Powered by Deep Web Technologies
Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "2-meter soil temperature" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

Development of 2-Meter Soil Temperature Probes and Results of Temperature  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Development of 2-Meter Soil Temperature Probes and Results of Temperature Development of 2-Meter Soil Temperature Probes and Results of Temperature Survey Conducted at Desert Peak, Nevada, USA Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Conference Paper: Development of 2-Meter Soil Temperature Probes and Results of Temperature Survey Conducted at Desert Peak, Nevada, USA Abstract Temperature gradient drilling has historically been a key tool in the exploration for geothermal resources in the Great Basin, USA but regulatory, environmental, and accessibility issues, as well as the expense of drilling, are increasingly limiting its use. In cases where thermal groundwater is not overlain by near-surface cold aquifers, temperatures measured at a depth of 2-meters is an efficient method for mapping thermal anomalies at a high level of detail. This is useful for augmenting deeper

2

Use of Rapid Temperature Measurements at a 2-Meter Depth to Augment Deeper  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Use of Rapid Temperature Measurements at a 2-Meter Depth to Augment Deeper Use of Rapid Temperature Measurements at a 2-Meter Depth to Augment Deeper Temperature Gradient Drilling Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Conference Paper: Use of Rapid Temperature Measurements at a 2-Meter Depth to Augment Deeper Temperature Gradient Drilling Abstract Temperature gradient drilling has historically been a key tool in the exploration for geothermal resources in the Great Basin, USA, but regulatory, environmental, and accessibility issues, as well as the expense of drilling, are increasingly limiting its use. In cases where thermal groundwater is not overlain by near-surface cold aquifers, it is possible to augment temperature gradient drilling with temperatures measured from a 2-meter depth. We discuss the development of a rapid, efficient, and

3

ARM - Measurement - Soil surface temperature  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

surface temperature surface temperature ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Measurement : Soil surface temperature The temperature of the soil measured near the surface. Categories Surface Properties Instruments The above measurement is considered scientifically relevant for the following instruments. Refer to the datastream (netcdf) file headers of each instrument for a list of all available measurements, including those recorded for diagnostic or quality assurance purposes. ARM Instruments AMC : Ameriflux Measurement Component CO2FLX : Carbon Dioxide Flux Measurement Systems SOIL : Soil Measurement from the SGP SWATS : Soil Water and Temperature System MET : Surface Meteorological Instrumentation

4

Soil Water and Temperature System (SWATS) Handbook  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The soil water and temperature system (SWATS) provides vertical profiles of soil temperature, soil-water potential, and soil moisture as a function of depth below the ground surface at hourly intervals. The temperature profiles are measured directly by in situ sensors at the Central Facility and many of the extended facilities of the SGP climate research site. The soil-water potential and soil moisture profiles are derived from measurements of soil temperature rise in response to small inputs of heat. Atmospheric scientists use the data in climate models to determine boundary conditions and to estimate the surface energy flux. The data are also useful to hydrologists, soil scientists, and agricultural scientists for determining the state of the soil.

Bond, D

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

5

Effects of Soil Moisture on the Responses of Soil Temperatures to Climate Change in Cold Regions  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

At high latitudes, changes in soil moisture could alter soil temperatures independently of air temperature changes by interacting with the snow thermal rectifier. The authors investigated this mechanism with model experiments in the Community Land ...

Zachary M. Subin; Charles D. Koven; William J. Riley; Margaret S. Torn; David M. Lawrence; Sean C. Swenson

2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

6

Black Warrior: Sub-soil gas and fluid inclusion exploration and...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

development and power plant operation. - Extend and adapt the DOE sub-soil 2 meter probe technology to gas sampling. * Validate the 2 meter probe technology as a...

7

Soil temperature, soil moisture and thaw depth, Barrow, Alaska, Ver. 1  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This dataset consists of field measurements of soil properties made during 2012 and 2013 in areas A-D of Intensive Site 1 at the Next-Generation Ecosystem Experiments (NGEE) Arctic site near Barrow, Alaska. Included are i) weekly measurements of thaw depth, soil moisture, presence and depth of standing water, and soil temperature made during the 2012 and 2013 growing seasons (June - September) and ii) half-hourly measurements of soil temperature logged continuously during the period June 2012 to September 2013.

Sloan, V.L.; J.A. Liebig; M.S. Hahn; J.B. Curtis; J.D. Brooks; A. Rogers; C.M. Iversen; R.J. Norby

2014-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

8

CO2 CH4 flux Air temperature Soil temperature and Soil moisture, Barrow, Alaska 2013 ver. 1  

DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

This dataset consists of field measurements of CO2 and CH4 flux, as well as soil properties made during 2013 in Areas A-D of Intensive Site 1 at the Next-Generation Ecosystem Experiments (NGEE) Arctic site near Barrow, Alaska. Included are i) measurements of CO2 and CH4 flux made from June to September (ii) Calculation of corresponding Gross Primary Productivity (GPP) and CH4 exchange (transparent minus opaque) between atmosphere and the ecosystem (ii) Measurements of Los Gatos Research (LGR) chamber air temperature made from June to September (ii) measurements of surface layer depth, type of surface layer, soil temperature and soil moisture from June to September.

Margaret Torn

9

SCS-2005-17 Soil Temperatures for Cotton Planting  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

SCS-2005-17 6-05 Soil Temperatures for Cotton Planting Randy Boman, Ph.D., Associate Professor and Extension Agronomist-Cotton Robert Lemon, Ph.D., Professor and Extension Agronomist-Cotton C otton can and leaves. The cotton seed also has two cotyledons, or seed leaves. These cotyledons are storage tissues

Mukhtar, Saqib

10

DVS5.2 METERS 8 METERS OCR507, STOR-X DATA LOGGER  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

DVS5.2 METERS 10 METERS 8 METERS OCR507, STOR-X DATA LOGGER 16" BATTERY HOUSING TC INVERTED5 METERS 1" SAS INDUCTIVE CABLE BREAKOUT RADAR REFLECTOR OS PAPA RECOVERY HANDLE 1 METER-SBE 37 MICROCAT TC HUMIDITY (FLEX) CTD/GTD/O2 4 METERS WETLabs FLNTUSB FLUOROMETER DOUBLE NUT AND TORQUE ALL LOAD CELL NUTS

11

Soil temperature is an important regulatory control on dissolved organic carbon supply and uptake of soil solution nitrate  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The role of abiotic processes on dissolved organic matter (DOM) production is often underappreciated. However, abiotic processes appear to be especially important in subsoils where, with increasing depth, microbial activity declines and soil organic matter (SOM) becomes a progressively more important contributor to DOM. Within three soil depths (20, 40, and 60 cm) in a temperate forest, soil temperature was positively associated with dissolved organic carbon (DOC) concentration (R2 = 0.23–0.77) and the DOM humification index (R2 = 0.35–0.72) for soil solutions in slow and fast flowpaths. With increasing soil temperature from 5 to 24 °C, average DOC concentrations increased by 86% at 20 cm, 12% at 40 cm and 12% at 60 cm soil depths. Our data suggest that DOM supply, especially in subsoils, is temperature dependent. We attribute this to the influence of temperature on DOM replenishment through direct processes such as SOM dissolution, diffusion and exchange reactions as well as indirect processes such as rhizodeposition and exoenzyme activity. In contrast, negative relationships (R2 = 0.71–0.88) between temperature and nitrate concentrations in subsoil suggested that the temperature-dependent supply of DOM drives microbial processes such as dissimilatory and assimilatory nitrate consumption.

Ehsan R. Toosi; John P. Schmidt; Michael J. Castellano

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

12

Physical, mineralogical, and micromorphological properities of expansive soil treated at different temperature  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Different characterizations were carried out on unheated expansive soil and samples heated at different temperature. The samples are taken from the western outskirts of Nanning of Guangxi Province, China. In the present paper, the mineral and chemical ...

Jian Li, Xiyong Wu, Long Hou

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

13

Black Warrior: Sub-soil gas and fluid inclusion exploration and slim well drilling  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

DOE Geothermal Peer Review 2010 - Presentation. Project Objectives: Discover a blind, low-moderate temperature resource: Apply a combination of detailed sub-soil gas, hydrocarbon, and isotope data to define possible upflow areas; Calibrate the sub-soil chemistry with down-hole fluid inclusion stratigraphy and fluid analyses to define a follow-up exploration drilling target; Create short term jobs and long term employment through resource exploration, development and power plant operation; Extend and adapt the DOE sub-soil 2 meter probe technology to gas sampling.

14

The Usage of Screen-Level Parameters and Microwave Brightness Temperature for Soil Moisture Analysis  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This study focuses on testing two different soil moisture analysis systems based on screen-level parameters (2-m temperature T2m, 2-m relative humidity RH2m) and 1.4-GHz passive microwave brightness temperatures TB. First, a simplified extended ...

G. Seuffert; H. Wilker; P. Viterbo; M. Drusch; J-F. Mahfouf

2004-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

15

Clemson final report: High temperature formulations for SRS soils  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This study was undertaken to demonstrate the application of a DC arc melter to in-situ vitrification of SRS soils. The melter that was available at the DOE/Industrial Vitrification Laboratory at Clemson University was equipped with opposing solid electrodes. To simulate field conditions, two hollow electrode configurations were evaluated which allowed fluxes to be injected into the melter while the soils were being vitrified. the first 4 runs utilized pre-blended flux (two runs) and attempted flux injection (two runs). These runs were terminated prematurely due to offgas sampling problems and melt freezing. The remaining four runs utilized a different electrode geometry, and the runs were not interrupted to change out the offgas sampling apparatus. These runs were conducted successfully.

Schumacher, R.F. [Westinghouse Savannah River Company, AIKEN, SC (United States)

1997-03-11T23:59:59.000Z

16

Validation of Noah-simulated Soil Temperature in the North American Land Data Assimilation System Phase 2  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Soil temperature can exhibit considerable memory from weather and climate signals and is among the most important initial conditions in numerical weather and climate models. Consequently, a more accurate long-term land surface soil temperature dataset is needed to improve weather and climate simulation and prediction, and is also important for the simulation of agricultural crop yield and ecological processes. The North-American Land Data Assimilation (NLDAS) Phase 2 (NLDAS-2) has generated 31-years (1979-2009) of simulated hourly soil temperature data with a spatial resolution of 1/8o. This dataset has not been comprehensively evaluated to date. Thus, the ultimate purpose of the present work is to assess Noah-simulated soil temperature for different soil depths and timescales. We used long-term (1979-2001) observed monthly mean soil temperatures from 137 cooperative stations over the United States to evaluate simulated soil temperature for three soil layers (0-10 cm, 10-40 cm, 40-100 cm) for annual and monthly timescales. We used short-term (1997-1999) observed soil temperature from 72 Oklahoma Mesonet stations to validate simulated soil temperatures for three soil layers and for daily and hourly timescales. The results showed that the Noah land surface model (Noah LSM) generally matches observed soil temperature well for different soil layers and timescales. At greater depths, the simulation skill (anomaly correlation) decreased for all time scales. The monthly mean diurnal cycle difference between simulated and observed soil temperature revealed large midnight biases in the cold season due to small downward longwave radiation and issues related to model parameters.

Xia, Youlong; Ek, Michael; Sheffield, Justin; Livneh, Ben; Huang, Maoyi; Wei, Helin; Song, Feng; Luo, Lifeng; Meng, Jesse; Wood, Eric

2013-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

17

An example of remediation of mercury impacted soil using high vacuum low temperature thermal desorption  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this paper is to describe a high vacuum, low temperature thermal desorption (LTTD) technology which has been used to remediate soil impacted with elemental mercury and to present the results of pre-treatment and post-treatment soil sampling. The general operating principles of this high vacuum LTTD technology, the IRHV-200, are: (a) depression of the boiling points of the target compounds by lowering the ambient pressure within the treatment chamber using a vacuum pump; (b) use of infrared radiation to generate a thermal gradient in the top several inches of non-liquid material contained within the treatment chamber and use of a carrier gas to transport the desorbed contaminants from the treatment chamber to a pollution control system. The overall effect of these parameters is a batch treatment system capable of desorbing target contaminants from soil under anaerobic conditions and low temperature such that the desorbed contaminants do not degrade and generate thermal or oxidative by-products. Essentially, the desorbed contaminants undergo a reversible phase change from liquid to vapor in the treatment chamber and are condensed back to liquid in the pollution control system. Results of bench top testing are compared to full scale remediations of significant volumes of soil to demonstrate remediation of mercury impacted soil. This technology is also applicable for soils impacted with other higher boiling point organics, such as, PCP, PCBs, PAHs, PNAs, pesticides and herbicides.

Dagdigian, J.V. [McLaren/Hart, Irvine, CA (United States)

1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

18

Importance of moisture transport, snow cover and soil freezing to ground temperature predictions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

foundation may also be explicitly calculated. For buildings utilizing ground source heat pump systems of the annual outdoor and indoor air temperatures. Then periodic heat transfer coefficients and phase lags with significant earth contact. A numerical model for heat and moisture transfer in partially frozen soils has been

19

A METHOD OF RECORDING MAXIMUM AND MINIMUM TEMPERATURES OF FOREST SOILS  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...authors would give a slight rebate on the price to offset...Ent., May, 1929. 1 C. G. Bates and Raphael...reads from minus 20 to plus 500 C. The Six type of ther-mometer...within the pit (Fig. 1). When readings are made...soil temperatures are: (1) The bulb remains at all...

E. W. Gemmer JR.

1929-11-22T23:59:59.000Z

20

A soil moisture assimilation scheme using satellite-retrieved skin temperature in meso-scale weather forecast model  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A thermodynamically consistent soil moisture assimilation scheme for clear sky and snow free conditions has been developed for the meso-scale modeling system in the Arctic region by using satellite-derived skin temperatures. Parallel control and sensitivity modeling experiments were designed and their results demonstrated that the assimilation scheme successfully improves the soil moistures that were deliberately perturbed initially, indicating capability of the scheme to correct bias in the soil moisture initialization. Moreover, the resultant benefit of this assimilation scheme does not only lie in the improvement of soil moisture; the skin temperature also consequently exhibits improvements in a thermodynamic consistency. A real application of the assimilation scheme with satellite-retrieved skin temperature exhibited noticeable positive impacts on the modeling simulation and weather forecast; the model obviously captured meso-scale features of soil moistures as well as the skin temperatures. The warming tendency bias in original model simulations was removed to a considerable extent by this assimilation scheme.

Jing Zhang; Xiangdong Zhang

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "2-meter soil temperature" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Design and fabrication of a 1.2 meter long internally cooled silicon x-ray mirror for APS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper describes the specifications, design, and fabrication of a 1.2 meter long ultra high vacuum (UHV) silicon mirror for use as the first optical element on an x-ray beamline at APS. The mirror, which is 1,200 mm x 90 mm x 120 mm in size, intercepts the incident x-ray beam at 0.15{degree}. The thermal power incident on the mirror is 1.2 kW with a peak heat flux of 0.38 W/mm{sup 2}. The heat is removed by flowing water through a set of channels configured in the face plate of the mirror. Various aspects of this mirror, including its purpose, utility, expected thermal and structural performance, cooling design, UHV provision, support and mounting, surface figure and finish, bonding of the cooling conduits, and other manufacturing steps are discussed.

Tonnessen, T.W. [Rocketdyne Albuquerque Operations, NM (United States); Khounsary, A.M.; Yun, W.B.; Shu, D. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States). Advanced Photon Source

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

22

Methods for estimating temperature sensitivity of soil organic matter based on incubation data: A comparative evaluation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Although the temperature sensitivity (Q10) of soil organic matter (SOM) decomposition has been widely studied, the estimate substantially depends on the methods used with specific assumptions. Here we compared several commonly used methods (i.e., one-pool (1P) model, two-discrete-pool (2P) model, three-discrete-pool (3P) model, and time-for-substrate (T4S) Q10 method) plus a new and more process-oriented approach for estimating Q10 of SOM decomposition from laboratory incubation data to evaluate the influences of the different methods and assumptions on Q10 estimation. The process-oriented approach is a three-transfer-pool (3PX) model that resembles the decomposition sub-model commonly used in Earth system models. The temperature sensitivity and other parameters in the models were estimated from the cumulative CO2 emission using the Bayesian Markov Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) technique. The estimated \\{Q10s\\} generally increased with the soil recalcitrance, but decreased with the incubation temperature increase. Our results indicated that the 1P model did not adequately simulate the dynamics of SOM decomposition and thus was not adequate for the Q10 estimation. All the multi-pool models fitted the soil incubation data well. The Akaike information criterion (AIC) analysis suggested that the 2P model is the most parsimonious. As the incubation progressed, Q10 estimated by the 3PX model was smaller than those by the 2P and 3P models because the continuous C transfers from the slow and passive pools to the active pool were included in the 3PX model. Although the T4S method could estimate the Q10 of labile carbon appropriately, our analyses showed that it overestimated that of recalcitrant SOM. The similar structure of 3PX model with the decomposition sub-model of Earth system models provides a possible approach, via the data assimilation techniques, to incorporate results from numerous incubation experiments into Earth system models.

Junyi Liang; Dejun Li; Zheng Shi; James M. Tiedje; Jizhong Zhou; Edward A.G. Schuur; Konstantinos T. Konstantinidis; Yiqi Luo

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

23

Impact of Hillslope-Scale Organization of Topography, Soil Moisture, Soil Temperature, and Vegetation on Modeling Surface Microwave Radiation Emission  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Microwave radiometry will emerge as an important tool for global remote sensing of near-surface soil moisture in the coming decade. In this modeling study, we find that hillslope-scale topography (tens of meters) influences ...

Flores, Alejandro N.

24

Effects of Low Temperature and Freeze-Thaw Cycles on Hydrocarbon Biodegradation in Arctic Tundra Soil  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...observed. Freeze-thaw cycles had a temporary inhibitory...effect of freeze-thaw cycles. First, freezing...soil (). However, diesel range alkanes are, in general, more volatile than...The freeze-thaw cycles also affected the composition...

Mikael Eriksson; Jong-Ok Ka; William W. Mohn

2001-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

25

Novel Phytase from Pteris vittata Resistant to Arsenate, High Temperature, and Soil Deactivation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, Florida 32611, United States State Key Lab of Pollution Control and Resource Reuse, School Jason T. Lessl, Lena Q. Ma,*,, Bala Rathinasabapathi,§ and Charles Guy Soil and Water Science Department, § Horticultural Sciences, and Environmental Horticulture, University of Florida, Gainesville

Ma, Lena

26

The effects of temperature and soil moisture on the germination and emergence of three perennial warm season grasses  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

t paratxures, Ruat Narfa 4L4 not 4ifferentiate between the tesxptkratme zeglxsea isxpoaa4 ~ xn cane bluestsss, ~530 continwa4 to ~ hibit vexxy low gerxLination at all texsperatures 4-866:qersxinat hetter at 15 -25' or 20'-30 C than at the otheX(' teaperatax..., three lines within each of three species, were compared for their ability to gersLinate at various taaperature ranges and to emerge from soil sub)ected to various combinations of temperature and moisture i' ll c f the grasses germina ted and emerged...

Ohlenbusch, Paul Dietrich

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

27

Impact of Soil Moisture–Atmosphere Interactions on Surface Temperature Distribution  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Understanding how different physical processes can shape the probability distribution function (PDF) of surface temperature, in particular the tails of the distribution, is essential for the attribution and projection of future extreme temperature ...

Alexis Berg; Benjamin R. Lintner; Kirsten L. Findell; Sergey Malyshev; Paul C. Loikith; Pierre Gentine

2014-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

28

User's manual for GEOTEMP, a computer code for predicting downhole wellbore and soil temperatures in geothermal wells. Appendix to Part I report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

GEOTEMP is a computer code that calculates downhole temperatures in and surrounding a well. Temperatures are computed as a function of time in a flowing stream, in the wellbore, and in the soil. Flowing options available in the model include the following: injection/production, forward/reverse circulation, and drilling. This manual describes how to input data to the code and what results are printed out, provides six examples of both input and output, and supplies a listing of the code. The user's manual is an appendix to the Part I report Development of Computer Code and Acquisition of Field Temperature Data.

Wooley, G.R.

1980-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

29

Hydrogeology of Stromboli volcano, Aeolian Islands (Italy) from the interpretation of resistivity tomograms, self-potential, soil temperature and soil CO2 concentration measurements  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......France 9 Earth and Atmospheric Sciences Department...can occur when water encounters a...measurements with a generator and a voltmeter...two-phase (liquid water and steam) flow...concentration below atmospheric level (350 ppm...The evidence of atmospheric levels of soil...infiltration of meteoric water can flow on the......

A. Revil; A. Finizola; T. Ricci; E. Delcher; A. Peltier; S. Barde-Cabusson; G. Avard; T. Bailly; L. Bennati; S. Byrdina; J. Colonge; F. Di Gangi; G. Douillet; M. Lupi; J. Letort; E. Tsang Hin Sun

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

30

Relationships between soil CO2 concentration and CO2 production, temperature, water content, and gas diffusivity: implications for field studies through sensitivity analyses  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Soil CO2 levels reflect CO2 production and transport in soil and provide valuable information about soil CO2 dynamics. However, extracting information from soil CO2 profiles is often difficult because of the comp...

Shoji Hashimoto; Hikaru Komatsu

2006-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

31

Degradation of Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons at Low Temperature under Aerobic and Nitrate-Reducing Conditions in Enrichment Cultures from Northern Soils  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...incineration, storage, or soil washing (12). PAHs are often found in oil spills and in soil at old gasworks sites...H. Frimmel. 1997. Surfactant-enhanced mobilization...manufactured gas. Plant Soil Environ. Sci. Technol...

Mikael Eriksson; Erik Sodersten; Zhongtang Yu; Gunnel Dalhammar; William W. Mohn

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

32

ARM - Measurement - Soil moisture  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

moisture moisture ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Measurement : Soil moisture The moisture of the soil measured near the surface. This includes soil wetness and soil water potential. Categories Surface Properties Instruments The above measurement is considered scientifically relevant for the following instruments. Refer to the datastream (netcdf) file headers of each instrument for a list of all available measurements, including those recorded for diagnostic or quality assurance purposes. ARM Instruments AMC : Ameriflux Measurement Component CO2FLX : Carbon Dioxide Flux Measurement Systems SOIL : Soil Measurement from the SGP SWATS : Soil Water and Temperature System SEBS : Surface Energy Balance System

33

Relationship of Soil Respiration to Crop and Landscape in the Walnut Creek Watershed  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Soil respiration is an important component of the carbon dynamics of terrestrial ecosystems. Many factors exert controls on soil respiration, including temperature, soil water content, organic matter, soil texture, and plant root activity. This ...

T. B. Parkin; T. C. Kaspar; Z. Senwo; J. H. Prueger; J. L. Hatfield

2005-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

34

Surface Soil  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Surface Soil Surface Soil Surface Soil We compare local soil samples with samples collected from northern New Mexico locations that are beyond the range of potential influence from normal Laboratory operations. April 12, 2012 Farm soil sampling Two LANL environmental field team members take soil samples from a farm. Contact Environmental Communication & Public Involvement P.O. Box 1663 MS M996 Los Alamos, NM 87545 (505) 667-0216 Email Measurements are compared to samples from the regional sites and compared to averages over time to see if there are changes in concentrations. Monitoring surface soil LANL has monitored surface soils since the early 1970s. Institutional surface soil samples are collected from 17 on-site, 11 perimeter, and six regional (background) locations every three years.

35

Soil Quality Information Sheet Rangeland Soil Quality--Soil Biota  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

powerhouse of soil, include an incredible diversity of organisms. Tons of soil biota, including micro

36

Wellbore and soil thermal simulation for geothermal wells: development of computer model and acquisition of field temperature data. Part I report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A downhole thermal simulator has been developed to improve understanding of the high downhole temperatures that affect many design factors in geothermal wells. This development is documented and field temperature data presented for flowing and shut-in conditions.

Wooley, G.R.

1980-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

37

Algae from a Connecticut soil  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

While studying the effect of a broad range of incubation temperatures on growth of algae fromone cornfield soil, 23 species of algae, 19 Chlorophyta and 4 Cyanophyta, were isolated and identified. No members of t...

R. L. Hilton; F. R. Trainor

1963-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

38

Soil Minerals  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Soil Minerals Soil Minerals Nature Bulletin No. 707 March 2, 1963 Forest Preserve District of Cook County Seymour Simon, President Roberts Mann, Conservation Editor SOIL MINERALS We all depend upon the land Our food is obtained from plants and animals -- bread and meat, potatoes and fish, fruit and eggs and milk and the rest of it. Our livestock feed on plants and plant products such as grass and grain. Plants, by means of their root systems, take moisture and nutrients from the soils on which they grow. Their food values, for us or for animals that furnish us food, depend upon the available nutrients in those soils. Soils contain solids, water and air. The solids, the bulk of a soil -- except in purely organic types such as peat and muck -- are mostly mineral materials. Ordinarily they also contain some organic material: decayed and decaying remains of plants and animals.

39

Degradation of Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons at Low Temperature under Aerobic and Nitrate-Reducing Conditions in Enrichment Cultures from Northern Soils  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...from well-drained areas. In general, most successful enrichment...temperature and freeze-thaw cycles on hydrocarbon biodegradation...Krieg. 1994. Methods for general and molecular bacteriology...Canada creosote degradation diesel fuel Eastern Canada Ellesmere...

Mikael Eriksson; Erik Sodersten; Zhongtang Yu; Gunnel Dalhammar; William W. Mohn

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

40

Improvements in Shallow (Two-Meter) Temperature Measurements and Data  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Improvements in Shallow (Two-Meter) Temperature Measurements and Data Improvements in Shallow (Two-Meter) Temperature Measurements and Data Interpretation Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Conference Paper: Improvements in Shallow (Two-Meter) Temperature Measurements and Data Interpretation Abstract The Great Basin Center for Geothermal Energy has been working on improvements in shallow (two-meter) temperature surveys in two areas: overcoming limitations posed by difficult ground conditions with the use of a portable rock drill, and improvements in temperature measurements and interpretations Previous 2-meter temperature surveys conducted by the Great Basin Center for Geothermal Energy have been limited to areas that were not excessively rocky. This limitation has been overcome by the use of a

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "2-meter soil temperature" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Spatial Variation of Soil Type and Soil Moisture in the Regional Atmospheric Modeling System  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Soil characteristics (texture and moisture) are typically assumed to be initially constant when performing simulations with the Regional Atmospheric Modeling System (RAMS). Soil texture is spatially homogeneous and time-independent, while soil moisture is often spatially homogeneous initially, but time-dependent. This report discusses the conversion of a global data set of Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) soil types to RAMS soil texture and the subsequent modifications required in RAMS to ingest this information. Spatial variations in initial soil moisture obtained from the National Center for Environmental Predictions (NCEP) large-scale models are also introduced. Comparisons involving simulations over the southeastern United States for two different time periods, one during warmer, more humid summer conditions, and one during cooler, dryer winter conditions, reveals differences in surface conditions related to increases or decreases in near-surface atmospheric moisture con tent as a result of different soil properties. Three separate simulation types were considered. The base case assumed spatially homogeneous soil texture and initial soil moisture. The second case assumed variable soil texture and constant initial soil moisture, while the third case allowed for both variable soil texture and initial soil moisture. The simulation domain was further divided into four geographically distinct regions. It is concluded there is a more dramatic impact on thermodynamic variables (surface temperature and dewpoint) than on surface winds, and a more pronounced variability in results during the summer period. While no obvious trends in surface winds or dewpoint temperature were found relative to observations covering all regions and times, improvement in surface temperatures in most regions and time periods was generally seen with the incorporation of variable soil texture and initial soil moisture.

Buckley, R.

2001-06-27T23:59:59.000Z

42

Soils | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Soils Jump to: navigation, search Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgwindex.php?titleSoils&oldid612253" Category: NEPA Resources...

43

Soil Sterilization  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... received the notice they deserved. Among them is soil sterilization as a factor in food production. How to produce the greatest amount of good food has become an urgent problem ... proper consideration. Pests and diseases, for example, not only cause serious losses in food production, but they also waste time, labour and materials. Thus, by employing measures for ...

W. J. C. L.

1944-06-17T23:59:59.000Z

44

Soils Collections Project Page  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Soil Collections Soil Collections Soil Collections Overview Soil covers a major portion of the Earth's surface, and is an important natural resource that either directly or indirectly supports most of the planet's life. Soil is a mixture of mineral and organic materials plus air and water. The contents of soil vary by location and are constantly changing. The ORNL DAAC Soil Collections archive contains data on the physical and chemical properties of soils, including: soil carbon and nitrogen soil water-holding capacity soil respiration soil texture Most data sets are globally gridded, while a few are of a regional nature. Get Soils Data Find and order data sets: See list of data sets and download data Browse Soils Data Holdings by selected attributes Retrieve Soils data by FTP browse

45

Substrate regulation of soil respiration in a tallgrass prairie: Results of a clipping and shading experiment  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Temperature sensitivity of soil respiration decreased from 1.93 in the control plots to 1.88, 1.75, and 1 of substrate supply in regulating soil respiration and its temperature sensitivity. INDEX TERMS: 1615 Global in a tallgrass prairie of the Great Plains, United States, to manipulate substrate supply to soil respiration

46

Ethylene and soil fungistasis  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... SMITH1 has reported that ethylene is a causative agent of soil fungistasis, that its production in soil varies with ... earlier work3; more recent observations4 suggest that soil anaerobiosis is necessary to mobilise substrates3 for ethylene formation by soil microorganisms.

J. M. LYNCH; S. H. T. HARPER

1974-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

47

Reading Comprehension - Soil  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Soil Soil What Is Soil? Soil is the loose top layer of Earth's surface. Plants depend on soil. It holds them up. It provides them with food and water. Soil is made of _________ fungi humus particles . These very small pieces mostly come from rocks broken down by weathering. Other soil particles come from rotting remains of plants and animals. The part of soil that comes from living things is called _________ loam organic matter texture . Soil Life Many small organisms live in soil. They include worms, bacteria, and fungi. _________ Fungi Humus Particles are like plants, but they aren't green. And they have no leaves, flowers, or roots. The organisms feed on dead plants and animals. They cause them to _________ decay loam particles , or break down. The decayed plant and animal matter is called _________ fungi humus

48

Mass Transport within Soils  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Contaminants in soil can impact human health and the environment through a complex web of interactions. Soils exist where the atmosphere, hydrosphere, geosphere, and biosphere converge. Soil is the thin outer zone of the earth's crust that supports rooted plants and is the product of climate and living organisms acting on rock. A true soil is a mixture of air, water, mineral, and organic components. The relative proportions of these components determine the value of the soil for agricultural and for other human uses. These proportions also determine, to a large extent, how a substance added to soil is transported and/or transformed within the soil (Spositio, 2004). In mass-balance models, soil compartments play a major role, functioning both as reservoirs and as the principal media for transport among air, vegetation, surface water, deeper soil, and ground water (Mackay, 2001). Quantifying the mass transport of chemicals within soil and between soil and atmosphere is important for understanding the role soil plays in controlling fate, transport, and exposure to multimedia pollutants. Soils are characteristically heterogeneous. A trench dug into soil typically reveals several horizontal layers having different colors and textures. As illustrated in Figure 1, these multiple layers are often divided into three major horizons: (1) the A horizon, which encompasses the root zone and contains a high concentration of organic matter; (2) the B horizon, which is unsaturated, lies below the roots of most plants, and contains a much lower organic carbon content; and (3) the C horizon, which is the unsaturated zone of weathered parent rock consisting of bedrock, alluvial material, glacial material, and/or soil of an earlier geological period. Below these three horizons lies the saturated zone - a zone that encompasses the area below ground surface in which all interconnected openings within the geologic media are completely filled with water. Similarly to the unsaturated zone with three major horizons, the saturated zone can be further divided into other zones based on hydraulic and geologic conditions. Wetland soils are a special and important class in which near-saturation conditions exist most of the time. When a contaminant is added to or formed in a soil column, there are several mechanisms by which it can be dispersed, transported out of the soil column to other parts of the environment, destroyed, or transformed into some other species. Thus, to evaluate or manage any contaminant introduced to the soil column, one must determine whether and how that substance will (1) remain or accumulate within the soil column, (2) be transported by dispersion or advection within the soil column, (3) be physically, chemically, or biologically transformed within the soil (i.e., by hydrolysis, oxidation, etc.), or (4) be transported out of the soil column to another part of the environment through a cross-media transfer (i.e., volatilization, runoff, ground water infiltration, etc.). These competing processes impact the fate of physical, chemical, or biological contaminants found in soils. In order to capture these mechanisms in mass transfer models, we must develop mass-transfer coefficients (MTCs) specific to soil layers. That is the goal of this chapter. The reader is referred to other chapters in this Handbook that address related transport processes, namely Chapter 13 on bioturbation, Chapter 15 on transport in near-surface geological formations, and Chapter 17 on soil resuspention. This chapter addresses the following issues: the nature of soil pollution, composition of soil, transport processes and transport parameters in soil, transformation processes in soil, mass-balance models, and MTCs in soils. We show that to address vertical heterogeneity in soils in is necessary to define a characteristic scaling depth and use this to establish process-based expressions for soil MTCs. The scaling depth in soil and the corresponding MTCs depend strongly on (1) the composition of the soil and physical state of the soil, (2) the chemical and physic

McKone, Thomas E.

2009-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

49

Soil washing technology evaluation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Environmental Restoration Engineering (ERE) continues to review innovative, efficient, and cost effective technologies for SRS soil and/or groundwater remediation. As part of this effort, this technical evaluation provides review and the latest information on the technology for SRS soil remediation. Additional technology evaluation reports will be issued periodically to update these reports. The purpose of this report is to review the soil washing technology and its potential application to SRS soil remediation. To assess whether the Soil Washing technology is a viable option for SRS soil remediation, it is necessary to review the technology/process, technology advantages/limitations, performance, applications, and cost analysis.

Suer, A.

1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

50

Surfactant-enhanced extraction of hazardous wastes from soils. First report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Through combined efforts, researchers at Clark Atlanta University and Savannah River Site propose to develop improved soil washing techniques for decontaminating soils containing organic, inorganic and radioactive wastes. This project encompasses several tasks including (1) identification of organic, inorganic and radioactive pollutants in selected soils, (2) separation of soils into various fractions and the determination of wastes in each fraction, (3) soil decontamination by washing with surfactants and evaluation of the effectiveness of various types of surfactants in removing contaminants from soils, (4) determination of soil remediation and the effects of the surfactant concentration and wash solution-to-soil ratio on the desorption and removal of organic wastes from soils, (5) assessment of soil particle size distribution on waste efficiency, (6) evaluating the effects of temperature, mixing rates, and extraction times on waste solubilization and extraction, and (7) determination of the influence of surface charge properties and the pHs of the souls slurries on the decontamination efficiency.

Abotsi, G.; Davies, I.; Saha, G.

1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

51

Soil remediation using soil washing followed by Fenton oxidation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Soil washing was applied to a contaminated soil with p-Cresol by using a nonionic surfactant (Tween 80). A mathematical model has also been proposed to describe both the pollutant desorption and the surfactant adsorption, taking place simultaneously. The effect of temperature (20–40 °C) and surfactant concentration (0.1–10 g L?1) have been analyzed on both kinetic rates. The kinetic desorption rate of p-Cresol increases as the initial solubilizer concentration. Desorption of p-Cresol was slightly greater with increasing temperature. The obtained kinetic model represents quite well the experimental results. Soil washing wastewater (20 mg L?1 of p-Cresol and 0.86 g L?1 of Tween 80) has been treated with Fenton Reagent to remove the pollutant extracted (p-Cresol) and to recover the surfactant solution. The pH of the soil washing wastewater was about 6.5 and did not change significantly during the Fenton Reagent treatment. Total conversions of p-Cresol were observed, at very short times, at the conditions tested for the Fenton reaction (100 mg L?1 of H2O2 and 10 mg L?1 of Fe2+). The hydrogen peroxide was not totally exhausted, showing conversions near 60% at 120 min. Besides, the removal of Tween 80 during the Fenton’s reaction was lower than 10%, which suggests that the reaction is mainly selective to p-Cresol degradation. The toxicity of the liquids, measured by Microtox bioassay, was significantly reduced after the oxidation reaction, suggesting the negligible formation of degradation intermediates with higher toxicity than p-Cresol.

J.M. Rosas; F. Vicente; A. Santos; A. Romero

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

52

Extractable soil phosphorus in Blackland Prairie soils  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Texas Agricultural Extension Service (TAEX) Soil Testing Laboratory currently utilizes a single phosphorus (P) extractant consisting of 1.43 M NH4OAc, 1. 0 M HCl, and 0.025 M EDTA-PH 4.2 to estimate plant available P for all soils in Texas...

Byrd, Robert Claude

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

53

Soil Quality Information Sheet Rangeland Soil Quality--  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

impact or flowing water. They seal the soil surface, reduce the rate of water infiltration, and can into individual particles that clog soil pores, seal the surface, and form a layer that is dense when dry of physical crust with many small, unconnected air pockets or spaces similar to those in a sponge

54

Definition: Soil Gas Sampling | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Definition Definition Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Definition: Soil Gas Sampling Jump to: navigation, search Dictionary.png Soil Gas Sampling Soil gas sampling is sometimes used in exploration for blind geothermal resources to detect anomalously high concentrations of hydrothermal gases in the near-surface environment. Identification of high concentrations of hydrothermal gas species may indicates the presence of enhanced permeability (faults) and high temperature hydrothermal activity at depth. Soil gas data may also be used to study other important aspects of the geothermal system, such as distinguishing between magmatic and amagmatic sources of heat. The technique may also be used for ongoing monitoring of the geothermal system during resource development and production.

55

Adsorption of tetrahydrothiophene (THT) onto soils  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Adsorption is one of the major industrial separation technique nowadays. Although adsorption is most commonly used as a separation method in some cases cause harmful and undesirable effects such as capture odorant from natural gas onto soil. In the event of an accident the gas can leak from pipes in two ways - either directly into the surrounding air or the soil where the odorant can be mostly absorbed depending of type of soil water content and temperature. Design of experimental apparatus for measurement of breakthrough curves is studied in detail. Alternative arrangement of experimental apparatus calibration of measuring devices method of measurement and processing the data are narrowly discussed. Moreover experimental measurements of breakthrough curves are presented. The actual measurement was made to identify the equilibrium adsorption capacity of THT (tetrahydrothiophene) onto soils. Experimental data were evaluated using Linear Freundlich Langmuir and Koble-Corrigan model.

