bolinger, Mark; Wiser, Ryan; Golove, William

    2002-05-31

    Advocates of renewable energy have long argued that wind power and other renewable technologies can mitigate fuel price risk within a resource portfolio. Such arguments--made with renewed vigor in the wake of unprecedented natural gas price volatility during the winter of 2000/2001--have mostly been qualitative in nature, however, with few attempts to actually quantify the price stability benefit that wind and other renewables provide. This paper attempts to quantify this benefit by equating it with the cost of achieving price stability through other means, particularly gas-based financial derivatives (futures and swaps). We find that over the past two years, natural gas consumers have had to pay a premium of roughly 0.50 cents/kWh over expected spot prices to lock in natural gas prices for the next 10 years. This incremental cost is potentially large enough to tip the scales away from new investments in natural gasfired generation and in favor of investments in wind power and other renewable technologies.

  14. Precise Determination of the Deuteron Spin Structure at Low to Moderate $Q^2$ with CLAS and Extraction of the Neutron Contribution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    N. Guler; R. G. Fersch; S. E. Kuhn; P. Bosted; K. A. Griffioen; C. Keith; R. Minehart; Y. Prok; K. P. Adhikari; D. Adikaram; M. J. Amaryan; M. D. Anderson; S. Anefalos Pereira; J. Ball; M. Battaglieri; V. Batourine; I. Bedlinskiy; W. J. Briscoe; W. K. Brooks; S. Bultmann; V. D. Burkert; D. S. Carman; A. Celentano; S. Chandavar; G. Charles; L. Colaneri; P. L. Cole; M. Contalbrigo; D. Crabb; V. Crede; A. D Angelo; N. Dashyan; A. Deur; C. Djalali; G. E. Dodge; R. Dupre; A. El Alaoui; L. El Fassi; L. Elouadrhiri; P. Eugenio; G. Fedotov; S. Fegan; A. Filippi; J. A. Fleming; T. A. Forest; B. Garillon; M. Garcon; N. Gevorgyan; G. P. Gilfoyle; K. L. Giovanetti; F. X. Girod; J. T. Goetz; E. Golovatch; R. W. Gothe; M. Guidal; L. Guo; K. Hafidi; H. Hakobyan; N. Harrison; M. Hattawy; K. Hicks; D. Ho; M. Holtrop; S. M. Hughes; C. E. Hyde; D. G. Ireland; B. S. Ishkhanov; E. L. Isupov; H. S. Jo; K. Joo; S. Joosten; D. Keller; M. Khandaker; A. Kim; W. Kim; A. Klein; F. J. Klein; V. Kubarovsky; S. V. Kuleshov; K. Livingston; H. Y. Lu; I. J. D. MacGregor; B. McKinnon; M. Mirazita; V. Mokeev; R. A. Montgomery; A Movsisyan; C. Munoz Camacho; P. Nadel-Turonski; L. A. Net; I. Niculescu; M. Osipenko; A. I. Ostrovidov; K. Park; E. Pasyuk; S. Pisano; O. Pogorelko; J. W. Price; S. Procureur; M. Ripani; A. Rizzo; G. Rosner; P. Rossi; P. Roy; F. Sabatie; C. Salgado; D. Schott; R. A. Schumacher; E. Seder; A. Simonyan; Iu. Skorodumina; D. Sokhan; N. Sparveris; I. I. Strakovsky; S. Strauch; V. Sytnik; Ye Tian; S. Tkachenko; M. Ungaro; E. Voutier; N. K. Walford; X. Wei; L. B. Weinstein; M. H. Wood; N. Zachariou; L. Zana; J. Zhang; Z. W. Zhao; I. Zonta

    2015-06-01

    We present the final results for the deuteron spin structure functions obtained from the full data set collected with Jefferson Lab's CLAS in 2000-2001. Polarized electrons with energies of 1.6, 2.5, 4.2 and 5.8 GeV were scattered from deuteron ($^{15}$ND$_3$) targets, dynamically polarized along the beam direction, and detected with CLAS. From the measured double spin asymmetry, the virtual photon absorption asymmetry $A_1^d$ and the polarized structure function $g_1^d$ were extracted over a wide kinematic range (0.05 GeV$^2 < Q^2 <$ 5 GeV$^2$ and 0.9 GeV $< W <$ 3 GeV). We use an unfolding procedure and a parametrization of the corresponding proton results to extract from these data the polarized structure functions $A_1^n$ and $g_1^n$ of the (bound) neutron, which are so far unknown in the resonance region, $W < 2$ GeV. We compare our final results, including several moments of the deuteron and neutron spin structure functions, with various theoretical models and expectations as well as parametrizations of the world data. The unprecedented precision and dense kinematic coverage of these data can aid in future extractions of polarized parton distributions, tests of perturbative QCD predictions for the quark polarization at large $x$, a better understanding of quark-hadron duality, and more precise values for higher-twist matrix elements in the framework of the Operator Product Expansion.

  15. A NEW ACCRETION DISK AROUND THE MISSING LINK BINARY SYSTEM PSR J1023+0038

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Patruno, A.; Archibald, A. M.; Hessels, J. W. T.; Bassa, C. G.; Janssen, G. H.; Bogdanov, S.; Stappers, B. W.; Lyne, A. G.; Kaspi, V. M.; Tendulkar, S.

    2014-01-20

    PSR J1023+0038 is an exceptional system for understanding how slowly rotating neutron stars are spun up to millisecond rotational periods through accretion from a companion star. Observed as a radio pulsar from 2007-2013, optical data showed that the system had an accretion disk in 2000/2001. Starting at the end of 2013 June, the radio pulsar has become undetectable, suggesting a return to the previous accretion-disk state, where the system more closely resembles an X-ray binary. In this Letter we report the first targeted X-ray observations ever performed of the active phase and complement them with UV/optical and radio observations collected in 2013 October. We find strong evidence that indeed an accretion disk has recently formed in the system and we report the detection of fast X-ray changes spanning about two orders of magnitude in luminosity. No radio pulsations are seen during low flux states in the X-ray light curve or at any other times.

  16. Status of Activities on Rehabilitation Of Radioactively Contaminated Facilities and the Site of Russian Research Center ''Kurchatov Institute''

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Volkov, V. G.; Ponomarev-Stepnoi, N. N.; Melkov, E. S; Ryazantsev, E. P.; Dikarev, V. S.; Gorodetsky, G. G.; Zverkov, Yu. A.; Kuznetsov, V. V.; Kuznetsova, T. I.

    2003-02-25

    This paper describes the program, the status, and the course of activities on rehabilitation of radioactively contaminated facilities and the territory of temporary radioactive waste (radwaste) disposal at the Russian Research Center ''Kurchatov Institute'' (RRC KI) in Moscow as performed in 2001-2002. The accumulation of significant amounts of radwaste at RRC KI territory is shown to be the inevitable result of Institute's activity performed in the days of former USSR nuclear weapons project and multiple initial nuclear power projects (performed from 1950's to early 1970's). A characterization of RRC KI temporary radwaste disposal site is given. Described is the system of radiation control and monitoring as implemented on this site. A potential hazard of adverse impacts on the environment and population of the nearby housing area is noted, which is due to possible spread of the radioactive plume by subsoil waters. A description of the concept and project of the RRC KI temporary radwaste disposal site is presented. Specific nature of the activities planned and performed stems from the nearness of housing area. This paper describes main stages of the planned activities for rehabilitation, their expected terms and sources of funding, as well as current status of the project advancement. Outlined are the problems faced in the performance and planning of works. The latter include: diagnostics of the concrete-grouted repositories, dust-suppression technologies, packaging of the fragmented ILW and HLW, soil clean-up, radioactive plume spread prevention, broad radiation monitoring of the work zone and environment in the performance of rehabilitation works. Noted is the intention of RRC KI to establish cooperation with foreign, first of all, the U.S. partners for the solution of problems mentioned above.

