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1

Glenwood Springs Amendments | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Amendments Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Land Use Plan: Glenwood Springs Amendments Organization BLM Published Publisher Not Provided, 2002 DOI...

2

Glenwood Hot Springs Lodge Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Lodge Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Lodge Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Glenwood Hot Springs Lodge Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Facility Glenwood Hot Springs Lodge Sector Geothermal energy Type Space Heating Location Glenwood Springs, Colorado Coordinates 39.5505376°, -107.3247762° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[]}

3

Internal Corrosion Analysis of Model 9975 Packaging Containing Pu or PuO{sub 2} During Shipping and Storage  

SciTech Connect

The Materials Consultation Group of SRTC has completed an internal corrosion analysis of the Model 9975 packaging assembly containing either Pu or PuO2 for storage in K Reactor under ambient conditions for a period of 12 years. The 12-year storage period includes two years for shipping and up to ten years for storage.

Vormelker, P.

1999-03-23T23:59:59.000Z

4

A theoretical study of the ground state and lowest excited states of PuO0/+/+2 and PuO20/+/+2  

SciTech Connect

The ground and excited states of neutral and cationic PuO and PuO2 have been studied with multiconfigurational quantum chemical methods followed by second order perturbation theory, the CASSCF/CASPT2 method. Scalar relativistic effects and spin-orbit coupling have been included in the treatment. As literature values for the ionization energy of PuO2 are in the wide range of ~;;6.6 eV to ~;;10.1 eV, a central goal of the computations was to resolve these discrepancies; the theoretical results indicate that the ionization energy is near the lower end of this range. The calculated ionization energies for PuO, PuO+ and PuO2+ are in good agreement with the experimental values.

Gibson, John K.; La Macchia, Giovanni; Infante, Ivan; Gagliardi, Laura; Raab, Juraj

2008-12-08T23:59:59.000Z

5

AFS-2 FLOWSHEET MODIFICATIONS TO ADDRESS THE INGROWTH OF PU(VI) DURING METAL DISSOLUTION  

SciTech Connect

In support of the Alternate Feed Stock Two (AFS-2) PuO{sub 2} production campaign, Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) conducted a series of experiments concluding that dissolving Pu metal at 95C using a 610 M HNO{sub 3} solution containing 0.050.2 M KF and 02 g/L B could reduce the oxidation of Pu(IV) to Pu(VI) as compared to dissolving Pu metal under the same conditions but at or near the boiling temperature. This flowsheet was demonstrated by conducting Pu metal dissolutions at 95C to ensure that PuO{sub 2} solids were not formed during the dissolution. These dissolution parameters can be used for dissolving both Aqueous Polishing (AP) and MOX Process (MP) specification materials. Preceding the studies reported herein, two batches of Pu metal were dissolved in the H-Canyon 6.1D dissolver to prepare feed solution for the AFS-2 PuO{sub 2} production campaign. While in storage, UV-visible spectra obtained from an at-line spectrophotometer indicated the presence of Pu(VI). Analysis of the solutions also showed the presence of Fe, Ni, and Cr. Oxidation of Pu(IV) produced during metal dissolution to Pu(VI) is a concern for anion exchange purification. Anion exchange requires Pu in the +4 oxidation state for formation of the anionic plutonium(IV) hexanitrato complex which absorbs onto the resin. The presence of Pu(VI) in the anion feed solution would require a valence adjustment step to prevent losses. In addition, the presence of Cr(VI) would result in absorption of chromate ion onto the resin and could limit the purification of Pu from Cr which may challenge the purity specification of the final PuO{sub 2} product. Initial experiments were performed to quantify the rate of oxidation of Pu(IV) to Pu(VI) (presumed to be facilitated by Cr(VI)) as functions of the HNO{sub 3} concentration and temperature in simulated dissolution solutions containing Cr, Fe, and Ni. In these simulated Pu dissolutions studies, lowering the temperature from near boiling to 95 C reduced the oxidation rate of Pu(IV) to Pu(VI). For 8.1 M HNO{sub 3} simulated dissolution solutions, at near boiling conditions >35% Pu(VI) was present in 50 h while at 95 C <10% Pu(VI) was present at 50 h. At near boiling temperatures, eliminating the presence of Cr and varying the HNO{sub 3} concentration in the range of 78.5 M had little effect on the rate of conversion of Pu(IV) to Pu(VI). HNO{sub 3} oxidation of Pu(IV) to Pu(VI) in a pure solution has been reported previously. Based on simulated dissolution experiments, this study concluded that dissolving Pu metal at 95C using a 6 to 10 M HNO{sub 3} solution 0.050.2 M KF and 02 g/L B could reduce the rate of oxidation of Pu(IV) to Pu(VI) as compared to near boiling conditions. To demonstrate this flowsheet, two small-scale experiments were performed dissolving Pu metal up to 6.75 g/L. No Pu-containing residues were observed in the solutions after cooling. Using Pu metal dissolution rates measured during the experiments and a correlation developed by Holcomb, the time required to completely dissolve a batch of Pu metal in an H-Canyon dissolver using this flowsheet was estimated to require nearly 5 days (120 h). This value is reasonably consistent with an estimate based on the Batch 2 and 3 dissolution times in the 6.1D dissolver and Pu metal dissolution rates measured in this study and by Rudisill et al. Data from the present and previous studies show that the Pu metal dissolution rate decreases by a factor of approximately two when the temperature decreased from boiling (112 to 116C) to 95C. Therefore, the time required to dissolve a batch of Pu metal in an H-Canyon dissolver at 95C would likely double (from 36 to 54 h) and require 72 to 108 h depending on the surface area of the Pu metal. Based on the experimental studies, a Pu metal dissolution flowsheet utilizing 610 M HNO{sub 3} containing 0.050.2 M KF (with 02 g/L B) at 95C is recommended to reduce the oxidation of Pu(IV) to Pu(VI) as compared to near boiling conditions. The time required to completely di