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

56

Overview of different aspects of climate change effects on soils.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Climate change [i.e., high atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) concentrations (?400 ppm); increasing air temperatures (2-4°C or greater); significant and/or abrupt changes in daily, seasonal, and inter-annual temperature; changes in the wet/dry cycles; intensive rainfall and/or heavy storms; extended periods of drought; extreme frost; heat waves and increased fire frequency] is and will significantly affect soil properties and fertility, water resources, food quantity and quality, and environmental quality. Biotic processes that consume atmospheric CO2 and create organic carbon (C) that is either reprocessed to CO2 or stored in soils, are the subject of active current investigations with great concern over the influence of climate change. In addition, abiotic C cycling and its influence on the inorganic C pool in soils is a fundamental global process in which acidic atmospheric CO2 participates in the weathering of carbonate and silicate minerals, ultimately delivering bicarbonate and Ca2+ or other cations that precipitate in the form of carbonates in soils or are transported to the rivers, lakes, and oceans. Soil responses to climate change will be complex, and there are many uncertainties and unresolved issues. The objective of the review is to initiate and further stimulate a discussion about some important and challenging aspects of climate-change effects on soils, such as accelerated weathering of soil minerals and resulting C and elemental fluxes in and out of soils, soil/geo-engineering methods used to increase C sequestration in soils, soil organic matter (SOM) protection, transformation and mineralization, and SOM temperature sensitivity. This review reports recent discoveries and identifies key research needs required to understand the effects of climate change on soils.

Qafoku, Nikolla

2014-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

57

Aquatic Botany 64 (1999) 381398 Controls on soil cellulose decomposition along a salinity  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Aquatic Botany 64 (1999) 381­398 Controls on soil cellulose decomposition along a salinity gradient gradient, where nutrients, soil moisture, temperature and salinity among other factors also varied. Our placed at seven marsh sites along the salinity gradient, and soil and in- terstitial water samples were

Brix, Hans

58

Amchitka Archived Soil & Groundwater Master Reports | Department...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Archived Soil & Groundwater Master Reports Miscellaneous Archived Soil & Groundwater Master Reports Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site Archived Soil & Groundwater Master...

59

Soil loss: An overview  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The earth's soil budget is analysed and the causes of loss and degeneration are described. The main efforts to solve the problems of soil los should be concentrated on: 1. (i) the preparation of international guidelines for conservation policy; 2. (ii) declaration of an International Soil Conservation Decade; 3. (iii) acceleration of and support for land assessment; 4. (iv) development of national planning for alternative land uses; 5. (v) research to establish ecologically sound policies for land use and conservation.

V.A. Kovda

1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

60

Pressure &Pressure & TemperatureTemperature  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to measure atmospheric pressure, and thermometer toprobe to measure atmospheric pressure, and thermometer toprobe to measure atmospheric pressure, and thermometer toprobe to measure atmospheric pressure, and thermometer to measure air temperature.measure air temperature.measure air temperature.measure air temperature

California at Santa Cruz, University of

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "2-meter soil temperature" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Procedures to predict vertical differential soil movement for expansive soils  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, geotechnical engineers run tests to measure the soil properties required to estimate differential soil movements. However, there seems to be apprehension toward attempting these soil movement calculations due to the perceived complexity of the calculations or a...

Naiser, Donald David

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

62

Managing Soil Salinity  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

is high enough, the plants will wilt and die, no matter how much you water them. Routine soil testing can identify your soil?s salinity levels and suggest measures you can take to correct the specific salinity problem in your soil. Salinity and salt... The terms salt and salinity are often used inter- changeably, and sometimes incorrectly. A salt is sim- ply an inorganic mineral that can dissolve in water. Many people associate salt with sodium chloride? common table salt. In reality, the salts that affect...

Provin, Tony; Pitt, John L.

2001-07-13T23:59:59.000Z

63

EMSL - soil organic matter  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

soil-organic-matter en Structures and Stabilities of (MgO)n Nanoclusters. http:www.emsl.pnl.govemslwebpublicationsstructures-and-stabilities-mgon-nanoclusters

64

Ethylene and soil fungistasis (reply)  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... research1. We have shown clearly that spore-forming anaerobic bacteria are the major producers of ethylene in soil; that ... in soil; that ethylene is produced in anaerobic microsites in even (relatively dry soil; that the anaerobic microsites ...

SMITH

1974-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

65

communications in soil scienceand  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

) IMPACT OF HIGH-VOLUME WOOD-FIRED BOILER ASH AMENDMENT ON SOIL PROPERTIES AND NUTRIENTS Tait Chirenje-0290 ABSTRACT Forest application of boiler ash is fast becoming a popular alternative to landfilling. Boiler ash following the application of large quantities of boiler ash in a sandy soil (with a spodic horizon). Two

Ma, Lena

66

Sustainable Soil Remediation:  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...wastes and creating new markets for the end products...study of the treatment of diesel-contaminated soil indicated...size and location of markets relative to waste production...remediation scenario for a diesel-contaminated site using...catabolic activity in diesel contaminated soil following...

David L. Jones; John R. Healey

67

Reappraisal of the Soil  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...ions of the solid phase of the soil system...liquid and gaseous phases of the soil system...solid and non-solid phases of the system show...than that of fine sand. 187 Oxidation...and to formation of hydrates and hydrated sec-ondary...brief review of the behavior of carbon in the...

C. C. Nikiforoff

1959-01-23T23:59:59.000Z

68

Soil Studies with Isotopes  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... reference are even strained to include the use of steam from nuclear reactors for the desalination of water. The proceedings are divided into five sections dealing respectively with equipment and ... moisture profile; soil water movement ; the interaction between soil, vegetation and water; and desalination of water for agriculture. Among the most valuable contributions are comparisons between the performance ...

E. C. CHILDS

1968-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

69

Ethylene in soil  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... we have confirmed earlier reports that heat8 and even autoclaving9 can stimulate the production of ethylene by soils (Table 1). The effect of heat at 100 C on the ... soils (Table 1). The effect of heat at 100 C on the release of ethylene from pure cultures of M. hiemalis was therefore investigated. No ...

J. M. LYNCH

1975-08-14T23:59:59.000Z

70

Soil and Water Conservation (Indiana)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Indiana Association of Soil and Water Conservation Districts is an association of the 92 soil and water conservation districts, each representing one of the 92 Indiana counties.

71

Fine Particles in Soils  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Fine Particles in Soils Fine Particles in Soils Nature Bulletin No. 582 November 28, 1959 Forest Preserve District of Cook County Daniel Ryan, President Roberts Mann, Conservation Editor David H. Thompson, Senior Naturalist FINE PARTICLES IN SOILS If a farmer, while plowing, is visited in the field by another farmer, invariably the visitor will pick up a handful of turned over earth and knead it with his fingers while they talk. The "feel" of it tells him a lot about the texture and structure of that soil. He knows that both are important factors in the growth of plants and determine the crops that may be obtained from the land. Soil is a combination of three different things About half of it is solid matter; the other half consists of air and water The solid portion is composed of organic and inorganic materials.

72

Soil Sampling At Molokai Area (Thomas, 1986) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Soil Sampling At Molokai Area (Thomas, 1986) Soil Sampling At Molokai Area (Thomas, 1986) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Soil Sampling At Molokai Area (Thomas, 1986) Exploration Activity Details Location Molokai Area Exploration Technique Soil Sampling Activity Date Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Notes Due to the very small potential market on the island of Molokai for geothermal energy, only a limited effort was made to confirm a resource in the identified PGRA. An attempt was made to locate the (now abandoned) water well that was reported to have encountered warm saline fluids. The well was located but had caved in above the water table and thus no water sampling was possible. Temperature measurements in the open portion of the well were performed, but no temperatures significantly above ambient were

73

Soil washing treatability study  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Soil washing was identified as a viable treatment process option for remediating soil at the FEMP Environmental Management Project (FEMP). Little information relative to the specific application and potential effectiveness of the soil washing process exists that applies to the types of soil at the FEMP. To properly evaluate this process option in conjunction with the ongoing FEMP Remedial Investigation/Feasibility Study (RI/FS), a treatability testing program was necessary to provide a foundation for a detailed technical evaluation of the viability of the process. In August 1991, efforts were initiated to develop a work plan and experimental design for investigating the effectiveness of soil washing on FEMP soil. In August 1992, the final Treatability Study Work Plan for Operable Unit 5: Soil Washing (DOE 1992) was issued. This document shall be referenced throughout the remainder of this report as the Treatability Study Work Plan (TSWP). The purpose of this treatability study was to generate data to support initial screening and the detailed analysis of alternatives for the Operable Unit 5 FS.

Krstich, M.

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

74

Ultrasound enhanced soil washing  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The development of an ultrasonic enhanced soil-washing process requires a comprehensive, well-designed experimental program, with the results carefully analyzed on the basis of known ultrasonic cleaning mechanisms. There has been no systematic work carried out to develop information on the important variables that can affect the efficacy of ultrasonic enhancement of contaminant removal from soil. The goal of this study is to examine the potential of ultrasonic energy to enhance soil washing and to optimize conditions. Ultrasonic energy potentially can be used in enhancing contaminant removal from the entire soil mix, or it can be used as a polishing operation on the fines portion of the soil mixture after traditional soil washing operations. The research study was designed to demonstrate that ultrasonic energy can: improve process performance, e.g., remove contaminants to lower residual concentrations; and improve process economics, e.g., shorter treatment (residence) times, less surfactant use. This process was demonstrated using soil contaminated with polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons.

Meegoda, J.; Ho, W.; Bhattacharajee, M.; Wei, C.F.; Cohen, D.M.; Magee, R.S. [New Jersey Inst. of Technology, Newark, NJ (United States); Frederick, R.M. [Environmental Protection Agency, Edison, NJ (United States)

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

75

Development of an ultrasonic process for soil remediation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An ultrasonic process for the detoxification of carbon tetrachloride- (CCl{sub 4}{sup {minus}}) contaminated soil was investigated in the laboratory by using a batch irradiation reactor equipped with a 600-W ultrasonic power supply operated at a frequency of 20 kHz. Key parameters studied included soil characteristics, irradiation time, CCl{sub 4} concentration, steady-state operating temperature, applied ultrasonic-wave energy, and the ratio of soil to water in the system. The results of the experiments showed that (1) residual CCl{sub 4} concentrations could be decreased with longer irradiation periods and (2) detoxification efficiency was proportional to steady-state operating temperature and applied ultrasonic-wave energy. The characteristics of the contaminated soil were found to be an important factor in the design of an ultrasonic detoxification system. A soil-phase CCl{sub 4} concentration below 1 ppm (initial concentration of 56 ppm) was achieved through this process, indicating that the application of ultrasonic irradiation is feasible and effective in the detoxification of soil contaminated by organic compounds. On the basis of the experimental results, a schematic of a full-scale ultrasonic soil-detoxification system was developed. Improvements to this novel process are discussed.

Wu, J.M.; Huang, H.S.; Livengood, C.D.

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

76

Technical support for the Soiltech soil washing project. Interim report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The organic removal ability of a surfactant solution was studied for an ``as-received`` soil sample. A 15% surfactant solution was added to an equal portion of the soil sample, by volume, and blended. The mixture was then stirred with a magnetic stirrer. A black precipitate resulted, which was then periodically skimmed off the top of the solution. This was done at both room temperature and at 150{degrees}F. The soil sample was examined before and after processing with optical microscopy, environmental scanning electron microscopy (ESEM) , energy dispersive x-ray microanalysis (EDS), and analytical chemical analysis (total oil and grease and petroleum hydrocarbons).

Tomascik, T.S.

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

77

Tree Fertilization Soil Analysis  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, increase root density, maintain tree health #12;#12;pH ­ effects nutrient availability · Symptoms of high pHTree Fertilization #12;Soil Analysis vs. Foliar Analysis #12;Macronutrients N P K Mg S Ca

78

Oil degradation in soil.  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...homa, and Corpus Christi, Texas. The...fractionation, gas chromatography...depended upon the natural soil flora to...except at Corpus Christi (Table 13...recovered at Corpus Christi. Bean and turnip...extracts to gas chromatographic...

R L Raymond; J O Hudson; V W Jamison

1976-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

79

Optimization of surfactant-aided remediation of industrially contaminated soils  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Soil matrices contaminated with polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) abound at the sites of coke-oven gas plants, refineries, and many other major chemical industries. The removal of PAHs from soil using pure water, via soil washing (ex situ) or soil flushing (in situ), is quite ineffective due to their low solubility and hydrophobicity. However, addition of suitable surfactant(s) has been shown to increase the removal efficiency several fold. For the present work, the removal of PAHs occurring in industrially contaminated soil was studied. The objective was to use a nonionic surfactant solution for in situ soil flushing and to evaluate the optimal range of process parameters that can significantly increase the removal efficiency. The process parameters chosen were surfactant concentration, ratio of washing solution volume to soil weight, and temperature of washing solution. These parameters were found to have a significant effect on PAH removal from the contaminated soil and an optimal range was determined for each parameter under given washing conditions.

Joshi, M.M.; Lee, S. [Univ. of Akron, OH (United States). Dept. of Chemical Engineering

1996-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

80

Soil Erosion and Sediment Control Act, Soil and Water Conservation  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

and Sediment Control Act, Soil and Water Conservation and Sediment Control Act, Soil and Water Conservation District, and Council on Soil and Water Conservation Regulations (Connecticut) Soil Erosion and Sediment Control Act, Soil and Water Conservation District, and Council on Soil and Water Conservation Regulations (Connecticut) < Back Eligibility Utility Fed. Government Commercial Agricultural Investor-Owned Utility State/Provincial Govt Industrial Construction Municipal/Public Utility Local Government Residential Installer/Contractor Rural Electric Cooperative Tribal Government Low-Income Residential Schools Retail Supplier Institutional Multi-Family Residential Systems Integrator Fuel Distributor Nonprofit General Public/Consumer Transportation Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "2-meter soil temperature" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

A Global Database of Soil Respiration Data, Version 2.0  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Home > Data > Regional/Global > Soil Collections > Guide Document Home > Data > Regional/Global > Soil Collections > Guide Document A Global Database of Soil Respiration Data, Version 2.0 Get Data Revision date: February 24, 2012 Summary This data set provides an updated soil respiration database (SRDB), a near-universal compendium of published soil respiration (RS) data. Soil respiration, the flux of autotrophically- and heterotrophically-generated CO2 from the soil to the atmosphere remains the least well-constrained component of the terrestrial C cycle. The database encompasses all published studies that report at least one of the following data measured in the field (not laboratory): annual RS, mean seasonal RS, a seasonal or annual partitioning of RS into its sources fluxes, RS temperature response (Q10), or RS at 10 degrees C. SRDB's orientation is thus to seasonal and

82

Remote Sensing of Soils, Minerals, and Geomorphology  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

,Remote Sensing of Soils, Minerals, and GeomorphologyMinerals, and Geomorphology · Soil is unconsolidated material). ·· SoilSoil is unconsolidated material at the surface of the Earth thatis unconsolidated material

83

TRENDS: TEMPERATURE  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Historical Isotopic Temperature Record from the Vostok Ice Core Historical Isotopic Temperature Record from the Vostok Ice Core Graphics Digital Data J.R. Petit, D. Raynaud, and C. Lorius Laboratoire de Glaciogie et Géophysique de l'Environnement, CNRS, Saint Martin d'Hères Cedex, France J. Jouzel and G. Delaygue Laboratoire des Sciences du Climat et de l'Environnement (LSCE), CEA/CNRS, L'Orme des Merisiers, CEA Saclay, 91191 Gif-sur-Yvette Cedex, France N.I. Barkov Arctic and Antarctic Research Institute, Beringa Street 38, 199397 St. Petersburg, Russia V.M. Kotlyakov Institute of Geography, Staromonetny, per 29, Moscow 109017, Russia DOI: 10.3334/CDIAC/cli.006 Period of Record 420,000 years BP-present Methods Because isotopic fractions of the heavier oxygen-18 (18O) and deuterium (D) in snowfall are temperature-dependent and a strong spatial correlation

84

POST OAK SAVANNA IN TRANSITION: JUNIPER ENCROACHMENT AND CLIMATE CHANGE ALTER GRASSLAND SOIL RESPIRATION  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The amount of carbon flux from soils on a global scale is estimated at over 75 x 1015 g C yr-1. Climate change is projected to affect regional environmental conditions, raising temperatures and altering precipitation patterns. The semi...

Thompson, Bennie

2011-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

85

Identifying soils with potential of expanding sulfate mineral formation using electromagnetic induction  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, moisture, salinity, and temperature (Doerge et al., 2003). Soil properties such as cation exchange capacity, solum depth and pore continuity may also be extrapolated from apparent EC measurements. Currently, the two most popular commercial instruments...

Fox, Miranda Lynn

2004-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

86

Soil washing results for mixed waste pond soils at Hanford  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Soil washing technology was assessed as a means for remediating soil contaminated with mixed wastes primarily composed of heavy metals and radionuclides. The soils at the US Department of Energy's Hanford Site are considered suitable for soil washing because of their relatively low quantities of silt and clay. However, in a limited number of soil washing experiments using soils from different locations in the north pond of the 300 Area, the degree of decontamination achieved for the coarse fraction of the soil varied considerably. Part of this variation appears to be due to the presence of a discrete layer of contaminated sediment found in some of the samples. 7 refs., 2 figs., 4 tabs.

Gerber, M.A.

1991-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

87

Surfactant-enhanced remediation of organic contaminated soil and water  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Surfactant based remediation technologies for organic contaminated soil and water (groundwater or surface water) is of increasing importance recently. Surfactants are used to dramatically expedite the process, which in turn, may reduce the treatment time of a site compared to use of water alone. In fact, among the various available remediation technologies for organic contaminated sites, surfactant based process is one of the most innovative technologies. To enhance the application of surfactant based technologies for remediation of organic contaminated sites, it is very important to have a better understanding of the mechanisms involved in this process. This paper will provide an overview of the recent developments in the area of surfactant enhanced soil and groundwater remediation processes, focusing on (i) surfactant adsorption on soil, (ii) micellar solubilization of organic hydrocarbons, (iii) supersolubilization, (iv) density modified displacement, (v) degradation of organic hydrocarbon in presence surfactants, (vi) partitioning of surfactants onto soil and liquid organic phase, (vii) partitioning of contaminants onto soil, and (viii) removal of organics from soil in presence of surfactants. Surfactant adsorption on soil and/or sediment is an important step in this process as it results in surfactant loss reduced the availability of the surfactants for solubilization. At the same time, adsorbed surfactants will retained in the soil matrix, and may create other environmental problem. The biosurfactants are become promising in this application due to their environmentally friendly nature, nontoxic, low adsorption on to soil, and good solubilization efficiency. Effects of different parameters like the effect of electrolyte, pH, soil mineral and organic content, soil composition etc. on surfactant adsorption are discussed here. Micellar solubilization is also an important step for removal of organic contaminants from the soil matrix, especially for low aqueous solubility organic contaminants. Influences of different parameters such as single and mixed surfactant system, hydrophilic and hydrophobic chain length, HLB value, temperature, electrolyte, surfactant type that are very important in micellar solubilization are reviewed here. Microemulsion systems show higher capacity of organic hydrocarbons solubilization than the normal micellar system. In the case of biodegradation of organic hydrocarbons, the rate is very slow due to low water solubility and dissolution rate but the presence of surfactants may increase the bioavailability of hydrophobic compounds by solubilization and hence increases the degradation rate. In some cases the presence of it also reduces the rate. In addition to fundamental studies, some laboratory and field studies on removal of organics from contaminated soil are also reviewed to show the applicability of this technology.

Santanu Paria

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

88

Soil Carbon in Montane Meadows Modulated by Climate and Vegetation along an  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Soil Carbon in Montane Meadows Modulated by Climate and Vegetation along an Soil Carbon in Montane Meadows Modulated by Climate and Vegetation along an Elevation Gradient Speaker(s): Marc Fischer Date: September 25, 1998 - 12:00pm Location: 90-3148 Release or uptake of soil carbon has the potential to affect atmospheric carbon dioxide concentrations and hence feedback to greenhouse gas forced climate change. We conducted extensive observations of soil carbon cycling in three montane meadows spaced at elevation intervals (~300 m) that effect average temperature variations in the range expected under a doubled CO2 climate (~2 C). We find that carbon in the top 10 cm of soil can be explained (R2~0.7) by a simple function of plant productivity, litter quality, and soil microclimate that is derived from a steady-state model of carbon pools and flows. Because the variables used in this

89

Pneumatic soil removal tool  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A soil removal tool is provided for removing radioactive soil, rock and other debris from the bottom of an excavation, while permitting the operator to be located outside of a containment for that excavation. The tool includes a fixed jaw, secured to one end of an elongate pipe, which cooperates with a movable jaw pivotably mounted on the pipe. Movement of the movable jaw is controlled by a pneumatic cylinder mounted on the pipe. The actuator rod of the pneumatic cylinder is connected to a collar which is slidably mounted on the pipe and forms part of the pivotable mounting assembly for the movable jaw. Air is supplied to the pneumatic cylinder through a handle connected to the pipe, under the control of an actuator valve mounted on the handle, to provide movement of the movable jaw. 3 figs.

Neuhaus, J.E.

1992-10-13T23:59:59.000Z

90

Beamline Temperatures  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Temperatures Temperatures Energy: 3.0000 GeV Current: 493.2242 mA Date: 11-Jan-2014 21:40:00 Beamline Temperatures Energy 3.0000 GeV Current 493.2 mA 11-Jan-2014 21:40:00 LN:MainTankLevel 124.4 in LN:MainTankPress 56.9 psi SPEAR-BL:B120HeFlow 15.4 l/min SPEAR-BL:B131HeFlow 22.2 l/min BL 4 BL02:LCW 0.0 ℃ BL02:M0_LCW 31.5 ℃ BL 4-1 BL04-1:BasePlate -14.0 ℃ BL04-1:Bottom1 46.0 ℃ BL04-1:Bottom2 47.0 ℃ BL04-1:Lower 32.0 ℃ BL04-1:Moly 46.0 ℃ BL04-1:ChinGuard1 31.0 ℃ BL04-1:ChinGuard2 31.0 ℃ BL04-1:FirstXtalA -167.0 ℃ BL04-1:FirstXtalB -172.0 ℃ BL04-1:Pad1 31.0 ℃ BL04-1:Pad2 31.0 ℃ BL04-1:SecondXtalA -177.0 ℃ BL04-1:SecondXtalB -175.0 ℃ BL 4-2 BL04-2:BasePlate -14.0 ℃ BL04-2:Bottom1 24.0 ℃ BL04-2:Bottom2 25.0 ℃

91

Demonstration testing and evaluation of in situ soil heating. Revision 1, Demonstration system design  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Over the last nine years IIT Research Institute (IITRI) has been developing and testing the in situ heating and soil decontamination process for the remediation of soils containing hazardous organic contaminants. In this process the soil is heated in situ using electrical energy. The contaminants are removed from the soil due to enhanced vaporization, steam distillation and stripping. The vaporized contaminants, water vapor and air are recovered from the heated zone by means of a vacuum manifold system which collects gases from below surface as well as from the soil surface. A vapor barrier is used to prevent fugitive emissions of the contaminants and to control air infiltration to minimize dilution of the contaminant gases and vapors. The recovered gases and vapors are conveyed to an on site vapor treatment system for the clean up of the vent gases. Electrical energy is applied to the soil by forming an array of electrodes in the soil which are electrically interconnected and supplied with power. The electrodes are placed in drilled bore holes which are made through the contaminated zone. There are two versions of the in situ heating and soil treatment process: the f irst version is called the In Situ Radio Frequency (RF) Soil Decontamination Process and the second version is called the In Situ Electromagnetic (EM) Soil Decontamination Process. The first version, the RF Process is capable of heating the soil in a temperature range of 100{degrees} to 400{degrees}C. The soil temperature in the second version, the EM Process, is limited to the boiling point of water under native conditions. Thus the soil will be heated to a temperature of about 85{degrees} to 95{degrees}C. In this project IITRI will demonstrate the EM Process for in situ soil decontamination at K-25 Site due to the fact that most of the contaminants of concern are volatile organics which can be removed by heating the soil to a temperature range of 85{degrees} to 95{degrees}C.

Dev, H.

1994-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

92

Microbiological and physicochemical changes occurring in a contaminated soil after surfactant-enhanced soil  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...contaminated soil after surfactant-enhanced soil washing R. Iturbe 1 J. Lopez...augmented because of the surfactant soil washing. However, statistical...etc. INTRODUCTION Surfactant-enhanced soil washing has become a very important...

R. Iturbe; J. Lopez; L. G. Torres

93

Abundant and Stable Char Residues in Soils: Implications for Soil Fertility and Carbon Sequestration  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abundant and Stable Char Residues in Soils: Implications for Soil Fertility and Carbon Sequestration ... Large-scale soil application of biochar may enhance soil fertility, increasing crop production for the growing human population, while also sequestering atmospheric carbon. ...

J.-D. Mao; R. L. Johnson; J. Lehmann; D. C. Olk; E. G. Neves; M. L. Thompson; K. Schmidt-Rohr

2012-07-27T23:59:59.000Z

94

Soil Sampling | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Soil Sampling Soil Sampling Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Technique: Soil Sampling Details Activities (10) Areas (9) Regions (1) NEPA(0) Exploration Technique Information Exploration Group: Field Techniques Exploration Sub Group: Field Sampling Parent Exploration Technique: Field Sampling Information Provided by Technique Lithology: Stratigraphic/Structural: Can reveal relatively high permeability zones Hydrological: Thermal: Used to locate active hydrothermal systems Dictionary.png Soil Sampling: Soil sampling is a method that can be used for exploration of geothermal resources that lack obvious surface manifestations. Soils that are above or adjacent to a "hidden" hydrothermal system will have a unique chemistry that can be indicative of a hydrothermal system at depth and a zone of

95

Fixation of Radionuclides in Soil and Minerals by Heating  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Four mineral materials (a quartz sand, a feldspar sand, a calcitic limestone, and one soil from the DOE Hanford reservation (see Supporting Information, Table SI-1, for elemental compositions and descriptions)) were investigated after spiking with one of four radionuclides (85Sr, 134Cs, 57Co, and depleted U); leachability tests of these spiked materials were performed after thermal treatments up to 1200 °C using the detailed 15-step sequential extraction protocol (18). ... Previously, a similar relationship was observed following heating of naturally 90Sr -contaminated field soil from the Department of Energy's Oak Ridge Reservation within a similar range of submelting tempera tures (15) which observations were merely documented in this obscure programmatic report because we were unaware, at the time, of any mechanistic interpretation for the effect and failed to recognize its now clear implication for remediation technology; those observations (reproduced in the Supporting Information, Figure SI-31) should allay skeptical concerns that the immobilization effects reported herein result from some artifact of the isotopic spiking technique or sample preparations. ... Detailed descriptions of the gamma spectroscopic assay techniques and the sequential extraction procedures along with the elemental analyses of the mineral materials (Table SI-1) used throughout this investigation; sequential extraction graphs for 134Cs, 85Sr, 57Co, and U from quartz, feldspar, calcite, and the Hanford soil (Figures SI-1 through SI-16); preheating and reheating extraction results for 134Cs, 85Sr, and 57Co from the Hanford soil (Figures SI-17?SI-19); sequential extraction results for intermediate temperature treatments for all four isotopes in the Hanford soil (Figures SI-20?SI-23); sequential extract pHs for quartz, feldspar, limestone, and Hanford soil (Figures SI-24?SI-27); mineral weight retention after extrac tions (Table SI-2), radioisotope distribution following preheating and reheating of Hanford soil (Table SI-3), sequential extraction summaries (Table SI-4 and SI-5), and 90Sr leach ability from Oak Ridge soil following thermal treatment (Figure SI-28). ...

Brian P. Spalding

2001-10-05T23:59:59.000Z

96

The Basicity of Texas Soils.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

chemical prob- lems connected with the investigations of cotton root rot being made by the Division of Plant Pathology and Physiology. Lab- oratory methods were needed for estimating the amounts of acid or sulphur required to bring experimental soils... approxi- mately to a desired degree of acidity. Information was needed regarding the amounts of acid or sulphur required to make acid various kinds of soil. This Bulletin discusses the basicity of Texas soils, and the amounts of acid or sulphur...

Fraps, G. S. (George Stronach); Carlyle, E. C. (Elmer Cardinal)

1929-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

97

Occurrence of Nitrites in Soils.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

capacity for producing nitrates may form large amounts of nitrites. Nitrites may persist in the soil or in soil extracts for several weeks. Magnesium carbonate and calcium car- bonate may favor the formation of nitrites. Water equivaIent to 50 per cent... ............................................. Method of work 5 Nitrites in soils without additions of nitrogenous materials ........ 6 Nitrification capacity as measured by nitric nitrogen alone. and by nitric and nitrous nitrogen combined ....................... 6...

Fraps, G. S. (George Stronach); Sterges, A. J.

1930-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

98

Effects of soil moisture on the responses of soil temperatures to climate change in cold regions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and the Commu- nity Earth System Model 1 (CESM1) (http://poorly simulated by current earth system models. A number of

Subin, Z.M.

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

WATER AS A REAGENT FOR SOIL REMEDIATION  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

SRI International is conducting experiments to develop and evaluate hydrothermal extraction technology or hot water extraction (HWE) technology for remediating petroleum-contaminated soils. Most current remediation practices either fail to remove the polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) found in petroleum-contaminated sites, are too costly, or require the use of organic solvents at the expense of additional contamination and with the added cost of recycling solvents. Hydrothermal extraction offers the promise of efficiently extracting PAHs and other kinds of organics from contaminated soils at moderate temperatures and pressures, using only water and inorganic salts such as carbonate. SRI has conducted experiments to measure the solubility and rate of solubilization of selected PAHs (fluoranthene, pyrene, chrysene, 9,10-dimethylanthracene) in water using SRI's hydrothermal optical cell with the addition of varying amounts of sodium carbonate to evaluate the efficiency of the technology for removing PAHs from the soil. SRI data shows a very rapid increase in solubility of PAHs with increase in temperature in the range 25-275 C. SRI also measured the rate of solubilization, which is a key factor in determining the reactor parameters. SRI results for fluoranthene, pyrene, chrysene, and 9,10-dimethylanthracene show a linear relationship between rate of solubilization and equilibrium solubility. Also, we have found the rate of solubilization of pyrene at 275 C to be 6.5 ppm/s, indicating that the equilibrium solubilization will be reached in less than 3 min at 275 C; equilibrium solubility of pyrene at 275 C is 1000 ppm. Also, pyrene and fluoranthene appear to have higher solubilities in the presence of sodium carbonate. In addition to this study, SRI studied the rate of removal of selected PAHs from spiked samples under varying conditions (temperature, pore sizes, and pH). We have found a higher removal of PAHs in the presence of sodium carbonate in both sand and bentonite systems. Also, sodium carbonate greatly reduces the possible reactor corrosion under hydrothermal conditions. Our results show that a water-to-sand ratio of at least 3:1 is required to efficiently remove PAH from soil under static conditions.

Indira S. Jayaweera; Montserrat Marti-Perez; Jordi Diaz-Ferrero; Angel Sanjurjo

2001-03-29T23:59:59.000Z

100

Formation of Chloropyromorphite in a Lead-Contaminated Soil Amended with Hydroxyapatite  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

To confirm conversion of soil Pb to pyromorphite [Pb{sub 5}(PO{sub 4}){sub 3}Cl], a Pb contaminated soil collected adjacent to a historical smelter was reacted with hydroxyapatite in slurries of soil and hydroxyapatite separated by a dialysis membrane and incubated. A crystalline precipitate formed on the dialysis membrane in the slurry systems was identified as chloropyromorphite. Soluble species measured in the soil slurry indicated that dissolution of solid-phase soil Pb was the rate-limiting step for pyromorphite formation. Additionally samples reacted with hydroxyapatite were incubated at field-capacity moisture content. The sequential chemical extraction used to identify species in the field-moist soil incubation experiment showed that hydroxyapatite treatment reduced the first four fractions of extractable Pb and correspondingly increased the recalcitrant extraction residue fraction by 35% of total Pb at 0 d incubation and by 45% after 240 d incubation. the increase in the extraction residue fraction in the 240 d incubation as compared to the 0 d incubation implies that the reaction occurs in the soil but the increase in the hydroxyapatite amended 0 d incubated soil as compared to the control soil illustrates the chemical extraction procedure caused changes in the extractability. Thus, the chemical extraction procedure cannot easily be utilized to confirm changes occurring in the soil as a result of incubation. Extended x-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) spectroscopy indicated that the 240 d incubated hydroxyapatite treatment caused a change in the average, local molecular bonding environment of soil Pb. Low-temperature EXAFS spectra (chi data and radial structure functions - RSFs) showed a high degree of similarity between the chemical extraction residue and synthetic pyromorphite. Thus, confirming that the change of soil Pb to pyromorphite is possible by simple amendments of hydroxyapatite to soil.

RYAN,JAMES A.; ZHANG,PENGCHU; HESTERBERG,DEAN; ZHOU,WEIQING; SAYERS,DALE E.

2000-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "2-meter soil temperature" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Saxton soil remediation project  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Saxton Nuclear Experimental Facility (SNEF) consists of a 23-MW(thermal) pressurized light water thermal reactor located in south central Pennsylvania. The Saxton Nuclear Experimental Corporation (SNEC), a wholly owned subsidiary of the General Public Utilities (GPU) Corporation, is the licensee for the SNEF. Maintenance and decommissioning activities at the site are conducted by GPU Nuclear, also a GPU subsidiary and operator of the Three Mile Island and Oyster Creek nuclear facilities. The remediation and radioactive waste management of contaminated soils is described.

Holmes, R.D. [GPU Nuclear Corporation, Middletown, PA (United States)

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

102

Long-term soil warming and Carbon Cycle Feedbacks to the Climate System  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The primary objective of the proposed research was to quantify and explain the effects of a sustained in situ 5oC soil temperature increase on net carbon (C) storage in a northeastern deciduous forest ecosystem. The research was done at an established soil warming experiment at the Harvard Forest in central Massachusetts – Barre Woods site established in 2001. In the field, a series of plant and soil measurements were made to quantify changes in C storage in the ecosystem and to provide insights into the possible relationships between C-storage changes and nitrogen (N) cycling changes in the warmed plots. Field measurements included: 1) annual woody increment; 2) litterfall; 3) carbon dioxide (CO2) efflux from the soil surface; 4) root biomass and respiration; 5) microbial biomass; and 6) net N mineralization and net nitrification rates. This research was designed to increase our understanding of how global warming will affect the capacity of temperate forest ecosystems to store C. The work explored how soil warming changes the interactions between the C and N cycles, and how these changes affect land-atmosphere feedbacks. This core research question framed the project – What are the effects of a sustained in situ 5oC soil temperature increase on net carbon (C) storage in a northeastern deciduous forest ecosystem? A second critical question was addressed in this research – What are the effects of a sustained in situ 5{degrees}C soil temperature increase on nitrogen (N) cycling in a northeastern deciduous forest ecosystem?

Melillo, Jerry M.

2014-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

103

Climatic influences on hillslope soil transport efficiency  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The soil transport coefficient D represents the relationship between local topographical gradient and soil flux in the landscape evolution model. This work presents new estimates of the soil transport coefficient D at 9 ...

Schurr, Naomi D. (Naomi Daika)

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

104

Soil stabilization properties of flexible intruders  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In many locations, soil is held in place by the roots of plants. When these plants are removed or die, the soil loses its cohesive strength and erodes away. We seek to create artificial soil stabilizers that use the same ...

Luginbuhl, Katharine

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

105

Soil Moisture Memory in Climate Models  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Water balance considerations at the soil surface lead to an equation that relates the autocorrelation of soil moisture in climate models to 1) seasonality in the statistics of the atmospheric forcing, 2) the variation of evaporation with soil ...

Randal D. Koster; Max J. Suarez

2001-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

106

Gradients of soil salinity and moisture, and plant distribution, in a Mediterranean semiarid saline watershed: a model of soil–plant relationships for contributing to the management  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract This study reports the soil–plant relationships within a protected landscape in semiarid SE Spain that includes salt marshes and temporary streams and that is affected by agricultural water leaching. The main objective was to establish a conceptual model in order to use vegetation as bioindicator of soil conditions. With this model, environmental changes – based on the observation of vegetation – could be detectable, allowing the prevention of environmental impacts and the improvement of the environmental management of the studied area. Eight sampling stations with a total of 39 plots were established for the sampling of vegetation (floristic composition and species abundance) and soil (moisture, pH, redox potential, electrical conductivity and soluble ions). Multivariate analysis showed that vegetation was closely related to soil moisture and salinity. The soils colonised by steppe grasses (dominated by Lygeum spartum) and halophilus and halonitrophilus shrubs (dominated by Suaeda vera and Limonium spp.) were the driest (moisture saline (EC saline and wettest soils. P. australis reached maximum cover at EC values ~ 40 dS m? 1 and soil moisture ~ 30% and consistently appeared on those soils with lower seasonal contrasts of moisture and salinity. Between 30 and 80 dS m? 1 of soil salinity, S. fruticosa reached maximum cover (~ 100%) while A. macrostachyum did not exceed ~ 80%. Outside this range of salinity S. fruticosa declined (cover  ~ 40%. In addition, A. macrostachyum grew in soils with stronger seasonal changes of moisture and salinity. Based on the model established, if an expansion of P. australis is detected, an increase in soil moisture and a decrease in soil salinity during the year could be inferred. These changes could be due to an increased entry of effluents of fresh and/or brackish water from agricultural areas. In turn, an increase in the cover of A. macrostachyum would indicate higher soil salinity, which could be a consequence of an increase in the evaporation rates (due to rising temperatures) and a decrease in rainfall (predicted consequences of global warming). The expansion of S. fruticosa would be favoured under relatively high soil salinity conditions (which limit P. australis expansion) jointly with high soil moisture, without strong seasonal changes (which limit A. macrostachyum expansion). Our results support the role of vegetation as bioindicator of disturbances and the use of soil–plant relationships models to improve the environmental management of saline ecosystems.

M.N. González-Alcaraz; F.J. Jiménez-Cárceles; Y. Álvarez; J. Álvarez-Rogel

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

107

Remote sensing of soil radionuclide fluxes in a tropical ecosystem  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We are using a transponding geostationary satellite to collect surface environmental data to describe the fate of soil-borne radionuclides. The remote, former atomic testing grounds at the Eniwetok and Bikini Atolls present a difficult environment in which to collect continuous field data. Our land-based, solar-powered microprocessor and environmental data systems remotely acquire measurements of net and total solar radiation, rain, humidity, temperature, and soil-water potentials. For the past year, our water flux model predicts wet season plant transpiration rates nearly equal to the 6 to 7 mm/d evaporation pan rate, which decreases to 2 to 3 mm/d for the dry season. Radioisotopic analysis confirms the microclimate-estimated 1:3 to 1:20 soil to plant /sup 137/Cs dry matter concentration ratio. This ratio exacerbates the dose to man from intake of food plants. Nephelometer measurements of airborne particulates presently indicate a minimum respiratory radiological dose.

Clegg, B.; Koranda, J.; Robinson, W.; Holladay, G.

1980-11-06T23:59:59.000Z

108

Biological Diversity, Soils, and Economics  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Terrestrial biological diversity is supported by solar energy captured by plants growing in soil...Terrestrial biological diversity is supported by solar energy captured by plants growing in soil...Bhutan e De*Panara X 15 e* Norway i Tanzania_ * Costa Rica * *SnLanka &F.R.Germany...