  17. Characterization of Fine Particulate Matter (PM) and Secondary PM Precursor Gases in the Mexico City Metropolitan Area

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Molina, Luisa T.; Molina, Mario J.; Volkamer, Rainer; de Foy, Benjamin; Lei, Wenfang; Zavaka, Miguel; Velasco, Erik

    2008-10-31

    This project was one of three collaborating grants funded by DOE/ASP to characterize the fine particulate matter (PM) and secondary PM precursors in the Mexico City Metropolitan Area (MCMA) during the MILAGRO Campaign. The overall effort of MCMA-2006, one of the four components, focused on i) examination of the primary emissions of fine particles and precursor gases leading to photochemical production of atmospheric oxidants and secondary aerosol particles; ii) measurement and analysis of secondary oxidants and secondary fine PM production, with particular emphasis on secondary organic aerosol (SOA), and iii) evaluation of the photochemical and meteorological processes characteristic of the Mexico City Basin. The collaborative teams pursued the goals through three main tasks: i) analyses of fine PM and secondary PM precursor gaseous species data taken during the MCMA-2002/2003 campaigns and preparation of publications; ii) planning of the MILAGRO Campaign and deployment of the instrument around the MCMA; and iii) analysis of MCMA-2006 data and publication preparation. The measurement phase of the MILAGRO Campaign was successfully completed in March 2006 with excellent participation from the international scientific community and outstanding cooperation from the Mexican government agencies and institutions. The project reported here was led by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology/Molina Center for Energy and the Environment (MIT/MCE2) team and coordinated with DOE/ASP-funded collaborators at Aerodyne Research Inc., University of Colorado at Boulder and Montana State University. Currently 24 papers documenting the findings from this project have been published. The results from the project have improved significantly our understanding of the meteorological and photochemical processes contributing to the formation of ozone, secondary aerosols and other pollutants. Key findings from the MCMA-2003 include a vastly improved speciated emissions inventory from on-road vehicles: the MCMA motor vehicles produce abundant amounts of primary PM, elemental carbon, particle-bound polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, carbon monoxide and a wide range of air toxics; the feasibility of using eddy covariance techniques to measure fluxes of volatile organic compounds in an urban core and a valuable tool for validating local emissions inventory; a much better understanding of the sources and atmospheric loadings of volatile organic compounds; the first spectroscopic detection of glyoxal in the atmosphere; a unique analysis of the high fraction of ambient formaldehyde from primary emission sources; characterization of ozone formation and its sensitivity to VOCs and NOx; a much more extensive knowledge of the composition, size distribution and atmospheric mass loadings of both primary and secondary fine PM, including the fact that the rate of MCMA SOA production greatly exceeded that predicted by current atmospheric models; evaluations of significant errors that can arise from standard air quality monitors for O3 and NO2; and the implementation of an innovative Markov Chain Monte Carlo method for inorganic aerosol modeling as a powerful tool to analyze aerosol data and predict gas phase concentrations where these are unavailable. During the MILAGRO Campaign the collaborative team utilized a combination of central fixed sites and a mobile laboratory deployed throughout the MCMA to representative urban and boundary sites to measure trace gases and fine particles. Analysis of the extensive 2006 data sets has confirmed the key findings from MCMA-2002/2003; additionally MCMA-2006 provided more detailed gas and aerosol chemistry and wider regional scale coverage. Key results include an updated 2006 emissions inventory; extension of the flux system to measure fluxes of fine particles; better understanding of the sources and apportionment of aerosols, including contribution from biomass burning and industrial sources; a comprehensive evaluation of metal containing particles in a com

  18. Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program facilities newsletter, November 2002.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Holdridge, D. J.

    2002-12-03

    Fall 2002 Intensive Operation Periods: Single Column Model and Unmanned Aerospace Vehicle--In an Intensive Operation Period (IOP) on November 3-23, 2002, researchers at the SGP CART site are collecting a detailed data set for use in improving the Single Column Model (SCM), a scaled-down climate model. The SCM represents one vertical column of air above Earth's surface and requires less computation time than a full-scale global climate model. Researchers first use the SCM to efficiently improve submodels of clouds, solar radiation transfer, and atmosphere-surface interactions, then implement the results in large-scale global models. With measured values for a starting point, the SCM predicts atmospheric variables during prescribed time periods. A computer calculates values for such quantities as the amount of solar radiation reaching the surface and predicts how clouds will evolve and interact with incoming light from the sun. Researchers compare the SCM's predictions with actual measurements made during the IOP, then adjust the submodels to make predictions more reliable. A second IOP conducted concurrently with the SCM IOP involves high-altitude, long-duration aircraft flights. The original plan was to use an unmanned aerospace vehicle (UAV), but the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) aircraft Proteus will be substituted because all UAVs have been deployed elsewhere. The UAV is a small, instrument-equipped, remote-control plane that is operated from the ground by a computer. The Proteus is a manned aircraft, originally designed to carry telecommunications relay equipment, that can be reconfigured for uses such as reconnaissance and surveillance, commercial imaging, launching of small space satellites, and atmospheric research. The plane is designed for two on-board pilots in a pressurized cabin, flying to altitudes up to 65,000 feet for as long as 18 hours. The Proteus has a variable wingspan of 77-92 feet and is 56 feet long. The plane can carry up to 7,260 pounds of equipment, making it a versatile research tool. The Proteus is making measurements at the very top of the cirrus cloud layer to characterize structures of these clouds. These new measurements will provide more accurate, more abundant data for use in improving the representation of clouds in the SCM. 2002-2003 Winter Weather Forecast--Top climate forecasters at the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's (NOAA's) Climate Prediction Center say that an El Nino condition in the tropical Pacific Ocean will influence our winter weather this year. Although this El Nino is not as strong as the event of the 1997-1998 winter season, the United States will nevertheless experience some atypical weather. Strong impacts could be felt in several areas. Nationally, forecasters are predicting warmer-than-average temperatures over the northern tier of states and wetter-than-average conditions in the southern tier of states during the 2002-2003 winter season. Kansas residents should expect warmer and wetter conditions, while Oklahoma will be wetter than average.

  19. Search for the Heliospheric Termination Shock (TS) and Heliosheath (HS)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ness, Norman F. [Bartol Research Institute, University of Delaware, Newark, DE 19716 (United States); Burlaga, Leonard F.; Acuna, Mario H. [NASA-Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Stone, Edward C. [California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91109 (United States); McDonald, Frank B. [Institute for Physical Science and Technology, University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742 (United States)

    2005-08-01

    Voyager 1 continues to measure the very distant Heliospheric Magnetic Field (HMF) beyond 95 AU at {approx}35 North latitude. The MAG instrument data covers more than a full 22 years solar magnetic cycle. The magnitude of the observed HMF is well described, on average, by Parker's Archimedean spiral structure if due account is made for time variations of the source field strength and solar wind velocity. The V1 magnetic field observations do not provide any evidence for a field increase associated with entry into a subsonic solar wind region, such as the heliosheath is expected to be, nor an exit from this regime. We see no evidence for crossing of the Termination Shock (TS) as has been reported at {approx}85 AU by the LECP instrument. Merged Interaction Regions are identified by an increased HMF and associated decreases in the flux of >70 MeV/nuc cosmic rays which are then followed by a flux recovery. This CR-B relationship has been identified in V1 data and studied since 1982 when V1 was at 11 AU. The variance of HMF, a direct measure of the energy**1/2 in the HMF fluctuations, shows no significant changes associated with the alleged TS crossings in 2002-2003. Thus, the absence of any HMF increase at the entry into the heliosheath appears not to be due to the onset of mesoscale turbulence as proposed by Fisk. The TS has yet to be directly observed in-situ by the V1 MAG experiment in data through 2003.