Crapse, K.; Rudisill, T.; O'Rourke, P.; Kyser, E.

2014-07-02T23:59:59.000Z

6

Glenwood Hot Springs Hotel Pool & Spa Low Temperature Geothermal Facility |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Hotel Pool & Spa Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Hotel Pool & Spa Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Glenwood Hot Springs Hotel Pool & Spa Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Facility Glenwood Hot Springs Hotel Sector Geothermal energy Type Pool and Spa Location Glenwood Springs, Colorado Coordinates 39.5505376°, -107.3247762° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[]}

7

Glenwood Springs Vapor Caves Pool & Spa Low Temperature Geothermal Facility  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Springs Vapor Caves Pool & Spa Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Springs Vapor Caves Pool & Spa Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Glenwood Springs Vapor Caves Pool & Spa Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Facility Glenwood Springs Vapor Caves Sector Geothermal energy Type Pool and Spa Location Glenwood Springs, Colorado Coordinates 39.5505376°, -107.3247762° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[]}

8

Microsoft PowerPoint - 2-06_ Marra Pu solubility Tech Exchange - 1.ppt  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

the Solubility and Homogeneity the Solubility and Homogeneity of Plutonium in an Alkali Borosilicate Glass Jim Marra, Charles Crawford and Kevin Fox Savannah River National Laboratory EM Tech Exchange - Atlanta, GA Print Close 2 Outline * Background * Glass composition options * Vitrification processes * Hf as a surrogate for Pu in borosilicate glasses * Lanthanide borosilicate (LaBS) glass * Alkali borosilicate glass * Initial studies * Present study - Pu behavior in HLW glass * Pu behavior in the DWPF melter * Summary Print Close 3 Background * U.S. National Academy of Sciences, 1994 * U.S. and Russian surplus weapons Pu is a "clear and present danger" * U.S. to disposition up to 50 metric tons of surplus Pu * Protect surplus Pu from theft or diversion and reintroduction into nuclear arsenals * Bulk of U.S. material to be dispositioned by fabrication in

9

Recovery of UO{sub 2}/PuO{sub 2} in IFR electrorefining process  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This invention is comprised of a process for converting PuO{sub 2} and U0{sub 2} present in an electrorefiner to the chlorides, by contacting the PuO{sub 2} and U0{sub 2} with Li metal in the presence of an alkali metal chloride salt substantially free of rare earth and actinide chlorides for a time and at a temperature sufficient to convert the U0{sub 2} and PuO{sub 2} to metals while converting Li metal to Li{sub 2}O. Li{sub 2}O is removed either by reducing with rare earth metals or by providing an oxygen electrode for transporting 0{sub 2} out of the electrorefiner and a cathode, and thereafter applying an emf to the electrorefiner electrodes sufficient to cause the Li{sub 2}O to disassociate to 0{sub 2} and Li metal but insufficient to decompose the alkali metal chloride salt. The U and Pu and excess lithium are then converted to chlorides by reaction with CdCl{sub 2}.