Michael Huston

1993-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

109

Technical Note Engineering Soils Maps  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Technical Note Engineering Soils Maps PAUL M. SANTI Department of Geology and Geological database. In this technique, rose-pie charts provide an overall assessment of soils hazards structures such as pipelines, power lines, and roads; and regional evaluations of sources of ag- gregate

110

Automated Monitoring of Soil Respiration: A Moving Chamber Design Nelson T. Edwards* and Jeffery S. Riggs  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

growthdifferential mode, and equivalent flow rates of reference gas (ambient air) and sample gas (air exiting chamber by establishing chamber when closed, provided an airtight seal. This feature and the temperature response rates continuously monitored soil temperature, or air temper- even in an environment with highly

111

Uptake of ?DDT, Arsenic, Cadmium, Copper, and Lead by Lettuce and Radish Grown in Contaminated Horticultural Soils  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Uptake of ?DDT, Arsenic, Cadmium, Copper, and Lead by Lettuce and Radish Grown in Contaminated Horticultural Soils ... Supplementary lighting was not used, and the temperature was maintained between 10 and 25 °C with an average minimum temperature of 14 °C and an average maximum temperature of 24 °C obtained for the duration of the trial. ... horticulture ...

S. K. Gaw; N. D. Kim; G. L. Northcott; A. L. Wilkins; G. Robinson

2008-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

112

High Temperatures & Electricity Demand  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

High Temperatures & Electricity Demand An Assessment of Supply Adequacy in California Trends.......................................................................................................1 HIGH TEMPERATURES AND ELECTRICITY DEMAND.....................................................................................................................7 SECTION I: HIGH TEMPERATURES AND ELECTRICITY DEMAND ..........................9 BACKGROUND

113

Non-Traditional Soil Additives: Can They Improve Crop Production?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Non-traditional soil additives include soil conditioners such as organic materials and minerals, soil activators that claim to stimulate soil microbes or inoculate soil with new beneficial organisms, and wetting agents that may be marketed...

McFarland, Mark L.; Stichler, Charles; Lemon, Robert G.

2002-06-26T23:59:59.000Z

114

Washing studies for PCP and creosote-contaminated soil  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Environmental Protection Agency has conducted a series of bench-scale and pilot-scale studies to evaluate the feasibility of washing pentachlorophenol (PCP) and creosote from the soil at an abandoned wood-treatment Superfund site in Pensacola, FL. The high sand content and low silt/fines content of the soil made soil washing a promising alternative to incineration. The bench-scale tests confirmed the feasibility of washing the PCP and the carcinogenic creosote compounds from the soil using a nonionic surfactant at the pH of nine to ten and a water temperature of approximately 120 F. The target concentrations for total creosote were not achieved, but the results were sufficiently close to warrant further testing. The pilot-scale tests using the EPA's mobile Volume Reduction Unit produced residual PCP, carcinogenic creosote, and total creosote levels below the target levels. The tests also produced comparison data on the effects of surfactant concentration, pH, temperature, and liquid:solid ratio. (Copyright (c) 1994 Elsevier Science B.V.)

Tobia, R.J.; Camacho, J.M.; Augustin, P.; Griffiths, R.A.; Frederick, R.M.

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

115

Interannual coupling between summertime surface temperature and precipitation over land: processes and implications for climate change  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Widespread negative correlations between summertime-mean temperatures and precipitation over land regions are a well-known feature of terrestrial climate. This behavior has generally been interpreted in the context of soil moisture-atmosphere ...

Alexis Berg; Benjamin R. Lintner; Kirsten Findell; Sonia I. Seneviratne; Bart van den Hurk; Agnès Ducharne; Frédérique Chéruy; Stefan Hagemann; David M. Lawrence; Sergey Malyshev; Arndt Meier; Pierre Gentine

116

Pilot Plant for Soil Remediation with Supercritical CO2 under Quasi-Isobaric Conditions  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Soil remediation using CO2 in a supercritical extraction process is one innovative technique currently available. ... It was based on a first pressurized vessel acting as an extractor (where the soil to be remediated was located), a second pressurized vessel acting as an adsorber (where activated carbon was placed), a pump for solvent supply, and auxiliary equipment such as heat exchangers, pressure, temperature, and flow meters. ...

M. J. Cocero; E. Alonso; S. Lucas

2000-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

117

Soil protection major Prof. Dani Or  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

sustainable management of regional agroecosystems. Theoretical and practical basis for quantifying physical. Fundamentals of soil mechanics including key processes; recent case histories of field monitoring experiments · understand composition and structure of soil · study key processes in soils and their relation to soil

Giger, Christine

118

Ethylene as a Cause of Soil Fungistasis  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... by gas chromatography from about fifty soils collected throughout Australia with different origins and histories. Ethylene was the only material identified in all soils in concentrations likely to be biologically active ... was the only material identified in all soils in concentrations likely to be biologically active. Ethylene has recently been identified in soil under anaerobic conditions5. In this study, ...

A. M. SMITH

1973-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

119

DNA Radiation Environments Program Spring 1991 2-meter box experiments and analyses. [DEfense Nuclear Agency (DNA)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report summarizes the Spring 1991 2-m Box experiments that were performed at the Army Pulse Radiation Facility (APRF) at Aberdeen Proving Ground. These studies were sponsored by the Defense Nuclear Agency (DNA) under the Radiation Environments Program to obtain measured data for benchmarking the Adjoint Monte Carlo Code System, MASH, Version 1.0. The MASH code system was developed for the Department of Defense and NATO for calculating neutron and gamma-ray radiation fields and shielding protection factors for armored vehicles and military structures against nuclear weapon radiation. In the 2-m Box experiments, neutron and gamma-ray dose rates and reduction factors were measured in the free-field and as a function of position on an anthropomorphic phantom that was placed outside and inside a borated polyethylene lined steel-walled 2-m box. The data were acquired at a distance of 400-m from the APRF reactor. The purpose of these experiments was to measure the neutron and gamma-ray dose rates as a function of detector location on the phantom for cases when the phantom was in the free-field and inside of the box. Neutron measurements were made using a BD-100R bubble detector and gamma-ray measurements were made using thermoluminescent detectors (TLD). Calculated and measured data were compared in terms of the C/M ratio. The calculated and measured neutron and gamma-ray dose rates and reduction factors agreed on the average within the [plus minus]20% limits mandated by DNA and demonstrate the capability of the MASH code system in reproducing measured data in nominally shielded assemblies.

Santoro, R.T. (Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)); Whitaker, S.Y. (Clark Atlanta Univ., GA (United States))

1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

120

Tree Species Effects on Soil Organic Matter Dynamics: The Role of Soil  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Tree Species Effects on Soil Organic Matter Dynamics: The Role of Soil Cation Composition Sarah E the influence of tree species on soil carbon and nitrogen (N) dynamics in a common garden of replicated substantial divergence in foliar and soil base cation concentrations and soil pH among spe- cies, we

Minnesota, University of

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "2-meter soil temperature" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Trees, soils, and food security  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...providing resilience against weather or price disruptions, soil erosion is minimized...to inputs and markets at reason- able prices (Place 1996). Public investment to increase...with Leucaena leucocephala (Lam.) De Wit and Acioa barteri (Hook. f.) Engl...

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

122

Soil Decontamination at Rocky Flats  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

During the last few years, many articles have appeared in newspapers and journals concerning radioactive contamination around Rocky Flats.1,2 The amount of plutonium in the soil has been of particular interest. T...

R. L. Olsen; J. A. Hayden; C. E. Alford…

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

123

Selective leaching of uranium from uranium-contaminated soils: Progress report 1  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Three soils and a sediment contaminated with uranium were used to determine the effectiveness of sodium carbonate and citric acid leaching to decontaminated or remove uranium to acceptable regulatory levels. Two of the soils were surface soils from the DOE facility formerly called the Feed Materials Production Center (FMPC) at Fernald, Ohio. This facility is presently called the Femald Environmental Management Project (FEMP). Carbonate extractions generally removed from 70 to 90% of the uranium from the Fernald storage pad soil. Uranium was slightly more difficult to extract from the Fernald incinerator and the Y-12 landfarm soils. Very small amounts of uranium could be extracted from the storm sewer sediment. Extraction with carbonate at high solution-to-soil ratios were as effective as extractions at low solution-to-soil ratios, indicating attrition by the paddle mixer was not significantly different than that provided in a rotary extractor. Also, pretreatments such as milling or pulverizing the soil sample did not appear to increase extraction efficiency when carbonate extractions were carried out at elevated temperatures (60[degree]C) or long extraction times (23 h). Adding KMnO[sub 4] in the carbonate extraction appeared to increase extraction efficiency from the Fernald incinerator soil but not the Fernald storage pad soil. The most effective leaching rates (> 90 % from both Fernald soils) were obtained using a citrate/dithionite extraction procedure designed to remove amorphous (noncrystalline) iron/aluminum sesquioxides from surfaces of clay minerals. Citric acid also proved to be a very good extractant for uranium.

Francis, C.W.; Mattus, A.J.; Farr, L.L.; Elless, M.P.; Lee, S.Y.

1993-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

124

Selective leaching of uranium from uranium-contaminated soils: Progress report 1  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Three soils and a sediment contaminated with uranium were used to determine the effectiveness of sodium carbonate and citric acid leaching to decontaminated or remove uranium to acceptable regulatory levels. Two of the soils were surface soils from the DOE facility formerly called the Feed Materials Production Center (FMPC) at Fernald, Ohio. This facility is presently called the Femald Environmental Management Project (FEMP). Carbonate extractions generally removed from 70 to 90% of the uranium from the Fernald storage pad soil. Uranium was slightly more difficult to extract from the Fernald incinerator and the Y-12 landfarm soils. Very small amounts of uranium could be extracted from the storm sewer sediment. Extraction with carbonate at high solution-to-soil ratios were as effective as extractions at low solution-to-soil ratios, indicating attrition by the paddle mixer was not significantly different than that provided in a rotary extractor. Also, pretreatments such as milling or pulverizing the soil sample did not appear to increase extraction efficiency when carbonate extractions were carried out at elevated temperatures (60{degree}C) or long extraction times (23 h). Adding KMnO{sub 4} in the carbonate extraction appeared to increase extraction efficiency from the Fernald incinerator soil but not the Fernald storage pad soil. The most effective leaching rates (> 90 % from both Fernald soils) were obtained using a citrate/dithionite extraction procedure designed to remove amorphous (noncrystalline) iron/aluminum sesquioxides from surfaces of clay minerals. Citric acid also proved to be a very good extractant for uranium.

Francis, C.W.; Mattus, A.J.; Farr, L.L.; Elless, M.P.; Lee, S.Y.

1993-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

125

Rapid reconnaissance of geothermal prospects using shallow temperature  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Semi-annual technical report Semi-annual technical report Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Report: Rapid reconnaissance of geothermal prospects using shallow temperature surveys. Semi-annual technical report Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: Shallow (2-m) soil temperature data have been collected at 27 sites at Long Valley, California, and at 102 sites at Coso, California. These geothermal areas are locations where traditional deep reconnaissance geothermal survey bore holes have been emplaced, allowing us to compare directly our shallow temperature results with standard geothermal exploration techniques. The effects of surface roughness, albedo, soil thermal diffusivity, topography and elevation were considered in making the necessary corrections to our 2-m temperature data. The corrected data for

126

Developing a Soil Property Database for the Oklahoma Mesonet.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??The objective of this study was to create a comprehensive database of soil hydraulic and physical properties of the Oklahoma Mesonet station soils. Replicate soil… (more)

Scott, Bethany

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

127

Global Soils Data, Sept. 5, 2000  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Soils Data, Sept. 5 Soils Data, Sept. 5 The ORNL DAAC expanded its global data holdings to include the three additional data sets related to soil characteristics. "Global Soil Profile Data (ISRIC-WISE)" This data set consists of homogenized data for 1125 soil profiles, including soil classification, site data, soil horizon data, source of data, and methods used for determining analytical data. The profiles were derived from the World Inventory of Soil Emissions Potentials (WISE) project. The data set contains a selection of 665 profiles from the Natural Resources Conservation Service, 250 profiles from the Food and Agricultural Organization (FAO) of the United Nations, and 210 profiles from the reference collection of the International Soil Reference and Information

128

The prediction of root zone soil moisture with a water balance - microwave emission model  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. T (1-) = T (I-) = T (I + e t &Rz) + ( T (I + e R. ) 8 e el I=2 ei i+ I (II-18) where -2a azi T =T. (1-e ) e. i 1 n = number of layers Rn =0 bz n To describe the brightness temperature above the soil sur face, the effective temperature of emi... and Groundtruth. Analysis of the Surface Flux Approach RADCON Model Scatter Due to Soil Variability . Selection of 21 cm Wavelength over 6 cm Wavelength. V CONCLUSION Summary of Results. Recommendations REFERENCES. 72 72 76 80 83 90 100 109 109...

Smith, Michael Robert

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

129

HVDC ground electrode heat dissipation in an N-layer soil  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The temperature distribution in an N-layer soil, due to High Voltage Direct Current (HVDC) injection via ground electrodes was computed using finite difference methods. The temperature profiles using various ground electrode shapes buried in a two-layer soil were computed using these same techniques. The results obtained were then compared with results obtained experimentally in a laboratory at Ecole Polytecnique. A sensitivity analysis was performed on the effect of the height of the top layer of a two-layer earth model and the results were tabulated.

Greiss, H.; Mukhedkar, D.; Houle, J.L.; Do, X.D.; Gervais, Y. (Ecole Polytechnique, Montreal, Quebec (CA))

1988-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

130

Heterotrophic Soil Respiration in Warming Experiments: Using Microbial Indicators to Partition Contributions from Labile and Recalcitrant Soil Organic Carbon. Final Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The central objective of the proposed work was to develop a genomic approach (nucleic acid-based) that elucidates the mechanistic basis for the observed impacts of experimental soil warming on forest soil respiration. The need to understand the mechanistic basis arises from the importance of such information for developing effective adaptation strategies for dealing with projected climate change. Specifically, robust predictions of future climate will permit the tailoring of the most effective adaptation efforts. And one of the greatest uncertainties in current global climate models is whether there will be a net loss of carbon from soils to the atmosphere as climate warms. Given that soils contain approximately 2.5 times as much carbon as the atmosphere, a net loss could lead to runaway climate warming. Indeed, most ecosystem models predict that climate warming will stimulate microbial decomposition of soil carbon, producing such a positive feedback to rising global temperatures. Yet the IPCC highlights the uncertainty regarding this projected feedback. The uncertainty arises because although warming-experiments document an initial increase in the loss of carbon from soils, the increase in respiration is short-lived, declining to control levels in a few years. This attenuation could result from changes in microbial physiology with temperature. We explored possible microbial responses to warming using experiments and modeling. Our work advances our understanding of how soil microbial communities and their activities are structured, generating insight into how soil carbon might respond to warming. We show the importance of resource partitioning in structuring microbial communities. Specifically, we quantified the relative abundance of fungal taxa that proliferated following the addition of organic substrates to soil. We added glycine, sucrose, cellulose, lignin, or tannin-protein to soils in conjunction with 3-bromo-deoxyuridine (BrdU), a nucleotide analog. Active microbes absorb BrdU from the soil solution; if they multiply in response to substrate additions, they incorporate the BrdU into their DNA. After allowing soils to incubate, we extracted BrdU-labeled DNA and sequenced the ITS regions of fungal rDNA. Fungal taxa that proliferated following substrate addition were likely using the substrate as a resource for growth. We found that the structure of active fungal communities varied significantly among substrates. The active fungal community under glycine was significantly different from those under other conditions, while the active communities under sucrose and cellulose were marginally different from each other and the control. These results indicate that the overall community structure of active fungi was altered by the addition of glycine, sucrose, and cellulose and implies that some fungal taxa respond to changes in resource availability. The community composition of active fungi is also altered by experimental warming. We found that glycine-users tended to increase under warming, while lignin-, tannin/protein-, and sucrose-users declined. The latter group of substrates requires extracellular enzymes for use, but glycine does not. It is possible that warming selects for fungal species that target, in particular, labile substrates. Linking these changes in microbial communities and resource partitioning to soil carbon dynamics, we find that substrate mineralization rates are, in general, significantly lower in soils exposed to long-term warming. This suggests that microbial use of organic substrates is impaired by warming. Yet effects are dependent on substrate identity. There are fundamental differences in the metabolic capabilities of the communities in the control and warmed soils. These differences might relate to the changes in microbial community composition, which appeared to be associated with groups specialized on different resources. We also find that functional responses indicate temperature acclimation of the microbial community. There are distinct seasonal patterns and to long-term soil warming, with

Bradford, M A; Melillo, J M; Reynolds, J F; Treseder, K K; Wallenstein, M D

2010-06-10T23:59:59.000Z

131

The Chemical Composition of Some Texas Soils.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. The postoffice address is College, Station, Texas. Reports and bulletins are sent free upon application to the Director. THE CHEMICAL COMPOSITION OF SOME TEXAS SOILS. BY G. S. FRAPS. This bulletin is a popular account of a study of a nnmber of Texas soils... of the soil in pots, fertilized with different fertilizing ingredients, also show the needs of the soil for plant food. This is the method we used in our work on the soils described in this bulletin. Third, to ascertain whether or not the soil is acid. A...

Fraps, G. S. (George Stronach)

1907-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

132

Innovative technologies for soil cleanup  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

These notes provide a broad overview of current developments in innovative technologies for soil cleanup. In this context, soil cleanup technologies include site remediation methods that deal primarily with the vadose zone and with relatively shallow, near-surface contamination of soil or rock materials. This discussion attempts to emphasize approaches that may be able to achieve significant improvements in soil cleanup cost or effectiveness. However, since data for quantitative performance and cost comparisons of new cleanup methods are scarce, preliminary comparisons must be based on the scientific approach used by each method and on the sits-specific technical challenges presented by each sold contamination situation. A large number of technical alternatives that are now in research, development, and testing can be categorized by the scientific phenomena that they employ and by the site contamination situations that they treat. After cataloging a representative selection of these technologies, one of the new technologies, Dynamic Underground Stripping, is discussed in more detail to highlight a promising soil cleanup technology that is now being field tested.

Yow, J.L. Jr.

1992-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

133

High-temperature environments of human evolution in East Africa based on bond ordering in paleosol carbonates  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...surface soil temperatures were well in excess of 28–41 °C...35 °C/km and 25 °C/km geothermal gradients. There is no clear evidence...Orbital-scale climate variability is well documented in this low-latitude setting (10...modern soils from central New Mexico, USA . Geol Soc Am Bull 121...

Benjamin H. Passey; Naomi E. Levin; Thure E. Cerling; Francis H. Brown; John M. Eiler

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

Changes in soil carbon and nitrogen associated with switchgrass production  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

.), other forage grasses, cultivated crops, and forest were collected seasonally at six locations. Soil organic C (SOC), total N, soil microbial biomass C (SMBC) and N (SMBN), soil mineralizable C and N, and basal soil respiration (BSR) were in general...

Lobo Alonzo, Porfirio Jose

2004-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

135

Category:Soil Gas Sampling | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Soil Gas Sampling page? For detailed information on Soil Gas Sampling as exploration techniques, click here. Category:Soil Gas Sampling Add.png Add a new Soil Gas Sampling...

136

Soil & Groundwater Remediation | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Soil & Groundwater Soil & Groundwater Remediation Soil & Groundwater Remediation Soil & Groundwater Remediation The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) manages the largest groundwater and soil remediation effort in the world. The inventory at the DOE sites includes 6.5 trillion liters of contaminated groundwater, an amount equal to about four times the daily U.S. water consumption, and 40 million cubic meters of soil and debris contaminated with radionuclides, metals, and organics. The Office of Groundwater and Soil Remediation is working with DOE site managers around the country regarding specific technical issues. At the large sites such as Hanford, Savannah River, and Oak Ridge, the Office of Groundwater and Soil Remediation has conducted research and demonstration projects to test new technologies and remediation

137

Bioaugmentation of TNT-contaminated soil  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Microbial transformation of trinitrotoluene (TNT) in phics. contaminated soil was investigated in this research. A Bacillus sp., isolated from soil obtained from an army ammunition facility, was used to enhance the rate of TNT removal over a 360 day...

Bokelmann, Annamarie

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

138

Soil Carbon Sequestration and the Greenhouse Effect  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Soil Carbon Sequestration and the Greenhouse Effect Second edition Rattan Lal & Ronald F. Follett. Printed in the United States of America. #12;181 Soil Carbon Sequestration and the Greenhouse Effect, 2nd

Archer, Steven R.

139

Maryland Soil Conservation Districts Law (Maryland)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

It is the policy of the state to conserve the soil, water, and related resources of the state through establishing regulations for land-use practices related to soil erosion. This legislation...

140

Rainwater Harvesting: Soil Storage and Infiltration System  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A soil storage and infiltration system collects rainfall runoff from the roofs of buildings and directs it underground where it infiltrates the soil. Such a system conserves water and protects it from surface pollution. This publication describes...

Mechell, Justin; Lesikar, Bruce J.

2008-08-11T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "2-meter soil temperature" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

DIVISION S-10-WETLAND SOILS Wetland Soils --Opportunities and Challenges  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of Sciences entitled "Restoration of aquatic ecosystems: Science, technol- ogy and public policy" failed of Interior, and the U.S. Department of Agriculture-Soil Conservation Service. Wetlands are complex ecosystems that are poorly understood relative to terrestrial and aquatic systems. Difficulties in characterizing wetlands

Florida, University of

142

A soil moisture budget analysis of Texas using basic climatic data while assuming a possible warming trend across the state  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of the slope (dashed lines) of the regression line of precipitation on mean temperature for the Lower Valley. 35. Isopleths of MTRANGE (in 'F) for Texas during August. 71 36. Percentage of monthly soil moisture (SM) for the High Plains for a O'F (control... are significant at the 95% confidence interval. 74 37. Percentage of monthly soil moisture (SM) for the High Plains for a O'F (control), I' F, 2'F, 3'F, and 4'F increase in the mean annual temperature of Texas. Mean monthly temperatures increase non...

Bjornson, Brian Matthew

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

143

Centennial black carbon turnover observed in a Russia steppe soil  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the zonal steppe soils of Russia. J. Plant Nutr. Soil Sci. ,CD-ROM "Land Resources of Russia", International Institute

Hammes, K.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

144

Modular System Concept For Soil Heating Using Radio?Frequency Energy  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Soil is one of the most important natural resources and its exploitation preservation and regeneration are huge challenges for modern industrial society. For this reason it is essential to have innovative efficient cost?effective and reliable technologies for the decontamination and soil remediation. These technologies should be flexibly applicable for a wide spectrum of contaminants. Beside other biological physical and chemical methods research on thermally?supported soil remediation methods has increased over the last years. Due to a controlled heating of soil the mobility of pollutants their water solubility and their vapor pressures can be enhanced. To support biodegradation of pollutants the maximum activity of most microorganisms can be realized by moderate heating independent of ambient temperature and seasonal conditions.

Frank Holzer; Dirk Lippik; Tilo Heimbold; Ulf Roland; Frank?Dieter Kopinke; Joachim Schenk

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

145

Author's personal copy Soil total carbon analysis in Hawaiian soils with visible, near-infrared and  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Author's personal copy Soil total carbon analysis in Hawaiian soils with visible, near-infrared reflectance spectroscopy Agriculture Hawaii Mid-infrared Soil carbon Visible near-infrared Accurate assessment of DRS for Ct prediction of Hawaiian ag- ricultural soils by creating visible, near-infrared (VNIR

Grunwald, Sabine

146

Airborne microwave remote sensing of soil moisture  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Newton [1]) . . . . . . . . . . . ~ ~ ~ 23 10 12 Location of aircraft soil moisture experiments. . . Soil types for fields at the 1975 Phoenix experiment. Soil types for fields at the 1976 Finney County, Kansas experiment . 34 43 44 13 14 Soil... Algorithms. Penetration Depth. EXPERII4ENTAL PROGRAM. I ntr oducti on. Phoenix, 1975. Lawrence-Topeka, Kansas Experiment Fi nney County Experiment South Dakota Experiment. . . . . . Colby, Kansas Experiment . . Moisture Sampling and Accuracy...

Black, Quentin Robert

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

147

Physical Degradation of Soils, Risks and Threats  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Physical soil degradation...is one of the eight main risks and threats defined by the European Thematic Strategy for...

Winfried E. H. Blum

2014-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

148

Oxidation of Organic Compounds in the Soil.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

.................... ltudy by Means of Carbon Dioxide Formed 8 ............................... lomparison of . Various Materials 9 ...................................... lffect of Nature of Soil 14 ..................................... Ixidation of Soil Carbon 18... was drawn to take out the carbon dioxide. Althongl~ such experi- ments are well adapted to estimate carbon cliosicle, obviously, such con- ditions do not prevail in the soil, and while it is possible that Wollnp's conclusions may appl~r to the soil uncler...

Fraps, G. S. (George Stronach)

1915-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

149

Miamisburg Environmental Management Project Archived Soil & Groundwate...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

VOCs Miamisburg Environmental Management Project - Tritium More Documents & Publications Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site Archived Soil & Groundwater Master Reports...

150

Soil maps of Wisconsin Alfred E. Hartemink a,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Soil maps of Wisconsin Alfred E. Hartemink a, , Birl Lowery a , Carl Wacker b a University May 2012 Accepted 15 May 2012 Available online xxxx Keywords: Soil maps Historical maps Digital soil mapping Soil survey Legacy soil maps are an important input in digital soil mapping. This paper traces how

Mladenoff, David

151

Common Questions Why should I soil test?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Common Questions Why should I soil test? Soil testing is an important diagnostic tool to evaluate nutrient imbalances and understand plant growth. The most important reason to soil test is to have a basis for intelligent application of fertilizer and lime. Testing also allows for growers and homeowners to maintain

Isaacs, Rufus

152

Effect of soil freezing on particulate resuspension  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report presents the results of small scale laboratory tests that were conducted to determine the effect of soil freezing on soil resuspension. Nontransuranic contaminated soil form the Radioactive Waste Management Complex was subjected to a series of test conditions to determine respirable and nonrespirable fractions of airborne dust. A separate fraction of the same soil was spiked with Pu-239 and subjected to the same test conditions. Concentrations of resuspended soil and Pu in air were determined. Test results show that: (a) the largest fraction of soil resuspended is in the nonrespirable size fraction, (b) the concentration of resuspended soil in air is highly dependent on surface air velocity, and (c) freezing is not as effective at reducing resuspension of fine dry soil as it is with coarse soil, and (d) artificially prepared Pu contaminated soil has a high proportion of the total activity distributed on ultrafine material, reacts inversely to the mass movement of soil, and does not adequately imitate Pu movement in an actual contaminated soil. 26 figs., 3 tabs.

Duce, S.W.; Shaw, P.G.; Winberg, M.R.

1988-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

153

9, 1443714473, 2012 Soil carbon drivers  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

BGD 9, 14437­14473, 2012 Soil carbon drivers and benchmarks in Earth system models K. E. O. Todd if available. Causes of variation in soil carbon predictions from CMIP5 Earth system models and comparison #12;BGD 9, 14437­14473, 2012 Soil carbon drivers and benchmarks in Earth system models K. E. O. Todd

Ickert-Bond, Steffi

154

Sulfate induced heave in lime stabilized soil  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The addition of hydrated lime to clay soils is one of the most common methods of soil stabilization. However, when sulfates are present in the soil, the calcium in the lime reacts with the sulfates to form ettringite, an expandable mineral...

Bredenkamp, Sanet

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

155

Chemical Composition of Soils of Texas.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

STATION Table 5. Analyses of soils of the Gulf Coast Prairie-Continued Type Name Flat marshy to semi-marshy soils ....................... Harr~e clay, surface.. Harris clay, subsoil. ........................ Harris fine sandy loam, surface.... ............. Harris fine sandy loam. subsoil.. ............. Tidal marsh. surface.. ...................... Tidal marsh. subsoil. ....................... Flat stream bottom soils Guadalupe clay. surface.. ................... Guadalupe clay, subsoil...

Fraps, G. S. (George Stronach); Fudge, J. F. (Joseph Franklin)

1937-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

156

Measurement of Radon in Soil Gas  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... CONCENTRATIONS of the order of 100,000-1,000,000 pc. radon/m3 are found in the gases trapped in common soils and rock1. The estimation ... m3 are found in the gases trapped in common soils and rock1. The estimation of radon in the soil gas and the free atmosphere has been suggested as a tool for ...

K. G. VOHRA; M. C. SUBBARAMU; A. M. MOHAN RAO

1964-01-04T23:59:59.000Z

157

Degradation and resilience of soils  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...7, 99119. Lal, R. 1997a Long-term tillage and maize monoculture...the press.) Lal, R. 1997b Long-term tillage and maize monoculture...thus reduce the potential `storage capacity' of the soil. What...use of crop residue and farm waste can lead to improvement in...

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

158

Soil Gas Sampling | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Soil Gas Sampling Soil Gas Sampling Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Technique: Soil Gas Sampling Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0) NEPA(0) Exploration Technique Information Exploration Group: Field Techniques Exploration Sub Group: Field Sampling Parent Exploration Technique: Gas Sampling Information Provided by Technique Lithology: Stratigraphic/Structural: Identify concealed faults that act as conduits for hydrothermal fluids. Hydrological: Identify hydrothermal gases of magmatic origin. Thermal: Differentiate between amagmatic or magmatic sources heat. Dictionary.png Soil Gas Sampling: Soil gas sampling is sometimes used in exploration for blind geothermal resources to detect anomalously high concentrations of hydrothermal gases

159

Soil: Carbon Sequestration in Agricultural Systems  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Soil carbon sequestration can contribute to greenhouse gas (GHG) mitigation by removing CO2 from the atmosphere and at the same time improving soil health and sustainability. This article outlines the basic principles and controlling mechanisms involved in soil carbon sequestration and reviews how improved agricultural practices impact soil carbon stocks, based on data from long-term field experiments and other sources. It concludes with a section outlining challenges and opportunities for implementation of GHG mitigation strategies involving soil carbon sequestration, summarizing key science and policy-related issues.

K. Paustian

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

160

Black Carbon in the Soil Carbon Cycle: Is it an Oxidation Resistant End-Product?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for different materials and combustion temperatures. It is less than 1% for thermally altered biomass at combusBlack Carbon in the Soil Carbon Cycle: Is it an Oxidation Resistant End-Product? Simone resistant product of incomplete combustion, and consists out of a range of combustion products such as char

Fischlin, Andreas

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "2-meter soil temperature" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Soil Moisture Droughts under the Retrospective and Projected Climate in India  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Changes in precipitation, air temperature, and model-simulated soil moisture were examined for the observed (1950–2008) and projected (2010–99) climate for the sowing period of Kharif and Rabi [KHARIF_SOW (May–July) and RABI_SOW (October–December)]...

Vimal Mishra; Reepal Shah; Bridget Thrasher

2014-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

162

Relation between Bioavailability and Fuel Oil Hydrocarbon Composition in Contaminated Soils  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The lysimeters were constructed of concrete and insulated with polystyrene foam plates, and a drain was installed in a 0.30-m sand layer. ... In lysimeter A, the lower boundary temperature of the soil could was controlled at 35 °C using a heating cable. ...

H. de Jonge; J. I. Freijer; J. M. Verstraten; J. Westerveld; F. W. M. van der Wielen

1997-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

163

Soil microbial biomass: an estimator of soil development in reclaimed lignite mine soil  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A two-year study was conducted at the Big Brown lignite mine in Fairfield, Texas, to determine the rate and extent of recovery of the soil microbial biomass (SMB) in mixed overburden. The relationships between SMB carbon (SMBC), basal respiration...

Swanson, Eric Scott

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

164

100 Area Hanford soil washing treatability tests  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Soil washing laboratory tests performed at Hanford in support of 100 Area Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) feasibility studies included characterization of soils, physical separation, chemical extraction, and water treatment. Results to date show that < 20 % of the soil is finer than 0.25 mm ({minus}40 mesh). The highest concentration of {sup 60}Co, {sup 152}Eu, and {sup 137}Cs contaminants is generally associated with fine soil particles. However, measurable concentrations of contaminants were found in all sizes of soil particles. In initial testing, attrition scrubbing was generally sufficient to treat soils to meet selected performance levels for {sup 60}Co and {sup 152}Eu. However, more intense attrition scrubbing, autogenous grinding, or chemical extraction was required to enhance removal of {sup 137}Cs. Additional tests and assessment of the feasibility of using soil washing techniques are in progress.

Field, J.G.; Belden, R.D. [Westinghouse Hanford Co., Richland, WA (United States); Serne, R.J.; Mattigod, S.V.; Freeman, H.D. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States); Scheck, R.W. [Mactec/Dames and Moore (United States); Goller, E.D. [USDOE Richland Operations Office, WA (United States)

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

165

On the multi-temporal correlation between photosynthesis and soil CO2 efflux: reconciling lags and observations.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Although there is increasing evidence of the temporal correlation between photosynthesis and soil CO{sub 2} efflux, no study has so far tested its generality across the growing season at multiple study sites and across several time scales. Here, we used continuous (hourly) data and applied time series analysis (wavelet coherence analysis) to identify temporal correlations and time lags between photosynthesis and soil CO{sub 2} efflux for three forests from different climates and a grassland. Results showed the existence of multi-temporal correlations at time periods that varied between 1 and 16 d during the growing seasons at all study sites. Temporal correlations were strongest at the 1 d time period, with longer time lags for forests relative to the grassland. The multi-temporal correlations were not continuous throughout the growing season, and were weakened when the effect of variations in soil temperature and CO{sub 2} diffusivity on soil CO{sub 2} efflux was taken into account. Multi-temporal correlations between photosynthesis and soil CO{sub 2} efflux exist, and suggest that multiple biophysical drivers (i.e. photosynthesis, soil CO{sub 2} diffusion, temperature) are likely to coexist for the regulation of allocation and transport speed of carbon during a growing season. Future studies should consider the multi-temporal influence of these biophysical drivers to investigate their effect on the transport of carbon through the soil-plant-atmosphere continuum.

Vargas, Rodrigo [Ensenada Center for Scientific Research and Higher Education (CICESE); Baldocchi, D. D. [University of California, Berkeley; Bahn, Michael [University of Innsbruck, Austria; Hanson, Paul J [ORNL; Hosman, K. P. [University of Missouri; Kulmala, Liisa [University of Helsinki; Pumpanen, Jukka [University of Helsinki; Yang, Bai [ORNL

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

166

Yeast and Temperature  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Yeast and Temperature Yeast and Temperature Name: Alyssaaum Location: N/A Country: N/A Date: N/A Question: How does temperature affect yeast? Replies: Dear Alyssa, At low temperatures (0-10 C) yeast will not grow, but not die either. At temperatures 10-37 C yeast will grow and multiply, faster at higher temperatures with an optimal growth at 30 or 37 C (that depends on the species). At higher temperature the cells become stressed, meaning that their content becomes damaged and which can be repaired to some degree. At high temperatures (>50 C) the cells die. The bacteria can survive freezing under certain conditions. When baking bread all yeast dies during the process. Dr. Trudy Wassenaar yeast is a unique type of fungi that grows quickly by rapid cell division. It grows best at about 100 degrees fahrenheit, colder will cause it to go dormant, much warmer could kill it

167

Vitrification testing of soil fines from contaminated Hanford 100 Area and 300 Area soils  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The suitability of Hanford soil for vitrification is well known and has been demonstrated extensively in other work. The tests reported here were carried out to confirm the applicability of vitrification to the soil fines (a subset of the Hanford soil potentially different in composition from the bulk soil) and to provide data on the performance of actual, vitrified soil fines. It was determined that the soil fines were generally similar in composition to the bulk Hanford soil, although the fraction <0.25 mm in the 100 Area soil sample appears to differ somewhat from the bulk soil composition. The soil fines are readily melted into a homogeneous glass with the simple additions of CaO and/or Na{sub 2}O. The vitrified waste (plus additives) occupies only 60% of the volume of the initial untreated waste. Leach testing has shown the glasses made from the soil fines to be very durable relative to natural and man-made glasses and has demonstrated the ability of the vitrified waste to greatly reduce the release of radionuclides to the environment. Viscosity and electrical conductivity measurements indicate that the soil fines will be readily processable, although with levels of additives slightly greater than used in the radioactive melts. These tests demonstrate the applicability of vitrification to the contaminated soil fines and the exceptional performance of the waste form resulting from the vitrification of contaminated Hanford soils.

Ludowise, J.D.

1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

168

6, 13011320, 2006 Temperature  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ACPD 6, 1301­1320, 2006 Temperature climatology and trend estimates over Durban, South Africa H and Physics Discussions Temperature climatology and trend estimates in the UTLS region as observed over Commons License. 1301 #12;ACPD 6, 1301­1320, 2006 Temperature climatology and trend estimates over Durban

Boyer, Edmond

169

Thermoelectric Temperature Control  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the controller can supply the power required to bring the device to the desired temperature and maintain a stableNOTE 201TM TECHNICAL Optimizing Thermoelectric Temperature Control Systems #12;2 May 1995 92 of applications that require extremely stable temperature control. System design can be complex, but improved

Saffman, Mark

170

ARM - Measurement - Soil moisture flux  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

moisture flux moisture flux ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Measurement : Soil moisture flux A quantity measured according to the formula B = {lambda}(dq/dz), where {lambda} is the conductivity of the soil that the moisture is moving through. Categories Surface Properties Instruments The above measurement is considered scientifically relevant for the following instruments. Refer to the datastream (netcdf) file headers of each instrument for a list of all available measurements, including those recorded for diagnostic or quality assurance purposes. ARM Instruments CO2FLX : Carbon Dioxide Flux Measurement Systems External Instruments ECMWFDIAG : European Centre for Medium Range Weather Forecasts

171

ARM - Measurement - Soil heat flux  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

heat flux heat flux ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Measurement : Soil heat flux A quantity measured according to the formula B = {lambda}(dT/dz), where {lambda} is the conductivity of the soil that the heat is moving through. Categories Surface Properties Instruments The above measurement is considered scientifically relevant for the following instruments. Refer to the datastream (netcdf) file headers of each instrument for a list of all available measurements, including those recorded for diagnostic or quality assurance purposes. ARM Instruments CO2FLX : Carbon Dioxide Flux Measurement Systems EBBR : Energy Balance Bowen Ratio Station SEBS : Surface Energy Balance System External Instruments

172

Review of soil contamination guidance  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A review of existing and proposed radioactive soil contamination standards and guidance was conducted for United Nuclear Corporation (UNC), Office of Surplus Facilities Management. Information was obtained from both government agencies and other sources during a literature survey. The more applicable standards were reviewed, evaluated, and summarized. Information pertaining to soil contamination for both facility operation and facility decommissioning was obtained from a variety of sources. These sources included: the Code of Federal Regulations, regulatory guides, the Federal Register, topical reports written by various government agencies, topical reports written by national laboratories, and publications from the American National Standards Institute (ANSI). It was difficult to directly compare the standards and guidance obtained from these sources since each was intended for a specific situation and different units or bases were used. However, most of the information reviewed was consistent with the philosophy of maintaining exposures at levels as low as reasonably achievable (ALARA).

Mueller, M.A.; Kennedy, W.E. Jr.; Soldat, J.K.