  20. DEVELOPMENT OF A LOW COST INFERENTIAL NATURAL GAS ENERGY FLOW RATE PROTOTYPE RETROFIT MODULE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    E. Kelner; D. George; T. Morrow; T. Owen; M. Nored; R. Burkey; A. Minachi

    2005-05-01

    In 1998, Southwest Research Institute began a multi-year project to develop a working prototype instrument module for natural gas energy measurement. The module will be used to retrofit a natural gas custody transfer flow meter for energy measurement, at a cost an order of magnitude lower than a gas chromatograph. Development and evaluation of the prototype energy meter in 2002-2003 included: (1) refinement of the algorithm used to infer properties of the natural gas stream, such as heating value; (2) evaluation of potential sensing technologies for nitrogen content, improvements in carbon dioxide measurements, and improvements in ultrasonic measurement technology and signal processing for improved speed of sound measurements; (3) design, fabrication and testing of a new prototype energy meter module incorporating these algorithm and sensor refinements; and (4) laboratory and field performance tests of the original and modified energy meter modules. Field tests of the original energy meter module have provided results in close agreement with an onsite gas chromatograph. The original algorithm has also been tested at a field site as a stand-alone application using measurements from in situ instruments, and has demonstrated its usefulness as a diagnostic tool. The algorithm has been revised to use measurement technologies existing in the module to measure the gas stream at multiple states and infer nitrogen content. The instrumentation module has also been modified to incorporate recent improvements in CO{sub 2} and sound speed sensing technology. Laboratory testing of the upgraded module has identified additional testing needed to attain the target accuracy in sound speed measurements and heating value.

  1. Quantifying the value that energy efficiency and renewable energy provide as a hedge against volatile natural gas prices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bolinger, Mark; Wiser, Ryan; Bachrach, Devra; Golove, William

    2002-05-15

    Advocates of energy efficiency and renewable energy have long argued that such technologies can mitigate fuel price risk within a resource portfolio. Such arguments--made with renewed vigor in the wake of unprecedented natural gas price volatility during the winter of 2000/2001--have mostly been qualitative in nature, however, with few attempts to actually quantify the price stability benefit that these sources provide. In evaluating this benefit, it is important to recognize that alternative price hedging instruments are available--in particular, gas-based financial derivatives (futures and swaps) and physical, fixed-price gas contracts. Whether energy efficiency and renewable energy can provide price stability at lower cost than these alternative means is therefore a key question for resource acquisition planners. In this paper we evaluate the cost of hedging gas price risk through financial hedging instruments. To do this, we compare the price of a 10-year natural gas swap (i.e., what it costs to lock in prices over the next 10 years) to a 10-year natural gas price forecast (i.e., what the market is expecting spot natural gas prices to be over the next 10 years). We find that over the past two years natural gas users have had to pay a premium as high as $0.76/mmBtu (0.53/242/kWh at an aggressive 7,000 Btu/kWh heat rate) over expected spot prices to lock in natural gas prices for the next 10 years. This incremental cost to hedge gas price risk exposure is potentially large enough - particularly if incorporated by policymakers and regulators into decision-making practices - to tip the scales away from new investments in variable-price, natural gas-fired generation and in favor of fixed-price investments in energy efficiency and renewable energy.

  2. High-resolution emissions of CO{sub 2} from power generation in the USA - article no. G04008

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Petron, G.; Tans, P.; Frost, G.; Chao, D.L.; Trainer, M. [NOAA, Boulder, CO (United States). Earth Systems Research Laboratory

    2008-10-15

    Electricity generation accounts for close to 40% of the U.S. CO{sub 2} emissions from fossil fuel burning, making it the economic sector with the largest source of CO{sub 2}. Since the late 1990s, the Environmental Protection Agency Clean Air Markets Division (EPA CAMD) has kept a repository of hourly CO{sub 2} emission data for most power plants in the conterminous United States. In this study, the CAMD CO{sub 2} data are used to derive a high spatiotemporal resolution CO{sub 2} emissions inventory for the electricity generation sector (inventory available on request). Data from 1998 to 2006 have been processed. This unique inventory can be used to improve the understanding of the carbon cycle at fine temporal and spatial scales. The CAMD data set provides the first quantitative estimates of the diurnal and seasonal cycles of the emissions as well as the year to year variability. Emissions peak in the summertime owing to the widespread use of air conditioning. Summertime emissions are in fact highly correlated with the daily average temperature. In conjunction with the EPA Emissions and Generation Resource Integrated Database (eGRID), we have derived high-resolution maps of CO{sub 2} emissions by fossil fuel burned (coal, gas, oil) for the year 2004. The CAMD data set also reflects regional anomalies in power generation such as the August 2003 blackout in the northeastern United States and the 2000-2001 increase in production in California. We recommend that all sectors of the economy report similar high-resolution CO{sub 2} emissions because of their great usefulness both for carbon cycle science and for greenhouse gases emissions mitigation and regulation.

  3. Strong Links Between Teleconnections and Ecosystem Exchange Found at a Pacific Northwest Old-Growth Forest from Flux Tower and MODIS EVI Data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wharton, S; Chasmer, L; Falk, M; Paw U, K T

    2009-03-12

    Variability in three Pacific teleconnection patterns are examined to see if net carbon exchange at a low-elevation, old-growth forest is affected by climatic changes associated with these periodicities. Examined are the Pacific Decadal Oscillation (PDO), Pacific/North American Oscillation (PNA) and El Nino-Southern Oscillation (ENSO). We use nine years of eddy covariance CO{sub 2}, H{sub 2}O and energy fluxes measured at the Wind River AmeriFlux site, Washington, USA and eight years of tower-pixel remote sensing data from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) to address this question. We compute a new Composite Climate Index (CCI) based on the three Pacific Oscillations to divide the measurement period into positive- (2003 and 2005), negative- (1999 and 2000) and neutral-phase climate years (2001, 2002, 2004, 2006 and 2007). The forest transitioned from an annual net carbon sink (NEP = + 217 g C m{sup -2} year{sup -1}, 1999) to a source (NEP = - 100 g C m{sup -2} year{sup -1}, 2003) during two dominant teleconnection patterns. Net ecosystem productivity (NEP), water use efficiency (WUE) and light use efficiency (LUE) were significantly different (P < 0.01) during positive (NEP = -0.27 g C m{sup -2} day{sup -1}, WUE = 4.1 mg C/g H{sub 2}O, LUE = 0.94 g C MJ{sup -1}) and negative (NEP = +0.37 g C m{sup -2} day{sup -1}, WUE = 3.4 mg C/g H{sub 2}O, LUE = 0.83 g C MJ{sup -1}) climate phases. The CCI was linked to variability in the MODIS Enhanced Vegetation Index (EVI) but not to MODIS Fraction of absorbed Photosynthetically Active Radiation (FPAR). EVI was highest during negative climate phases (1999 and 2000) and was positively correlated with NEP and showed potential for using MODIS to estimate teleconnection-driven anomalies in ecosystem CO{sub 2} exchange in old-growth forests. This work suggests that any increase in the strength or frequency of ENSO coinciding with in-phase, low frequency Pacific oscillations (PDO and PNA) will likely increase CO{sub 2} uptake variability in Pacific Northwest conifer forests.