Tomczuk, Z.; Miller, W.E.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

10

Recovery of UO[sub 2]/PuO[sub 2] in IFR electrorefining process  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process is described for converting PuO[sub 2] and UO[sub 2] present in an electrorefiner to the chlorides, by contacting the PuO[sub 2] and UO[sub 2] with Li metal in the presence of an alkali metal chloride salt substantially free of rare earth and actinide chlorides for a time and at a temperature sufficient to convert the UO[sub 2] and PuO[sub 2] to metals while converting Li metal to Li[sub 2]O. Li[sub 2]O is removed either by reducing with rare earth metals or by providing an oxygen electrode for transporting O[sub 2] out of the electrorefiner and a cathode, and thereafter applying an emf to the electrorefiner electrodes sufficient to cause the Li[sub 2]O to disassociate to O[sub 2] and Li metal but insufficient to decompose the alkali metal chloride salt. The U and Pu and excess lithium are then converted to chlorides by reaction with CdCl[sub 2].

Tomczuk, Z.; Miller, W.E.

1994-10-18T23:59:59.000Z

11

Thermophysical properties of ??Pu{sub 2}O{sub 3}: A new potential model  

SciTech Connect

??Pu{sub 2}O{sub 3} is an important material among plutonium based materials in nuclear industry. Pure plutonium surfaces quickly oxidizes into ??Pu{sub 2}O{sub 3} and PuO{sub 2} which are in the form of layers one on another. Here we have investigated thermal properties of ??Pu{sub 2}O{sub 3} by molecular dynamics simulation by using a partially ionic semi-empirical rigid ion potential. Mechanical properties, thermal expansion, and heat capacity are calculated. Results were compared with available experimental data and quantum calculation [2]. Due to the experimental limitations such as toxicity and radiation effects, studying the physical properties of such materials from molecular dynamics simulations have vital importance.

Gnay, S. D., E-mail: sdgunay@gmail.com; Akdere, .; Ta?seven, . [Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, Yildiz Technical University, Davutpaa Campus, Esenler, 34210, Istanbul (Turkey); Akgen, B., E-mail: berna.akgenc@kirklareli.edu.tr [Krklareli University Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, Kavakl, 39060, Krklareli (Turkey)

2013-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

12

Hematological responses after inhaling {sup 238}PuO{sub 2}: An extrapolation from beagle dogs to humans  

SciTech Connect

The alpha emitter plutonium-238 ({sup 238}Pu), which is produced in uranium-fueled, light-water reactors, is used as a thermoelectric power source for space applications. Inhalation of a mixed oxide form of Pu is the most likely mode of exposure of workers and the general public. Occupational exposures to {sup 238}PuO{sub 2} have occurred in association with the fabrication of radioisotope thermoelectric generators. Organs and tissue at risk for deterministic and stochastic effects of {sup 238}Pu-alpha irradiation include the lung, liver, skeleton, and lymphatic tissue. Little has been reported about the effects of inhaled {sup 238}PuO{sub 2} on peripheral blood cell counts in humans. The purpose of this study was to investigate hematological responses after a single inhalation exposure of Beagle dogs to alpha-emitting {sup 238}PuO{sub 2} particles and to extrapolate results to humans.

Scott, B.R.; Muggenburg, B.A.; Welsh, C.A.; Angerstein, D.A.

1994-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

13

Density-functional study of water adsorption on the PuO2(110) surface  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Water adsorption on a PuO2(110) surface is studied using a periodic model with both the local-density approximation (LDA) and the generalized gradient approximation (GGA) of density-functional theory. The 60 core electrons of the Pu atom are represented by a relativistic effective core potential, and scalar relativistic effects have been incorporated into the valence orbitals. Both molecular and dissociative configurations of the adsorbate H2O are considered at one molecular layer coverage. For molecular water adsorption, LDA calculations indicate binding only at the top site, whereas the GGA indicates no binding for any site. Dissociative adsorption is found to be energetically more favorable than molecular adsorption, in agreement with experimental observations. The effects on the geometric and electronic structures influenced by water adsorption are investigated.