1981-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

173

Mössbauer Study of Soil Profiles in Industrial Region of Ukraine  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Mössbauer spectroscopy was applied to study the influence of industrial activity on soil composition. Comparing the Mössbauer spectra of separate layers for the Mariupol sampling site (highly polluted industrial region of South — East Ukraine) we observed: i) appearance of the Fe3O4 compound at top soil layers: 16.6% of relative spectral area (RA) at (0 – 10 cm) layer 5.3% of RA at (30 – 40 cm) layer and no magnetite component at deeper layers ii) a significant increase of the contribution of the magnetically split spectral components: from 10.9% of RA for (120 – 130 cm) layer to 32.8% of RA for (0–10 cm) layer. The differences in RA of the magnetically split spectral components between top soil layer and the (120 – 130 cm) layer at the Homutovski steppe sampling site (non?polluted area) are much smaller 13.7% and 9.8% respectively. From the temperature dependence of the Mössbauer spectra it was concluded that part of the iron?containing compounds appears in the form of ultra fine particles in the superparamagnetic state. The observed increase of total concentration of the magnetic minerals for polluted sampling sites is caused by an increase of the content of coarse fraction of the magnetic particles.

B. Kopcewicz; M. Kopcewicz; M. Jelenska; A. Hasso?Agopsowicz

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

174

Temperature compensated photovoltaic array  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A temperature compensated photovoltaic module comprises a series of solar cells having a thermally activated switch connected in parallel with several of the cells. The photovoltaic module is adapted to charge conventional batteries having a temperature coefficient differing from the temperature coefficient of the module. The calibration temperatures of the switches are chosen whereby the colder the ambient temperature for the module, the more switches that are on and form a closed circuit to short the associated solar cells. By shorting some of the solar cells as the ambient temperature decreases, the battery being charged by the module is not excessively overcharged at lower temperatures. PV module is an integrated solution that is reliable and inexpensive. 2 figs.

Mosher, D.M.

1997-11-18T23:59:59.000Z

175

DIFFERENTIAL SOIL IMPEDANCE OBSTACLE DETECTION  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This project develops a new and unique obstacle detection sensor for horizontal directional drilling (HDD) equipment. The development of this new technology will greatly improve the reliability and safety of natural gas HDD construction practices. This sensor utilizes a differential soil impedance measurement technique that will be sensitive to the presence of plastic and ceramic, as well as metallic obstacles. The use of HDD equipment has risen significantly in the gas industry because HDD provides a much more cost-effective and less disruptive method for gas pipe installation than older, trenching methods. However, there have been isolated strikes of underground utilities by HDD equipment, which may have been avoided if methods were available to detect other underground obstacles when using HDD systems. GTI advisors from the gas industry have ranked the value of solving the obstacle detection problem as the most important research and development project for GTI to pursue using Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) funds available through its industry partner, GRI. GTI proposes to develop a prototype down-hole sensor system that is simple and compact. The sensor utilizes an impedance measurement technique that is sensitive to the presence of metallic or nonmetallic objects in the proximity of the HDD head. The system will use a thin film sensor conformal with the drill head. The impedance of the soil will be measured with a low frequency signal injected through the drill head itself. A pair of bridge type impedance sensors, mounted orthogonal to one another, is capacitively coupled to the soil. Inclusions in the soil will cause changes to the sensor balance distinguishable from homogeneous soil. The sensor will provide range and direction data for obstacles near the HDD head. The goal is to provide a simple, robust system that provides the information required to avoid obstacles. This must be done within the size and ruggedness constraints of the HDD equipment. Imaging obstacles is not within the scope of this work, as it would require a more elaborate sensor than is practical within the HDD head.

Maximillian J. Kieba

2002-08-30T23:59:59.000Z

176

Removal of Cu, Pb and Zn by foam fractionation and a soil washing process from contaminated industrial soils using soapberry-derived saponin: A comparative effectiveness assessment  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The feasibility of using the eco-friendly biodegradable surfactant saponin (a plant-based surfactant) from soapberry and surfactin from Bacillus subtilis (BBK006) for the removal of heavy metals from contaminated industrial soil (6511 mg kg?1 copper, 4955 mg kg?1 lead, and 15 090 mg kg?1 zinc) by foam fractionation and a soil flushing process was evaluated under variation of fundamental factors (surfactant concentration, pH, temperature and time). The results of latter process showed that 1–2% Pb, 16–17% Cu and 21–24% Zn was removed by surfactin after 48 h, whereas the removal of Pb, Cu and Zn was increased from 40% to 47%, 30% to 36% and 16% to 18% in presence of saponin with an increase from 24 to 72 h at room temperature by the soil washing process at pH 4. In the foam fractionation process, the metal removal efficiencies were increased with increases in the saponin concentration (0.075–0.15 g L?1) and time (24–72 h), whereas the efficiency was decreased with increasing pH (4–10) and temperature (>40 °C). The removal efficiencies of Pb, Cu and Zn were increased significantly from 57% to 98%, 85% to 95% and 55% to 56% with an increase in the flow rate from 0.2 to 1.0 L min?1 at 0.15 g L?1 saponin (pH 4 and 30 °C). The present investigation indicated that the foam fractionation process is more efficient for the removal of heavy metal from contaminated industrial soil in comparison to the soil washing process. The plant-based eco-friendly biodegradable biosurfactant saponin can be used for environmental cleanup and pollution management.

Jyoti Prakash Maity; Yuh Ming Huang; Chun-Mei Hsu; Ching-I Wu; Chien-Cheng Chen; Chun-Yi Li; Jiin-Shuh Jean; Young-Fo Chang; Chen-Yen Chen

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

177

Environment - Nano soil science | ornl.gov  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Environment - Nano soil science Environment - Nano soil science Cross-disciplinary research at Oak Ridge National Laboratory is yielding new insight into the carbon cycle, contaminated soils and soil fertility. An ORNL team is using a novel combination of neutron reflectometry experiments and supercomputer simulations to provide a detailed view of the interactions between organic matter and minerals in soil. The research suggests that relationships among these compounds are governed by simpler principles than previously thought. "It changes the whole way we think about how carbon, nutrients and contaminants interact with soils, which therefore affects fertility, water quality, and the terrestrial carbon cycle," said ORNL's Loukas Petridis. "We don't understand these topics very well because until now we haven't had the techniques capable

178

Thermal Removal Of Tritium From Concrete And Soil To Reduce Groundwater Impacts  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Legacy heavy-water moderator operations at the Savannah River Site (SRS) have resulted in the contamination of equipment pads, building slabs, and surrounding soil with tritium. At the time of discovery the tritium had impacted the shallow (< 3-m) groundwater at the facility. While tritium was present in the groundwater, characterization efforts determined that a significant source remained in a concrete slab at the surface and within the associated vadose zone soils. To prevent continued long-term impacts to the shallow groundwater a CERCLA non-time critical removal action for these source materials was conducted to reduce the leaching of tritium from the vadose zone soils and concrete slabs. In order to minimize transportation and disposal costs, an on-site thermal treatment process was designed, tested, and implemented. The on-site treatment consisted of thermal detritiation of the concrete rubble and soil. During this process concrete rubble was heated to a temperature of 815 deg C (1,500 deg F) resulting in the dehydration and removal of water bound tritium. During heating, tritium contaminated soil was used to provide thermal insulation during which it's temperature exceeded 100 deg C (212 deg F), causing drying and removal of tritium. The thermal treatment process volatiles the water bound tritium and releases it to the atmosphere. The released tritium was considered insignificant based upon Clean Air Act Compliance Package (CAP88) analysis and did not exceed exposure thresholds. A treatability study evaluated the effectiveness of this thermal configuration and viability as a decontamination method for tritium in concrete and soil materials. Post treatment sampling confirmed the effectiveness at reducing tritium to acceptable waste site specific levels. With American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA) funding three additional treatment cells were assembled utilizing commercial heating equipment and common construction materials. This provided a total of four units to batch treat concrete rubble and soil. Post treatment sampling verified that the activity in the treated soil and concrete met the treatment standards for each medium which allowed the treated concrete rubble and soil to be disposed of on site as backfill. During testing and operations a total of 1,261-m{sup 3} (1,650-yd{sup 3}) of contaminated concrete and soils were treated with an actual incurred cost of $3,980,000. This represents a unit treatment cost of $3,156/m{sup 3} ($2,412/yd{sup 3}). In 2011 the project was recognized with an e-Star Sustainability Award by DOE's Office of Environmental Management.

Jackson, Dennis G.; Blount, Gerald C.; Wells, Leslie H.; Cardoso-Neto, Joao E.; Kmetz, Thomas F.; Reed, Misty L.

2012-12-04T23:59:59.000Z

179

Soil phosphorus status and fertilizer use in select agricutural soils in Nicaragua  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A survey of small, medium and large Nicaraguan producers indicated a heavy reliance on imported complete fertilizer. Analysis of soils sampled from the large-scale commercial producers found low P retention in the lowland heavy clay soils...

Niemeyer, Patrick G

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

180

The behavior of soil-applied cyclotri- and cyclotetraphosphate in Texas soils  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Cyclotriphosphate (C3P) is of interest to soil scientists because it demonstrates little or no retention by soil constituents. Non-sorption is desirable in the development of mobile P fertilizers. Work was expanded to include cyclotetraphosphate...

Trostle, Calvin Lewie

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "2-meter soil temperature" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Abundant and Stable Char Residues in Soils: Implications for Soil Fertility and Carbon Sequestration  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Large-scale soil application of biochar may enhance soil fertility, increasing crop production while also sequestering atmospheric carbon. But reaching these outcomes requires an understanding of the relations...

J. D. Mao; R. L. Johnson; J. Lehmann…

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

182

Consolidation theories for saturated-unsaturated soils and numerical simulation of residential buildings on expansive soils  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to perform uncoupled two or three dimensional consolidation calculation for both expansive soils and collapsible soils. From the analysis, the equivalent effective stress and excessive pore water pressure can be easily calculated. At the same time...

Zhang, Xiong

2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

183

Helping People Help the Land Web Soil Survey  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Helping People Help the Land Web Soil Survey Jorge L. Lugo-Camacho MLRA Soil Survey Project Leader provee igualdad de oportunidades en empleo y programas. #12;�Qu� es el Web Soil Survey? El Web Soil catastros de suelos. #12;�C�mo puedo entrar al Web Soil Survey? Se puede entrar a trav�s de las siguientes

Gilbes, Fernando

184

Surface mining: soil, coal, and society  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The book concentrates on the effects of surface mining of coal upon the utilization of another resource, soil. Possible planning and management strategies for land reclamation are studied and the problem of choosing the correct solution for a particular situation is considered taking the many factors into account. The goal of reconstructing soil after mining is to equal or exceed the productivity of pre-mine soils, with a change in landscape if necessary, with minimum disturbance to the local community. (252 refs.)

Not Available

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

185

Soil Fumigation for Plant Disease Control.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

AGRICULTURAL AND MECHANICAL COLLEGE OF TEXAS T- 0. WALTON, President [Blank Page in Original Bulletin] The control of soit-borne plant diseases by soil fumigation hm been nhown to be efficient and practicable in greenhouses, seed Ws, cold frames, small... diseases. Undesirable weeds are als~ frequently present. This bulletin deals with soil fumigation clesignecl especially to control these disease-producing organisms that infest the soil. It is based on experi- ments conducted in the last seven years...

Young, P. A. (Paul Allen); Godfrey, G. H. (George Harold)

1943-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

186

FINGERPRINTING SOILS – A PROOF OF CONCEPT  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

as UNDERGRADUATE RESEARCH SCHOLAR A Senior Scholars Thesis by CATHERINE KOBYLINSKI FINGERPRINTING SOILS ? A PROOF OF CONCEPT Approved by: Research Advisor: Cristine Morgan Director for Honors and Undergraduate Research: Sumana Datta Major... iii ABSTRACT Fingerprinting Soils - A Proof of Concept. (April 2011) Catherine Kobylinski Department of Plant Pathology and Microbiology Texas A&M University Research Advisor: Dr. Cristine Morgan Department of Soil and Crop Sciences...

Kobylinski, Catherine

2011-05-06T23:59:59.000Z

187

Heavy metal concentrations in soils of five United States cities, 1972 urban soils monitoring program  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Research report:Lead, mercury, cadmium, and arsenic levels detected in soil samples taken from five U.S. cities are reported. Cities studied were: Des Moines, Iowa; Fitchburg, Mass.; Lake Charles, La.; Reading, Pa.; and Pittsburgh. In all cities except Fitchburg, urban soils had higher concentrations of the metals than suburban soils had. Higher metals concentrations in urban soil are attributed to atmospheric fallout of aerosols from industrial processes and fossil fuel burning. (26 references, 2 tables)

Carey, A.E.; Gowen, J.A.; Forehand, T.J.; Tai, H.; Wiersma, G.B.

1980-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

188

Sorption Behavior of Triazole Fungicides in Indian Soils and Its Correlation with Soil Properties  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

(2)?Futch, S. H.; Singh, M. Herbicide mobility using soil leaching columns. ... Futch, S. H.; Singh, M. ...

Neera Singh

2002-09-27T23:59:59.000Z

189

Pullman Soils: Distribution, Importance, Variability, and Management.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

soils in Texas is bounded by the New Mexico-Texas state line on the west, the Canadian River on the north, and the caprock escarpment at the High Plains-Rolling Plains boundary on the east. A catena of loamy soils extending from Farwell to near...). The portions of different counties occupied by Pullman soil range from about 0.1 to 70 percent (Table 2). The area of Pullman soils is bounded by the New Mexico- Texas state line on the west, the caprock escarpment at the Canadian River on the north...

Unger, Paul W.; Pringle, Fred B

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

190

Soil Machine Dynamics Ltd | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Dynamics Ltd Jump to: navigation, search Name: Soil Machine Dynamics Ltd Region: United Kingdom Sector: Marine and Hydrokinetic Website: http:http:smd.co.ukproduc This company...

191

Irrigation and Management of Texas Soils.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

is available, soil micro- organisms will change ammonium nitrogen in- to nitrate nitrogen and then be taken up by plants. Nitrate nitrogen (NO,-) is not at- tached to clay particles ; it is water-soluble and it moves with soil moisture. On coarse... is unevenly distributed. If nitrogen is applied in irrigation water as the ammonium form to alkaline soils, there is a possibility of 25 to 30 percent loss of the nitrogen as a gas. Phosphorus applied in irrigation water will not move into the soil too...

Box, John; Bennett, William F.

1959-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

192

Azimsulfuron Sorption?Desorption on Soil  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Azimsulfuron Sorption?Desorption on Soil ... The Freundlich desorption data indicated that a significant amt. of the imazosulfuron sorbed is not easily desorbed. ...

Alba Pusino; M. Vittoria Pinna; Carlo Gessa

2004-05-06T23:59:59.000Z

193

Daily Temperature Lag  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Daily Temperature Lag Daily Temperature Lag Name: Shyammayi Status: teacher Grade: K-2 Country: Mauritius Date: Summer 2011 Question: At what time of the day is the temperature hottest? At what time of the day is the temperature coldest? Replies: In general, the hottest part of the day is late afternoon. The sun has passed its peak in the sky but still heats the Earth up until very late in the afternoon. The lowest temperatures are around dawn. Earth has had all night to get rid of the day's heat by radiating it into space. After sunrise, temperatures begin to climb. This can be changed by local storms, sea breezes or mountain breezes and even monsoon winds. Hope this helps. R. W. "Bob" Avakian Instructor Arts and Sciences/CRC Oklahoma State Univ. Inst. of Technology Shyammayi

194

Automatic temperature adjustment apparatus  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An apparatus for increasing the efficiency of a conventional central space heating system is disclosed. The temperature of a fluid heating medium is adjusted based on a measurement of the external temperature, and a system parameter. The system parameter is periodically modified based on a closed loop process that monitors the operation of the heating system. This closed loop process provides a heating medium temperature value that is very near the optimum for energy efficiency.

Chaplin, James E. (66 Overlook Rd., Bloomingdale, NJ 07403)

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

195

Soil compaction: track induced soil stress isn't so positive in comparison with tyre  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Soil compaction: track induced soil stress isn't so positive in comparison with tyre Ingeniors presence and the overall higher load of the track system. Conversely, tyres distribute uniformly the load the easy to obtain contact area surface of the track -or tyre- with the soil, the interface pressure

Boyer, Edmond

196

Soil Science Society of America Journal Soil Sci. Soc. Am. J.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Larson Dep. of Aerospace Engineering Sciences Univ. of Colorado Boulder, CO 80309 Eni G. Njoku Jet security. Large-scale soil moisture monitoring has advanced in recent years, creating opportunitiesSoil Science Society of America Journal Soil Sci. Soc. Am. J. doi:10.2136/sssaj2013

Small, Eric

197

Effects of wildfire and permafrost on soil organic matter and soil climate in interior Alaska  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Effects of wildfire and permafrost on soil organic matter and soil climate in interior Alaska J E NGeological Sciences and Environmental Studies, University of Colorado at Boulder, CB-399, Boulder, CO 80309, USA soil climates was examined after a wildfire near Delta Junction, AK in July 1999. At this site, we

Neff, Jason

198

Applied Soil Ecology 21 (2002) 7188 Soil invertebrate and microbial communities, and decomposition  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Applied Soil Ecology 21 (2002) 71­88 Soil invertebrate and microbial communities, and decomposition. Spongberg Department of Earth, Ecological and Environmental Sciences, University of Toledo, Toledo, OH 43606 for quantification of ecological impact of chemical contamination of soils. This study examined the effects

Neher, Deborah A.

199

Surface Temperature of IGUs  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

117 117 Surface Temperatures of Insulated Glazing Units: Infrared Thermography Laboratory Measurements Brent T. Griffith, Daniel Türler, and Dariush Arasteh Building Technologies Program Environmental Energy Technologies Division Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory University of California Berkeley, CA 94720 USA Fax: 510-486-6046, email: D_Arasteh@lbl.gov Abstract Data are presented for the distribution of surface temperatures on the warm-side surface of seven different insulated glazing units. Surface temperatures are measured using infrared thermography and an external referencing technique. This technique allows detailed mapping of surface temperatures that is non-intrusive. The glazings were placed between warm and cold environmental chambers that were operated at conditions

200

External vs. body temperature  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

External vs. body temperature External vs. body temperature Name: jacqui Location: N/A Country: N/A Date: N/A Question: If one's internal body temperature is approximately 98.6, WHY when the external temperature is 98.6 do we feel hot? Since both temperatures are "balanced", shouldn't we feel comfortable? I am assuming here that humidity levels are controlled, and play no factor in the external temperature. Replies: First of all, skin temperature is lower than 98.6F; 98.6F is internal body temperature, so air at 98.6F is hotter than skin. But more important, it is the nervous system, and the cells in your skin that your brain uses to detect temperature that determine whether you "feel" hot or not, not whether the air is hotter than your skin. These are set so that you feel hot when the air is actually colder than your skin. Why? They are probably set to make you feel hot whenever the air is warm enough so that your body has some trouble getting rid of the excess heat it produces through metabolism. This insures that you take some actions to help your body cool off. Like drinking cool water, or reducing exercise

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "2-meter soil temperature" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Temperature | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Property:GeofluidTemp M Property:MeanReservoirTemp R Property:ReservoirTemp T Property:Temperature U Property:USGSMeanReservoirTemp Retrieved from "http:...

202

ARM - Temperature Converter  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Teachers' Toolbox Lesson Plans Temperature Converter The Fahrenheit scale, invented by German physicist Daniel Gabriel Fahrenheit (1686-1736), is based on 32 F for the freezing...

203

Low Temperature Proton Conductivity  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Presentation by Tom Zawodzinski to DOE's Fuel Cell Operations at Sub-Freezing Temperatures Workshop held February 1-5, 2005 in Phoenix, Arizona.

204

Temperature and productivity  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

symptoms and performance of office work under combined exposure to temperature, noise and air pollution. PhD Thesis. International Centre for Indoor Environment and Energy,...

205

Experimental Study of Bridge Scour in Cohesive Soil  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The bridge scour depths in cohesive soil have been predicted using the scour equations developed for cohesionless soils due to scarce of studies about cohesive soil. The scour depths predicted by the conventional methods will result in significant...

Oh, Seung Jae

2011-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

206

University of Florida Soil and Water Science Department  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to soil properties, water/soil quality, and water/soil management · Highlight important and/or innovative environmental contamination prevention strategies and remediation techniques that serve to protect and promote

Ma, Lena

207

Acid soil fertility at the Cinzana station, Mali, West Africa  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

that may be associated with acid soil infertility include biological organisms (nematodes, termites), restrictive subsoil layers (claypans, ironpans, silt pans, plow pans, etc. ), soil erosion, zones of low soil moisture retention, and other physical...

Doumbia, Mamadou Diosse

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

208

Fiber optic temperature sensor  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Our fiber optic temperature measurement sensor and system is a major improvement over methods currently in use in most industrial processes, and it delivers all of the attributes required simplicity, accuracy, and cost efficiency-to help improve all of these processes. Because temperature is a basic physical attribute of nearly every industrial and commercial process, our system can eventually result in significant improvements in nearly every industrial and commercial process. Many finished goods, and the materials that go into them, are critically dependent on the temperature. The better the temperature measurement, the better quality the goods will be and the more economically they can be produced. The production and transmission of energy requires the monitoring of temperature in motors, circuit breakers, power generating plants, and transmission line equipment. The more reliable and robust the methods for measuring these temperature, the more available, stable, and affordable the supply of energy will become. The world is increasingly realizing the threats to health and safety of toxic or otherwise undesirable by products of the industrial economy in the environment. Cleanup of such contamination often depends on techniques that require the constant monitoring of temperature in extremely hazardous environments, which can damage most conventional temperature sensors and which are dangerous for operating personnel. Our system makes such monitoring safer and more economical.

Rabold, D.

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

209

Rapid reconnaissance of geothermal prospects using shallow temperature  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Second technical report Second technical report Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Report: Rapid reconnaissance of geothermal prospects using shallow temperature surveys. Second technical report Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: The previously examined geothermal sites at Long Valley and Coso were studied in much greater detail. Techniques for correcting the 2-m temperature data were evaluated. Using a preliminary model and analysis of the Coso data, the importance of measuring soil thermal diffusivity data at each temperature probe site was shown. Corrected 2-m temperature anomaly at Coso was compared with a low altitude aeromagnetic anomaly and an anomaly outlined by electrical resistivity methods obtained independently. Preliminary tests were made with a simple thermal conductivity probe

210

High temperature probe  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A high temperature probe for sampling, for example, smokestack fumes, and is able to withstand temperatures of 3000.degree. F. The probe is constructed so as to prevent leakage via the seal by placing the seal inside the water jacket whereby the seal is not exposed to high temperature, which destroys the seal. The sample inlet of the probe is also provided with cooling fins about the area of the seal to provide additional cooling to prevent the seal from being destroyed. Also, a heated jacket is provided for maintaining the temperature of the gas being tested as it passes through the probe. The probe includes pressure sensing means for determining the flow velocity of an efficient being sampled. In addition, thermocouples are located in various places on the probe to monitor the temperature of the gas passing there through.

Swan, Raymond A. (Fremont, CA)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

211

19th World Congress of Soil Science, Soil solutions for a changing world, Brisbane, Australia 1-6 August 2010  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

). The investigated ES were climate regulation through carbon sequestration in soil and biomass, soil conservation of these results are discussed. Key Words Land use change, socioeconomic drivers, carbon sequestration, soil

Boyer, Edmond

212

Effect of Mineral and Organic Soil Constituents on Microbial Mineralization of Organic Compounds in a Natural Soil  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...remediation technology of in situ soil washing (10, 28). Most modern surfactants...Knaebel and Vestal (20). The surfactant-soil constituent complexes were added...small amount (100 mg) of the surfactant-soil constituent complex was mixed...

David B. Knaebel; Thomas W. Federle; Drew C. McAvoy; J. Robie Vestal

1994-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

213

Accumulation and replacement of exchangeable sodium in soils of Southeast Texas under turfgrass and its effect on soil infiltration rate  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in soils of this area. This study assessed the degree of Na accumulation on cation exchange sites as affected by gypsum treatments in soils that support turfgrass (bermudagrass) and the response of soil infiltration rate to different rates of gypsum...

Aydemir, Salih

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

214

SOME SOIL FACTORS AFFECTING TREE GROWTH  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...characterized by measuring the water held by a soil at varying...1931 ). MATTSON, S, Electrodialysis of the colloidal soil...normal entrance of both water and mineral nutrients...adequately controlled, any treatment which either de-creases...normal entrance of both water and mineral nutrients...

ROBT. M. SALTER

1940-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

215

Process for removing polychlorinated biphenyls from soil  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The present invention relates to a method of removing polychlorinated biphenyls from soil. The polychlorinated biphenyls are extracted from the soil by employing a liquid organic solvent dispersed in water in the ratio of about 1:3 to 3:1. The organic solvent includes such materials as short-chain hydrocarbons including kerosene or gasoline which are immiscible with water and are nonpolar. The organic solvent has a greater affinity for the PCB's than the soil so as to extract the PCB's from the soil upon contact. The organic solvent phase is separated from the suspended soil and water phase and distilled for permitting the recycle of the organic solvent phase and the concentration of the PCB's in the remaining organic phase. The present process can be satisfactorily practiced with soil containing 10 to 20% petroleum-based oils and organic fluids such as used in transformers and cutting fluids, coolants and the like which contain PCB's. The subject method provides for the removal of a sufficient concentration of PCB's from the soil to provide the soil with a level of PCB's within the guidelines of the Environmental Protection Agency.

Hancher, C.W.; Saunders, M.B.; Googin, J.M.

1984-11-16T23:59:59.000Z

216

CCA Training : Soil and Water Management  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

dry 25,000,000 acresa Includes both external surfaces and surfaces between crystal plates. #12;The and nutrient transformations · Associated with soil porosity #12;Soil Physical Properties: Structure Properties: Structure · Structure type = aggregation has different shape and varies with depth ­Granular

Balser, Teri C.

217

Analysis of large soil samples for actinides  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method of analyzing relatively large soil samples for actinides by employing a separation process that includes cerium fluoride precipitation for removing the soil matrix and precipitates plutonium, americium, and curium with cerium and hydrofluoric acid followed by separating these actinides using chromatography cartridges.

Maxwell, III; Sherrod L. (Aiken, SC)

2009-03-24T23:59:59.000Z

218

Soil Salinity Abatement Following Hurricane Ike  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. The initial salt levels in November 2008 had an electrical conductivity (ECe) of the inundated soils as high as 26.7 dS/m. Fifty-four percent of the soils sampled in the 0-15 cm horizons and 9% in the 15-30 cm horizons of the edge area had an ECe >= 4 dS/m...

Mueller, Ryan

2012-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

219

Mineral Soils as Carriers for Rhizobium Inoculants  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...looked healthier and greener than the uninoculated...example, when peat-lime pelleted clover seeds...rhizobia survive better in mineral soil-based inoculant...inoculated plants were greener and looked healthier...ENVIRON. MICROBIOL. MINERAL SOILS AS CARRIERS FOR...

W.-L. Chao; Martin Alexander

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

220

Original article Imidacloprid and pyrimethanil soil sorption  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Original article Imidacloprid and pyrimethanil soil sorption Ettore CAPRIa*, M.G. CAMISAa, F 2000) Abstract ­ The sorption of imidacloprid and pyrimethanil was measured in different soils of southern Europe. Pyrimethanil sorption (Kf=1.2­4.60) was higher than that of imidacloprid (Kf=0

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "2-meter soil temperature" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Isolation and Characterization of Chlorothalonil-Degrading Bacterial Strain H4 and Its Potential for Remediation of Contaminated Soil  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract A chlorothalonil (CTN)-degrading bacterial strain H4 was isolated in this study from a contaminated soil by continuous enrichment culture to identify its characteristics and to investigate its potential for remediation of CTN in contaminated soil. Based on the morphological, physiological and biochemical tests and 16S rDNA sequence analysis, the strain was identified as Stenotrophomonas sp. After liquid culture for 7 d, 82.2% of CTN was removed by strain H4. The isolate could degrade CTN over a broad range of temperatures and pH values, and the optimum conditions for H4 degradation were pH 7.0 and 30 °C. Reintroduction of the bacteria into artificially contaminated soil resulted in substantial removal of CTN (> 50%) after incubation for 14 d. Soil samples treated by H4 showed significant increases (P < 0.05) in soil dehydrogenase activity, soil polyphenol oxidase activity, average well-color development obtained by the Biolog Eco plateTM assay and Shannon-Weaver index, compared with the control. Strain H4 might be a promising candidate for application in the bioremediation of CTN-contaminated soils.

Man-Yun ZHANG; Ying TENG; Ye ZHU; Jun WANG; Yong-Ming LUO; P. CHRISTIE; Zhen-Gao LI; T.K. UDEIGWE

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

222

Estimating Soil C Sequestration Potential in U.S. Agricultural Soils Using the IPCC Approach  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Estimating Soil C Sequestration Potential in U.S. Agricultural Soils Using Estimating Soil C Sequestration Potential in U.S. Agricultural Soils Using the IPCC Approach M. Sperow Natural Resource Ecology Laboratory, Colorado State University Fort Collins, CO 80523 M. Eve US Department of Agriculture, Agricultural Research Service Soil Plant Nutrient Research Unit Fort Collins, Colorado 80522 K. Paustian Natural Resource Ecology Laboratory, Colorado State University Fort Collins, CO 80523 Abstract Field studies across the U.S. have been used to estimate soil C stock changes that result from changes in agricultural management. Data from these studies are not easily extrapolated to reflect changes at a national scale because soils and climate vary locally and regionally. These studies are also limited to addressing existing changes in

223

Mechanisms controlling soil carbon turnover and their potential...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

controlling soil carbon turnover and their potential application for enhancing carbon sequestration . Mechanisms controlling soil carbon turnover and their potential application...

224

Slick Rock Archived Soil & Groundwater Master Reports | Department...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Soil & Groundwater Master Reports Slick Rock - Old North Continent Slick Rock - Union Carbide More Documents & Publications South Valley Archived Soil & Groundwater Master Reports...

225

Dynamics of decadally cycling carbon in subsurface soils  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

dynamics in a California conifer forest, Soil Sci. Soc. Am.in a range of temperate conifer forest soils, Global Change

Koarashi, Jun; Hockaday, William C; Masiello, Caroline A; Trumbore, Susan E

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

226

Measurement of advective soil gas flux: Results of field and...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Measurement of advective soil gas flux: Results of field and laboratory experiments with CO2. Measurement of advective soil gas flux: Results of field and laboratory experiments...

227

Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site Archived Soil & Groundwater...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site Archived Soil & Groundwater Master Reports Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site Archived Soil & Groundwater Master Reports Rocky...

228

Soil Gas Sampling At Kilauea East Rift Geothermal Area (Cox,...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Soil Gas Sampling At Kilauea East Rift Geothermal Area (Cox, 1980) Exploration Activity Details Location Kilauea East Rift Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Soil Gas Sampling...

229

Measuring spatial variability in soil characteristics  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The present invention provides systems and methods for measuring a load force associated with pulling a farm implement through soil that is used to generate a spatially variable map that represents the spatial variability of the physical characteristics of the soil. An instrumented hitch pin configured to measure a load force is provided that measures the load force generated by a farm implement when the farm implement is connected with a tractor and pulled through or across soil. Each time a load force is measured, a global positioning system identifies the location of the measurement. This data is stored and analyzed to generate a spatially variable map of the soil. This map is representative of the physical characteristics of the soil, which are inferred from the magnitude of the load force.

Hoskinson, Reed L. (Rigby, ID); Svoboda, John M. (Idaho Falls, ID); Sawyer, J. Wayne (Hampton, VA); Hess, John R. (Ashton, ID); Hess, J. Richard (Idaho Falls, ID)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

230

Fever and Body Temperature  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Fever and Body Temperature Fever and Body Temperature Name: Ying Location: N/A Country: N/A Date: N/A Question: Hi, I have a few questions that I want to ask you: Why does your body chose to raise its temperature when you have a fever? Replies: Most bacteria and viruses that live in your body grow best at body temperature. They don't grow very well when the temperature is raised. When there are bacteria in your body they give off chemicals that signal white blood cells to come to try to eat them and also affect an area in your brain called the hypothalamus. This part of the brain controls alot of the automatic functions in your body and is also the site of your body's "thermostat". When the chemicals from the bacteria circulate through the hypothalamus it sets the body's temperature higher. This is called a fever. Your body kind of tries to "sweat out" the bacteria and kill them with a higher temperature. Some scientists question whether trying to bring down a fever is the best thing to do. If it isn't too high, some believe we should just let it work

231

Maintaining body temperature  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Maintaining body temperature Maintaining body temperature Name: Jeff Location: N/A Country: N/A Date: N/A Question: What keeps the human body at a constant temperature of 98.6? Replies: Maintaining body temperature is very complex. It also takes a lot of energy. About 80% of the energy from the food you eat goes to maintaining body temperature. Basically, the chemical reactions of metabolism of stored food, especially fats, generate heat as a by product. This heat warms the body. The brain reads temperature and controls to some extent the rate of this metabolism. There are also many other mechanisms triggered by the brain to keep the core of your body warm, even if the periphery (skin) is cold. Blood vessels to the fingers and toes constrict, so that the cold air doesn't cool the blood too much, so that cooled blood doesn't cool down the heart and brain when it returns. In severe cases, your body will sacrifice a finger or a toe to keep you from dying of cold core temperature (frostbite: it saves your life!). Also the brain can order a lot of muscles to contract rapidly. This generates a lot of heat quickly, a response called shivering. There's much more to this exciting field of research.

232

A study of the homogenization of soils  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In accordance with US Environmental Protection Agency (US EPA) regulations, areas of land that have been contaminated must be returned to an environmental condition that permits less restrictive forms of use. In anticipation of being listed as an EPA Superfund Site, the United States Department of Energy`s (US DOE) Nevada Test Site (NTS) is evaluating existing the technologies, and supporting the development of new technologies, for the removal of plutonium contaminants from soils. During the 1950s, DOE conducted a series of tests on the NTS wherein attempts were made to detonate nuclear weapons by igniting charges of high explosives packed around the weapons` warheads. While the warheads never achieved criticality, each test disseminated particulate plutonium over several square miles, principally in Area 11 of the NTS.DOE`s Nevada Operations Office has committed to a Plutonium In Soils Integrated Demonstration Project (PuID) to evaluate existing and developmental technologies for the safe removal of plutonium contamination from soils. It is DOE`s intention to provide approximately one ton of Area 11 soil, traced with a non-radioactive plutonium surrogate, to each of several companies with expertise in the removal of soil contaminants. These companies have expressed an interest in contracting with DOE for remediation of NTS soils. DOE wishes to evaluate each company`s process in an unbiased and statistically justifiable manner. For this reason, DOE must provide to each company a large sample of soil for prototype testing. The soil must be homogenized such that the representativeness of each split is well documented and defensible. The process of uniformly mixing large volumes of soil has not been addressed, to our knowledge, in the hydrogeologic, soil science or mining literature. Several mixing devices are currently being evaluated by DOE for use in the PuID. This report describes the results of some initial experimentation with a small cement mixer.

Giovine, L.R.S.; Miller, F.L. Jr.

1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

233

Moderate Temperature | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Moderate Temperature Moderate Temperature Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Print PDF Sanyal Temperature Classification: Moderate Temperature Dictionary.png Moderate Temperature: No definition has been provided for this term. Add a Definition Sanyal Temp Classification This temperature scheme was developed by Sanyal in 2005 at the request of DOE and GEA, as reported in Classification of Geothermal Systems: A Possible Scheme. Extremely Low Temperature Very Low Temperature Low Temperature Moderate Temperature High Temperature Ultra High Temperature Steam Field Reservoir fluid between 190°C and 230°C is considered by Sanyal to be "moderate temperature." "The next higher resource temperature limit is chosen as 230°C, which is lower than the minimum initial resource temperature encountered in

234

Biogenesis (trade name) soil washing technology: Innovative technology evaluation report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Soil washing technologies are designed to transfer contaminants from soil to a liquid phase. The BioGenesis Soil Washing Technology uses soil washing with a proprietary surfactant solution to transfer organic contaminants from soils to wastewater. The BioGenesis soil washing process was evaluated under the SITE program at a refinery where soils were contaminated with crude oil. Results of chemical analyses show that levels of total recoverable petroleum hydrocarbons (TRPH), an indicator of degraded crude oil, decreased by 65 to 73 percent in washed soils. The TRPH in residual soils were allowed to biodegrade for an additional 120 days. Results indicate that soil washing and biodegradation removed 85 to 88 percent of TRPH in treated soils. The Innovative Technology Evaluation Report provides information on the technology applicability, economic analysis, technology limitations, a technology description, process residuals, site requirements, latest performance data, the technology status, vendors claims, and the source of further information.

Bannerjee, P.

1993-09-02T23:59:59.000Z

235

Crude oil contaminated soil washing in air sparging assisted stirred tank reactor using biosurfactants  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This study investigated the removal of crude oil from soil using air sparging assisted stirred tank reactors. Two surfactants (rhamnolipid and sodium dodecyl sulfate, SDS) were tested and the effects of different parameters (i.e. temperature, surfactant concentrations, washing time, volume/mass ratio) were investigated under varying washing modes namely, stirring only, air sparging only and the combination of stirring and air sparging. The results showed that SDS removed more than 80% crude oil from non-weathered soil samples, whist rhamnolipid showed similar oil removal at the third and fourth levels of the parameters tested. The oil removal ability of the seawater prepared solutions were better than those of the distilled water solutions at the first and second levels of temperature and concentration of surfactant solutions. This approach of soil washing was noted to be effective in reducing the amount of oil in soil. Therefore we suggested that a field scale test be conducted to assess the efficiency of these surfactants.

Kingsley Urum; Turgay Pekdemir; David Ross; Steve Grigson

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

236

ARM - Measurement - Atmospheric temperature  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

temperature temperature ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Measurement : Atmospheric temperature The temperature indicated by a thermometer exposed to the air in a place sheltered from direct solar radiation. Categories Atmospheric State Instruments The above measurement is considered scientifically relevant for the following instruments. Refer to the datastream (netcdf) file headers of each instrument for a list of all available measurements, including those recorded for diagnostic or quality assurance purposes. ARM Instruments AERI : Atmospheric Emitted Radiance Interferometer SONDE : Balloon-Borne Sounding System CO2FLX : Carbon Dioxide Flux Measurement Systems ECOR : Eddy Correlation Flux Measurement System

237

ARM - Measurement - Virtual temperature  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

govMeasurementsVirtual temperature govMeasurementsVirtual temperature ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Measurement : Virtual temperature The virtual temperature Tv = T(1 + rv/{epsilon}), where rv is the mixing ratio, and {epsilon} is the ratio of the gas constants of air and water vapor ( 0.622). Categories Atmospheric State Instruments The above measurement is considered scientifically relevant for the following instruments. Refer to the datastream (netcdf) file headers of each instrument for a list of all available measurements, including those recorded for diagnostic or quality assurance purposes. ARM Instruments CO2FLX : Carbon Dioxide Flux Measurement Systems MWRP : Microwave Radiometer Profiler RWP : Radar Wind Profiler

238

Temperature-aware microarchitecture  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

With power density and hence cooling costs rising exponentially, processor packaging can no longer be designed for the worst case, and there is an urgent need for runtime processor-level techniques that can regulate operating temperature when the package's ...