  4. Off-Highway Gasoline Consuption Estimation Models Used in the Federal Highway Administration Attribution Process: 2008 Updates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hwang, Ho-Ling; Davis, Stacy Cagle

    2009-12-01

    This report is designed to document the analysis process and estimation models currently used by the Federal Highway Administration (FHWA) to estimate the off-highway gasoline consumption and public sector fuel consumption. An overview of the entire FHWA attribution process is provided along with specifics related to the latest update (2008) on the Off-Highway Gasoline Use Model and the Public Use of Gasoline Model. The Off-Highway Gasoline Use Model is made up of five individual modules, one for each of the off-highway categories: agricultural, industrial and commercial, construction, aviation, and marine. This 2008 update of the off-highway models was the second major update (the first model update was conducted during 2002-2003) after they were originally developed in mid-1990. The agricultural model methodology, specifically, underwent a significant revision because of changes in data availability since 2003. Some revision to the model was necessary due to removal of certain data elements used in the original estimation method. The revised agricultural model also made use of some newly available information, published by the data source agency in recent years. The other model methodologies were not drastically changed, though many data elements were updated to improve the accuracy of these models. Note that components in the Public Use of Gasoline Model were not updated in 2008. A major challenge in updating estimation methods applied by the public-use model is that they would have to rely on significant new data collection efforts. In addition, due to resource limitation, several components of the models (both off-highway and public-us models) that utilized regression modeling approaches were not recalibrated under the 2008 study. An investigation of the Environmental Protection Agency's NONROAD2005 model was also carried out under the 2008 model update. Results generated from the NONROAD2005 model were analyzed, examined, and compared, to the extent that is possible on the overall totals, to the current FHWA estimates. Because NONROAD2005 model was designed for emission estimation purposes (i.e., not for measuring fuel consumption), it covers different equipment populations from those the FHWA models were based on. Thus, a direct comparison generally was not possible in most sectors. As a result, NONROAD2005 data were not used in the 2008 update of the FHWA off-highway models. The quality of fuel use estimates directly affect the data quality in many tables published in the Highway Statistics. Although updates have been made to the Off-Highway Gasoline Use Model and the Public Use Gasoline Model, some challenges remain due to aging model equations and discontinuation of data sources.

  5. Corrective Action Plan for Corrective Action Unit 262: Area 25 Septic Systems and Underground Discharge Point, Nevada Test Site, Nevada

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    K. B. Campbell

    2002-06-01

    This Corrective Action Plan (CAP) provides selected corrective action alternatives and proposes the closure methodology for Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 262, Area 25 Septic Systems and Underground Discharge Point. CAU 262 is identified in the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO) of 1996. Remediation of CAU 262 is required under the FFACO. CAU 262 is located in Area 25 of the Nevada Test Site (NTS), approximately 100 kilometers (km) (62 miles [mi]) northwest of Las Vegas, Nevada. The nine Corrective Action Sites (CASs) within CAU 262 are located in the Nuclear Rocket Development Station complex. Individual CASs are located in the vicinity of the Reactor Maintenance, Assembly, and Disassembly (R-MAD); Engine Maintenance, Assembly, and Disassembly (E-MAD); and Test Cell C compounds. CAU 262 includes the following CASs as provided in the FFACO (1996); CAS 25-02-06, Underground Storage Tank; CAS 25-04-06, Septic Systems A and B; CAS 25-04-07, Septic System; CAS 25-05-03, Leachfield; CAS 25-05-05, Leachfield; CAS 25-05-06, Leachfield; CAS 25-05-08, Radioactive Leachfield; CAS 25-05-12, Leachfield; and CAS 25-51-01, Dry Well. Figures 2, 3, and 4 show the locations of the R-MAD, the E-MAD, and the Test Cell C CASs, respectively. The facilities within CAU 262 supported nuclear rocket reactor engine testing. Activities associated with the program were performed between 1958 and 1973. However, several other projects used the facilities after 1973. A significant quantity of radioactive and sanitary waste was produced during routine operations. Most of the radioactive waste was managed by disposal in the posted leachfields. Sanitary wastes were disposed in sanitary leachfields. Septic tanks, present at sanitary leachfields (i.e., CAS 25-02-06,2504-06 [Septic Systems A and B], 25-04-07, 25-05-05,25-05-12) allowed solids to settle out of suspension prior to entering the leachfield. Posted leachfields do not contain septic tanks. All CASs located in CAU 262 are inactive or abandoned. However, some leachfields may still receive liquids from runoff during storm events. Results from the 2000-2001 site characterization activities conducted by International Technology (IT) Corporation, Las Vegas Office are documented in the Corrective Action Investigation Report for Corrective Action Unit 262: Area 25 Septic Systems and Underground Discharge Point, Nevada Test Site, Nevada. This document is located in Appendix A of the Corrective Action Decision Document for CAU 262. Area 25 Septic Systems and Underground Discharge Point, Nevada Test Site, Nevada. (DOE/NV, 2001).

  6. Groundwater Flow and Thermal Modeling to Support a Preferred Conceptual Model for the Large Hydraulic Gradient North of Yucca Mountain

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McGraw, D.; Oberlander, P.

    2007-12-18

    The purpose of this study is to report on the results of a preliminary modeling framework to investigate the causes of the large hydraulic gradient north of Yucca Mountain. This study builds on the Saturated Zone Site-Scale Flow and Transport Model (referenced herein as the Site-scale model (Zyvoloski, 2004a), which is a three-dimensional saturated zone model of the Yucca Mountain area. Groundwater flow was simulated under natural conditions. The model framework and grid design describe the geologic layering and the calibration parameters describe the hydrogeology. The Site-scale model is calibrated to hydraulic heads, fluid temperature, and groundwater flowpaths. One area of interest in the Site-scale model represents the large hydraulic gradient north of Yucca Mountain. Nearby water levels suggest over 200 meters of hydraulic head difference in less than 1,000 meters horizontal distance. Given the geologic conceptual models defined by various hydrogeologic reports (Faunt, 2000, 2001; Zyvoloski, 2004b), no definitive explanation has been found for the cause of the large hydraulic gradient. Luckey et al. (1996) presents several possible explanations for the large hydraulic gradient as provided below: The gradient is simply the result of flow through the upper volcanic confining unit, which is nearly 300 meters thick near the large gradient. The gradient represents a semi-perched system in which flow in the upper and lower aquifers is predominantly horizontal, whereas flow in the upper confining unit would be predominantly vertical. The gradient represents a drain down a buried fault from the volcanic aquifers to the lower Carbonate Aquifer. The gradient represents a spillway in which a fault marks the effective northern limit of the lower volcanic aquifer. The large gradient results from the presence at depth of the Eleana Formation, a part of the Paleozoic upper confining unit, which overlies the lower Carbonate Aquifer in much of the Death Valley region. The Eleana Formation is absent at borehole UE-25 p#1 at Yucca Mountain, which penetrated the lower Carbonate Aquifer directly beneath the lower volcanic confining unit. The Site-scale model uses an area of very low permeability, referenced as the east-west barrier, to simulate the large hydraulic gradient. The Site-scale model is further refined in this study to provide a base-case model for exploring the geologic causes of the large hydraulic gradient.