Xueyuan Wu and Asok K. Ray

2002-01-30T23:59:59.000Z

14

Predictions of PuO{sub 2} and tracer compound release from ISV melts  

SciTech Connect

Two field tests were conducted at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) to assess in situ vitrification (ISV) suitability for long-term stabilization of buried radioactive waste. Both tests contained rare-earth oxide tracers (DY{sub 2}O{sub 3}, Yb{sub 2}O{sub 3}, and Tb{sub 4}O{sub 7}) to simulate the presence of plutonium in the form of PuO{sub 2}. In the first test, Intermediate Field Test (IFT)-l, approximately 4-% release of tracer material occurred during soil melting and associated off-gassing, while essentially nil release was observed for the second experiment (IFT-2) for which off-gassing was much reduced. This report presents an evaluation of the IFT test data in terms of governing release processes. Prediction of tracer release during ISV melting centered on an assessment of three potential transport mechanisms, (a) tracer diffusion through stagnant pool, (b) tracer transport by convective currents, and (c) tracer carry-off by escaping gas bubbles. Analysis indicates that tracer release by escaping gas is the dominant release mechanism, which is consistent with video records of gas bubble escape from the ISV melt surface. Quantitative mass transport predictions were also made for the IFT-I test conditions, indicating similarity between the 4-% release data and calculational results at viscosities of {approx} poise and tracer diffusivities of {approx}10{sub {minus}6} CM{sup 2}/s. Since PuO{sub 2} has similar chemical and transport (diffusivity) properties as the rare-earth tracers used in the rare earth tracers used in the IFT experiments, release of PuO{sub 2} is predicted for similar off-gassing conditions. Reduced off-gassing during ISV would thus be expected to improve the overall retention of heavy-oxides within vitrified soil.

Cronenberg, A.W. [Engineering Science and Analysis, Albuquerque, NM (United States); Callow, R.A. [EG and G Idaho, Inc., Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

1992-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

15

Predictions of PuO sub 2 and tracer compound release from ISV melts  

SciTech Connect

Two field tests were conducted at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) to assess in situ vitrification (ISV) suitability for long-term stabilization of buried radioactive waste. Both tests contained rare-earth oxide tracers (DY{sub 2}O{sub 3}, Yb{sub 2}O{sub 3}, and Tb{sub 4}O{sub 7}) to simulate the presence of plutonium in the form of PuO{sub 2}. In the first test, Intermediate Field Test (IFT)-l, approximately 4-% release of tracer material occurred during soil melting and associated off-gassing, while essentially nil release was observed for the second experiment (IFT-2) for which off-gassing was much reduced. This report presents an evaluation of the IFT test data in terms of governing release processes. Prediction of tracer release during ISV melting centered on an assessment of three potential transport mechanisms, (a) tracer diffusion through stagnant pool, (b) tracer transport by convective currents, and (c) tracer carry-off by escaping gas bubbles. Analysis indicates that tracer release by escaping gas is the dominant release mechanism, which is consistent with video records of gas bubble escape from the ISV melt surface. Quantitative mass transport predictions were also made for the IFT-I test conditions, indicating similarity between the 4-% release data and calculational results at viscosities of {approx} poise and tracer diffusivities of {approx}10{sub {minus}6} CM{sup 2}/s. Since PuO{sub 2} has similar chemical and transport (diffusivity) properties as the rare-earth tracers used in the rare earth tracers used in the IFT experiments, release of PuO{sub 2} is predicted for similar off-gassing conditions. Reduced off-gassing during ISV would thus be expected to improve the overall retention of heavy-oxides within vitrified soil.