Kevin Skadron; Mircea R. Stan; Wei Huang; Sivakumar Velusamy; Karthik Sankaranarayanan; David Tarjan

2003-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

239

Elevated temperature crack propagation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper is a summary of two NASA contracts on high temperature fatigue crack propagation in metals. The first evaluated the ability of fairly simple nonlinear fracture parameters to correlate crack propagation. Hastelloy-X specimens were tested under isothermal and thermomechanical cycling at temperatures up to 980 degrees C (1800 degrees F). The most successful correlating parameter was the crack tip opening displacement derived from the J-integral. The second evaluated the ability of several path-independent integrals to correlate crack propagation behavior. Inconel 718 specimens were tested under isothermal, thermomechanical, temperature gradient, and creep conditions at temperatures up to 650 degrees C (1200 degrees F). The integrals formulated by Blackburn and by Kishimoto correlated the data reasonably well under all test conditions.

Orange, T.W.

1994-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

240

Low temperature cryoprobe  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A portable, hand held probe usable within a small confine to produce a point source of nitrogen or helium at a relatively constant temperatures of 77 degrees Kelvin, is discussed. 3 figs.

Sungaila, Z.F.

1988-04-12T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "2-meter soil temperature" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

High temperature pressure gauge  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A high temperature pressure gauge comprising a pressure gauge positioned in fluid communication with one end of a conduit which has a diaphragm mounted in its other end. The conduit is filled with a low melting metal alloy above the diaphragm for a portion of its length with a high temperature fluid being positioned in the remaining length of the conduit and in the pressure gauge.

Echtler, J. Paul (Pittsburgh, PA); Scandrol, Roy O. (Library, PA)

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

242

Innovative vitrification for soil remediation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of this DOE demonstration program is to validate the performance and operation of the Vortec Cyclone Melting System (CMS{trademark}) for the processing of LLW contaminated soils found at DOE sites. This DOE vitrification demonstration project has successfully progressed through the first two phases. Phase 1 consisted of pilot scale testing with surrogate wastes and the conceptual design of a process plant operating at a generic DOE site. The objective of Phase 2, which is scheduled to be completed the end of FY 95, is to develop a definitive process plant design for the treatment of wastes at a specific DOE facility. During Phase 2, a site specific design was developed for the processing of LLW soils and muds containing TSCA organics and RCRA metal contaminants. Phase 3 will consist of a full scale demonstration at the DOE gaseous diffusion plant located in Paducah, KY. Several DOE sites were evaluated for potential application of the technology. Paducah was selected for the demonstration program because of their urgent waste remediation needs as well as their strong management and cost sharing financial support for the project. During Phase 2, the basic nitrification process design was modified to meet the specific needs of the new waste streams available at Paducah. The system design developed for Paducah has significantly enhanced the processing capabilities of the Vortec vitrification process. The overall system design now includes the capability to shred entire drums and drum packs containing mud, concrete, plastics and PCB`s as well as bulk waste materials. This enhanced processing capability will substantially expand the total DOE waste remediation applications of the technology.

Jetta, N.W.; Patten, J.S.; Hart, J.G.

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

243

Temperature maintained battery system  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A chassis contains a battery charger connected to a multi-cell battery. The charger receives direct current from an external direct current power source and has means to automatically selectively charge the battery in accordance with a preselected charging program relating to temperature adjusted state of discharge of the battery. A heater device is positioned within the chassis which includes heater elements and a thermal switch which activates the heater elements to maintain the battery above a certain predetermined temperature in accordance with preselected temperature conditions occurring within the chassis. A cooling device within the chassis includes a cooler regulator, a temperature sensor, and peltier effect cooler elements. The cooler regulator activates and deactivates the peltier cooler elements in accordance with preselected temperature conditions within the chassis sensed by the temperature sensor. Various vehicle function circuitry may also be positioned within the chassis. The contents of the chassis are positioned to form a passage proximate the battery in communication with an inlet and outlet in the chassis to receive air for cooling purposes from an external source.

Newman, W.A.

1980-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

244

High Temperature | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Temperature Temperature Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Print PDF Sanyal Temperature Classification: High Temperature Dictionary.png High Temperature: No definition has been provided for this term. Add a Definition Sanyal Temp Classification This temperature scheme was developed by Sanyal in 2005 at the request of DOE and GEA, as reported in Classification of Geothermal Systems: A Possible Scheme. Extremely Low Temperature Very Low Temperature Low Temperature Moderate Temperature High Temperature Ultra High Temperature Steam Field Reservoir fluid between 230°C and 300°C is considered by Sanyal to be "high temperature." "Above a temperature level of 230°C, the reservoir would be expected to become two-phase at some point during exploitation. The next higher

245

WATER AS A REAGENT FOR SOIL REMEDIATION  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

SRI International conducted experiments in a two-year, two-phase process to develop and evaluate hydrothermal extraction technology, also known as hot water extraction (HWE) technology, to separate petroleum-related contaminants and other hazardous pollutants from soil and sediments. In this process, water with added electrolytes (inexpensive and environmentally friendly) is used as the extracting solvent under subcritical conditions (150-300 C). The use of electrolytes allows us to operate reactors under mild conditions and to obtain high separation efficiencies that were hitherto impossible. Unlike common organic solvents, water under subcritical conditions dissolves both organics and inorganics, thus allowing opportunities for separation of both organic and inorganic material from soil. In developing this technology, our systematic approach was to (1) establish fundamental solubility data, (2) conduct treatability studies with industrial soils, and (3) perform a bench-scale demonstration using a highly contaminated soil. The bench-scale demonstration of the process has shown great promise. The next step of the development process is the successful pilot demonstration of this technology. Once pilot tested, this technology can be implemented quite easily, since most of the basic components are readily available from mature technologies (e.g., steam stripping, soil washing, thermal desorption). The implementation of this technology will revolutionize the conventional use of water in soil remediation technologies and will provide a stand-alone technology for removal of both volatile and heavy components from contaminated soil.

Indira S. Jayaweera; Montserrat Marti-Perez; Jordi Diaz-Ferrero; Angel Sanjurjo

2001-11-12T23:59:59.000Z

246

A petroleum contaminated soil bioremediation facility  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The amount of petroleum contaminated soil (PCS) at the Savannah River site (SRS) that has been identified, excavated and is currently in storage has increased several fold during the last few years. Several factors have contributed to this problem: (1) South Carolina Department of Health ad Environmental control (SCDHEC) lowered the sanitary landfill maximum concentration for total petroleum hydrocarbons (TPH) in the soil from 500 to 100 parts per million (ppm), (2) removal and replacement of underground storage tanks at several sites, (3) most recently SCDHEC disallowed aeration for treatment of contaminated soil, and (4) discovery of several very large contaminated areas of soil associated with leaking underground storage tanks (LUST), leaking pipes, disposal areas, and spills. Thus, SRS has an urgent need to remediate large quantities of contaminated soil that are currently stockpiled and the anticipated contaminated soils to be generated from accidental spills. As long as we utilize petroleum based compounds at the site, we will continue to generate contaminated soil that will require remediation.

Lombard, K.; Hazen, T.

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

247

Acuff Soils: Distribution, Importance, Variability, and Management.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

at the High Plains Rolling Plains boundary on the southeast, and a catena of sandy soils extending from Stanton, Texas, to Clovis, New Mexico, on the west. Within this roughly crescent-shaped area, Acuff soils occupy about 21 percent of the land surface.... The area of Acuff soils ranges from aboutl01?lOmin. to 103?50 min. west longitude and from about 32?10 min. to 35?40 min. north latitude Eleva tion of the surface ranges from abou t 2,500 to 4,200 feet above mean sea level. The area is in a subhumid...

Unger, Paul W.; Pringle, Fred B.; Blackstock, Dan A.

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

248

Assessing inhalation exposure from airborne soil contaminants  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A method of estimation of inhalation exposure to airborne soil contaminants is presented. this method is derived from studies of airborne soil particles with radioactive tags. The concentration of contaminants in air (g/m{sup 3}) can be derived from the product of M, the suspended respirable dust mass concentration (g/m{sup 3}), S, the concentration of contaminant in the soil (g/g), and E{sub f}, an enhancement factor. Typical measurement methods and values of M, and E{sub f} are given along with highlights of experiences with this method.

Shinn, J.H.

1998-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

249

Ecological Screening Values for Surface Water, Sediment, and Soil  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document provides a comprehensive listing of ecological screening values for surface water, sediment, and soil.

Friday, G. P.

1999-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

250

Applicability of CS616 Soil Water Sensors for South  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

site water balance Image from: (Migliaccio 2007) #12;Background ­ Soil Water Sensors Time DomainApplicability of CS616 Soil Water Sensors for South Florida Urban Soils Kevin Koryto Water: Determine if CS616 soil water sensors are functioning adequately at field site. Hypothesis: Presence of air

Migliaccio, Kati White

251

Manoj Shukla Assistant Professor of Environmental Soil Physics,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of scales, and carbon sequestration in soils Professional Activities and Honors (last 6 years) Present

Johnson, Eric E.

252

On-Site Wastewater Treatment Systems: Soil Particle Analysis Procedure  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Soil is an important component of an on-site wastewater treatment system. This publication explains the composition of soils, the sizing of soil particles, and the ways soil particles are analyzed to determine whether a site is suitable for a...

Lesikar, Bruce J.

2005-08-18T23:59:59.000Z

253

Soils of Amazonia with particular reference to the RAINFOR sites  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

they develop over unconsolidated weathering materials ofthin soils derived from unconsolidated material and lacking

Quesada, C. A; Lloyd, J.; Anderson, L. O; Fyllas, N. M; Schwarz, M.; Czimczik, C. I

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

254

www.VadoseZoneJournal.org Soil Architecture and  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

www.VadoseZoneJournal.org Soil Architecture and Physicochemical Func ons: An Introduc on Soils func engineers with the best educa on possible. The 16 papers in this special sec on on soil architecture measurement, visualiza on, and modeling of soil structure (architecture) and physical, chemical

Wildenschild, Dorthe

255

Extraction agents for the removal of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) from soil in soil washing technologies  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in soil have been recognised as a serious health and environmental issue due to their carcinogenic, mutagenic and teratogenic properties. One of the commonly employed soil remediation techniques to clean up such contamination is soil washing or solvent extraction. The main factor which governs the efficiency of this process is the solubility of \\{PAHs\\} in the extraction agent. Past field-scale soil washing treatments for PAH-contaminated soil have mainly employed organic solvents or water which is either toxic and costly or inefficient in removing higher molecular weight PAHs. Thus, the present article aims to provide a review and discussion of the alternative extraction agents that have been studied, including surfactants, biosurfactants, microemulsions, natural surfactants, cyclodextrins, vegetable oil and solution with solid phase particles. These extraction agents have been found to remove \\{PAHs\\} from soil at percentages ranging from 47 to 100% for various PAHs.

Ee Von Lau; Suyin Gan; Hoon Kiat Ng; Phaik Eong Poh

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

256

Low Temperature | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Temperature Temperature Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Print PDF Sanyal Temperature Classification: Low Temperature Dictionary.png Low Temperature: No definition has been provided for this term. Add a Definition Sanyal Temp Classification This temperature scheme was developed by Sanyal in 2005 at the request of DOE and GEA, as reported in Classification of Geothermal Systems: A Possible Scheme. Extremely Low Temperature Very Low Temperature Low Temperature Moderate Temperature High Temperature Ultra High Temperature Steam Field Reservoir fluid between 150°C and 190°C is considered by Sanyal to be "low temperature." "The mobile fluid phase in these reservoirs is liquid water. A number of commercial power projects have been operated over the last two decades

257

High temperature thermometric phosphors  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A high temperature phosphor consists essentially of a material having the general formula LuPO.sub.4 :Dy.sub.(x),Eu.sub.y) wherein: 0.1 wt %.ltoreq.x.ltoreq.20 wt % and 0.1 wt %.ltoreq.y.ltoreq.20 wt %. The high temperature phosphor is in contact with an article whose temperature is to be determined. The article having the phosphor in contact with it is placed in the environment for which the temperature of the article is to be determined. The phosphor is excited by a laser causing the phosphor to fluoresce. The emission from the phosphor is optically focused into a beam-splitting mirror which separates the emission into two separate emissions, the emission caused by the dysprosium dopant and the emission caused by the europium dopent. The separated emissions are optically filtered and the intensities of the emission are detected and measured. The ratio of the intensity of each emission is determined and the temperature of the article is calculated from the ratio of the intensities of the separate emissions.

Allison, Stephen W. (Knoxville, TN); Cates, Michael R. (Oak Ridge, TN); Boatner, Lynn A. (Oak Ridge, TN); Gillies, George T. (Earlysville, VA)

1999-03-23T23:59:59.000Z

258

Temperature Data Evaluation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Groundwater temperature is sensitive to the competing processes of heat flow from below the advective transport of heat by groundwater flow. Because groundwater temperature is sensitive to conductive and advective processes, groundwater temperature may be utilized as a tracer to further constrain the uncertainty of predictions of advective radionuclide transport models constructed for the Nevada Test Site (NTS). Since heat transport, geochemical, and hydrologic models for a given area must all be consistent, uncertainty can be reduced by devaluing the weight of those models that do not match estimated heat flow. The objective of this study was to identify the quantity and quality of available heat flow data at the NTS. One-hundred-forty-five temperature logs from 63 boreholes were examined. Thirteen were found to have temperature profiles suitable for the determination of heat flow values from one or more intervals within the boreholes. If sufficient spatially distributed heat flow values are obtained, a heat transport model coupled to a hydrologic model may be used to reduce the uncertainty of a nonisothermal hydrologic model of the NTS.

Gillespie, David

2003-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

259

Phosphorus release and retention by soils of natural isolated wetlands  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Hydrological restoration of historically isolated wetlands may mitigate phosphorus (P) loss. The objectives of this study were to quantify P in soil, and to determine the effect of (1) soil characteristics on P release, and (2) antecedent soil hydrological conditions on P dynamics. Humic/fulvic acid bound P and residual P accounted for majority of P (>78%) in surface soils. Soils with highest nutrient status and labile P fractions released most P during initial flooding. Phosphorus dynamics during additional flooding were dependent on soil characteristics, antecedent soil hydrological conditions, and P levels in the water. Phosphorus retention varied between 0.3 and 8 mg m-2 d-1.

E.J. Dunne; K.R. Reddy; M.W. Clark

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

260

Temperature initiated passive cooling system  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A passive cooling system for cooling an enclosure only when the enclosure temperature exceeds a maximum standby temperature comprises a passive heat transfer loop containing heat transfer fluid having a particular thermodynamic critical point temperature just above the maximum standby temperature. An upper portion of the heat transfer loop is insulated to prevent two phase operation below the maximum standby temperature. 1 fig.

Forsberg, C.W.

1994-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "2-meter soil temperature" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Global Soil Data on CD-ROM, Nov. 2000  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Available on CD-ROM Available on CD-ROM The ORNL DAAC now offers a CD-ROM with global soil data prepared by the Global Soil Data Task for the International Geosphere-Biosphere Programme (IGBP) Data and Information Services (DIS). The CD is entitled "Global Soil Data Products CD-ROM (IGBP-DIS)." The new CD includes the IGBP's SoilData System, which links the Global Pedon Database to the FAO/UNESCO Digital Soil Map of the World. The system allows users to generate maps and data sets for a range of original and derived soil parameters for any part of the world at soil depths and resolutions selected by the user. The CD also contains 1125 soil profiles that provide information about fundamental soil properties (e.g., depth, particle size distribution, bulk density, extractable nutrient composition) for soil classes based on FAO

262

Growth of Phymatotrichum omnivorum in Branyon and Weswood soils: and its interactions with other soil microorganisms  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Pathogen vi vi I xiv Control of Phymatotr ichum omnivorum Interactions with Competitive Microflora Interactions wi th Antagonistic Micruflora Suppr essive Soils Survival of Antagonists 10 MATERIALS AND METHODS Selection of Soil 14 Source... 10 cm from the inoculum. Trial 1 67 14. P1ycel i a) growth in ster i le ( top ) and nonster i le & bottom & Br anyon clay pr i or to coming in contact with chitin-amended soil. Notice the browning of the mycelium in the nonsterile soil 69 15...

Powell, Rebecca Lynn

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

263

temperature | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

temperature temperature Dataset Summary Description Freedom Field is a not-for-profit organization formed to facilitate development and commercialization of renewable energy solutions. The organization has installed a variety of renewable energy generating technologies at their facility (located at Rock River Water Reclamation in Rockford, IL), with the intention of serving as a demonstration facility. The facility monitors data (at 5-minute intervals) from a weather station, 12.4 kW of PV panels (56 220-watt panels), a 10kW wind turbine (HAWT), a 1.2 kW wind turbine (VAWT), an absorption cooling system, and biogas burners. Source Freedom Field Date Released July 19th, 2011 (3 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords biogas monitoring data PV radiance solar temperature

264

A Furnace Temperature Regulator  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Synopsis.—By making the heating coil of an electric furnace one arm of a wheatstone bridge, and combining this with a galvanometer regulator, thus keeping constant the resistance of the coil, we can, regardless of variations in the current supply, and with no attention, maintain constant the temperature of furnaces not too directly influenced by the temperature of the room, or where the surrounding air is kept constant. The power available in this regulator is relatively very great indeed; nothing has to be inserted within the furnace cavity, and the lag is practically nothing; the regulator is often almost at its best under conditions most unfavorable to other regulators. It has held a small furnace constant to 0.1° for hours at temperatures from 500° to 1400°.

Walter P. White and Leason H. Adams.

1919-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

265

Temperature profile detector  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Disclosed is a temperature profile detector shown as a tubular enclosure surrounding an elongated electrical conductor having a plurality of meltable conductive segments surrounding it. Duplicative meltable segments are spaced apart from one another along the length of the enclosure. Electrical insulators surround these elements to confine molten material from the segments in bridging contact between the conductor and a second electrical conductor, which might be the confining tube. The location and rate of growth of the resulting short circuits between the two conductors can be monitored by measuring changes in electrical resistance between terminals at both ends of the two conductors. Additional conductors and separate sets of meltable segments operational at differing temperatures can be monitored simultaneously for measuring different temperature profiles. 8 figs.

Tokarz, R.D.

1983-10-11T23:59:59.000Z

266

Temperature, heat flow maps and temperature gradient holes |...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Temperature, heat flow maps and temperature gradient holes Author T. G. Zacharakis Organization Colorado Geological Survey in Cooperation with the U.S. Department of Energy...

267

Ch. VII, Temperature, heat flow maps and temperature gradient...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Ch. VII, Temperature, heat flow maps and temperature gradient holes Author T. G. Zacharakis Editor T. G. Zacharakis Published Colorado Geological Survey in Cooperation with the...

268

Adsorption and transport of pyrithiobac in soils  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

adsorbents (Gonzales bentonite, Georgia kaolinite, goethite, and Michigan peat) and four soils (Houston Black c, Hidalgo sl, Orelia scl, and Ships sic) having a wide range of physical and chemical properties. Adsorption isotherms were developed...

Matocha, Christopher John

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

269

Biodegradation of rubber particles in soil  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The biodegradation of rubber particles in rubber-soil mixtures at different rubber contents was monitored by the carbon dioxide production. The cumulative carbon dioxide production was modelled according to a two...

Guus T. G. Keursten; Pieter H. Groenevelt

1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

270

Magnetic Resonance Imaging in Soil Science  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Magnetic resonance imaging is based upon the physical effect of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) of spin bearing atomic...1991; Blümich, 2000...). The most important NMR active nuclei in soil science applications...

Andreas Pohlmeier

2014-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

271

Soil Building as a Climate Mitigation Strategy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

capacity? Promote soil formation Prevent erosion (increase cohesion, shield water and wind energy, The City College of New York nkrakauer@ccny.cuny.edu #12;"drought may become so widespread and so severe

Krakauer, Nir Y.

272

Soil Moisture Sensor - Energy Innovation Portal  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Marketing SummaryIn the agriculture industry, it is critical to know the water content in the soil in order to maintain the viability and profitability of an agriculture...

273

Engineered Polymeric Nanoparticles for Soil Remediation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

compds. in soil-water systems in which surfactants play a role in contaminant remediation or facilitated transport. ... (9)?Abdul, A. S.; Ang, C. C. Ground Water 1994, 32, 727. ...

Warapong Tungittiplakorn; Leonard W. Lion; Claude Cohen; Ju-Young Kim

2004-01-28T23:59:59.000Z

274

Studies on the soil fungi of Iraq  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

An investigation was carried out on soil fungi in the area around Basrah. Of the 37 species isolated, 3 belong to the phycomycetes, 32 to the fungi imperfecti and 2 to the Mycelia sterilia. In general, the myc...

A L S Ismail; Samir K Abdullah

1977-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

275

Soil phosphorus status in potato fields  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

P deficiency in irrigated potatoes. Can. J. Plant Sci. 68,soil test P levels in these potato fields. References He,Introduction The potato crop requires substantial amounts of

He, Z.; Honeycutt, C. W.; Zhang, H.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

276

The Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) Mission  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) mission is one of the first Earth observation satellites being developed by NASA in response to the National Research Council's Decadal Survey. SMAP will make global measurements of ...

Entekhabi, Dara

277

What Happens to Nitrogen in Soils?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This publication explains the chemistry of nitrogen, the processes by which nitrogen is added to and removed from the soil, and methods of preventing nitrogen losses on agricultural lands....

Provin, Tony; Hossner, L. R.

2001-07-09T23:59:59.000Z

278

The moisture retention characteristic of four soils from Niger  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of air at the surface is relatively facile. Hydraulic Conductivity Redistribution of soil water affects plant growth, and the rate and duration of internal moisture flow determines 19 effective soil water storage. This is important to remember when... in sorption (wetting). This characteristic of wetting versus drying for a soil is known as the hysteresis effect (Lal 1979a). Hillel (1980) notes that hysteresis is important for coarse-textured soils in the process of redistribution of soil water...

Landeck, Jonathon Keith

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

279

Fluorescent temperature sensor  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The present invention is a fluorescent temperature sensor or optical thermometer. The sensor includes a solution of 1,3-bis(1-pyrenyl)propane within a 1-butyl-1-1-methylpyrrolidinium bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)imide ionic liquid solvent. The 1,3-bis(1-pyrenyl)propane remains unassociated when in the ground state while in solution. When subjected to UV light, an excited state is produced that exists in equilibrium with an excimer. The position of the equilibrium between the two excited states is temperature dependent.

Baker, Gary A [Los Alamos, NM; Baker, Sheila N [Los Alamos, NM; McCleskey, T Mark [Los Alamos, NM

2009-03-03T23:59:59.000Z

280

High Temperature Superconductors  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract A brief review of the phenomenology of superconductivity, the distinction between type I and type II superconductors, and the application of type II superconductors is followed by a history of the theory of conventional superconductivity. Unconventional high-temperature superconductivity in the copper oxides is reviewed as a phenomenon occurring in narrow two-dimensional bands where the time for an electron transfer between like atoms is comparable to the period of an optical-mode lattice vibration. A family of iron pnictides containing layers of iron atoms may not require an alternative explanation of its high-temperature superconductivity.

J.B. Goodenough

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "2-meter soil temperature" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Possibilities of Sulphur as a Soil Amendment.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

TEXAS AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION A. B. CONNER, DIRECTOR COLLEGE STATION, BRAZOS COUNTY, TEXAS BULLETIN NO. 414 AUGUST, 1930 DIVISION OF CHEMISTRY POSSIBILITIES OF SULPHUR AS A - SOIL AMENDMENT AGRICULTURAL AND MECHANICAL COLLEGE OF TEXAS... . --- Agronomist B. C. LANGLEY,'B. S., Assistant in Soils PUBLICATIONS: A. D. JACKSON, Chief VETERINARY SCIENCE: *M. FRANCIS, D. V. M., Chief. H SCHMIDT D V M Veferznarian E: JUNGHE~R, D. V. M.. Veterinarran W T HARDY D V RI., Veterinnrian F.'E.'CARROL;, D...

Fraps, G. S. (George Stronach)

1930-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

282

Procedures for sampling radium-contaminated soils  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Two procedures for sampling the surface layer (0 to 15 centimeters) of radium-contaminated soil are recommended for use in remedial action projects. Both procedures adhere to the philosophy that soil samples should have constant geometry and constant volume in order to ensure uniformity. In the first procedure, a ''cookie cutter'' fashioned from pipe or steel plate, is driven to the desired depth by means of a slide hammer, and the sample extracted as a core or plug. The second procedure requires use of a template to outline the sampling area, from which the sample is obtained using a trowel or spoon. Sampling to the desired depth must then be performed incrementally. Selection of one procedure over the other is governed primarily by soil conditions, the cookie cutter being effective in nongravelly soils, and the template procedure appropriate for use in both gravelly and nongravelly soils. In any event, a minimum sample volume of 1000 cubic centimeters is recommended. The step-by-step procedures are accompanied by a description of the minimum requirements for sample documentation. Transport of the soil samples from the field is then addressed in a discussion of the federal regulations for shipping radioactive materials. Interpretation of those regulations, particularly in light of their application to remedial action soil-sampling programs, is provided in the form of guidance and suggested procedures. Due to the complex nature of the regulations, however, there is no guarantee that our interpretations of them are complete or entirely accurate. Preparation of soil samples for radium-226 analysis by means of gamma-ray spectroscopy is described.

Fleischhauer, H.L.

1985-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

283

Organic Phosphoric Acid of the Soil.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

TEXAS AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATIONS BULLETIN NO. +6CT /36 CHEMICAL SECTION, FEBRUARY, 191 1 I TECHNICAL BULLETIN Organic Phosphoric Acid of the Soil BY G. S. FRAPS, Chemist POSTOFFICE College Station, Brazos County, 'Texas. ,\\ustin... . ................................................ introduction 5 .............................. hmmonia-Soluble Phosphoric Acid 5 ................ Solubility of Phosphates in Ammonia 6 I Fixation of Phosphoric Acid from Ammonia .......... 7 Effect of Ratio of Soil to Solvent in Extraction of Phos- I I...

Fraps, G. S. (George Stronach)

1911-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

284

The behavior of piles in cohesionless soils  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and the load- settlement behavior of single piles in cohesionless soils is addressed. The available data on instrumerted piles load-tested vertically in sands is collected and analyzed to determine the load transfer characteristics of the soil. A... the distribution of residual stresses in the piles, and methods of obtaining residual stresses from load test results are discussed. Correlations with the results of the Standard Penetration Test are presented and are used to develop a new design procedure which...

Tucker, Larry Milton

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

285

Response of rice to soil phosphorus levels  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

RESPORSE OF RICE TO SOIL PHOSPHORUS LEVELS MOHJQRiD JL ~ QUDDUS Submitted te the Graduate Sohool of the kgrloultural and Mechanical College of Texas im partial fulfillment of the requirements for the legree of IGLSTER OF SCIENCE Luguet~ 1962... Eager Sub)cot& Agronomy RESPONSE OF RICE TO SOIL PHOSPHORUS LEVELS A Thesis KIHAMNAD Ae QUDDUS Approwed as to style and content by& Chairman of Committee Cpt r Head of Department August, 1962 ACKNOWLEDGMENTS The author wishes to express his...

Quddus, Mohammad Abdul

1962-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

286

Soil degradation, global warming and climate impacts  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

will demonstrate one methodology for assessing the potential large-scale impacts of soil degradation on African climates and water resources. In addition it will compare and contrast these impacts to those expected from global warming and compare impacts for differ...- ent watershed regions on the continent. 2. METHODS In order to make a similar comparison between pro- jected climate change scenarios due to global warming © Inter-Research 2001 *E-mail: feddema@ku.edu Soil degradation, global warming and climate...

Feddema, Johannes J.; Freire, Sergio Carneiro

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

287

Survival of Salmonella typhimurium in soil  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

hot (39 C) soil conditions were rapidly lethal to the organism, causing complete die-out within 3 weeks, Some cool, moist samples yielded via- ble Salmonella after 12 weeks of incubation. Inoculum carrier had no beneficial effect on survival... animal waste may be beneficial for crop production (31, 47), it may contain disease organisms, which, if they persist in manured soil, could be a health hazard for people coming into contact with manured oil (16) and For livestock in contact...

Zibilske, Larry Marvin

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

288

Soil washing: A preliminary assessment of its applicability to Hanford  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Soil washing is being considered for treating soils at the US Department of Energy's (DOE) Hanford Site. As a result of over 50 years of operations to produce plutonium for the US Department of Defense and research for DOE, soils in areas within the Site are contaminated with hazardous wastes and radionuclides. In the soil washing process, contaminated soil is mixed with a liquid and then physically and/or chemically treated to dissolve the contaminants into solution and/or concentrate them in a small fraction of the soil. The purpose of this procedure is to separate the contaminants from the bulk of the soil. The key to successful application is to match the types of contaminants and soil characteristics with physical-chemical methods that perform well under the existing conditions. The applicability of soil washing to Hanford Site contaminated soils must take into account both the characteristics of the oil and the type of contamination. Hanford soils typically contain up to 90% sand, gravel, and cobbles, which generally are favorable characteristics for soil washing. For example, in soil samples from the north pond in the 300 Area, 80% to 90% of the soil particles were larger than 250 {mu}m. The principal contaminants in the soil are radionuclides, heavy metals, and nitrate and sulfate salts. For most of the sites, organic contaminants are either not present or are found in very low concentration. 28 refs., 5 figs., 10 tabs.

Gerber, M A; Freeman, H D; Baker, E G; Riemath, W F

1991-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

289

The influence of soluble anions upon some physical and physico-chemical properties of soils  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Miller soil and solutions of various sodium salts ..................... ..................... . 22 Figure 2. Breaking strength of artificial soil crusts made from Miller soil and solutions of various potassium SaltS .................. ......... 23... Figure 3, Breaking strength of artificial soil crusts made from Lake Charles soil and solutions of various sodium salts ....................................... 24 Figure 4. Breaking strength of artificial soil crusts made from Lake Charles soil...

Longenecker, Donald Edwin

2013-10-04T23:59:59.000Z

290

Temperature differential detection device  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A temperature differential detection device for detecting the temperature differential between predetermined portions of a container wall is disclosed as comprising a Wheatstone bridge circuit for detecting resistance imbalance with a first circuit branch having a first elongated wire element mounted in thermal contact with a predetermined portion of the container wall, a second circuit branch having a second elongated wire element mounted in thermal contact with a second predetermined portion of a container wall with the wire elements having a predetermined temperature-resistant coefficient, an indicator interconnected between the first and second branches remote from the container wall for detecting and indicating resistance imbalance between the first and second wire elements, and connector leads for electrically connecting the wire elements to the remote indicator in order to maintain the respective resistance value relationship between the first and second wire elements. The indicator is calibrated to indicate the detected resistance imbalance in terms of a temperature differential between the first and second wall portions.

Girling, Peter M. (Allentown, PA)

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

291

Chemistry at High Temperatures  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...347 the condensed phase. Both cases are...show the opposite behavior. These predictions...vapors. Condensed phase B203 B + B203 02...complex silicates and hydrates in high-temperature...characterized by phase diagrams (derived...doubt that thou-sands of new chemical materials...

John L. Margrave

1962-02-02T23:59:59.000Z

292

High Temperature Membrane Working Group  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The High Temperature Membrane Working Group consists of government, industry, and university researchers interested in developing high temperature membranes for fuel cells.

293

NON-DESTRUCTIVE SOIL CARBON ANALYZER.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes the feasibility, calibration, and safety considerations of a non-destructive, in situ, quantitative, volumetric soil carbon analytical method based on inelastic neutron scattering (INS). The method can quantify values as low as 0.018 gC/cc, or about 1.2% carbon by weight with high precision under the instrument's configuration and operating conditions reported here. INS is safe and easy to use, residual soil activation declines to background values in under an hour, and no radiological requirements are needed for transporting the instrument. The labor required to obtain soil-carbon data is about 10-fold less than with other methods, and the instrument offers a nearly instantaneous rate of output of carbon-content values. Furthermore, it has the potential to quantify other elements, particularly nitrogen. New instrumentation was developed in response to a research solicitation from the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE LAB 00-09 Carbon Sequestration Research Program) supporting the Terrestrial Carbon Processes (TCP) program of the Office of Science, Biological and Environmental Research (BER). The solicitation called for developing and demonstrating novel techniques for quantitatively measuring changes in soil carbon. The report includes raw data and analyses of a set of proof-of-concept, double-blind studies to evaluate the INS approach in the first phase of developing the instrument. Managing soils so that they sequester massive amounts of carbon was suggested as a means to mitigate the atmospheric buildup of anthropogenic CO{sub 2}. Quantifying changes in the soils' carbon stocks will be essential to evaluating such schemes and documenting their performance. Current methods for quantifying carbon in soil by excavation and core sampling are invasive, slow, labor-intensive and locally destroy the system being observed. Newly emerging technologies, such as Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy and Near-Infrared Spectroscopy, offer soil-carbon analysis; however, these also are invasive and destructive techniques. The INS approach permits quantification in a relatively large volume of soil without disrupting the measurement site. The technique is very fast and provides nearly instantaneous results thereby reducing the cost, and speeding up the rate of analysis. It also has the potential to cover large areas in a mobile scanning mode. These capabilities will significantly advance the tracking carbon sequestration and offer a tool for research in agronomy, forestry, soil ecology and biogeochemistry.

WIELOPOLSKI,L.MITRA,S.HENDREY,G.ORION,I.ROGERS,H.TORBERT,A.PRIOR,S.RUNION,B.

2004-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

294

E-Print Network 3.0 - air soil water Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

iii. Soil-Plant Relationships iv. Cation exchange IV. Pollution of Water, Soil, and Air: (Lecture... unsaturated unsteady water flow X. Gaseous Phase of Soils (Hillel pages...

295

E-Print Network 3.0 - air water soil Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

iii. Soil-Plant Relationships iv. Cation exchange IV. Pollution of Water, Soil, and Air: (Lecture... unsaturated unsteady water flow X. Gaseous Phase of Soils (Hillel pages...

296

E-Print Network 3.0 - affected granular soils Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

platy, prismlike, and blocklike (see Figure 3... ). Soil structure affects soil water movement when a soil is saturated with water. Water can move quickly... between...

297

E-Print Network 3.0 - affecting soil erosion Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Collection: Mathematics 2 Soil Quality Information Sheet Rangeland Soil Quality--Water Erosion Summary: and in roadbeds. Many vegetation and soil properties affect the risk...

298

Water Transfer from Soil to the Atmosphere as Related to Climate and Soil Properties  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

/sec. Conductivity Studies - The conductivity of the Olton loam soil is very low at fairly low soil water pressures corresponding to high contents. This is an asset in preventing evaporation losses, but may be detrimental to crop production in that the crops need...

Wendt, C. W.

299

Kinetics of Ni Sorption in Soils: Roles of Soil Organic Matter and Ni Precipitation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Kinetics of Ni Sorption in Soils: Roles of Soil Organic Matter and Ni Precipitation Zhenqing Shi, Lawrence, Kansas 66045-7609, United States *S Supporting Information ABSTRACT: The kinetics of Ni sorption) precipitates using both experimental studies and kinetic modeling. Batch sorption kinetic experiments were

Sparks, Donald L.

300

DIVISION S-2--SOIL CHEMISTRY Sorption of Pyridine to Suspended Soil Particles Studied by  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

DIVISION S-2--SOIL CHEMISTRY Sorption of Pyridine to Suspended Soil Particles Studied by Deuterium, studies of sorption by spectroscopic tech- niques are very limited. Fourier transform infrared-frequency solid stateshow that the strongest sorption occurs at the weak acidic condition NMR has been used

Herbert, Bruce

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "2-meter soil temperature" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Treatability of PCB-contaminated soils with quicklime (CaO)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The possibility that quicklime (calcium oxide, CaO) can destroy PCBs has received much attention over the past year. Observations at an EPA remediation site, where lime-containing kiln dusts were used for interim stabilization of PCB-containing wastes prompted the EPA to sponsor a small research project to investigate quicklime-PCB interactions. That study reported decreases in PCB content in synthetic, PCB-spiked soil following the application of quicklime and heat. META Environmental, Inc., as a contractor to EPRI, recently completed research designed to evaluate the effectiveness of quicklime for treating PCBs in soil and sand matrices under several reaction conditions, and to examine the underlying dechlorination chemistry involved, if any. Experiments were run with PCB-spiked sand and with actual PCB-contaminated soil. A variety of experimental conditions were employed including tests in open and closed containers, at ambient and elevated temperatures, and over a range of one hour to four days. Granular quicklime, fly ash, and kiln dust were all tested for reaction with PCBs. Early experiments showed that a mixture of sand/quicklime/water at 1:3:1.5 by weight, placed in an insulated container reached a maximum temperature of 216[degree]C. Treatability experiments were subsequently run under controlled heat at room temperature, at 80[degree]C, and at 200[degree]C (following the initial temperature increase which occurs when water is added to quicklime). Little or no loss of PCBs was observed in open or closed containers at ambient or at 800[degree]C over any period of time studied. A significant decrease of PCBs levels was observed only in the high temperature experiments (above 200[degree]C), however the fate of the PCBs in those experiments was not determined. The conditions and the results of the PCB treatment tests are presented in this report, as well as recommendations for further studies.

Mauro, D.; Taylor, B.B. (Meta Environmental, Inc., Watertown, MA (United States))

1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

302

Eect of sludge-processing mode, soil texture and soil pH on metal mobility in undisturbed soil columns under accelerated loading  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Eect of sludge-processing mode, soil texture and soil pH on metal mobility in undisturbed soil 8 September 1999 Abstract The eect of sludge processing (digested dewatered, pelletized, alkaline (Lamellic Hapludalf), at initial pH levels of 5 and 7. Sludges were applied during four accelerated cropping

Walter, M.Todd

303

High Temperature Membrane Working Group  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This presentation provides an overview of the High Temperature Membrane Working Group Meeting in May 2007.

304

Soil and Water Conservation (Texas) | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

(Texas) (Texas) Soil and Water Conservation (Texas) < Back Eligibility Utility Commercial Agricultural Investor-Owned Utility Industrial Construction Municipal/Public Utility Local Government Rural Electric Cooperative Tribal Government Schools Institutional Nonprofit Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State Texas Program Type Environmental Regulations Provider Texas State Soil and Water Conservation Board The Texas State Soil and Water Conservation Board is established to encourage and oversee soil-conserving land-use practices, and to provide for the conservation of soil and related resources and the control and prevention of soil erosion, and thereby to preserve natural resources,

305

Experiment Hazard Class 15.2 - USDA Soil Permit  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

2 - USDA Regulated Soil 2 - USDA Regulated Soil Applicability This hazard classification applies to all experiments involving soils regulated by the United States Department of Agricultute (USDA). Other hazard classifications and their associated hazard controls may also apply to experiments in this hazard class. Experiment Category Experiments involving this hazard class categorized as low risk experiments unless other hazard classes apply. Experiment Hazard Control Verification Statements Engineered Controls - None required. Procedural Controls - All work with regulated soils must be performed in compliance with the APS Protocols for Handling, Storage, and Disposal of Untreated Foreign Soil and Regulated Domestic Soil. The APS protocols state the requirements for handling, storage, shipment, and disposal of regulated

306

Washing of field weathered crude oil contaminated soil with an environmentally compatible surfactant, alkyl polyglucoside  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Weathered crude oil contaminated soils (COCSs), which are much more difficult to remediate than those freshly contaminated, are widespread especially at the sites of oil fields and industries. Surfactant enhanced ex situ soil washing could be used to remediate COCSs, but surfactant toxicity becomes one of the major concerns. In this study, a class of green surfactants, alkyl polyglucosides (APGs), were tested in washing the field weathered COCS with relatively high oil concentration (123 mg g?1 dry soil) from Jilin Oilfield, Northeastern China. APG1214, characterized with longer alkyl chain, was more effective than APG0810 in crude oil removal. Adding inorganic sodium salts into APG1214 solution further improved the crude oil removal efficiency (CORE). Washing parameters (temperature, washing time, agitation speed and solution/soil ratio) were investigated and further optimized integratedly with an orthogonal design. At the optimum conditions, the CORE reached 97%. GC/MS analysis showed that the proportion of small n-alkanes (C16–C23) in residual crude oil gradually increased, which was helpful to interpret the oil removal mechanism. Moreover, eminent effect on removal of large n-alkanes was achieved from the synergy between APG1214 and inorganic salts, which was opposite to the effect when they were added separately. This study demonstrated a promising way to remediate COCS with ecologically compatible surfactant and provided guidelines for its practical application.