  7. Development and evaluation of fully automated demand response in large facilities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Piette, Mary Ann; Sezgen, Osman; Watson, David S.; Motegi, Naoya; Shockman, Christine; ten Hope, Laurie

    2004-03-30

    This report describes the results of a research project to develop and evaluate the performance of new Automated Demand Response (Auto-DR) hardware and software technology in large facilities. Demand Response (DR) is a set of activities to reduce or shift electricity use to improve electric grid reliability, manage electricity costs, and ensure that customers receive signals that encourage load reduction during times when the electric grid is near its capacity. The two main drivers for widespread demand responsiveness are the prevention of future electricity crises and the reduction of electricity prices. Additional goals for price responsiveness include equity through cost of service pricing, and customer control of electricity usage and bills. The technology developed and evaluated in this report could be used to support numerous forms of DR programs and tariffs. For the purpose of this report, we have defined three levels of Demand Response automation. Manual Demand Response involves manually turning off lights or equipment; this can be a labor-intensive approach. Semi-Automated Response involves the use of building energy management control systems for load shedding, where a preprogrammed load shedding strategy is initiated by facilities staff. Fully-Automated Demand Response is initiated at a building or facility through receipt of an external communications signal--facility staff set up a pre-programmed load shedding strategy which is automatically initiated by the system without the need for human intervention. We have defined this approach to be Auto-DR. An important concept in Auto-DR is that a facility manager is able to ''opt out'' or ''override'' an individual DR event if it occurs at a time when the reduction in end-use services is not desirable. This project sought to improve the feasibility and nature of Auto-DR strategies in large facilities. The research focused on technology development, testing, characterization, and evaluation relating to Auto-DR. This evaluation also included the related decisionmaking perspectives of the facility owners and managers. Another goal of this project was to develop and test a real-time signal for automated demand response that provided a common communication infrastructure for diverse facilities. The six facilities recruited for this project were selected from the facilities that received CEC funds for new DR technology during California's 2000-2001 electricity crises (AB970 and SB-5X).

  8. Establishment of Lipolexis oregmae (Hymenoptera: Aphidiidae) in a classical biological control program directed against the brown citrus aphid (Homoptera: Aphididae) in Florida

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Persad, A.B.; Hoy, M.A.; Ru Nguyen

    2007-03-15

    The parasitoid Lipolexis oregmae Gahan (introduced as L. scutellaris Mackauer) was imported from Guam, evaluated in quarantine, mass reared, and released into citrus groves in Florida in a classical biological control program directed against the brown citrus aphid, Toxoptera citricida Kirkaldy. Releases of 20,200, 12,100, and 1,260 adults of L. oregmae were made throughout Florida during 2000, 2001, and 2002, respectively. To determine if L. oregmae had successfully established, surveys were conducted throughout the state beginning in the summer of 2001 and continuing through the summer of 2003. Parasitism during 2001 and 2002 was evaluated by holding brown citrus aphids in the laboratory until parasitoid adults emerged. Lipolexis oregmae was found in 10 sites in 7 counties and 4 sites in 3 counties with parasitism rates ranging from 0.7 to 3.3% in 2001 and 2002, respectively. Laboratory tests indicated that high rates of mortality occurred if field-collected parasitized aphids were held in plastic bags, so a molecular assay was used that allowed immature L. oregmae to be detected within aphid hosts immediately after collection. The molecular assay was used in 2003 with the brown citrus aphids and with other aphid species collected from citrus, weeds, and vegetables near former release sites; immatures of L. oregmae were detected in black citrus aphids, cowpea aphids, spirea aphids, and melon aphids, as well as in the brown citrus aphid, in 4 of 8 counties sampled, with parasitism ranging from 2.0 to 12.9%, indicating that L. oregmae is established and widely distributed. Samples taken in Polk County during Oct 2005 indicated that L. oregmae has persisted. The ability of L. oregmae to parasitize other aphid species on citrus, and aphids on other host plants, enhances the ability of L. oregmae to persist when brown citrus aphid populations are low. (author) [Spanish] El parasitoide Lipolexis oregmae Gahan (introducido como L. scutellaris Mackauer) fue importado de Guam, evaluado en cuarentena, criado en masa y liberado en huertos de citricos en un programa de control biologico clasico dirigido contra el afido pardo de citricos, Toxoptera citricida Kirkaldy. Se hicieron liberaciones de 20,200, 12,100, y 1,260 adultos de L. oregmae a traves de la Florida durante los anos de 2000, 2001, y 2002, respectivamente. Para determinar si L. oregmae ha logrado en establecer, se realizaron sondeos a traves del estado empezando en el verano del 2001 y continuando hasta el final del verano del 2003. El parasitismo durante 2001 y 2002 fue evaluado con el mantenimiento de individuos del afido pardo de los citricos en el laboratorio hasta que los adultos emergieron. Lipolexis oregmae fue encontrado en 10 sitios en 7 condados y con tasas de parasitismo en 4 sitios en 3 condados entre 0.7 a 3.3% en el 2001 y 2002, respectivamente. Las pruebas del laboratorio indicaron que las tasas altas de mortalidad fueron posibles si los afidos con parasitos recolectados en el campo fueron mantenidos en bolsas plasticas, entonces un ensayo molecular fue usado con lo que permitio la deteccion de inmaduros de L. oregmae dentro de los hospederos de afidos inmediatamente despues de la recoleccion. El ensayo molecular fue usado en el 2003 con individuos del afido pardo de los citricos y con otras especies de afidos recolectados sobre citricos, malezas y hortalizas cerca de los sitios donde los parasitoides fueron liberados anteriormente; inmaduros de L. oregmae fueron detectados en individuos del afido negro de los citricos, el afido del caupi, el afido spirea y el afido del melon, ademas del afido pardo de los citricos en 4 de los 8 condados muestreados, con la tasa del parasitismo entre 2.0 a12.9%, indicando que L. oregmae estaba estabecido y ampliamente distribuido. Las muestras tomadas en el Condado de Polk durante octobre del 2005 indicaron que L. oregmae ha persistido. La capacidad de L. oregmae para parasitar otras especies de afidos sobre citricos y otros afidos sobre otras plantas hospederas, incrementa la capacidad de L. oregmae para persistir cuand

  9. Advanced Oil Recovery Technologies for Improved Recovery from Slope Basin Clastic Reservoirs, Nash Draw Brushy Canyon Pool, Eddy County, NM

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mark B. Murphy

    2005-09-30

    The Nash Draw Brushy Canyon Pool in Eddy County New Mexico was a cost-shared field demonstration project in the U.S. Department of Energy Class III Program. A major goal of the Class III Program was to stimulate the use of advanced technologies to increase ultimate recovery from slope-basin clastic reservoirs. Advanced characterization techniques were used at the Nash Draw Pool (NDP) project to develop reservoir management strategies for optimizing oil recovery from this Delaware reservoir. The objective of the project was to demonstrate that a development program, which was based on advanced reservoir management methods, could significantly improve oil recovery at the NDP. Initial goals were (1) to demonstrate that an advanced development drilling and pressure maintenance program can significantly improve oil recovery compared to existing technology applications and (2) to transfer these advanced methodologies to other oil and gas producers. Analysis, interpretation, and integration of recently acquired geological, geophysical, and engineering data revealed that the initial reservoir characterization was too simplistic to capture the critical features of this complex formation. Contrary to the initial characterization, a new reservoir description evolved that provided sufficient detail regarding the complexity of the Brushy Canyon interval at Nash Draw. This new reservoir description was used as a risk reduction tool to identify 'sweet spots' for a development drilling program as well as to evaluate pressure maintenance strategies. The reservoir characterization, geological modeling, 3-D seismic interpretation, and simulation studies have provided a detailed model of the Brushy Canyon zones. This model was used to predict the success of different reservoir management scenarios and to aid in determining the most favorable combination of targeted drilling, pressure maintenance, well stimulation, and well spacing to improve recovery from this reservoir. An Advanced Log Analysis technique developed from the NDP project has proven useful in defining additional productive zones and refining completion techniques. This program proved to be especially helpful in locating and evaluating potential recompletion intervals, which has resulted in low development costs with only small incremental increases in lifting costs. To develop additional reserves at lower costs, zones behind pipe in existing wells were evaluated using techniques developed for the Brushy Canyon interval. These techniques were used to complete uphole zones in thirteen of the NDP wells. A total of 14 recompletions were done: four during 1999, four during 2000, two during 2001, and four during 2002-2003. These workovers added reserves of 332,304 barrels of oil (BO) and 640,363 MCFG (thousand cubic feet of gas) at an overall weighted average development cost of $1.87 per BOE (barrel of oil equivalent). A pressure maintenance pilot project in a developed area of the field was not conducted because the pilot area was pressure depleted, and the reservoir in that area was found to be compartmentalized and discontinuous. Economic analyses and simulation studies indicated that immiscible injection of lean hydrocarbon gas for pressure maintenance was not warranted at the NDP and would need to be considered for implementation in similar fields very soon after production has started. Simulation studies suggested that the injection of miscible carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) could recover significant quantities of oil at the NDP, but a source of low-cost CO{sub 2} was not available in the area. Results from the project indicated that further development will be under playa lakes and potash areas that were beyond the regions covered by well control and are not accessible with vertical wells. These areas, covered by 3-D seismic surveys that were obtained as part of the project, were accessed with combinations of deviated/horizontal wells. Three directional/horizontal wells have been drilled and completed to develop reserves under surface-restricted areas and potash mines. The third

  10. Xyce Parallel Electronic Simulator - Users' Guide Version 2.1.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hutchinson, Scott A; Hoekstra, Robert J.; Russo, Thomas V.; Rankin, Eric; Pawlowski, Roger P.; Fixel, Deborah A; Schiek, Richard; Bogdan, Carolyn W.; Shirley, David N.; Campbell, Phillip M.; Keiter, Eric R.

    2005-06-01

    This manual describes the use of theXyceParallel Electronic Simulator.Xycehasbeen designed as a SPICE-compatible, high-performance analog circuit simulator, andhas been written to support the simulation needs of the Sandia National Laboratorieselectrical designers. This development has focused on improving capability over thecurrent state-of-the-art in the following areas:%04Capability to solve extremely large circuit problems by supporting large-scale par-allel computing platforms (up to thousands of processors). Note that this includessupport for most popular parallel and serial computers.%04Improved performance for all numerical kernels (e.g., time integrator, nonlinearand linear solvers) through state-of-the-art algorithms and novel techniques.%04Device models which are specifically tailored to meet Sandia's needs, includingmany radiation-aware devices.3 XyceTMUsers' Guide%04Object-oriented code design and implementation using modern coding practicesthat ensure that theXyceParallel Electronic Simulator will be maintainable andextensible far into the future.Xyceis a parallel code in the most general sense of the phrase - a message passingparallel implementation - which allows it to run efficiently on the widest possible numberof computing platforms. These include serial, shared-memory and distributed-memoryparallel as well as heterogeneous platforms. Careful attention has been paid to thespecific nature of circuit-simulation problems to ensure that optimal parallel efficiencyis achieved as the number of processors grows.The development ofXyceprovides a platform for computational research and de-velopment aimed specifically at the needs of the Laboratory. WithXyce, Sandia hasan %22in-house%22 capability with which both new electrical (e.g., device model develop-ment) and algorithmic (e.g., faster time-integration methods, parallel solver algorithms)research and development can be performed. As a result,Xyceis a unique electricalsimulation capability, designed to meet the unique needs of the laboratory.4 XyceTMUsers' GuideAcknowledgementsThe authors would like to acknowledge the entire Sandia National Laboratories HPEMS(High Performance Electrical Modeling and Simulation) team, including Steve Wix, CarolynBogdan, Regina Schells, Ken Marx, Steve Brandon and Bill Ballard, for their support onthis project. We also appreciate very much the work of Jim Emery, Becky Arnold and MikeWilliamson for the help in reviewing this document.Lastly, a very special thanks to Hue Lai for typesetting this document with LATEX.TrademarksThe information herein is subject to change without notice.Copyrightc 2002-2003 Sandia Corporation. All rights reserved.XyceTMElectronic Simulator andXyceTMtrademarks of Sandia Corporation.Orcad, Orcad Capture, PSpice and Probe are registered trademarks of Cadence DesignSystems, Inc.Silicon Graphics, the Silicon Graphics logo and IRIX are registered trademarks of SiliconGraphics, Inc.Microsoft, Windows and Windows 2000 are registered trademark of Microsoft Corporation.Solaris and UltraSPARC are registered trademarks of Sun Microsystems Corporation.Medici, DaVinci and Taurus are registered trademarks of Synopsys Corporation.HP and Alpha are registered trademarks of Hewlett-Packard company.Amtec and TecPlot are trademarks of Amtec Engineering, Inc.Xyce's expression library is based on that inside Spice 3F5 developed by the EECS De-partment at the University of California.All other trademarks are property of their respective owners.ContactsBug Reportshttp://tvrusso.sandia.gov/bugzillaEmailxyce-support%40sandia.govWorld Wide Webhttp://www.cs.sandia.gov/xyce5 XyceTMUsers' GuideThis page is left intentionally blank6

  11. Application of the New Decommissioning Regulation to the Nuclear Licensed Facilities (NLF) at Fontenay-aux-Roses's Nuclear Center (CEA)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sauret, Josiane; Piketty, Laurence; Jeanjacques, Michel