Mei Han; Guodong Ji; Jinren Ni

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

307

Ettringite formation and behaviour in clayey soils  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Failures in soil stabilization have been reported previously as being due to the formation of ettringite, an expansive mineral which develops in the presence of sulfate, calcium, and aluminum compounds of clay fraction in high pH levels between 10.36 and 14. By comparing the pattern of formation of ettringite, formed from different possible sources and specifically in stabilized soil, it is expected that a clearer picture of the kinetics of ettringite formation from different sources will be obtained. In this paper, a set of physico-chemical experiments and XRD tests were performed to investigate the process of ettringite formation and to explore its possible performance in clayey soils. The growth of the ettringite XRD peaks was used as a measure of the rate and its formation pattern. It is shown that the rate of ettringite formation in soil stabilization is much slower than that of artificial ettringite. Furthermore, it is shown that ettringite swells to the order of 50% and its fluid retention is significantly higher (by as much as 400%) than that of the soil sample studied in this research.

Vahid R. Ouhadi; Raymond N. Yong

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

308

Sorption of inositol hexaphosphate on desert soils  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Sorption of inositol hexaphosphate (IP6) on desert soils was studied to evaluate their use as a novel low-cost sorbent material for organic P removal in water treatment. The kinetics of IP6 sorption, pH effects, and sorption isotherms were examined in batch experiments on four desert saline–sodic soils: Antofagasta (AN), Mejillones (ME), Aguas Blancas I (ABI), and Aguas Blancas II (ABII). The sorption kinetics of inositol hexaphosphate expressed as P (P-IP6) on these soils were described by the Elovich equation and the initial sorption velocities ranked in the order: ABII > ABI > ME > AN. In addition, P-IP6 sorption capacity in AN, ME, and ABI was strongly influenced by the solution pH, but in ABII it was not pH-dependent. Whereas the experimental data of P-IP6 sorption on ME, ABI, and ABII were better fitted by the Langmuir equation (implying a homogenous distribution of active sorption sites), for AN the best fit was obtained with the Freundlich model (implying heterogeneous, multi-layered sorption surfaces). The maximum P-IP6 sorption capacities ranked: ABII > ME > AN > ABI. Based on the results of our study, ABII soil is recommended for P-IP6 removal. In this soil, P-IP6 sorption did not depend on solution pH, and the precipitation and sorption of IP6 were associated with Ca2 +, Mg2 +, and minerals such as montmorillonite and vermiculite.

Bárbara Fuentes; María de la Luz Mora; Roland Bol; Francisca San Martin; Elizabeth Pérez; Paula Cartes

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

309

Guidance for Developing Ecological Soil Screening Levels  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Developing Developing Ecological Soil Screening Levels OSWER Directive 9285.7-55 U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Office of Solid Waste and Emergency Response 1200 Pennsylvania Avenue, N.W. Washington, DC 20460 November 2003 This Page Intentionally Left Blank EXECUTIVE SUMMARY This document describes the process used to derive a set of risk-based ecological soil screening levels (Eco-SSLs) for many of the soil contaminants that are frequently of ecological concern for plants and animals at hazardous waste sites and provides guidance for their use. The Eco-SSL derivation process represents the group effort of a multi-stakeholder workgroup consisting of federal, state, consulting, industry, and academic participants led by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Office of Superfund Remediation and Technology Innovation (OSRTI). The

310

Chemotactic selection of pollutant degrading soil bacteria  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method is described for identifying soil microbial strains which may be bacterial degraders of pollutants. This method includes: Placing a concentration of a pollutant in a substantially closed container; placing the container in a sample of soil for a period of time ranging from one minute to several hours; retrieving the container and collecting its contents; microscopically determining the identity of the bacteria present. Different concentrations of the pollutant can be used to determine which bacteria respond to each concentration. The method can be used for characterizing a polluted site or for looking for naturally occurring biological degraders of the pollutant. Then bacteria identified as degraders of the pollutant and as chemotactically attracted to the pollutant are used to innoculate contaminated soil. To enhance the effect of the bacteria on the pollutant, nutrients are cyclicly provided to the bacteria then withheld to alternately build up the size of the bacterial colony or community and then allow it to degrade the pollutant.

Hazen, T.C.

1991-03-04T23:59:59.000Z

311

Surfactant screening of diesel-contaminated soil  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

At one installation, approximately 60,000 gal of No. 2 diesel fuel leaked into the subsurface environment, with contamination at depths of 6 to 34 m below the surface. Argonne National Laboratory was contracted to perform treatability studies for site remediation. The treatability studies focused on four separate phases: (1) leachability studies on the various contaminated soil borings, (2) air stripping studies, (3) bioremediation studies, and (4) surfactant screening/surfactant flooding studies. This paper summarizes the fourth phase of the research program in which twenty-one surfactants were screened for possible use to mobilize the organics from the contaminated soil prior to bioremediation. Anionic surfactants resulted in the greatest degree of diesel mobilization. The most promising surfactants will be employed on actual contaminated soil samples obtained from the site. 18 refs., 16 figs., 1 tab.

Peters, R.W.; Montemagno, C.D.; Shem, L. (Argonne National Lab., IL (USA)); Lewis, B.A. (Northwestern Univ., Evanston, IL (USA). Dept. of Civil Engineering)

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

312

Kinetics of Ni Sorption in Soils: Roles of Soil Organic Matter and Ni Precipitation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The kinetics of Ni sorption to two Delaware agricultural soils were studied to quantitatively assess the relative importance of Ni adsorption on soil organic matter (SOM) and the formation of Ni layered double hydroxide (Ni-LDH) precipitates using both experimental studies and kinetic modeling. Batch sorption kinetic experiments were conducted with both soils at pH 6.0, 7.0, and 7.5 from 24 h up to 1 month. Time-resolved Ni speciation in soils was determined by X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) during the kinetic experiments. A kinetics model was developed to describe Ni kinetic reactions under various reaction conditions and time scales, which integrated Ni adsorption on SOM with Ni-LDH precipitation in soils. The soil Ni speciation (adsorbed phases and Ni-LDH) calculated using the kinetics model was consistent with that obtained through XAS analysis during the sorption processes. Under our experimental conditions, both modeling and XAS results demonstrated that Ni adsorption on SOM was dominant in the short term and the formation of Ni-LDH precipitates accounted for the long-term Ni sequestration in soils, and, more interestingly, that the adsorbed Ni may slowly transfer to Ni-LDH phases with longer reaction times.

Shi, Zhenqing; Peltier, Edward; Sparks, Donald L. (Delaware); (Kansas)

2012-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

313

Soil C Accumulation in a White Oak CO2-Enrichment Experiment via Enhanced Root Production  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

After four growing seasons, soil below white oak trees exposed to elevated atmospheric carbon dioxide levels (ambient + 300 ppm) had an average of 14% more soil carbon than soil below trees exposed to ambient levels of carbon dioxide. The soil ...

Kevin G. Harrison; Richard J. Norby; Wilfred M. Post; Emily L. Chapp

2004-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

314

Soil solution chemistry at different positions on slope in a conifer plantation forest  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

It is known that soil property varies along the slope. It suggests that soil solution chemistry also differs topographically. To determine the variation in soil solution chemistry within one watershed, soil so...

Naoko Tokuchi; Goro Iwatsubo

1999-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

315

Soil Testing Following Flooding, Overland Flow of Wastewater and other Freshwater Disasters  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Freshwater flooding can seriously affect soil fertility and the physical and chemical properties of soil. This publication explains how to reclaim flooded soil. Having the soil tested for microbes, pesticides, hydrocarbons and other contaminants...

Provin, Tony; Feagley, Sam E.; Pitt, John L.; McFarland, Mark L.

2009-05-26T23:59:59.000Z

316

High temperature detonator  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A detonator assembly is provided which is usable at high temperatures about 300.degree. C. A detonator body is provided with an internal volume defining an anvil surface. A first acceptor explosive is disposed on the anvil surface. A donor assembly having an ignition element, an explosive material, and a flying plate, are placed in the body effective to accelerate the flying plate to impact the first acceptor explosive on the anvil for detonating the first acceptor explosive. A second acceptor explosive is eccentrically located in detonation relationship with the first acceptor explosive to thereafter effect detonation of a main charge.

Johnson, James O. (Los Alamos, NM); Dinegar, Robert H. (Los Alamos, NM)

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

317

Thermionic converter temperature controller  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A method and apparatus for controlling the temperature of a thermionic reactor over a wide range of operating power, including a thermionic reactor having a plurality of integral cesium reservoirs, a honeycomb material disposed about the reactor which has a plurality of separated cavities, a solid sheath disposed about the honeycomb material and having an opening therein communicating with the honeycomb material and cavities thereof, and a shell disposed about the sheath for creating a coolant annulus therewith so that the coolant in the annulus may fill the cavities and permit nucleate boiling during the operation of the reactor.

Shaner, Benjamin J. (McMurray, PA); Wolf, Joseph H. (Pittsburgh, PA); Johnson, Robert G. R. (Trafford, PA)

2001-04-24T23:59:59.000Z

318

Thermionic Converter Temperature Controller  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A method and apparatus for controlling the temperature of a thermionic reactor over a wide range of operating power, including a thermionic reactor having a plurality of integral cesium reservoirs, a honeycomb material disposed about the reactor which has a plurality of separated cavities, a solid sheath disposed about the honeycomb material and having an opening therein communicating with the honeycomb material and cavities thereof, and a shell disposed about the sheath for creating a coolant annulus therewith so that the coolant in the annulus may fill the cavities and permit nucleate boiling during the operation of the reactor.

Shaner,B. J.; Wolf, Joseph H.; Johnson, Robert G. R.

1999-08-23T23:59:59.000Z

319

Drexel University Temperature Sensors  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document summarizes background information and presents results related to temperature measurements in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) National Scientific User Facility (NSUF) Drexel University Project 31091 irradiation. The objective of this test was to assess the radiation performance of new ceramic materials for advanced reactor applications. Accordingly, irradiations of transition metal carbides and nitrides were performed using the Hydraulic Shuttle Irradiation System (HSIS) in the B-7 position and in static capsules inserted into the A-3 and East Flux Trap Position 5 locations of the ATR.

K. L. Davis; D. L. Knudson; J. L. Rempe; B. M. Chase

2014-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

320

A study of cellulose gasification in a fluidized bed using a high-temperature solar furnace  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A 4.2-meter solar furnace was used to study the gasification of cellulose with steam in a fluidized bed. The heating value of the high-temperature equilibrium products is about twenty percent higher than that of the reactants. The increase represents stored solar energy; and the product, synthesis gas, is valuable as a chemical feedstock or pipeline gas. All experiments were performed at atmospheric pressure. Pure tabular alumina as well as crushed automotive exhaust was used as a bed material. Microcrystalline {alpha}-cellulose, entrained in argon, entered the fluidized bed just above the distributor. Steam heated to the operating temperature in a 10 cm packed bed section below the fluidized bed. In all cases, the process ran with more steam than required to produce an equimolar mixture of carbon monoxide and hydrogen. We used a quartz reactor between 1100 and 1430 K; a steel reactor at 1500 K and an Inconel reactor at 1600 K. Reactor inside diameter, nominally 5 cm, varied slightly; the bed height was adjusted to keep the gas residence time constant. Hydrogen production rate was measured before and after experiments with steam alone, with this amount subtracted. Equilibrium mixtures were not achieved. Catalysts improved hydrogen yields with higher than expected concentrations of carbon monoxide, methane and lighter hydrocarbons such as ethylene and acetylene. Experiments performed without catalyst at 1300 K, achieved a mixture (dry, argon-free) of 46 mole% CO, 30% H{sub 2} 14% CH{sub 4} 5% CO{sub 2} and 5% C{sub 2}H{sub 4}. An equilibrium mixture at this temperature would have contained 39% CO, 30% H{sub 2} 7% CO{sub 2} and no CH{sub 4} or C{sub 2}H{sub 4}. With the catalyst, the CO and CH{sub 4} decreased to 40% and 2% respectively, the H{sub 2} increased to 47%, and CO{sub 2} remained the same. No ethylene was formed. The hydrocarbon-rich mixtures achieved are typical of rapid-pyrolysis processes.

Murray, J.P.

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "2-meter soil temperature" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Soil Erosion (Minnesota) | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

(Minnesota) (Minnesota) Soil Erosion (Minnesota) < Back Eligibility Utility Fed. Government Commercial Agricultural Investor-Owned Utility State/Provincial Govt Industrial Construction Municipal/Public Utility Local Government Residential Installer/Contractor Rural Electric Cooperative Tribal Government Low-Income Residential Schools Retail Supplier Institutional Multi-Family Residential Systems Integrator Fuel Distributor Nonprofit General Public/Consumer Transportation Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State Minnesota Program Type Siting and Permitting The Board of Water and Soil Resources has adopted a model ordinance to serve as the minimum standard for local governments, which are asked to

322

Sherm Soils - Distribution, Importance, Variability, and Management.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

from about 101 0 30' to 1030 30' west longitude and from about 35 0 40' to 360 40' north latitude. This area is bounded by the breaks above the North Canadian River on the north, the caprock escarpment at the Cana dian River on the south..., the caprock escarpment at the High Plains Rolling Plains boundary on the east, and a catena of loamy soils extending from Kerrick to Channing on the west. Within the area of occurrence, Sherm soils occupy about 75 percent of the land surface. Elevation...

Unger, Paul W.; Pringle, Fred B.

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

323

Olton Soils - Distribution, Importance Variability and Management.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

from about 101 ?10' to 103?50' West longitude and about 32?50' to 35?40' North latitude. Elevation of the sur face of Olton soils ranges from about 2,600 to 4 ,200 feet above mean sea level. The area is in a semiarid climatic zone where average.... The depth to a strong calcic horizon averages about 49 inches. The CaC03 content ofthis layer ranges from 35 to 56 percent and averages about 45 percent. The primary area of occurrence for Olton soils includes the area south and west of a line...

Unger, Paul W.; Pringle, Fred B.

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

324

In situ removal of contamination from soil  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A process of remediation of cationic heavy metal contamination from soil utilizes gas phase manipulation to inhibit biodegradation of a chelating agent that is used in an electrokinesis process to remove the contamination. The process also uses further gas phase manipulation to stimulate biodegradation of the chelating agent after the contamination has been removed. The process ensures that the chelating agent is not attacked by bioorganisms in the soil prior to removal of the contamination, and that the chelating agent does not remain as a new contaminant after the process is completed. 5 figs.

Lindgren, E.R.; Brady, P.V.

1997-10-14T23:59:59.000Z

325

Crowdsourcing urban air temperatures from smartphone battery?temperatures  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Accurate air temperature observations in urban areas are important for meteorology and energy demand planning. They are indispensable to study the urban heat island effect and the adverse effects of high temperatures on ...

Overeem, A.

326

ORNL researchers improve soil carbon cycling models | ornl.gov  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

researchers improve soil carbon cycling models researchers improve soil carbon cycling models January 01, 2013 ORNL's new carbon cycling model could help scientists understand the role of soil microbes (MBC) in climate change by tracking extracellular enzymes (ENZ) that break down carbon-rich soil materials (SOC) into forms that microbes can respire (DOC). A more robust model of the soil carbon cycle developed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) improves understanding of carbon residence time in soils and enables scientists to make more accurate climate predictions. The model does a better job than previous models of accounting for how microbes in the soil break down carbon-rich materials and release carbon dioxide. "Soil is a big reservoir of carbon," said co-author Melanie Mayes of the Environmental Sciences Division and the Climate Change Science

327

Estimated Annual Net Change in Soil Carbon per US County  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Estimated Annual Net Change in Soil Carbon per US County These data represent the estimated net change (Megagram per year) in soil carbon due to changes in the crop type and tillage intensity. Estimated accumulation of soil carbon under Conservation Reserve Program (CRP)lands is included in these estimates. Negative values represent a net flux from the atmosphere to the soil; positive values represent a net flux from the soil to the atmosphere. As such, soil carbon sequestration is represented here as a negative value. The method of analysis is based on empirical relationshipsbetween land management and soil carbon. The method for modeling land management and estimating soil carbonchange, used to generate these data, is described in the following publication:

328

Application of Polymeric Agents for Improved Soil Decontamination  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objectives of the Thrust II project include optimization of the technology for PO Mayak soils, identification of clean up requirements, design and construction of a mobile production-scale process system, installation and deployment of the soil washing technology.

Heiser, John

2008-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

329

Soil Science Education:5 Perceptions and Experiences of6  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

that soil science education can be reformed through the incorporation of an13 interdisciplinary focus colleges.23 Soil science education reform has been discussed even as early as 1994 with the24 publication

Ma, Lena

330

Cation Exchange and A1 Mobilization in Soils  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Predicting the equilibria of cations distributed between soil solutions and exchange sites is a classical soil chemistry problem. Interest in such cation distribution problems has been motivated by a need to i...

D. D. Richter; D. W. Johnson; K. H. Dai

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

331

Detecting preferential infiltration pathways in soils using geophysics  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...vegetation or thin remedial soil cover...hydrogeological investigations. Suggested...sinkholes on the Oak Ridge Reservation, Tennessee...vegetation or thin remedial soil cover...hydrogeological investigations. Suggested...sinkholes on the Oak Ridge Reservation, Tennessee...

P. J. Carpenter; S. Ahmed

332

Investigation of Soil Moisture - Vegetation Interactions in Oklahoma  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, but not well understood climate factor. This study examines soil moisture-vegetation health interactions using both in situ observations and land surface model simulations. For the observational study, soil moisture is taken from 20 in situ Oklahoma Mesonet...

Ford, Trenton W.

2013-03-06T23:59:59.000Z

333

Agricultural soil and its conservation in Mexico as percei  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

natural and human causes as somewhat major causes of agricultural soil degradation in Mexico, with human causes being more of a cause than natural causes. 3. Students felt that soil conservation efforts are needed; these efforts should...

Revello, Valerie Ann

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

334

Non-linear Seismic Soil Structure Interaction Method for Developing...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Contact - Sliding and Separation Non-linear springs * Material ElasticPlastic * Non-linear soil behavior * Non-linear behavior between soil and structure (i.e. the...

335

Onsite Wastewater Treatment Systems: Septic Tank/Soil Absorption Field  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

For septic tank and soil absorption systems to work properly, homeowners must choose the right kind of system for their household size and soil type, and they must maintain them regularly. This publication explains the treatment, design, operation...

Lesikar, Bruce J.

2008-10-23T23:59:59.000Z

336

Beta Particle Dose Rates to Micro-Organisms in Soil  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Copyright 1977 Japan Radiation Research Society May 1977 research-article Articles Beta Particle...soil are constantly exposed to betaradiations arising from the naturally occuring radionuclides in soil as in this case no overlying tissue shields......

M. Kabir; F.W. Spiers; T.A Iinuma

1977-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

337

Critical loads of acid deposition on Scottish soils  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The impact of acid deposition, attributable to sulphur and nitrogen pollutants, on the soils of Scotland has been analysed using a critical loads approach. The critical load of a soil (as an indicator of ecolo...

Simon J. Langan; M. J. Wilson

1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

338

Stability of Biomass-derived Black Carbon in Soils . | EMSL  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Stability of Biomass-derived Black Carbon in Soils . Stability of Biomass-derived Black Carbon in Soils . Abstract: Black carbon (BC) may play an important role in the global C...

339

PHYTOTOXIC SUBSTANCES FROM SOIL MICROORGANISMS AND CROP RESIDUES  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...thiamin, biotin, mineral salts, enzymes...acid Transpiration Green wt ppm 20 75 87...overcome by adequate mineral fertilization of...materials such as lime, soil, kaolin...of soil to which lime and complete mineral fertilization had...

T. M. McCalla; F. A. Haskins

1964-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

340

Ground-based measurements of soil water storage in Texas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Landslides EROSION Dust Weak SOIL STRENGTH Hard Latent heat SOLAR ENERGY Sensible heat Energy Stevens' HydraProbe Soil T, q, and ECapparent ADVANTAGES Lower initial cost Spatial distribution SDI

Yang, Zong-Liang

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "2-meter soil temperature" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Earth pressures and deformations in civil infrastructure in expansive soils  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This dissertation includes the three major parts of the study: volume change, and lateral earth pressure due to suction change in expansive clay soils, and design of civil infrastructure drilled pier, retaining wall and pavement in expansive soils...

Hong, Gyeong Taek

2008-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

342

Kinetics ofin situ surfactant soil flushing at moderate washing conditions  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Economicin situ soil flushing using common surfactants may be a good substitute for exhaustive, pressurized soil washing or bioremediation requiring high energy consumption or laborious technique. Two model surfactants

Daechul Cho; Hyun-Su Kim

2002-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

343

Effect of Ultrasound on Surfactant-Aided Soil Washing  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The use of ultrasound as an enhancement mechanism in the surfactant-aided soil-washing process was examined by conducting desoption tests of soils contaminated with naphthalene or diesel-oil. The experiments were conducted to elucidate the effect of ultrasound on the mass transfer from soil to the aqueous phase using naphthalene-contaminated soil. In addition, the use of ultrasound for the diesel-oil-contaminated soil was investigated under a range of conditions of surfactant concentration, sonication power, duration, soil/liquid ratio, particle size and initial diesel-oil concentration. The ultrasound used in the soil-washing process significantly enhanced the mass transfer rate from the solid phase to the aqueous phase. The removal efficiency of diesel-oil from the soil phase generally increased with longer sonication time, higher power intensity, and large particle size.

Seungmin Na; Yongwoon Park; Anna Hwang; Jeongsook Ha; Younguk Kim; Jeehyeong Khim

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

344

Offsetting China's CO2 Emissions by Soil Carbon Sequestration  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Fossil fuel emissions of carbon (C) in China in 2000 was ... % or more of the antecedent soil organic carbon (SOC) pool.Some of the depleted ... . A crude estimated potential of soil C sequestration in China is 1...

R. Lal

2004-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

345

The spatial and temporal organization of soil moisture  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Runoff, infiltration, evaporation and transpiration and-at climatic scales-precipitation are hydrologic processes that strongly depend on soil moisture. From a descriptive viewpoint, soil moisture is. characterized by an extremely high degree...

Vogel, Gregor Klaus

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

346

Soil moisture modeling and scaling using passive microwave remote sensing  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Soil moisture in the shallow subsurface is a primary hydrologic state governing land-atmosphere interaction at various scales. The primary objectives of this study are to model soil moisture in the root zone in a distributed manner and determine...

Das, Narendra N.

2007-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

347

Cesium sorption and desorption on selected Los Alamos soils  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Laboratory experiments were conducted to evaluate the sorptivity of cesium onto Los Alamos soils under controlled experimental conditions. Four soil profiles were collected and each soil profile which is broken into layers according to previously identified soil horizons were studied. Batch sorption isotherms were studied to quantify the chemical reactivity of each soil horizon toward cesium ion. Radioactive cesium-137 was used as sorbent and gamma counting was used to quantify the amount of sorption. Desorption experiments were conducted after the sorption experiments. Batch desorption isotherms were studied to quantify the desorption of presorbed cesium from these Los Alamos soils. This study suggests cesium may sorb strongly and irreversibly on most Los Alamos soils. The amount of cesium sorption and desorption is possibly related to the clay content of the soil sample since subsurface sample has a higher clay content than that of surface sample.

Kung, K.S.; Chan, J.; Longmire, P.; Fowler, M.

1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

348

Microbial Biomass and Activity in Lead-Contaminated Soil  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Perspectives on risks of soil pollution and experience with innovative remediation technologies . Kuperman R. G. Carreiro M. M...acids organic compounds pH pollutants pollution remediation RNA soils toxic materials waste disposal sites GeoRef...

A. Konopka; T. Zakharova; M. Bischoff; L. Oliver; C. Nakatsu; R. F. Turco

1999-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

349

Avoiding and Mitigating Soil Compaction Associated with Natural Gas Development  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-term impact of well drilling and pipeline instal- lation activities on your soils and their future and pipeline- laying activities; limit drilling activities to periods of expected drier soil conditions defined terms for repairs on dam

Boyer, Elizabeth W.

350

Development of the NIST Rocky Flats Soil Standard  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) Rocky Flats Soil-II Standard reference material (SRM) ... values and uncertainties for the radionuclides in the Rocky Flats Soil II SRM.

S. Nour; K. Inn; J. Filliben

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

351

Modeling, estimation, and control of robot-soil interactions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This thesis presents the development of hardware, theory, and experimental methods to enable a robotic manipulator arm to interact with soils and estimate soil properties from interaction forces. Unlike the majority of ...

Hong, Won, 1971-

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

352

SOIL PHYSICS, SWS 4602C I. COURSE INSTRUCTOR  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

agrochemicals (fertilizers and pesticides). Emphasis will be given to basic concepts of transport and retention (parameters) of soils and appropriate fate and transport parameters of agrochemicals in soils. 4. Use

Ma, Lena

353

An Open Source Simulation Model for Soil and Sediment Bioturbation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

An Open Source Simulation Model for Soil and Sediment Bioturbation Katja Schiffers1 *¤a , Lorna (2011) An Open Source Simulation Model for Soil and Sediment Bioturbation. PLoS ONE 6(12): e28028. doi

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

354

Guide to Using Wood Ash as an Agricultural Soil Amendment  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

wastes Increases soil pH Add plant nutrients Low cost #12;UNH COOPERATIVE EXTENSION Food & Agriculture and scab-susceptible potatoes varieties thrive in acid soils, and should not be supplemented with wood ash

New Hampshire, University of

355

Removal of uranium from uranium-contaminated soils -- Phase 1: Bench-scale testing. Uranium in Soils Integrated Demonstration  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

To address the management of uranium-contaminated soils at Fernald and other DOE sites, the DOE Office of Technology Development formed the Uranium in Soils Integrated Demonstration (USID) program. The USID has five major tasks. These include the development and demonstration of technologies that are able to (1) characterize the uranium in soil, (2) decontaminate or remove uranium from the soil, (3) treat the soil and dispose of any waste, (4) establish performance assessments, and (5) meet necessary state and federal regulations. This report deals with soil decontamination or removal of uranium from contaminated soils. The report was compiled by the USID task group that addresses soil decontamination; includes data from projects under the management of four DOE facilities [Argonne National Laboratory (ANL), Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), and the Savannah River Plant (SRP)]; and consists of four separate reports written by staff at these facilities. The fundamental goal of the soil decontamination task group has been the selective extraction/leaching or removal of uranium from soil faster, cheaper, and safer than current conventional technologies. The objective is to selectively remove uranium from soil without seriously degrading the soil`s physicochemical characteristics or generating waste forms that are difficult to manage and/or dispose of. Emphasis in research was placed more strongly on chemical extraction techniques than physical extraction techniques.

Francis, C. W.

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

356

2000): Soil carbon sequestration and land-use change: processes and potential  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

matter dynamics that may result in enhanced soil carbon sequestration with changes in land-use and soil

W. M. Post; K. C. Kwon

357

Use of thermistors for the measurement of soil moisture and temperature  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

'concentration upon a thermal unit and Bouyoucos block. I'hermistor mounted in plaster of paris. 37 7. Moisture curve for Lufkin I'ine sandy loam. Thermistor mounted in plaster of paris 8. Moisture curve I' or Lufkin i'ine sandy loam. Thermistor mounted...' or Nillacy fine sandy loam Curve 6 - 100 ma used. Curve 7 - 150 ma. used. Thermistors mounted in plaster oi' paris. 45 12. Moisture curve I' or Harlinsen clay. I'hermistor mounted in fired clay (900 C. ) 47 13. Moisture curve for Miller clay. Thermistor...

Bloodworth, Morris E

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

358

Effect of soil temperature on resistance of rice to seedling blight caused by Sclerotium rolfsii Sacc  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

I":". . -"';-'. , ;::::, RP9?C2 '|GZ - GGt'W "ZR%Zh&'~I'Tgfi *" zo?: 3~Gh'&IPWI|tG! Eh QZ 'BXCAK. - TQ '-, ';: ?' ! ', -':;, i", , ;. :;?-i;'!:G :. BGGZZIIG BBIZGGG, ':G"G", Kl'GZ' h il 'ZZZIIGXIIXGLGZGBZZ;::"BGG. ''::, . :":G ';"', . '?'i... ''' ' ', ' '' ? ' ', , ' ZZ " I AVP~' . ' I. , X Z?Z" '' 1 ?''. .. l~;t, , I. h 3R'kCK6I;"'VIh'. Z-hg~Z, ' ', '?" l;, I, ', 'hhh ~~i Z'. zZ, , *, ~~;". ?', BGIGI. ' 'I, . ; =, '-. ?::-";, ':. "?::. . ":-, :, :;. ";, . "', '-'-. -'::;:, :. ; T5@-', : jjyft8i:-. W4%es, , :pi...

Weerapat, Praphas

1964-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

359

Biochar Carbon Stability in a Clayey Soil As a Function of Feedstock and Pyrolysis Temperature  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A long-term (5 year) laboratory experiment was conducted under controlled conditions using 11 biochars made from five C3 biomass feedstocks (Eucalyptus saligna wood and leaves, papermill sludge, poultry litter, cow manure) at 400 and/or 550 °C. ...

Bhupinder Pal Singh; Annette L. Cowie; Ronald J. Smernik

2012-09-27T23:59:59.000Z

360

Soil carbon sensitivity to temperature and carbon use efficiency compared across microbial-ecosystem models  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, accounting for the response of microbial communities to environmental parameters in Earth system models may

German, Donovan P.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "2-meter soil temperature" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Low-Temperature Soil Heating Using Renewable Energy Anthony J. Rossman1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

was harvested with a hybrid photovoltaic/wind electric system. The electrical energy generated by the hybrid with a lower potential environmental impact than traditional strategies and can be cost effective at sites contaminant volatility, diffusion, desorption, and microbiological activity. Direct and indirect solar energy

Vermont, University of

362

The adsorption of selected chemical compounds on soil clays  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, California. The Yolo soil series is discussed in the U. S. D. A. Contra Costa County, California Soil Survey, Series 1933, No. 26. Montmorillonite de osit material. The relatively "pure" montmorillonite clay was purchased as Panther Creek Bentonite from..., California. The Yolo soil series is discussed in the U. S. D. A. Contra Costa County, California Soil Survey, Series 1933, No. 26. Montmorillonite de osit material. The relatively "pure" montmorillonite clay was purchased as Panther Creek Bentonite from...

Hoover, William Leroy

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

363

Unsaturated soil behavior under monotonic and cyclic stress states  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

on triaxial apparatus and helping me on the calibration of equipment. I would like to say thank to Dr. Lianxi Ma for providing me USD testing knowledge and test results. I also would like to thank the Korean students in the Geotechnical Engineering.................. 6 2.1 Soil Suction in Unsaturated Soil....................................................... 6 2.2 Pore Water in Unsaturated Soil and Degrees of Saturation.............. 8 2.3 Soil-Water Characteristic Curve...

Mun, Byoung-Jae

2005-02-17T23:59:59.000Z

364

Comparison of methods for determining soil hydraulic characteristics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

). Soil cores were centrifuged and the redistribution of water was measured as change in weight with time. Inconsistent results and limited data obtained with this method, consequently, prevented ade- quate conclusions from being made. Hydraulic... storage capacity of a soil is determined by infiltration, redistribution and drainage processes which also rely on knowledge of soil moisture movement. Three approaches used to determine the relevant hydraulic properties utitilized in describing soil...

Byrd Humphreys, Kathryn

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

365

Systematic Variability of Soil Hydraulic Conductivity Across Three Vertisol Catenas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of soil measured on small samples is log-normally distributed and related to physical properties of that soil sample (Mapa, 1995; Reynolds and Zebchuk, 1996; Lin et al., 1998; Baldock and Nelson, 2000). The United States Department of Agriculture (USDA... structure and water content for clayey soils (Mapa, 1995; Baldock and Nelson, 2000). 6 Measurement Methods A variety of laboratory and field methods of measuring Ks are available. Laboratory measurements are typically conducted on undisturbed soil...

Rivera, Leonardo Daniel

2011-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

366

Active cooling-based surface confinement system for thermal soil treatment  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A thermal barrier is disclosed for surface confinement with active cooling to control subsurface pressures during thermal remediation of shallow (5-20 feet) underground contaminants. If steam injection is used for underground heating, the actively cooled thermal barrier allows the steam to be injected into soil at pressures much higher (20-60 psi) than the confining strength of the soil, while preventing steam breakthrough. The rising steam is condensed to liquid water at the thermal barrier-ground surface interface. The rapid temperature drop forced by the thermal barrier drops the subsurface pressure to below atmospheric pressure. The steam and contaminant vapors are contained by the thermal blanket, which can be made of a variety of materials such as steel plates, concrete slabs, membranes, fabric bags, or rubber bladders. 1 fig.

Aines, R.D.; Newmark, R.L.

1997-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

367

Active cooling-based surface confinement system for thermal soil treatment  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A thermal barrier is disclosed for surface confinement with active cooling to control subsurface pressures during thermal remediation of shallow (5-20 feet) underground contaminants. If steam injection is used for underground heating, the actively cooled thermal barrier allows the steam to be injected into soil at pressures much higher (20-60 psi) than the confining strength of the soil, while preventing steam breakthrough. The rising steam is condensed to liquid water at the thermal barrier-ground surface interface. The rapid temperature drop forced by the thermal barrier drops the subsurface pressure to below atmospheric pressure. The steam and contaminant vapors are contained by the thermal blanket, which can be made of a variety of materials such as steel plates, concrete slabs, membranes, fabric bags, or rubber bladders.

Aines, Roger D. (Livermore, CA); Newmark, Robin L. (Pleasanton, CA)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

368

Agricultural Soil Carbon Sequestration: Economic Issues and Research Needs  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Agricultural Soil Carbon Sequestration: Economic Issues and Research Needs Draft paper Bruce A Mc............................................................................................................. 5 2 Why Consider Promoting Agricultural Soil Carbon Sequestration?...................... 6 2 Agricultural Soil Carbon Sequestration....... 11 3.1 What is the cost of GHGE offsets arising from large

McCarl, Bruce A.

369

Soil to plant transfer of 238 Th on a uranium  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Soil to plant transfer of 238 U, 226 Ra and 232 Th on a uranium mining-impacted soil from species grown in soils from southeastern China contaminated with uranium mine tailings were analyzed The radioactive waste (e.g. tailings) produced by uranium mining activities contains a series of long

Hu, Qinhong "Max"

370

Soil Management Plan for the Y-12 Plant  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Construction activities at the US Department of Energy (DOE) Y-12 Plant have often required the excavation or other management of soil within the facility. Because some of this soil may be contaminated, Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc. (Energy Systems) adopted specific policies to ensure the proper management of contaminated or potentially contaminated soil at the plant. Five types of contaminated or potentially contaminated soil are likely to be present at the Y-12 Plant: Soil that is within the boundaries of a Comprehensive Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) Area of Contamination (AOC) or Operable Unit (OU); Soil that contains listed hazardous wastes; Soil that is within the boundaries of a RCRA Solid Waste Management Unit (SWMU); Soil that contains polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBS); Soil that contains low-level radioactive materials. The regulatory requirements associated with the five types of contaminated soil listed above are complex and will vary according to site conditions. This Soil Management Plan provides a standardized method for managers to determine the options available for selecting soil management scenarios associated with construction activities at the Y-12 Plant.

Not Available

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

371

Department of Crop and Soil Sciences Dr. Markus Flury, Professor  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

& Environmental Engineering, Chem- ical Engineering, Soil Science (with Soil Physics or Soil Chemistry emphasis, Engineering Science, or Biological Systems Engineering. The candidate will receive salary, health insurance eligibility verification as required by the US Citizenship and Immigration Services. PO Box 646420, Pullman

Flury, Markus

372

The Composition of the Soils of the Texas Panhandle.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Soil Types by Counties. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 Armstrong County . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 Briecoe County... BY COUNTIES. The following is a list of the types of soils found in the varwus counties accoTding to maps published by the Bureau of Soils. Armstrong County. Amarillo silty clay loam. Amarillo loam. Amarillo sands. Rough broken land. Vernon loam...

Fraps, G. S.

1915-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

373

Relation of Soil Nitrogen, Nitrification and Ammonification to Pot Experiments.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

............................................ 6 Relation of the Crops to the Total Nitrogen of the Soil ........... 7 Relation of the Different Crops ................................. 8 Relation of Surface Soil to Subsoil ............................. 13 Acid Soils Compared with Non-Acid... of Production of Nitrates to the Results of the Pot Ex- periments ................................................ 21 Extensive Work ............................................ 24 Relation of Nitric Nitrogen to Nitrogen Removed by First Crop .... 24...

Fraps, G. S. (George Stronach)

1921-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

374

Enrichment of Heavy Metals in Sediment Resulting from Soil  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, Harpenden, Hertfordshire AL5 2JQ, U.K. Heavy metal pollution of soil and water is often associatedEnrichment of Heavy Metals in Sediment Resulting from Soil Erosion on Agricultural Fields J O H N N concentrations of these heavy metals were up to 3.98 times higher in the sediment than in the parent soil

Quinton, John

375

European Commission DG ENV Soil biodiversity: functions, threats and  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

European Commission DG ENV Soil biodiversity: functions, threats and tools for policy makers.turbe@biois.com In association with #12;2 European Commission - DG ENV Soil biodiversity: functions, threats and tools for policy Putten, Eric Labouze, and Shailendra Mudgal. Soil biodiversity: functions, threats and tools for policy

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

376

The Composition and Properties of Some Texas Soils.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

would be advis- able. Organic materiaI, such as green crops plowed under, and stable ma- nure, have a very beneficial influence upon these soils. These soils are sry much benefited by leguminous crops which take nitrogen from the a Orangeburg Soils...