    2008-01-15

    This abstract describes the application of the new decommissioning regulation on all Nuclear Licensed Facilities (NLF is to say INB in French) at Fontenay-aux-Roses's Center (CEA/FAR). The decommissioning process has been applied in six buildings which are out of the new nuclear perimeter proposed (buildings no 7, no 40, no 94, no 39, no 52/1 and no 32) and three buildings have been reorganized (no 54, no 91 and no 53 instead of no 40 and no 94) in order to increase the space for temporary nuclear waste disposal and to reduce the internal transports of nuclear waste on the site. The advantages are the safety and radioprotection improvements and a lower operating cost. A global safety file was written in 2002 and 2003 and was sent to the French Nuclear Authority on November 2003. The list of documents required is given in the paragraph I of this paper. The main goals were two ministerial decrees (one decree for each NLF) getting the authorization to modify the NLF perimeter and to carry out cleaning and dismantling activities leading to the whole decommissioning of all NLF. Some specific authorizations were necessary to carry out the dismantling program during the decommissioning procedure. They were delivered by the French Nuclear Safety Authority (FNSA) or with limited delegation by the General Executive Director (GED) on the CEA Fontenay-aux-Roses's Center, called internal authorization. Some partial dismantling or decontamination examples are given below: - evaporator for the radioactive liquid waste treatment station (building no 53): FNSA authorization: phase realised in 2002/2003. - disposal tanks for the radioactive liquid waste treatment station (building no 53) FNSA authorization: phase realised in 2004, - incinerator for the radioactive solid waste treatment station (building no 07): FNSA authorization: operation realised in 2004, - research equipments in the building no. 54 and building no. 91: internal authorization ; realised in 2005, - sample-taking to characterize solvent contained in one tank of Petrus installation (NLF 57, building 18) for radiological and chemical analysis needed to prepare the treatment and the evacuation of these wastes : internal authorization ; realised in june 2005. It was possible to plan the whole decommissioning process on the Nuclear Licensed Facilities of Fontenay-aux-Roses's Center (CEA/FAR) taking into account the French new regulation and to plan a coherent and continue program activity for the dismantling process. For the program not to be interrupted during the administrative process (2003-2006), specific authorisations have been delivered by the French Nuclear Safety Authority or by the General Executive Director (GED) on the CEA Fontenay-aux- Roses's Center (internal authorization). The time schedule to complete the entire program is until 2017 for NLF 'Procede' (NLF no 165) and until 2018 for NLF 'Support' (NLF no 166). Since 1999, an annual press meeting has been organised by the Fontenay-aux-Roses's Center Head Executive Manager.

  12. TOUGHREACT User's Guide: A Simulation Program for Non-isothermal Multiphase Reactive Geochemical Transport in Variably Saturated Geologic Media, V1.2.1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xu, Tianfu; Sonnenthal, Eric; Spycher, Nicolas; Pruess, Karsten

    2008-09-29

    Coupled modeling of subsurface multiphase fluid and heat flow, solute transport, and chemical reactions can be applied to many geologic systems and environmental problems, including geothermal systems, diagenetic and weathering processes, subsurface waste disposal, acid mine drainage remediation, contaminant transport, and groundwater quality. TOUGHREACT has been developed as a comprehensive non-isothermal multi-component reactive fluid flow and geochemical transport simulator to investigate these and other problems. A number of subsurface thermo-physical-chemical processes are considered under various thermohydrological and geochemical conditions of pressure, temperature, water saturation, and ionic strength. TOUGHREACT can be applied to one-, two- or three-dimensional porous and fractured media with physical and chemical heterogeneity. The code can accommodate any number of chemical species present in liquid, gas and solid phases. A variety of equilibrium chemical reactions are considered, such as aqueous complexation, gas dissolution/exsolution, and cation exchange. Mineral dissolution/precipitation can take place subject to either local equilibrium or kinetic controls, with coupling to changes in porosity and permeability and capillary pressure in unsaturated systems. Chemical components can also be treated by linear adsorption and radioactive decay. The first version of the non-isothermal reactive geochemical transport code TOUGHREACT was developed (Xu and Pruess, 1998) by introducing reactive geochemistry into the framework of the existing multi-phase fluid and heat flow code TOUGH2 (Pruess, 1991). TOUGHREACT was further enhanced with the addition of (1) treatment of mineral-water-gas reactive-transport under boiling conditions, (2) an improved HKF activity model for aqueous species, (3) gas species diffusion coefficients calculated as a function of pressure, temperature, and molecular properties, (4) mineral reactive surface area formulations for fractured and porous media, and (5) porosity, permeability, and capillary pressure changes owing to mineral precipitation/dissolution (Sonnenthal et al., 1998, 2000, 2001; Spycher et al., 2003a). Subsequently, TOUGH2 V2 was released with additional EOS modules and features (Pruess et al., 1999). The present version of TOUGHREACT includes all of the previous extensions to the original version, along with the replacement of the original TOUGH2 (Pruess, 1991) by TOUGH2 V2 (Pruess et al., 1999). TOUGHREACT has been applied to a wide variety of problems, some of which are included as examples, such as: (1) Supergene copper enrichment (Xu et al., 2001); (2) Mineral alteration in hydrothermal systems (Xu and Pruess, 2001a; Xu et al., 2004b; Dobson et al., 2004); (3) Mineral trapping for CO{sub 2} disposal in deep saline aquifers (Xu et al., 2003b and 2004a); (4) Coupled thermal, hydrological, and chemical processes in boiling unsaturated tuff for the proposed nuclear waste emplacement site at Yucca Mountain, Nevada (Sonnenthal et al., 1998, 2001; Sonnenthal and Spycher, 2000; Spycher et al., 2003a, b; Xu et al., 2001); (5) Modeling of mineral precipitation/dissolution in plug-flow and fracture-flow experiments under boiling conditions (Dobson et al., 2003); (6) Calcite precipitation in the vadose zone as a function of net infiltration (Xu et al., 2003); and (7) Stable isotope fractionation in unsaturated zone pore water and vapor (Singleton et al., 2004). The TOUGHREACT program makes use of 'self-documenting' features. It is distributed with a number of input data files for sample problems. Besides providing benchmarks for proper code installation, these can serve as a self-teaching tutorial in the use of TOUGHREACT, and they provide templates to help jump-start new applications. The fluid and heat flow part of TOUGHREACT is derived from TOUGH2 V2, so in addition to the current manual, users must have the manual of the TOUGH2 V2 (Pruess et al., 1999). The present version of TOUGHREACT provides the following TOUGH2 fluid property or 'EOS' (equation-of-state) modules: (1) EOS1 for

  13. DEVELOPMENT OF AN ADVANCED APPROACH FOR NEXT-GENERATION INTEGRATED RESERVOIR CHARACTERIZATION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Scott R. Reeves

    2005-04-01

    Accurate, high-resolution, three-dimensional (3D) reservoir characterization can provide substantial benefits for effective oilfield management. By doing so, the predictive reliability of reservoir flow models, which are routinely used as the basis for investment decisions involving hundreds of millions of dollars and designed to recover millions of barrels of oil, can be significantly improved. Even a small improvement in incremental recovery for high-value assets can result in important contributions to bottom-line profitability. Today's standard practice for developing a 3D reservoir description is to use seismic inversion techniques. These techniques make use of geostatistics and other stochastic methods to solve the inverse problem, i.e., to iteratively construct a likely geologic model and then upscale and compare its acoustic response to that actually observed in the field. This method has several inherent flaws, such as: (1) The resulting models are highly non-unique; multiple equiprobable realizations are produced, meaning (2) The results define a distribution of possible outcomes; the best they can do is quantify the uncertainty inherent in the modeling process, and (3) Each realization must be run through a flow simulator and history matched to assess it's appropriateness, and therefore (4) The method is labor intensive and requires significant time to complete a field study; thus it is applied to only a small percentage of oil and gas producing assets. A new approach to achieve this objective was first examined in a Department of Energy (DOE) study performed by Advanced Resources International (ARI) in 2000/2001. The goal of that study was to evaluate whether robust relationships between data at vastly different scales of measurement could be established using virtual intelligence (VI) methods. The proposed workflow required that three specific relationships be established through use of artificial neural networks (ANN's): core-to-log, log-to-crosswell seismic, and crosswell-to-surface seismic. One of the key attributes of the approach, which should result in the creation of high resolution reservoir characterization with greater accuracy and with less uncertainty than today's methods, is the inclusion of borehole seismic (such as crosswell and/or vertical seismic profiling--VSP) in the data collection scheme. Borehole seismic fills a critical gap in the resolution spectrum of reservoir measurements between the well log and surface seismic scales, thus establishing important constraints on characterization outcomes. The results of that initial study showed that it is, in fact, feasible to establish the three critical relationships required, and that use of data at different scales of measurement to create high-resolution reservoir characterization is possible. Based on the results of this feasibility study, in September 2001, the DOE, again through ARI, launched a subsequent two-year government-industry R&D project to further develop and demonstrate the technology. The goals of this project were to: (1) Make improvements to the initial methodology by incorporating additional VI technologies (such as clustering), using core measurements in place of magnetic resonance image (MRI) logs, and streamlining the workflow, among others. (2) Demonstrate the approach in an integrated manner at a single field site, and validate it via reservoir modeling or other statistical methods.

  14. Scanning Hall Probe Microscopy of Magnetic Vortices inVery Underdoped yttrium-barium-copper-oxide

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Guikema, Janice Wynn; /SLAC, SSRL

    2005-12-02

    Since their discovery by Bednorz and Mueller (1986), high-temperature cuprate superconductors have been the subject of intense experimental research and theoretical work. Despite this large-scale effort, agreement on the mechanism of high-T{sub c} has not been reached. Many theories make their strongest predictions for underdoped superconductors with very low superfluid density n{sub s}/m*. For this dissertation I implemented a scanning Hall probe microscope and used it to study magnetic vortices in newly available single crystals of very underdoped YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 6+x} (Liang et al. 1998, 2002). These studies have disproved a promising theory of spin-charge separation, measured the apparent vortex size (an upper bound on the penetration depth {lambda}{sub ab}), and revealed an intriguing phenomenon of ''split'' vortices. Scanning Hall probe microscopy is a non-invasive and direct method for magnetic field imaging. It is one of the few techniques capable of submicron spatial resolution coupled with sub-{Phi}{sub 0} (flux quantum) sensitivity, and it operates over a wide temperature range. Chapter 2 introduces the variable temperature scanning microscope and discusses the scanning Hall probe set-up and scanner characterizations. Chapter 3 details my fabrication of submicron GaAs/AlGaAs Hall probes and discusses noise studies for a range of probe sizes, which suggest that sub-100 nm probes could be made without compromising flux sensitivity. The subsequent chapters detail scanning Hall probe (and SQUID) microscopy studies of very underdoped YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 6+x} crystals with T{sub c} {le} 15 K. Chapter 4 describes two experimental tests for visons, essential excitations of a spin-charge separation theory proposed by Senthil and Fisher (2000, 2001b). We searched for predicted hc/e vortices (Wynn et al. 2001) and a vortex memory effect (Bonn et al. 2001) with null results, placing upper bounds on the vison energy inconsistent with the theory. Chapter 5 discusses imaging of isolated vortices as a function of T{sub c}. Vortex images were fit with theoretical magnetic field profiles in order to extract the apparent vortex size. The data for the lowest T{sub c}'s (5 and 6.5 K) show some inhomogeneity and suggest that {lambda}{sub ab} might be larger than predicted by the T{sub c} {proportional_to} n{sub s}(0)/m* relation first suggested by results of Uemura et al. (1989) for underdoped cuprates. Finally, Chapter 6 examines observations of apparent ''partial vortices'' in the crystals. My studies of these features indicate that they are likely split pancake vortex stacks. Qualitatively, these split stacks reveal information about pinning and anisotropy in the samples. Collectively these magnetic imaging studies deepen our knowledge of cuprate superconductivity, especially in the important regime of low superfluid density.

  15. Final report on the project entitled "The Effects of Disturbance & Climate on Carbon Storage & the Exchanges of CO2 Water Vapor & Energy Exchange of Evergreen Coniferous Forests in the Pacific Northwest: Integration of Eddy Flux, Plant and Soil Measurements at a Cluster of Supersites"

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Beverly E. Law , Christoph K. Thomas

    2011-09-20

    This is the final technical report containing a summary of all findings with regard to the following objectives of the project: (1) To quantify and understand the effects of wildfire on carbon storage and the exchanges of energy, CO2, and water vapor in a chronosequence of ponderosa pine (disturbance gradient); (2) To investigate the effects of seasonal and interannual variation in climate on carbon storage and the exchanges of energy, CO2, and water vapor in mature conifer forests in two climate zones: mesic 40-yr old Douglas-fir and semi-arid 60-yr old ponderosa pine (climate gradient); (3) To reduce uncertainty in estimates of CO2 feedbacks to the atmosphere by providing an improved model formulation for existing biosphere-atmosphere models; and (4) To provide high quality data for AmeriFlux and the NACP on micrometeorology, meteorology, and biology of these systems. Objective (1): A study integrating satellite remote sensing, AmeriFlux data, and field surveys in a simulation modeling framework estimated that the pyrogenic carbon emissions, tree mortality, and net carbon exchange associated with four large wildfires that burned ~50,000 hectares in 2002-2003 were equivalent to 2.4% of Oregon statewide anthropogenic carbon emissions over the same two-year period. Most emissions were from the combustion of the forest floor and understory vegetation, and only about 1% of live tree mass was combusted on average. Objective (2): A study of multi-year flux records across a chronosequence of ponderosa pine forests yielded that the net carbon uptake is over three times greater at a mature pine forest compared with young pine. The larger leaf area and wetter and cooler soils of the mature forest mainly caused this effect. A study analyzing seven years of carbon and water dynamics showed that interannual and seasonal variability of net carbon exchange was primarily related to variability in growing season length, which was a linear function of plant-available soil moisture in spring and early summer. A multi-year drought (2001-2003) led to a significant reduction of net ecosystem exchange due to carry-over effects in soil moisture and carbohydrate reserves in plant-tissue. In the same forest, the interannual variability in the rate carbon is lost from the soil and forest floor is considerable and related to the variability in tree growth as much as it is to variability in soil climatic conditions. Objective (3): Flux data from the mature ponderosa pine site support a physical basis for filtering nighttime data with friction velocity above the canopy. An analysis of wind fields and heat transport in the subcanopy at the mesic 40-year old Douglas site yielded that the non-linear structure and behavior of spatial temperature gradients and the flow field require enhanced sensor networks to estimate advective fluxes in the subcanopy of forest to close the surface energy balance in forests. Reliable estimates for flux uncertainties are needed to improve model validation and data assimilation in process-based carbon models, inverse modeling studies and model-data synthesis, where the uncertainties may be as important as the fluxes themselves. An analysis of the time scale dependence of the random and flux sampling error yielded that the additional flux obtained by increasing the perturbation timescale beyond about 10 minutes is dominated by random sampling error, and therefore little confidence can be placed in its value. Artificial correlation between gross ecosystem productivity (GEP) and ecosystem respiration (Re) is a consequence of flux partitioning of eddy covariance flux data when GEP is computed as the difference between NEE and computed daytime Re (e.g. using nighttime Re extrapolated into daytime using soil or air temperatures). Tower-data must be adequately spatially averaged before comparison to gridded model output as the time variability of both is inherently different. The eddy-covariance data collected at the mature ponderosa pine site and the mesic Douglas fir site were used to develop and evaluate a new method to extra