Fraps, G. S. (George Stronach)

1907-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

377

GIS and Spectral Soil Laboratory Key faculty member: Sabine Grunwald  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

satellite images and various soil spectral technologies, digital soil mapping, and quantitative soil. Equipment / Instrumentation (1) Information Technology and Computer Equipment: There are about ~20 PCs-arrays for storage of large databases that are coupled in an intranet to all machines and instruments in the core

Ma, Lena

378

Soil sampling kit and a method of sampling therewith  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A soil sampling device and a sample containment device for containing a soil sample is disclosed. In addition, a method for taking a soil sample using the soil sampling device and soil sample containment device to minimize the loss of any volatile organic compounds contained in the soil sample prior to analysis is disclosed. The soil sampling device comprises two close fitting, longitudinal tubular members of suitable length, the inner tube having the outward end closed. With the inner closed tube withdrawn a selected distance, the outer tube can be inserted into the ground or other similar soft material to withdraw a sample of material for examination. The inner closed end tube controls the volume of the sample taken and also serves to eject the sample. The soil sample containment device has a sealing member which is adapted to attach to an analytical apparatus which analyzes the volatile organic compounds contained in the sample. The soil sampling device in combination with the soil sample containment device allows an operator to obtain a soil sample containing volatile organic compounds and minimizing the loss of the volatile organic compounds prior to analysis of the soil sample for the volatile organic compounds. 11 figures.

Thompson, C.V.

1991-02-05T23:59:59.000Z

379

Sorption and Degradation of Fipronil in Flooded Anaerobic Rice Soils  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Sorption and Degradation of Fipronil in Flooded Anaerobic Rice Soils ... The data predicted that fipronil was subject to rapid, reductive degradation or immediate sorption to the soil and any sorbed fipronil desorbed was reductively degraded. ... The reductive metabolite, fipronil sulfide, accumulated over the 184 day duration of the experiment and sorbed rapidly to the soil, where it accumulated and did not appear to degrade. ...

Gregory Doran; Philip Eberbach; Stuart Helliwell

2009-10-13T23:59:59.000Z

380

SeedChaser: Vertical soil tillage distribution model  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Knowledge of the vertical distribution of surface residues, chemicals, or seeds following tillage operations is of great importance to a wide variety of soil research areas. This paper describes a 1D empirical vertical soil tillage distribution model ... Keywords: Conservation tillage, Leslie matrix, Seed movement, Seedbank, Soil movement

K. Spokas; F. Forcella; D. Archer; D. Reicosky

2007-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "2-meter soil temperature" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

The Greenhouse Effect Temperature Equilibrium  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Greenhouse Effect #12;Temperature Equilibrium The Earth is in equilibrium with the Sun temperature is about 14C, or 287K. The 40K difference is due to the greenhouse effect. Essentially all

Walter, Frederick M.

382

Low Temperature Proton Conductivity  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

and and MEAs at Freezing Temperatures Thomas A. Zawodzinski, Jr. Case Western Reserve University Cleveland, Ohio 2 Freezing Fuel Cells: Impact on MEAS Below 0 o C *Transport processes/motions slow down: questions re: lower conductivity,water mobility etc *Residual water will have various physical effects in different portions of the MEA questions re: durability of components 3 3 'States' of Water in Proton Conductors ? Freezing (bulk), bound freezable, bound non freezable water states claimed based on DSC * Freezing water more mobile, allegedly important for high conductivity Analysis common for porous systems Does the presence of these states matter? Why? 4 'State of Water' in PEMs At T < 0 o C *'Liquid-like' water freezes *'Non-freezing' fraction: water of solvation at pore

383

Radiation Minimum Temperatures  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Frost resulting from cooling of vegetation by nocturnal radiation is a serious agricultural problem. Because of the number of variables involved attacks on this problem from a purely theoretical point of view have met with only moderate success. It seems logical to suppose that an instrument might be devised which would speed up the natural radiation processes and enable an observer to obtain in a few hours a measure of the cooling which occurs naturally over a period of 12 to 14 hr. Such an instrument could serve as a frost warning device. This paper describes the construction of a radiation device and presents experimental evidence to show that it can be used as a predictor of freezing temperatures at vegetation level.

Francis K. Davis Jr.

1957-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

384

High-Temperature Water Splitting  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

High-temperature water splitting (a "thermochemical" process) is a long-term technology in the early stages of development.

385

Modeling soil salinity distribution along topographic gradients in tidal salt marshes in Atlantic and Gulf coastal regions  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Soil salinity plays a very important role in determining the distribution of vegetation, plant productivity, and biogeochemical processes in coastal marsh ecosystems. Salinity gradients and salinity–vegetation associations in salt marshes have often been observed but rarely explained. A quantitative and systematic study on the soil salinity distribution in salt marshes is not only important to the understanding of coastal marsh ecosystems but also to the development of a potentially useful ecological and environmental indicator. In this research, we developed a salt marsh soil salinity model based on an existing salt and water balance model with modifications to several key features to examine the impacts of tidal forcing, climate, soil, vegetation, and topography on soil salinity distributions of the Atlantic and Gulf coastal marshes. This model was calibrated and validated using field observations from the St. Marks National Wildlife Refuge (NWR) of northwestern Florida, USA. The results showed that the model had good agreement (r2 = 0.84, n = 15, P salinity maximum in a coastal salt marsh. Simulations indicate that tidal irregularity primarily controls the width of the salinity maximum band. Evapotranspiration, temperature, hydraulic conductivity, and incoming tidal salinity significantly affect the salinity maximum band, which may lead to the formation of salt barrens/flats when reaching a threshold level.

Hongqing Wang; Y. Ping Hsieh; Mark A. Harwell; Wenrui Huang

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

386

Arylsulfatase Activity in Salt Marsh Soils  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Arylsulfatase Activity in Salt Marsh Soils R. L. Oshrain W. J. Wiebe...Arylsulfatase Activity in Salt Marsh Soilst R. L. OSHRAIN: AND W...Gallagher, J. L., R. J. Reimold, and D...Remote sensing and salt marsh productivity, p. 338-348...

R. L. Oshrain; W. J. Wiebe

1979-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

387

Healthy soils for food system resiliency  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, air, and point sources like lead paint chips. This duality, emphasized in urban areas where more sources of pollution exist, means that urban gardeners must know their soils to participate effectively in sustainability. Gardeners must investigate... of mining and metallurgy ----------------------------------------------------------------------------- 37 3.2. History of waste management --------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 38 3.3. History of industrial...

Jackson, Trisha L.

2011-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

388

Soil Washing Potential of a Natural Surfactant  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Soil Washing Potential of a Natural Surfactant ... The aqueous solubilities of hexachlorobenzene (HCB) and naphthalene in the natural surfactant solutions were found to vary linearly with the concentration of the surfactant showing trends comparable to that of typical com mercial surfactants. ...

D. Roy; R. R. Kommalapati; S. S. Mandava; K. T. Valsaraj; W. D. Constant

1997-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

389

ASSESSMENT OF ABORIGINAL SMALLHOLDER SOILS FOR  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

potential and tree health Chemical property pH a,e Totallimiting pH and Ca levels, which may have been causing treepH can cause stunting or death Deficiency inhibits soil build-up of N; suboptimal productivity Deficiency increases immature stage of tree,

Kurt A. Schwabe

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

390

SOIL SAMPLING DERELICT, UNDERUSED AND NEGLECTED  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, insufficient identification and remediation of pollutant linkages could cause serious harm to receptors affected. At all stages of the site investigation process, professionals should not be afraid to conduct of a Preliminary Site Investigation Survey (Phase I). Soil sampling forms part of the intrusive site investigation

391

Soil Fungi in the Belgian Congo  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... J. MEYEB has given a comprehensive account of soil and litter fungi in the Belgian Congo (region of Yangambi) (Publications de l'lnstitut National pour l'fitude Agronomique du ... (region of Yangambi) (Publications de l'lnstitut National pour l'fitude Agronomique du Congo Beige. SeYie Scienti-fique, No. 75: "Moississures du Sol et des Litieres ...

1959-07-25T23:59:59.000Z

392

Soils and Vegetation of the Congo  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... responsible for the fifth International Congress of Soil Science being held in 1954 in the Congo. There have been numerous publications from this field, and this is one of a ... of a series on natural resources from L'Institut National pour 1'fitude Agronomique du Congo (Carte des Sols et de la Vegetation du ...

1963-09-14T23:59:59.000Z

393

Slow Sorption Kinetics of Pentachlorophenol on Soil  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Slow Sorption Kinetics of Pentachlorophenol on Soil: Concentration Effects J O H N P . D I V I N C of Delaware, Newark, Delaware 19717-1303 We investigated the sorption kinetics of pentachlorophenol (PCP in sorption. The onset of the slow sorption kinetics was also concentration dependent. At higher PCP

Sparks, Donald L.

394

Battery system with temperature sensors  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A battery system to monitor temperature includes at least one cell with a temperature sensing device proximate the at least one cell. The battery system also includes a flexible member that holds the temperature sensor proximate to the at least one cell.

Wood, Steven J.; Trester, Dale B.

2012-11-13T23:59:59.000Z

395

Running title: electrical resistivity in forest soils1 Title: Monitoring forest soil properties with electrical resistivity3  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Running title: electrical resistivity in forest soils1 2 Title: Monitoring forest soil properties with electrical resistivity3 4 Authors: Yoan Paillet1,* , Nathalie Cassagne2 , Jean-Jacques Brun1 5 6 1 Cemagref in a monitoring purpose. We explored the correlations between electrical resistivity and19 forest soil properties

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

396

Accounting for soil carbon sequestration in national inventories: a soil scientist's  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

As nations debate whether and how best to include the agricultural sector in greenhouse gas pollution reduction schemes, the role of soil organic carbon as a potential large carbon sink has been thrust onto center stage. Results from most agricultural field trials indicate a relative increase in soil carbon stocks with the adoption of various improved management practices. However, the few available studies with time series data suggest that this relative gain is often due to a reduction or cessation of soil carbon losses rather than an actual increase in stocks. On the basis of this observation, we argue here that stock change data from agricultural field trials may have limited predictive power when the state of the soil carbon system is unknown and that current IPCC (Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change) accounting methodologies developed from the trial results may not properly credit these management activities. In particular, the use of response ratios is inconsistent with the current scientific understanding of carbon cycling in soils and response ratios will overestimate the net–net sequestration of soil carbon if the baseline is not at steady state.

Jonathan Sanderman; Jeffrey A Baldock

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

397

Soil solution chemistry of sewage-sludge incinerator ash and phosphate fertilizer amended soil  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The chemical composition of the soil provides useful information on the feasibility of amending agricultural land with municipal and industrial waste, because the soil solution is the medium for most soil chemical reactions, the mobile phase in soils, and the medium for mineral adsorption by plant roots. The soil solutions studies in this research were from plots in a 4-yr field experiment conducted to evaluate the effects of the trace metals and P in sewage-sludge incinerator ash. Treatments compared ash with equivalent P rates from triple-superphosphate fertilizer and a control receiving no P application. Ash and phosphate fertilizer were applied annually at rates of 35, 70, and 140 kg citrate-soluble P ha{sup -1}. Cumulative ash applications during 4 yr amounted to 3.6, 7.2, and 14.4 Mg ash ha{sup -1}. Soil solutions were obtained by centrifugation-immiscible liquid displacement using a fluorocarbon displacing agent. Following chemical analysis, a chemical speciation model was used to determine possible solubility-controlling minerals for trace metals and P, and correlations between solution composition and plant uptake were analyzed. 37 refs., 5 tabs.

Bierman, P.M.; Rosen, C.J.; Bloom, P.R.; Nater, E.A. [Univ. of Minnesota, St. Paul, MN (United States)

1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

398

Soil remediation using a coupled process: soil washing with surfactant followed by photo-Fenton oxidation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In the present work the use of a coupled process, soil washing and photo-Fenton oxidation, was investigated for remediation of a soil contaminated with p,p?-DDT (DDT) and p,p?-DDE (DDE), and a soil artificially contaminated with diesel. In the soil washing experiments, Triton X-100 (TX-100) aqueous solutions were used at different concentrations to obtain wastewaters with different compositions. Removal efficiencies of 66% (DDT), 80% (DDE) and 100% (diesel) were achieved for three sequential washings using a TX-100 solution strength equivalent to 12 times the effective critical micelle concentration of the surfactant (12 CMCeff). The wastewater obtained was then treated using a solar photo-Fenton process. After 6 h irradiation, 99, 95 and 100% degradation efficiencies were achieved for DDT, DDE and diesel, respectively. In all experiments, the concentration of dissolved organic carbon decreased by at least 95%, indicating that residual concentration of contaminants and/or TX-100 in the wastewater was very low. The co-extraction of metals was also evaluated. Among the metals analyzed (Pb, Cr, Ni, Cu, Cd, Mn and Co), only Cr and Mn were detected in the wastewater at concentrations above the maximum value permitted by current Brazilian legislation. The effective removal of contaminants from soil by the TX-100 washing process, together with the high degradation efficiency of the solar photo-Fenton process, suggests that this procedure could be a useful option for soil remediation.

Ricardo D. Villa; Alam G. Trovó; Raquel F. Pupo Nogueira

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

399

Hot Pot Contoured Temperature Gradient Map  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Temperature gradient contours derived from Oski temperature gradient hole program and from earlier published information.

Lane, Michael

2013-06-28T23:59:59.000Z

400

Hot Pot Contoured Temperature Gradient Map  

DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

Temperature gradient contours derived from Oski temperature gradient hole program and from earlier published information.

Lane, Michael

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "2-meter soil temperature" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

The Soils of Bowie, Denton, Freestone, and Red River Counties.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

***J. N. TATE, B. S., Assistani; Ranch Recordr H. NESS, M. S., Berry Breeder and Accounts RANGE ANIMAL HUSBANDRY: RURAL HOME RESEARCH: J. M. JONES, .A. M.. Chief; Sheep and Goat JESSIE WHTTACRE Ph. D Chief Investrgafrons MAMIE GRIMES, M. S.. &tiles...-gray surface soils with friable sandy, clay subsoils : Subsoil pale yello~v-Norfolk soils. Subsoil yellonr above, red mottled below-Bowie soils. Subsoil reddish yellow to j7ellom recl-Ruston soils. Subsoil red-Orangeburg soils. 16 BULLETIN NO. 375, TEXAS...

Fraps, G. S. (George Stronach)

1928-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

402

Soil sorption characteristics of imidacloprid in different Croatian regions  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In Croatia, imidacloprid is increasingly used in olive growing areas against the olive fruit fly. Experiments were conducted to examine the relationship between soil properties, imidacloprid concentration and soil sorption capacity. The linear and the Freundlich model adequately described the imidacloprid sorption. Better sorption was observed at lower imidacloprid concentrations and in soils with higher organic carbon and clay content, but organic carbon content was predominant factor influencing sorption. Thus, for soils with lower sorption capacity a greater potential mobility of imidacloprid in the soil profile is expected, indicating a need for regular monitoring and strategy development against groundwater pollution.

Dalibor Brozni?; Jelena Marini?; Marin Tota; Gordana ?anadi Jureši?; ?edomila Milin

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

403

Raman spectroscopy of selected arsenates—implications for soil remediation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The contamination of soils with heavy metals such as As, Cr and Cu is of great importance; the remediation of such soils even more so. Arsenic compounds are prevalent in soils either through leaching of mine tailings, the use of Cu/Cr/As as a wood preservative or through the use of arsenic in cattle dips. The arsenic compounds in soils and leachates can be highly reactive and mobile, resulting in the formation of metal arsenate compounds. Of these compounds, one such set of minerals that can be formed is the vivianite arsenate minerals. Raman spectroscopy has been used to characterise the vivianite arsenates and to identify arsenic contaminants in a soil.

Ray L. Frost; Theo Kloprogge; Matthew L. Weier; Wayde N. Martens; Z. Ding; Howell G.H. Edwards

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

404

Quantum Chemistry at Finite Temperature  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In this article, we present emerging fields of quantum chemistry at finite temperature. We discuss its recent developments on both experimental and theoretical fronts. First, we describe several experimental investigations related to the temperature effects on the structures, electronic spectra, or bond rupture forces for molecules. These include the analysis of the temperature impact on the pathway shifts for the protein unfolding by atomic force microscopy (AFM), the temperature dependence of the absorption spectra of electrons in solvents, and the temperature influence over the intermolecular forces measured by the AFM. On the theoretical side, we review advancements made by the author in the coming fields of quantum chemistry at finite temperature. Starting from the Bloch equation, we have derived the sets of hierarchy equations for the reduced density operators in both canonical and grand canonical ensembles. They provide a law according to which the reduced density operators vary in temperature for the identical and interacting many-body systems. By taking the independent particle approximation, we have solved the equations in the case of a grand canonical ensemble, and obtained an energy eigenequation for the molecular orbitals at finite temperature. The explicit expression for the temperature-dependent Fock operator is also given. They form a mathematical foundation for the examination of the molecular electronic structures and their interplay with finite temperature. Moreover, we clarify the physics concerning the temperature effects on the electronic structures or processes of the molecules, which is crucial for both theoretical understanding and computation. Finally, ....

Liqiang Wei

2006-05-23T23:59:59.000Z

405

Surface and Soil Cleanup at Brookhaven National Laboratory  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Surface and Soil Projects Surface and Soil Projects placeholder Aerial view of capped landfills A major part of the overall site cleanup involved addressing contaminated soils, underground tanks, and waste storage areas. All of the major soil projects have now been completed, with the exception of some soils that will need to be cleaned up during the decommissioning of the Brookhaven Graphite Research Reactor and High Flux Beam Reactor. Following are a list of major surface and soil cleanup projects that have been completed since 1994: Three out-of-service 100,000 gallon aboveground waste tanks were removed and disposed of at a licensed off-site disposal facility. Sixteen underground storage tanks (USTs) were removed between 1988 and 2005 under the cleanup program. The project included the removal, transportation, and disposal of the tanks and approximately 4,000 cubic yards of soil and debris.

406

Massive Soil Cleanup Effort Concludes at Hanford - Recovery Act Funding  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Massive Soil Cleanup Effort Concludes at Hanford - Recovery Act Massive Soil Cleanup Effort Concludes at Hanford - Recovery Act Funding Pays for Safe Disposal of 20,000 Truckloads of Soil Massive Soil Cleanup Effort Concludes at Hanford - Recovery Act Funding Pays for Safe Disposal of 20,000 Truckloads of Soil August 11, 2011 - 12:00pm Addthis Media Contacts Andre Armstrong, CH2M HILL Andre_L_Armstrong@rl.gov 509-376-6773 Geoff Tyree, DOE Geoffrey.Tyree@rl.doe.gov 509-376-4171 RICHLAND, Wash. - U.S. Department of Energy contractor CH2M HILL Plateau Remediation Company removed nearly half a million tons of contaminated soil over the last two years using American Recovery and Reinvestment Act funding at the Hanford Site in southeast Washington State. Workers shipped more than 20,000 truckloads of contaminated soil excavated

407

LM Conducts Groundwater and Soil Investigation at Riverton, Wyoming, in  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Conducts Groundwater and Soil Investigation at Riverton, Conducts Groundwater and Soil Investigation at Riverton, Wyoming, in Response to 2010 Flood LM Conducts Groundwater and Soil Investigation at Riverton, Wyoming, in Response to 2010 Flood October 16, 2012 - 10:50am Addthis LM Conducts Groundwater and Soil Investigation at Riverton, Wyoming, in Response to 2010 Flood LM Conducts Groundwater and Soil Investigation at Riverton, Wyoming, in Response to 2010 Flood LM Conducts Groundwater and Soil Investigation at Riverton, Wyoming, in Response to 2010 Flood LM Conducts Groundwater and Soil Investigation at Riverton, Wyoming, in Response to 2010 Flood What does this project do? Goal 1. Protect human health and the environment A team representing two Federal agencies-U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Legacy Management and U.S. Geological Survey-is evaluating

408

Chapter 18 - Management of Soil Biota and Their Processes  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract This chapter explores the human management of soil microorganisms and the processes that microorganisms control through energetic metabolism. We detail examples of human manipulation of microorganisms to provide beneficial services to humankind, many inadvertent manipulations. Soil microorganisms play a central role in food and fiber production on a worldwide basis. They also play a major role in soil health, including nutrient cycling and aggregation of soil particles. Organic agriculture is particularly reliant on the microbial cycling of nutrients from organic amendments because inorganic plant nutrients are not applied. Other management strategies for soil microorganisms include the introduction of plant-growth promoting organisms, biocontrol agents for pests and weeds, and to control soil-borne pathogens. However, introduced organisms only survive for a period of days to weeks. Thus managing organisms for human benefit may be more up to the soil organism community than mankind.

Jeffrey L. Smith; Harold P. Collins; Alex R. Crump; Vanessa L. Bailey

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

409

High-temperature Pump Monitoring - High-temperature ESP Monitoring...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

at least at the outset, exclude new ideas. The drift issue appears to have brought a new search for materials into this research. * Objectives: Develop temperature and pressure...

410

High-temperature Pump Monitoring - High-temperature ESP Monitoring...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Report Detecting Fractures Using Technology at High Temperatures and Depths - Geothermal Ultrasonic Fracture Imager (GUFI); 2010 Geothermal Technology Program Peer Review Report...

411

Productive soil must be fertile physical fertility  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-'weathering' · physical ­freezing, thawing, wetting, drying, organisms · chemical ­dissolved minerals moved in water ­soil ­loam, silty clay, loamy sand ­changing proportions not recommended · clay also group of minerals - 1 bu / 20 sq ft ­perennial gardens - 1 bu / 10 ft · do not add to tree/shrub planting hole · green

Balser, Teri C.

412

Regulatory guidance on soil cover systems  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) in September 1991, completed revisions to 14 sections of the Standard Review Plan (SRP) for the Review of a License Application for a Low-Level Radioactive Waste Disposal Facility. The major purposes of the SRP are to ensure the quality and uniformity of the NRC staff`s safety reviews, and to present a well-defined base from which to evaluate the acceptability of information and data provided in the Safety Analysis Report (SAR) portion of the license application. SRP 3.2, entitled, Design Considerations for Normal and Abnormal/Accident Conditions, was one of the sections that was revised by the NRC staff. This revision was completed to provide additional regulatory guidance on the important considerations that need to be addressed for the proper design and construction of soil cover systems that are to be placed over the LLW. The cover system over the waste is acknowledged to be one of the most important engineered barriers for the long-term stable performance of the disposal facility. The guidance in revised SRP 3.2 summarizes the previous efforts and recommendations of the US Army Corps of Engineers (COE), and a peer review panel on the placement of soil cover systems. NRC published these efforts in NUREG/CR-5432. The discussions in this paper highlight selected recommendations on soil cover issues that the NRC staff considers important for ensuring the safe, long-term performance of the soil cover systems. The development phases to be discussed include: (1) cover design; (2) cover material selection; (3) laboratory and field testing; (4) field placement control and acceptance; and (5) penetrations through the constructed covers.

Kane, J.D. [Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Washington, DC (United States)

1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

413

A correlation between soil descriptions and {sup 226}Ra concentrations in Florida soils  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The soil radium content in Florida is highly variable. The range in radium concentrations, where the samples involved in this study are concerned, is from 0.1 pCi/g to 18.5 pCi/g. Low {sup 226}Ra concentrations (0.1 to 5 pCi/g) are evidenced in sands, moderate concentrations (5 to 11 pCi/g) are found in silt and gravel, and high {sup 226}Ra concentrations (>11 pCi/g) are found in soil horizons with shell, clay, and strata with phosphate. Strata containing phosphate yields a high concentration of {sup 226}Ra. The information obtained in this study, soil descriptions with their corresponding {sup 226}Ra concentrations, comes from geological cores drilled by geotechnical consultants with gamma spectrometry analysis performed by high resolution gamma spectroscopy. Concentration; of {sup 226}Ra generally increase with depth. These cores are usually terminated at 20 feet deep, with some cores being shallower than this due to hitting bedrock or encountering the water table. These frequency distributions give the core-logging geologist an approximate concentration of {sup 226}Ra based on the description of the soil. Since the correlation of {sup 226}Ra and soil descriptions can be used as a tool in assigning indoor radon potential, this study is of importance to land managers, contractors, developers, and regulating agencies who are attempting to place standards on tracts of land with {sup 226}Ra concentration used as a criterion.

Harrison, D.P.

1992-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

414

The Transfer of Dissolved Cs-137 from Soil to Plants  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Rapidly maturing plants were grown simultaneously at the same experimental sites under natural conditions at the Chernobyl Exclusion Zone. Roots of the plants were side by side in the soil. During two seasons we selected samples of the plants and of the soils several times every season. Content of Cs-137 in the plant and in the soil solution extracted from the samples of soils was measured. Results of measurements of the samples show that, for the experimental site, Cs-137 content in the plant varies with date of the sample selection. The plant:soil solution Cs-137 concentration ratio depends strongly on the date of selection and also on the type of soil. After analysis of the data we conclude that Cs-137 plant uptake is approximately proportional to the content of dissolved Cs-137 in the soil per unit of volume, and the plant:soil solution Cs-137 concentration ratio for the soil is approximately proportional to the soil moisture. (authors)

Prorok, V.V.; Melnichenko, L.Yu. [Department of Physics, Taras Shevchenko National University of Kyiv, 2, build. 1 Acad. Glushkov prospect, Kyiv-680 MSP (Ukraine); Mason, C.F.V. [Research Applications Corporation, 148 Piedra Loop, Los Alamos, NM 87544 (United States); Ageyev, V.A.; Ostashko, V.V. [Institute for Nuclear Research, 47 Nauky prospect, Kyiv-680 MSP (Ukraine)

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

415

Volatile organic compound losses from sewage sludge-amended soils  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) applied to soil in sludge have been assumed to disappear quickly and completely. The VOC behavior in sludge-amended soils has been studied previously only in laboratory systems where the sludged soil has been spiked with compounds of interest. Behavior in these systems may not necessarily represent compound behavior in field soils to which contaminated sludge is added. A series of laboratory microcosm experiments were designed therefore to investigate the behavior of toluene, ethyl benzene, o-, m-, and p-xylene applied to soil in contaminated sludge, and factors influencing loss processes. The VOC loss from sludge-amended soil was well described by a simple one step pseudo-first-order model but in certain soils was better described by a two step first-order model. Volatilization was the predominant loss process. Rates of loss depended on sludge application rate, method of sludge application, soil properties, and on compound characteristics. Experiments indicated that spiking sludge-amended soils gave a reasonable indication of VOC loss rates from systems amended with contaminated sludge at least over a period of 23 d. The majority of VOCs applied to soils in sludge volatilizes quickly to the atmosphere over a few to 10s of days with a small fraction lost more slowly. Potential for VOC crop uptake, livestock ingestion, and contamination of ground water is low under routine, managed applications of sewage sludge to agricultural land.

Wilson, S.C.; Jones, K.C.

1999-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

416

Washing of soils spiked with various pollutants by surfactant solutions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this study, the batch-type of washing with surfactant solutions was employed for the treatment of soils artificially contaminated with various volatile organic compounds (VOCs), polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), and heavy metals. 15 industrial grade surfactants were tested. Washing was conducing by adding surfactant solution to the soils and mixing for one hour, then centrifuging it and analyzing the supernatant. Deionized water was used for soil washing for comparison. Results indicated that deionized water performed as well as Surfactant No. 1 in washing VOC-contaminated soils. Therefore, it is concluded that the VOCs tested can be easily washed from soils by rain water. In washing PAH-contaminated soils, nonionic surfactants performed better than anionic surfactants in terms of removal efficiency. The amphoteric surfactant performed worst in washing PAH-contaminated soils. Generally, surfactants are useful in removing cadmium from soils, but are not useful for the removal of lead and copper. Amphoteric, anionic, and low pH cationic surfactants were the most effective of those tested. For PAH/heavy metals-contaminated soils, removal efficiencies were lower than that of soils containing a single contaminant.

Yang, G.C.C.; Chang, J.H. [National Sun Yat-Sen Univ., Kaohsiung (Taiwan, Province of China)

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

417

Impact of postfire logging on soil bacterial and fungal communities and soil biogeochemistry in a mixed-conifer forest in central Oregon  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Soil microbes can indirectly influence soil productivity by enhancing nutrient availability for plant uptake, or reducing plant productivity through competition for nutrients with plant roots by promoting nutr...

Tara N. Jennings; Jane E. Smith; Kermit Cromack Jr.; Elizabeth W. Sulzman…

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

418

Actinide Thermodynamics at Elevated Temperatures  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The postclosure chemical environment in the proposed Yucca Mountain repository is expected to experience elevated temperatures. Predicting migration of actinides is possible if sufficient, reliable thermodynamic data on hydrolysis and complexation are available for these temperatures. Data are scarce and scattered for 25 degrees C, and nonexistent for elevated temperatures. This collaborative project between LBNL and PNNL collects thermodynamic data at elevated temperatures on actinide complexes with inorganic ligands that may be present in Yucca Mountain. The ligands include hydroxide, fluoride, sulfate, phosphate and carbonate. Thermodynamic parameters of complexation, including stability constants, enthalpy, entropy and heat capacity of complexation, are measured with a variety of techniques including solvent extraction, potentiometry, spectrophotometry and calorimetry

Friese, Judah I.; Rao, Linfeng; Xia, Yuanxian; Bachelor, Paula P.; Tian, Guoxin

2007-11-16T23:59:59.000Z

419

High Temperature Processing Symposium 2014  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

} High temperature recycling operations } Materials sustainability } New furnace technology (including solar) We look forward to seeing you in February 2014. Dr M Akbar Rhamdhani (Chairman HTPS 2014) Prof

Liley, David

420

AAPG Low-Temperature Webinar  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

is coproduction? When and where are low temperature geothermal resources coproduced with oil and gas? * What are the economics of low temp geothermal coproduction? * Where are some...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "2-meter soil temperature" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Black Warrior: Sub-soil Gas and Fluid Inclusion Exploration and Slim Well  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Warrior: Sub-soil Gas and Fluid Inclusion Exploration and Slim Well Warrior: Sub-soil Gas and Fluid Inclusion Exploration and Slim Well Drilling Geothermal Project Jump to: navigation, search Last modified on July 22, 2011. Project Title Black Warrior: Sub-soil Gas and Fluid Inclusion Exploration and Slim Well Drilling Project Type / Topic 1 Recovery Act: Geothermal Technologies Program Project Type / Topic 2 Validation of Innovative Exploration Technologies Project Description The project area encompasses 6,273 acres of both private and federal lands including water and surface rights. It is reasonable to expect a capacity of about 20 MW. GeothermEx estimated a potential capacity of 40 MW. Black Warrior is a large blind geothermal prospect near the Pyramid Lake Indian Reservation that was identified by reconnaissance temperature gradient drilling in the 1980s by Philips Petroleum but was never tested through deep exploration drilling. Although the 10 square miles of high heat flow in the area reveals significant energy potential it also makes selection of an optimal exploration drilling target difficult.

422

Subsurface Temperature, Moisture, Thermal Conductivity and Heat Flux, Barrow, Area A, B, C, D  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Subsurface temperature data are being collected along a transect from the center of the polygon through the trough (and to the center of the adjacent polygon for Area D). Each transect has five 1.5m vertical array thermistor probes with 16 thermistors each. This dataset also includes soil pits that have been instrumented for temperature, water content, thermal conductivity, and heat flux at the permafrost table. Area C has a shallow borehole of 2.5 meters depth is instrumented in the center of the polygon.

Cable, William; Romanovsky, Vladimir

2014-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

423

Subsurface Temperature, Moisture, Thermal Conductivity and Heat Flux, Barrow, Area A, B, C, D  

DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

Subsurface temperature data are being collected along a transect from the center of the polygon through the trough (and to the center of the adjacent polygon for Area D). Each transect has five 1.5m vertical array thermistor probes with 16 thermistors each. This dataset also includes soil pits that have been instrumented for temperature, water content, thermal conductivity, and heat flux at the permafrost table. Area C has a shallow borehole of 2.5 meters depth is instrumented in the center of the polygon.

Cable, William; Romanovsky, Vladimir

424

Experiment Hazard Class 3 - High Temperatures  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Operation * APS Base Low Temperatures * Cryogenic Systems High Temperatures * Electric Furnace * Optical Furnace * Other High Temperature Lasers * Laser, Class 2 * Laser,...

425

Environmental radiation safety: plutonium/soil interactions for plutonium particles in soil  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The goal of this project is to provide information useful in estimating hazards related to resuspension characteristics and subsequent aerodynamic behavior of aerosols from a mixing of soil and /sup 238/PuO/sub 2/. Experiments were carried out to determine whether simple models, used to predict the total activity concentration of resuspended particles, need to be modified to account for changes in the /sup 238/PuO/sub 2/ activity distribution on resuspended particles due to aging of the soil mixture under humid or dry conditions. A literature search revealed that one model, based on the suspension factors, S/sub f/, may be a useful predictor of hazard reduction irrespective of site. Our experiments demonstrated little or no change in the activity of resuspended particles following humid or dry aging of the soil-/sup 238/PuO/sub 2/ mixture. Additional terms for activity distribution changes should not be needed for the simple resuspension hazard model.

Moss, O.R.; Rossingnol, E.J.; Cannon, W.C.; Stevens, D.L.

1980-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

426

Supercritical Rankine Cycle Coupled with Ground Cooling for Low Temperature Power Generation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract This paper presents an application of an earth-air-heat-exchanger (EAHE) as condenser in low to medium temperature power generation plants. A supercritical Rankine cycle (SRC) utilizing organic refrigerants as working fluids was used as the power cycle for the plant. The heat source temperature was varied from 125-1750C. The condenser was coupled to an EAHE system buried at a depth of 2 m under the surface of the earth. Its effect on the power cycle efficiency over a period of six months has been studied. It was observed that the soil temperature 10 cm from the surface (horizontal direction) of the underground pipe increased by almost 20C during this time. This temperature change decreased with distance from the pipe. The soil temperature profile varied with time, distance from the pipe and location along the length of the pipe. The efficiency of the SRC increased by 1% and the daily fluctuations were reduced when EAHE was used.

Rachana Vidhi; D. Yogi Goswami; Elias Stefanakos

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

427

Evaluation of the Mercury Soil Mapping Geothermal Exploration Techniques |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Evaluation of the Mercury Soil Mapping Geothermal Exploration Techniques Evaluation of the Mercury Soil Mapping Geothermal Exploration Techniques Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Conference Paper: Evaluation of the Mercury Soil Mapping Geothermal Exploration Techniques Abstract In order to evaluate the suitability of the soil mercury geochemical survey as a geothermal exploration technique, soil concentrates of mercy are compared to the distribution of measured geothermal gradients at Dixie Valley, Nevada; Roosevelt Hot Springs, Utah; and Nova, Japan. Zones containing high mercury values are found to closely correspond to high geothermal gradient zones in all three areas. Moreover, the highest mercury values within the anomalies are found near the wells with the highest geothermal gradient. Such close correspondence between soil concentrations

428

Development of an on-site ex-situ unsaturated-flow remediation process for trace metal contaminated soils.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Innovative means and methods were tested to develop an economical, pragmatic and environmentally sustainable soil remediation process for heavy metal contaminated soils. An unsaturated-flow soil… (more)

Andrade, Marc-David

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

429

ARM - Measurement - Surface skin temperature  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

skin temperature skin temperature ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Measurement : Surface skin temperature The radiative surface skin temperature, from an IR thermometer measuring the narrowband radiating temperature of the ground surface in its field of view. Categories Radiometric, Surface Properties Instruments The above measurement is considered scientifically relevant for the following instruments. Refer to the datastream (netcdf) file headers of each instrument for a list of all available measurements, including those recorded for diagnostic or quality assurance purposes. ARM Instruments IRT : Infrared Thermometer MFRIRT : Multifilter Radiometer and Infrared Thermometer External Instruments

430

Surface temperature | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Surface temperature Surface temperature Dataset Summary Description This dataset, made available by the UK Department of Energy and Climate Change (DECC), shows the difference between the yearly central England temperature for years 1772 through 2009 and the 1961 - 1990 baseline (1961 - 1990 Central England average after smoothing). It also shows the difference between average global temperature and 1961 - 1990 average after smoothing. The original source of the data is the Met Office. Source UK Department of Energy and Climate Change (DECC) Date Released March 12th, 2010 (4 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords climate change Surface temperature UK weather Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon 1 Excel file: Surface Temps, 1772 - 1990 (xls, 1.3 MiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Some Review

431

Version 3 Bioscience1 Enhancement of Carbon Sequestration in U.S. Soils  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Version 3 Bioscience1 Enhancement of Carbon Sequestration in U.S. Soils W.M. Post, R.C. Izaurralde and retain soil carbon can lead to specific manipulations for enhancement of soil C sequestration for an integrated evaluation of soil carbon sequestration methods are presented. Keywords: soil carbon, greenhouse

McCarl, Bruce A.

432

ORIGINAL PAPER On-farm effects of no-till versus occasional tillage on soil  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

under occasional tillage had somewhat lower soil organic carbon of 16.0 versus 19.2 gkg-1 , soil water-farm conditions. Keywords Field moisture capacity. Soil aggregation . Soil organic carbon . Sustainable farming process and by sequestering soil organic carbon (Lal et al., 2004). Thus, structural stability and quality

Boyer, Edmond

433

Soil–plant nitrogen cycling modulated carbon exchanges in a western temperate conifer forest in Canada  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Nitrogen controls, on the seasonal and inter-annual variability of net ecosystem productivity (NEP) in a western temperate conifer forest in British Columbia, Canada, were simulated by a coupled carbon and nitrogen (C&N) model. The model was developed by incorporating plant–soil nitrogen algorithms in the Carbon-Canadian Land Surface Scheme (C-CLASS). In the coupled C&N-CLASS, the maximum carboxylation rate of Rubisco (Vcmax) is determined non-linearly from the modelled leaf Rubisco-nitrogen, rather than being prescribed. Hence, variations in canopy assimilation and stomatal conductance are sensitive to leaf nitrogen status through the Rubisco enzyme. The plant–soil nitrogen cycle includes nitrogen pools from photosynthetic enzymes, leaves and roots, as well as organic and mineral reservoirs from soil, which are generated, exchanged, and lost by biological fixation, atmospheric deposition, fertilization, mineralization, nitrification, root uptake, denitrification, and leaching. Model output was compared with eddy covariance flux measurements made over a 5-year period (1998–2002). The model performed very well in simulating half-hourly and monthly mean NEP values for a range of environmental conditions observed during the 5 years. C&N-CLASS simulated NEP values were 274, 437, 354, 352 and 253 g C m?2 for 1998–2002, compared to observed NEP values of 269, 360, 381, 418 and 264 g C m?2, for the respective years. Compared to the default C-CLASS, the coupled C&N model showed improvements in simulating the seasonal and annual dynamics of carbon fluxes in this forest. The nitrogen transformation to soil organic forms, mineralization, plant nitrogen uptake and leaf Rubisco-nitrogen concentration patterns were strongly influenced by seasonal and annual temperature variations. In contrast, the impact of precipitation was insignificant on the overall forest nitrogen budget. The coupled C&N modelling framework will help to evaluate the impact of nitrogen cycle on terrestrial ecosystems and its feedbacks on Earth's climate system.

M. Altaf Arain; Fengming Yuan; T. Andrew Black

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

434

Zinc sorption by iron oxides and soil samples  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

(Head of Department) May 1989 ABSTRACT Zinc Sorption by Iron Oxides and Soil Samples. (May 1989) Markku Juhani Yli-Halla, M. S. University of Helsinki, Finland Chair of Advisory Committee: Dr. Richard H. Loeppert Zn sorption by synthetic Fe oxide... and soil samples was studied. The purpose was to examine the effect of crystallinity and adsorbed silica on Zn adsorption by synthetic Fe oxide using goethite and ferrihydrite as test materials. Zn sorption by acid soil samples from Finland and a...

Yli-Halla, Markku Juhani

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

435

The Soils of Brazos, Camp, Ellis, and Washington Counties.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

loam 11 per cent. and the Tabor fine sandy loam 8 per cent. These three are upland soils. The Miller clay, which is a very productive and durable alluvial soil, occupies 7.9 per cent. of the county. The average composition of the upland soils... fine sandy loam-subsoil.. low Bastrop sand- surface. ........................................ fair Rastrop sand-subsoil. ......................................... fair Rell clay-surface ............................................. good Bell cla y...

Fraps, G. S. (George Stronach)

1924-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

436

A soil moisture availability model for crop stress prediction  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

is composed of three major components, which are, a) calcul ation of evapotranspiration, b) infiltration of moisture into the soil, c) redistribution of the soil moisture. Other edaphic models have been developed by Hill [1974], Bai er and Robertson... inputs could result in the development of moist layers in the lower soil layer that would not be accounted for if the moisture were uniformly redistributed. As the cycle progesses, redistribution and moisture depletion do occur, until there 1s less...

Gay, Roger Franklin

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

437

Relation of Soil Acidity to Cotton Root Rot.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

R79-437-6m TEXAS AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION A. 13. CONNER, DIRECTOR COLLEGE STATION, BllAZOS COUNTY, TEXAS LLETIN NO. 545 JUNE, 1937 DIVISION OF PLANT PATHOLOGY AND PHYSIOLOGY AND DIVISION OF CHEMISTRY RELATION OF SOIL ACIDITY... at various depths in small plats Sulphur applied at small rates to surface soil, in plats i? which root rot was well established Discussion Summary Literature cited BULLETIN NO. 545 JUNE, 1937 RELATION OF SOIL ACIDITY TO COTTON ROOT ROT By J. J...

Taubenhaus, J. J. (Jacob Joseph); Ezekiel, Walter N. (Walter Naphtali); Fudge, J. F. (Joseph Franklin)

1937-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

438

Soil and Water Conservation (Florida) | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Soil and Water Conservation (Florida) Soil and Water Conservation (Florida) Soil and Water Conservation (Florida) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Developer Fed. Government Fuel Distributor General Public/Consumer Industrial Installer/Contractor Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Low-Income Residential Multi-Family Residential Municipal/Public Utility Nonprofit Residential Retail Supplier Rural Electric Cooperative Schools State/Provincial Govt Systems Integrator Transportation Tribal Government Utility Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State Florida Program Type Environmental Regulations Provider Florida Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services Florida's 62 Soil and Water Conservation Districts were established in

439

Potassium Fixation and Supply by Soils with Mixed Clay Minerals.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

supplied onl!. Studies were made on three agriculturally important me/me of exchangeable K. The capacity of all a soils of South Texas and Northern Mexico to determine soils to fix K increased with increasing remo\\dl i their potassium (K)-supplying power...- T east and Southeast United States has been investigated. Little work has been done, however, on soils of the Southwest. Soils of the West and Southwest are generally quite high in K, and responses are not usually obtained from the addition of K...

Hipp, Billy W.

1969-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

440

Analysis of soil and water for TATB content  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A reverse-phase liquid chromatography (HPLC) method was developed for the analysis of TATB in soil samples. The soil samples were extracted with dimethylformamide (DMF). The extract was analyzed to determine the TATB content in the soil. The detection limit using this procedure was 2 parts/million (ppm) for TATB in the soil. An organic free sample of water was saturated with TATB. The water was filtered through a 0.2-{mu} filter, then injected into both a reverse-phase and normal-phase liquid chromatograph system. No peaks were detected. Therefore, the solubility of TATB in water is less than the detection limits of the chromatograph methods.

Schaffer, C.L.

1992-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "2-meter soil temperature" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Effect of the Additions on Availability of Soil Phosphates.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-calcium or di-calcium or united to iron or aluminium. This matter is of considerable importance in soil chemistry. AS pointed out in Rull~tin No. 126 of this Station, the needs of soils for phosphatic fertilizer in pot experiments are, on an average, related...-calcium or di-calcium or united to iron or aluminium. This matter is of considerable importance in soil chemistry. AS pointed out in Rull~tin No. 126 of this Station, the needs of soils for phosphatic fertilizer in pot experiments are, on an average, related...

Fraps, G. S. (George Stronach)

1915-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

442

TIF film, substrates and nonfumigant soil disinfestation maintain fruit yields  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

soil disinfestation maintain fruit yields Steve Fennimore bystrawberry production sea- son, fruit yields on substrateswere com- parable to fruit yields using conventional

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

443

A study of compaction methods for lunar soil simulants  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Engineering ABSTRACT A Study of Compaction Methods for Lunar Soil Simulants. (August 1993) Rama Varadarajan Ekkad, B. Tech. , Jaw?harlal Nehru Technological University, Hyderabad, India Chair of Advisory Committee: Dr. Walter W. Boles Considerable... 3 6 II LUNAR SOIL STIJDIl S 2. 1 Introduction 2. 2 Lunar Soil Science 2. 2. 1 Grain Properties 2, 2, 2 Physical Properues 2. 3 I unar Soil Simulants 2. 3. I Maryland-Santlers Lunar Simulant 2. 3. 2 Arizona Lunar Simulant ? ALS 2. 3, 3 JSC-1...

Ekkad, Rama Varadarajan

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

444

Isotopic studies of Yucca Mountain soil fluids and carbonate pedogenesis  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Secondary carbonates occurring within the soils, faults, and subsurface fractures of Yucca Mountain contain some of the best available records of paleoclimate and palehydrology for the potential radioactive waste repository site. This article discusses conceptual and analytical advances being made with regard to the interpretation of stable isotope data from pedogenic carbonates, specifically related to the {sup 13}C content of soil CO{sub 2}, CaCO{sub 3}, precipitation mechanisms, and isotopic fractionations between parent fluids and precipitating carbonates. The {sup 13}C content of soil carbon dioxide from Yucca Mountain and vicinity shows most of the usual patterns expected in such contexts: Decreasing {sup 13}C content with depth decreasing {sup 13}C with altitude and reduced {sup 13}C during spring. These patterns exist within the domain of a noisy data set; soil and vegetational heterogeneities, weather, and other factors apparently contribute to isotopic variability in the system. Several soil calcification mechanisms appear to be important, involving characteristic physical and chemical environments and isotopic fractionations. When CO{sub 2} loss from thin soil solutions is an important driving factor, carbonates may contain excess heavy isotopes, compared to equilibrium precipitation with soil fluids. When root calcification serves as a proton generator for plant absorption of soil nutrients, heavy isotope deficiencies are likely. Successive cycles of dissolution and reprecipitation mix and redistribute pedogenic carbonates, and tend to isotopically homogenize and equilibrate pedogenic carbonates with soil fluids.

McConnaughey, T.A.; Whelan, J.F.; Wickland, K.P.; Moscati, R.J.

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

445

Soiling losses for solar photovoltaic systems in California  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

n efficiency and daily rainfall for a 554 kW dc PV plant inPV sites demonstrated how soiling decreases the efficiency of solar PV plants.

Mejia, Felipe A; Kleissl, Jan

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

446

Uncovering Role of Symbiotic Fungi in Soil Carbon Storage | U...  

Office of Science (SC) Website

scarce for other carbon decomposers in the soil and consequently reducing their biomass and rates of decomposition. By contrast, arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi lack many of...

447

100 Area soil washing bench-scale test procedures  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document describes methodologies and procedures for conducting soil washing treatability tests in accordance with the 100 Area Soil Washing Treatability Test Plan (DOE-RL 1992, Draft A). The objective of this treatability study is to evaluate the use of physical separation systems and chemical extraction methods as a means of separating chemically and radioactively contaminated soil fractions from uncontaminated soil fractions. These data will be primarily used for determining feasibility of the individual unit operations and defining the requirements for a system, or systems, for pilot-scale testing.

Freeman, H.D.; Gerber, M.A.; Mattigod, S.V.; Serne, R.J.

1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

448

Soils of Bell, Jefferson, Smith, Taylor and Webb Counties.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

conditions in addition to the fertility of the soil. The corn possibility is a convenient way of comparing the deficiency of various plant foods in the soil. For exam ple, with the Abilene clay of Bell County, the corn possibility for active phosphoric... acid is 12, for active potash 120, and for total nitrogen 38. The soil is probably deficient first in phosphoric acid, and then in nitro gen; and it is much less likely to be deficient in potash. In a lime stone soil like the Abilene clay...

Fraps, G. S. (George Stronach)

1922-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

449

Soil separator and sampler and method of sampling  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A soil sampler includes a fluidized bed for receiving a soil sample. The fluidized bed may be in communication with a vacuum for drawing air through the fluidized bed and suspending particulate matter of the soil sample in the air. In a method of sampling, the air may be drawn across a filter, separating the particulate matter. Optionally, a baffle or a cyclone may be included within the fluidized bed for disentrainment, or dedusting, so only the finest particulate matter, including asbestos, will be trapped on the filter. The filter may be removable, and may be tested to determine the content of asbestos and other hazardous particulate matter in the soil sample.

O'Brien, Barry H. (Idaho Falls, ID) [Idaho Falls, ID; Ritter, Paul D. (Idaho Falls, ID) [Idaho Falls, ID

2010-02-16T23:59:59.000Z

450

Surfactant-enhanced electrokinetic remediation of hydrocarbon-contaminated soils.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Concern over soil and groundwater contamination has created a demand for new and efficient remediation technologies. Surfactant-enhanced electrokinetic remediation is an innovative technique which has… (more)

Thomas, Steven P.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

451

Soil Gas Sampling At Chena Geothermal Area (Kolker, 2008) | Open...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Soil Gas Sampling At Chena Geothermal Area (Kolker, 2008) Exploration Activity Details Location...

452

Natural Oxidation of Black Carbon in Soils: Changes in Molecular...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Carbon in Soils: Changes in Molecular Form and Surface Charge along a Climosequence. Abstract: The aim of this work was to investigate changes in molecular form and surface...

453

Title A Review of Transuranic Elements in Soils, Plants, and...  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

in Soils, Plants, and Animals 1 NTSEIS ADMINISTRATIVE RECORD -;|B Keith R. Price 5 ABSTRACT Published information concerning the distribution and fate erf neptunium,...

454

Detection of Low Volatility Organic Analytes on Soils Using Infrared...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

of Low Volatility Organic Analytes on Soils Using Infrared Reflection Spectroscopy. Abstract: Previous work on detection of low-volatility liquid organic (and...

455

Temperature dependence of vortex charges in high-temperature superconductors  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Using a model Hamiltonian with d-wave superconductivity and competing antiferromagnetic (AF) interactions, the temperature (T) dependence of the vortex charge in high-Tc superconductors is investigated by numerically solving the Bogoliubov–de Gennes equations. The strength of the induced AF order inside the vortex core is T dependent. The vortex charge could be negative when the AF order with sufficient strength is present at low temperatures. At higher temperatures, the AF order may be completely suppressed and the vortex charge becomes positive. A first-order-like transition in the T-dependent vortex charge is seen near the critical temperature TAF. For an underdoped sample, the spatial profiles of the induced spin-density wave and the charge-density wave orders could have stripelike structures at TTs. As a result, a vortex charge discontinuity occurs at Ts.

Yan Chen; Z. D. Wang; C. S. Ting

2003-06-03T23:59:59.000Z

456

Soil Characterization at the Linde FUSRAP Site and the Impact on Soil Volume Estimates  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The former Linde site in Tonawanda, New York is currently undergoing active remediation of Manhattan Engineering District's radiological contamination. This remediation is authorized under the Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP). The focus of this paper will be to describe the impact of soil characterization efforts as they relate to soil volume estimates and project cost estimates. An additional objective is to stimulate discussion about other characterization and modeling technologies, and to provide a ''Lessons Learned'' scenario to assist in future volume estimating at other FUSRAP sites. Initial soil characterization efforts at the Linde FUSRAP site in areas known to be contaminated or suspected to be contaminated were presented in the Remedial Investigation Report for the Tonawanda Site, dated February 1993. Results of those initial characterization efforts were the basis for soil volume estimates that were used to estimate and negotiate the current remediation contract. During the course of remediation, previously unidentified areas of contamination were discovered, and additional characterization was initiated. Additional test pit and geoprobe samples were obtained at over 500 locations, bringing the total to over 800 sample locations at the 135-acre site. New data continues to be collected on a routine basis during ongoing remedial actions.

Boyle, J.; Kenna, T.; Pilon, R.

2002-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

457

The effects of soil type and chemical treatment on nickel speciation in refinery enriched soils  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

: A multi-technique investigation David H. McNear Jr. a,*, Rufus L. Chaney b , Donald L. Sparks c of 29 km2 of land with Ni concentrations exceeding the Canadian Ministry of the Environment's remedial as a remediation strategy for this area. In this paper we use multiple techniques to directly assess the role soil

458

Characterization of Soil Water Content Variability and Soil Texture using GPR Groundwave Techniques  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

measurements. Precipitation and irrigation were both shown to increase the spatial variability of water content the soil water content is well character- ized across a field. In addition to crop yield, the quality JEEG, September 2010, Volume 15, Issue 3, pp. 93­110 #12;of some crops, such as wine grapes, partially

Hubbard, Susan

459

Method for measuring surface temperature  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The present invention relates to a method for measuring a surface temperature using is a fluorescent temperature sensor or optical thermometer. The sensor includes a solution of 1,3-bis(1-pyrenyl)propane within a 1-butyl-1-1-methyl pyrrolidinium bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)imide ionic liquid solvent. The 1,3-bis(1-pyrenyl)propane remains unassociated when in the ground state while in solution. When subjected to UV light, an excited state is produced that exists in equilibrium with an excimer. The position of the equilibrium between the two excited states is temperature dependent.

Baker, Gary A. (Los Alamos, NM); Baker, Sheila N. (Los Alamos, NM); McCleskey, T. Mark (Los Alamos, NM)

2009-07-28T23:59:59.000Z

460

A Dynamical Approach to Temperature  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present a new dynamical approach for measuring the temperature of a Hamiltonian dynamical system in the micro canonical ensemble of thermodynamics. We show that under the hypothesis of ergodicity the temperature can be computed as a time-average of the functional, div(grad H/|grad H|^2), on the energy-surface. Our method not only yields an efficient computational approach for determining the temperature it also provides an intrinsic link between dynamical systems theory and the statistical mechanics of Hamiltonian systems.

Hans Henrik Rugh

1997-01-30T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "2-meter soil temperature" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

The Microbial Community of Landfill Soils and the Influence of Landfill Gas on Soil Recovery and Revegetation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

An extensive database for soil microbiological and physicochemical conditions has been established from samples taken from restored landfill sites in South East England. The sites...

Sharon D. Wigfull; Paul Birch

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

462

Carbonate Leaching of Uranium from Contaminated Soils  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Uranium (U) was successfully removed from contaminated soils from the Fernald Environmental Management Project (FEMP) site near Fernald, Ohio. ... The concentrations of uranium and other metals in the effluent were analyzed using a Varian Liberty 200 inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrophotometer (ICP-AES) or a kinetic phosphorescence analyzer (KPA). ... When 30% hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) was added prior to the carbonate solution, no increase in the removal of uranium was detected (data not shown) due to effervescence with heating, liberating carbon dioxide, and thus preventing uniform distribution of H2O2. ...

C. F. V. Mason; W. R. J. R. Turney; B. M. Thomson; N. Lu; P. A. Longmire; C. J. Chisholm-Brause

1997-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

463

Texas Soils: A Study of Chemical Composition.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

is about one half as mnch as in creek bottom. \\Ve have also an upland hainmock here that is a good soil." The next two divisions are hased on the classification given by Mr. ILobt.,T. Hill in the first report of the State Geological surrey....v be present sodium corbonate, and ill one inrtancc I have found cnlcium chloride-chloride of lime. The folloaiilg analysis reported for the- f3t:~tc geological surrey will illustrate t,!~ conlposition of Texas "alknli" spots: Black ,liZKali fronz X~2e2a...

Harrington, H. H. (Henry Hill)

1892-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

464

Sampling Irrigated Soils for Salinity Appraisal.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

per meter (dSm-1)1 (MIyamoto et al. 1986b). In these examples, the salinity of the surface layer was approximately equal to that of irrigation waters; then it increased almost linearly with depth. 1 A unitofdSm-1 is equal to the conventional... distribution of soil salinity mea sured in 1981, 1982, and 1983 in two sections of pecan orchards basin-irrigated with waters of 1.1 and 4.3 dSm-1 (equal to mmho/cm). Both sections consisted of Saneli silty clay loam (Vertic Torrijluvents). The standard...

Miyamoto, S.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

465

Sonochemical Digestion of Soil and Sediment Samples  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This work was performed as part of a broader effort to automate analytical methods for determination of plutonium and other radioisotopes in environmental samples. The work described here represented a screening study to determine the potential for applying ultrasonic irradiation to sample digestion. Two standard reference materials (SRMs) were used in this study: Columbia River Sediment and Rocky Flats Soil. The key experiments performed are listed below along with a summary of the results. The action of nitric acid, regardless of its concentration and liquid-to-solid ratio, did not achieve dissolution efficiency better that 20%. The major fraction of natural organic matter (NOM) remained undissolved by this treatment. Sonication did not result in improved dissolution for the SRMs tested. The action of hydrofluoric acid at concentrations of 8 M and higher achieved much more pronounced dissolution (up to 97% dissolved for the Rocky Flats soil sample and up to 78% dissolved for the Columbia River Sediment sample). Dissolution efficiency remains constant for solid-to-liquid ratios of up to 0.05 to 1 and decreases for the higher loadings of the solid phase. Sonication produced no measurable effect in improving the dissolution of the samples compared with the control digestion experiments. Combined treatment of the SRM by mixtures of HNO3 and HF showed inferior performance compared with the HF alone. An adverse effect of sonication was found for the Rocky Flats soil material, which became more noticeable at higher HF concentrations. Sonication of the Columbia River sediment samples had no positive effect in the mixed acid treatment. The results indicate that applying ultrasound in an isolated cup horn configuration does not offer any advantage over conventional ''heat and mix'' treatment for dissolution of the soil and sediment based on the SRM examined here. This conclusion, however, is based on an approach that uses gravimetric analysis to determine gross dissolution efficiency. This approach does not allow any conclusion regarding the possible advantage of sonication in selective dissolution of plutonium traces incorporated into an inorganic or organic fraction of the samples.

Sinkov, Sergei I.; Lumetta, Gregg J.

2006-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

466

Growing Potatoes Soil Potatoes are adapted to a wide range of soil types, though a deep, well-drained sandy loam is ideal.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Growing Potatoes Soil Potatoes are adapted to a wide range of soil types, though a deep, well to plant earlier. If irrigation is available, sandy soil will produce a good potato crop. Poorly drained contribute to tuber rot. Grow potatoes in soils with a pH of 5.2 to 5.5 to prevent potato scab. If the level

New Hampshire, University of

467

Soil Segregation Methods for Reducing Transportation and Disposal Costs - 13544  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

At Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP) sites where the selected alternative for contaminated soil is excavation and off-site disposal, the most significant budget items of the remedial action are the costs for transportation and disposal of soil at an off-site facility. At these sites, the objective is to excavate and dispose of only those soils that exceed derived concentration guideline levels. In situ soil segregation using gross gamma detectors to guide the excavation is often challenging at sites where the soil contamination is overlain by clean soil or where the contaminated soil is located in isolated, subsurface pockets. In addition, data gaps are often identified during the alternative evaluation and selection process, resulting in increased uncertainty in the extent of subsurface contamination. In response, the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Buffalo District is implementing ex situ soil segregation methods. At the remediated Painesville Site, soils were excavated and fed through a conveyor-belt system, which automatically segregated them into above- and below-cleanup criteria discharge piles utilizing gamma spectroscopy. At the Linde Site and the Shallow Land Disposal Area (SLDA) Site, which are both in the remediation phase, soils are initially segregated during the excavation process using gross gamma detectors and then transported to a pad for confirmatory manual surveying and sampling. At the Linde Site, the ex situ soils are analyzed on the basis of a site-specific method, to establish compliance with beneficial reuse criteria that were developed for the Linde remediation. At the SLDA Site, the ex situ soils are surveyed and sampled based on Multi-Agency Radiation Survey and Site Investigation Manual (MARSSIM) final status survey guidance to demonstrate compliance with the derived concentration guideline levels. At all three sites, the ex situ soils that meet the site- specific DCGLs are retained on-site and used as backfill material. This paper describes the ex situ soil segregation methods, the considerations of each method, and the estimated cost savings from minimizing the volume of soil requiring transportation and off-site disposal. (authors)

Frothingham, David; Andrews, Shawn; Barker, Michelle; Boyle, James; Buechi, Stephen; Graham, Marc; Houston, Linda; Polek, Michael; Simmington, Robert; Spector, Harold [U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Buffalo District, 1776 Niagara St., Buffalo, NY 14207 (United States)] [U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Buffalo District, 1776 Niagara St., Buffalo, NY 14207 (United States); Elliott, Robert 'Dan' [U.S. Army Reserve, 812A Franklin St.,Worcester, MA 01604 (United States)] [U.S. Army Reserve, 812A Franklin St.,Worcester, MA 01604 (United States); Durham, Lisa [Argonne National Laboratory, Environmental Science Division, 9700 S. Cass Ave., Argonne, IL 60439 (United States)] [Argonne National Laboratory, Environmental Science Division, 9700 S. Cass Ave., Argonne, IL 60439 (United States)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

468

Variations in chemical and physical properties of Amazon forest soils in relation to their genesis  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

soils was the RADAM-BRASIL soil survey (RADAMBRASIL, 1978).this study over the RADAM-BRASIL soil survey Biogeosciences,profiles in the RADAM- BRASIL, their sampling was limited by

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

469

Polyacrylamide and water quality effects on infiltration in sandy loam soils  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

were evaluated on a Hanford sandy loam soil (coarse-loamy,field tests near Fresno, CA, on Hanford sandy loam soils toA soil sam- ple (Hanford sandy loam) was shaken in 10 mg PAM

Ajwa, Husein A; Trout, T J

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

470

Monitoring Agricultural Risk in Canada Using L-Band Passive Microwave Soil Moisture from SMOS  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Soil moisture from Soil Moisture Ocean Salinity (SMOS) passive microwave satellite data was assessed as an information source for identifying regions experiencing climate-related agricultural risk for a period from 2010-2013. Both absolute soil ...

Catherine Champagne; Andrew Davidson; Patrick Cherneski; Jessika L’Heureux; Trevor Hadwen

471

Soils developed from alluvial and proluvial deposits in the Gröndalselva River valley in West Spitsbergen  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The genetic characterization of soils developed from alluvial and proluvial deposits in the Gröndalselva River valley (West Spitsbergen) is presented. These soils are ... texture of the soils in the Gröndalselva ...

V. N. Pereverzev; T. I. Litvinova

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

472

NASA's Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) Mission and Opportunities for Applications Users  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Water in the soil—both its amount (soil moisture) and its state (freeze/thaw)—plays a key role in water and energy cycles, in weather and climate, and in the carbon cycle. Additionally, soil moisture touches upon human ...

Brown, Molly E.

473

Soil Nitrogen Mineralization Potential for Improved Fertilizer Recommendations and Decreased Nitrate Contamination of Groundwater  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to determine optimum conditions for estimating soil microbial biomass (SMB) from previously dried soils and to identify a quick, reliable biochemical predictor of soil N mineralization potential. Initial evaluations were conducted on a Weswood silty clay loam...

Franzluebbers, Alan; Haney, Richard; Hons, Frank

474

Home Soil Testing-Frequently asked questions How quickly will I get my results?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

both conventional (chemical) and organic fertilizer recommendations. It also includes soil pH, organic class analysis, we need 2 cups of soil. If you are testing compost, we need 4-6 cups of soil. #12;Can I

New Hampshire, University of

475

Removal of cadmium and lead from soil using aescin as a biosurfactant  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Remediation of a soil contaminated with cadmium or lead was performed by a soil washing process using aescin as a biosurfactant. The removal of cadmium and lead from the soil was evaluated as a function of aes...

Kyung-Jin Hong; Young-Kook Choi; Shuzo Tokunaga…

1998-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

476

Remediation of a Diesel Contaminated, Sandy-Loam Soil Using Low Concentrated Surfactant Solutions (5 pp)  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Surfactant enhanced ex-situ soil washing can be used to remediate diesel contaminated soils. Surfactants enhance the diesel removal from soils by ... processes: mobilization and solubilization. Mobilization occu...

Steven Vreysen; André Maes

2005-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

477

Anionic Surfactant Mobility in Unsaturated Soil: The Impact of Molecular Structure  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...1994). In situ surfactant washing of polychlorinated biphenyls and soils from a contaminated field...1991). Importance of soil-contaminant-surfactant interactions for in situ soil washing. In D.-W. Tedder...

Barry J. Allred; Glenn O. Brown

478

Cometabolic oxidation of polychlorinated biphenyls in soil with a surfactant-based field application vector.  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...over- come these limitations. Surfactant-based soil washing systems have been developed for...hydrophobic contam- inants from soils (1, 29). The coupling of surfactant-based FAVs with soil washing systems may be effective for both...

C A Lajoie; A C Layton; G S Sayler

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

479

Soil Moisture Memory in AGCM Simulations: Analysis of Global Land–Atmosphere Coupling Experiment (GLACE) Data  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Soil moisture memory is a key aspect of land–atmosphere interaction and has major implications for seasonal forecasting. Because of a severe lack of soil moisture observations on most continents, existing analyses of global-scale soil moisture ...

Sonia I. Seneviratne; Randal D. Koster; Zhichang Guo; Paul A. Dirmeyer; Eva Kowalczyk; David Lawrence; Ping Liu; David Mocko; Cheng-Hsuan Lu; Keith W. Oleson; Diana Verseghy

2006-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

480

Soil solution chemistry of a fly ash-, poultry litter-, and sewage sludge-amended soil  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Mixing coal fly ash (FA) with organic wastes to provide balanced soil amendments offers a potential viable use of this industrial by-product. When such materials are land-applied to supply nutrients for agronomic crops, trace element contaminant solubility must be evaluated. In this study, major and trace element soil solution concentrations arising from application of fly ash, organic wastes, and mixtures of the two were compared in a laboratory incubation. Two fly ashes, broiler poultry litter (PL), municipal sewage sludge (SS), and mixtures of FA with either PL or SS were mixed with a Cecil sandy loam (fine, kaolinitic, thermic Typic Kanhapludult) at rates of 32.3, 8.1, and 16.1 g kg{sup {minus}1} soil for FA, PL, and SS, respectively. Treatments were incubated at 22 C at 17% moisture content and soil solution was periodically extracted by centrifugation over 33 d. Initial soil solution concentrations of As, Mo, Se, and Cu were significantly greater in FA/OL treatments than the respective FA-only treatments. For Cu, increased solution concentrations were attributable to increased loading rates in FA/PL mixtures. Solution Cu concentrations were strongly correlated with dissolved C (R{sup 2} > 0.96) in all PL treatments. Significant interactive effects for solution Mo and Se concentrations were observed for the FA/PL and may have resulted from the increased pH and competing anion concentrations of these treatments. Solution As concentrations showed a significant interactive effect for one FA/PL mixture. For the individual treatments, As was more soluble in the Pl treatment than either FA treatment. Except for soluble Se from on FA/SS mixture, trace element solubility in the FA/SS mixtures was not significantly different than the respective FA-only treatment.

Jackson, B.P.; Miller, W.P.

2000-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "2-meter soil temperature" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


481

ARM - Measurement - Sea surface temperature  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

govMeasurementsSea surface temperature govMeasurementsSea surface temperature ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Measurement : Sea surface temperature The temperature of sea water near the surface. Categories Surface Properties Instruments The above measurement is considered scientifically relevant for the following instruments. Refer to the datastream (netcdf) file headers of each instrument for a list of all available measurements, including those recorded for diagnostic or quality assurance purposes. External Instruments ECMWF : European Centre for Medium Range Weather Forecasts Model Data Field Campaign Instruments ECMWF : European Centre for Medium Range Weather Forecasts Model Data MIRAI : JAMSTEC Research Vessel Mirai

482

A Synthesis of Antarctic Temperatures  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Monthly surface air temperatures from land surface stations, automatic weather stations, and ship/buoy observations from the high-latitude Southern Hemisphere are synthesized into gridded analyses at a resolution appropriate for applications ...

William L. Chapman; John E. Walsh

2007-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

483

Philosophy 26 High Temperature Superconductivity  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

is the ratio of voltage to current. The resistance of a material tells us how a low resistance, and they are therefore good conductors; other materials, likePhilosophy 26 High Temperature Superconductivity By Ohm's Law, resistance

Callender, Craig

484

temperature heat pumps applied to  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Very high- temperature heat pumps applied to energy efficiency in industry Application June 21th 2012 Energy efficiency : A contribution to environmental protection Kyoto Copenhage Emission, plastics Partnership : EDF R&D Bil

Oak Ridge National Laboratory

485

Thermal Dosimetry and Temperature Measurements  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Saptem ber 15 and 16, 1978, San Diego, Calif. 2 The abbreviations used are: RF, radiofrequency; LED, light-emitting diode. gross temperature measurement errors when the probes are used to monitor tissue or phantom material in an electromag...

D. A. Christensen

1979-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

486

temperatures | OpenEI Community  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

temperatures temperatures Home Graham7781's picture Submitted by Graham7781(1992) Super contributor 18 January, 2013 - 15:46 U.S. Global Change Research Program publishes "National Climate Assessment" report for United States climate change drought OpenEI sea level rise temperatures U.S. Global Climate Change program The U.S. Global Change Research Program, established under the Department of Commerce in 2010, and partnered with NOAA, released an extensive National Climate Assessment report, projecting future climate changes in the United States under different scenarios. The 1,200 page report highlights some rather grim findings about the future of climate change. Here are 5 of the more disconcerting graphics from the report: 1. U.S. Average Temperatures Syndicate content

487

Fuel Temperature Coefficient of Reactivity  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A method for measuring the fuel temperature coefficient of reactivity in a heterogeneous nuclear reactor is presented. The method, which is used during normal operation, requires that calibrated control rods be oscillated in a special way at a high reactor power level. The value of the fuel temperature coefficient of reactivity is found from the measured flux responses to these oscillations. Application of the method in a Savannah River reactor charged with natural uranium is discussed.

Loewe, W.E.

2001-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

488

Curie temperature of multiphase nanostructures  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Curie temperature and the local spontaneous magnetization of ferromagnetic nanocomposites are investigated. The macroscopic character of the critical fluctuations responsible for the onset of ferromagnetic order means that there is only one Curie temperature, independent of the number of magnetic phases present. The Curie temperature increases with the grain size and is, in general, larger than predicted from the volume averages of the exchange constants. However, the Curie-temperature enhancement is accompanied by a relative reduction of the spontaneous magnetization. Due to the quadratic dependence of the permanent-magnet energy product on the spontaneous magnetization, this amounts to a deterioration of the magnets performance. The length scale on which an effective intergranular exchange coupling is realized (coupling length) depends on the Curie-temperature difference between the phases and on the spacial distribution of the local interatomic exchange. As a rule, it is of the order of a few interatomic distances; for much bigger grain sizes the structures mimic an interaction-free ensemble of different ferromagnetic materials. This must be compared to the magnetic-anisotropy coupling length, which is of the order of 10 nm. The difference is explained by the nonrelativistic character of the Curie-temperature problem. (c) 2000 American Institute of Physics.

Skomski, R. [Department of Physics and Astronomy and Center for Materials Research and Analysis, University of Nebraska, Lincoln, Nebraska 68588 (United States)] [Department of Physics and Astronomy and Center for Materials Research and Analysis, University of Nebraska, Lincoln, Nebraska 68588 (United States); Sellmyer, D. J. [Department of Physics and Astronomy and Center for Materials Research and Analysis, University of Nebraska, Lincoln, Nebraska 68588 (United States)] [Department of Physics and Astronomy and Center for Materials Research and Analysis, University of Nebraska, Lincoln, Nebraska 68588 (United States)

2000-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

489

Extremely Low Temperature | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Extremely Low Temperature Extremely Low Temperature Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Print PDF Sanyal Temperature Classification: Extremely Low Temperature Dictionary.png Extremely Low Temperature: No definition has been provided for this term. Add a Definition Sanyal Temp Classification This temperature scheme was developed by Sanyal in 2005 at the request of DOE and GEA, as reported in Classification of Geothermal Systems: A Possible Scheme. Extremely Low Temperature Very Low Temperature Low Temperature Moderate Temperature High Temperature Ultra High Temperature Steam Field Reservoir fluid less than 100°C is considered to to be "extremely low temperature." Note: Sanyal classified fluids of these temperatures to be "non-electrical grade" in 2005, but electricity has since been generated from these

490

Simulation of soil washing with surfactants  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A mathematical model of soil washing that incorporates the surfactant enhanced mobilization and solubilization of organic compounds was implemented using a finite difference compositional reservoir simulator. The primary objective of the model was identification of the contributions of the various mechanisms—water displacement, surfactant mobilization and dissolution—on the removal of organic contaminants from soil. Mobilization of the organic phase was described by a reduction in the residual oil saturation caused by decreased interfacial tension. Increased aqueous solubility of organic compounds due to solubilization by surfactant micelles was modeled assuming local equilibrium. Parameters for the model were obtained from experimental measurements and literature sources. The model was implemented in a two-dimensional, two-phase system. Experimental data from surfactant flushing of columns contaminated with automatic transmission fluid and a mixture of chlorinated organics were used to evaluate the performance of the model. In most cases, the predicted organic recoveries were found to agree well with experimental results. For the surfactant sodium dodecyl sulfate, mobilization of organic contaminants was the main recovery mechanism for both waste liquids modeled. The results suggest that complete dissolution of a contaminant nonaqueous phase, rather than mobilization and subsequent vertical migration, may be difficult to achieve at the surfactant concentrations studied.

Elaine P.S Cheah; Danny D Reible; Kalliat T Valsaraj; W.David Constant; Barry W Walsh; Louis J Thibodeaux

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

491

Soil gas investigations at the Sanitary Landfill  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A soil gas survey was performed at the 740-G Sanitary Landfill of Savannah River Plant during December, 1990. The survey monitored the presence and distribution of the C{sub 1}C{sub 4} hydrocarbons; the C{sub 5}-C{sub 10} normal paraffins; the aromatic hydrocarbons, BTXE; selected chlorinated hydrocarbons; and mercury. Significant levels of several of these contaminants were found associated with the burial site. In the northern area of the Landfill, methane concentrations ranged up to 63% of the soil gas and were consistently high on the western side of the access road. To the east of the access road in the northern and southern area high concentrations of methane were encountered but were not consistently high. Methane, the species found in highest concentration in the landfill, was generated in the landfill as the result of biological oxidation of cellulose and other organics to carbon dioxide followed by reduction of the carbon dioxide to methane. Distributions of other species are the result of burials in the landfill of solvents or other materials.

Wyatt, D.E.; Pirkle, R.J.; Masdea, D.J.

1992-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

492

Soil gas investigations at the Sanitary Landfill  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A soil gas survey was performed at the 740-G Sanitary Landfill of Savannah River Plant during December, 1990. The survey monitored the presence and distribution of the C[sub 1]C[sub 4] hydrocarbons; the C[sub 5]-C[sub 10] normal paraffins; the aromatic hydrocarbons, BTXE; selected chlorinated hydrocarbons; and mercury. Significant levels of several of these contaminants were found associated with the burial site. In the northern area of the Landfill, methane concentrations ranged up to 63% of the soil gas and were consistently high on the western side of the access road. To the east of the access road in the northern and southern area high concentrations of methane were encountered but were not consistently high. Methane, the species found in highest concentration in the landfill, was generated in the landfill as the result of biological oxidation of cellulose and other organics to carbon dioxide followed by reduction of the carbon dioxide to methane. Distributions of other species are the result of burials in the landfill of solvents or other materials.

Wyatt, D.E.; Pirkle, R.J.; Masdea, D.J.

1992-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

493

Monday, March 23, 2009 PHOENIX: SOIL, CHEMISTRY, AND HABITABILITY  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Monday, March 23, 2009 PHOENIX: SOIL, CHEMISTRY, AND HABITABILITY 2:30 p.m. Waterway Ballroom 1 and porous. Its cohesiveness changes when separated from the ground, most probable due to sublimation of its Aqueous Carbonate Chemistry of the Martian Soil at the Phoenix Landing Site [#2489] The Wet Chemistry Labs

Rathbun, Julie A.

494

Excavated soil reuse Development of a French management framework  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for Environment asked BRGM and INERIS to draft a methodological guidance document related to the off-site reuse values. Excavated soil off-site reuse methodology The presentation will focus on the main principlesTex, concerns groundwater risk assessment. It was developed to verify that the off- site reuse of excavated soil

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

495

Reclaiming earthen drainage channels using organic soil amendments  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. The primary goal of this study was to determine the best combination of organic amendment and vegetation to stabilize and maintain these waterways. A site was selected that had surface soil textures ranging from fine sandy loam to silt loam. Soils...

Carpenter, Todd A

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

496

Contraction scour in compound channels with cohesive soil beds  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Bridge scour, which is the removal of bed materials from near the bridge foundations, is observed to be the most predominant cause of bridge failures in the United States. Scour in cohesive soils is greatly different from scour in cohesionless soils...

Israel Devadason, Benjamin Praisy

2008-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

497

Contraction scour in compound channels with cohesive soil beds  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Bridge scour, which is the removal of bed materials from near the bridge foundations, is observed to be the most predominant cause of bridge failures in the United States. Scour in cohesive soils is greatly different from scour in cohesionless soils...

Israel Devadason, Benjamin Praisy

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

498

A baseline characterization of trace elements in Texas soils  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A baseline survey of concentrations of Mn, Fe, Zn, Cu, Se, As, Cd, Cr, Co, Pb, Ba, and Ni was performed for 100 soils from seven Land Resource Areas of Texas. Nearly 300 soil samples from the upper, middle, and lower depths of selected pedons were...

Frybarger, Mary Rita

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

499

Prediction methods for capacity of drag anchors in clayey soils  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A drag anchor is a marine foundation element, which is penetrated into the seabed by dragging in order to generate a required capacity. The holding capacity of a drag anchor in a particular soil condition is developed by soil resistance acting...

Yoon, Yeo Hoon

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

500

Method for the Analysis of Oxygen Isotopic Composition of Soil  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, including phosphorus (P) recycling by soil microorganisms, uptake by plants and P adsorption, precipitation.Twoagriculturalsoilsamples receiving reclaimed wastewater or fresh water were analyzed, and results indicate that all soil fractions, where rates of biological uptake and recycling through the biomass are relatively low, 18 OP (the ratio

Paytan, Adina