Cronenberg, A.W. (Engineering Science and Analysis, Albuquerque, NM (United States)); Callow, R.A. (EG and G Idaho, Inc., Idaho Falls, ID (United States))

1992-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

16

DOE plutonium disposition study: Pu consumption in ALWRs. Volume 2, Final report  

SciTech Connect

The Department of Energy (DOE) has contracted with Asea Brown Boveri-Combustion Engineering (ABB-CE) to provide information on the capability of ABB-CE`s System 80 + Advanced Light Water Reactor (ALWR) to transform, through reactor burnup, 100 metric tonnes (MT) of weapons grade plutonium (Pu) into a form which is not readily useable in weapons. This information is being developed as part of DOE`s Plutonium Disposition Study, initiated by DOE in response to Congressional action. This document Volume 2, provides a discussion of: Plutonium Fuel Cycle; Technology Needs; Regulatory Considerations; Cost and Schedule Estimates; and Deployment Strategy.

Not Available

1993-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

17

Decay Properties of Pu235, Pu237, and a New Isotope Pu233  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Electron-capture and alpha-decay properties of Pu237, Pu235, and the new isotope Pu233 have been measured. The over-all half-lives are 442 days for Pu237, 262 minutes for Pu235, and 202 minutes for Pu233. Two alpha groups, one of 5.650.02 Mev and one of 5.360.02 Mev, were detected in the decay of Pu237, one group of 5.850.02 Mev in the decay of Pu235, and one of 6.300.02 Mev in the decay of Pu233. The partial alpha half-lives corresponding to these alpha groups are, for Pu237, (1.70.4)104 years and (4.60.6)103 years, respectively; for Pu235, (1.70.4) years; and for Pu233, 114 days. On the basis of the experimental data it has been possible to calculate hindrance factors for the alpha decay and logft values for the electron-capture decay of the three isotopes and to correlate their properties with the alpha and electron-capture systematics.

T. Darrah Thomas, Robert Vandenbosch, Richard A. Glass, and Glenn T. Seaborg

1957-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

18

Solubility of Pu, Np, and U from Spent UO2?Fuel Under Inert/Reducing Conditions  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The overall objective of this program is to improve the scientific understanding of processes that control the release of radioactive species especially actinides from spent fuel inside a disposal canister. The Swedish concept has focused on deep burial in the rock with an iron?lined Cu?canister. Corrosion of the canister iron insert will consume any residual oxygen and provide actively reducing conditions in any fluid phase. Therefore an investigation of the solubility of different radionuclides under actively reducing conditions) (Fe2+/H2) has been performed. The solubility of U Np and Pu is measured as a function of time for three different conditions: Ar atmosphere H2 atmosphere and H2 atmosphere with Fe(II) in solution.

Yngve Albinsson; Virginia Oversby; Arvid degaard?Jensen; Lars Werme

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

19

Variability in PuO2 Intake by Inhalation: Implications for Worker Protection at the US Department of Energy  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......with emphasis on possible DOE worker exposures at the Rocky Flats facility near Denver, Colorado. The alpha-emitting isotopes 238Pu, 239Pu, 240Pu and 242Pu are found at Rocky Flats. Although 238Pu is thought to be present in relatively......

B.R. Scott; A.F. Fencl

1999-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

20

Electronic structure and anomalous properties of UAl2, NpAl2, and PuAl2  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The electronic ground states of UAl2, NpAl2, and PuAl2 in the C15 crystal structure were determined by performing self-consistent, semirelativistic, warped muffin-tin linear augmented-plane-wave electronic band-structure calculations. Then the densities of states and band states were determined by obtaining solutions including spin-orbit interactions with the self-consistent semirelativistic potential. The partial density of states functions obtained for these systems indicate strong d-f hybridization. A consistent procedure for determining the spin fluctuation parameters from the experimental data was obtained. This procedure was used to obtain the spin-fluctuation parameters from UAl2. It is found that this procedure yields parameters that are different from previous estimates and indicates that the calculated parameters such as the bare density of states at the Fermi energy N(0), and the occupied f-band width are consistent with the band-structure values. It is found that although the actinide-actinide separation is about the same, the electronic structure near EF is different. These calculations indicate that both d-f hybridization and spin-orbit coupling are important in the electronic structure of these systems.

A. Michael Boring; R. C. Albers; G. R. Stewart; D. D. Koelling

1985-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "2 glenwood pu" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Biodegradation of PuEDTA and Impacts on Pu Mobility  

SciTech Connect

The contamination of many DOE sites by Pu presents a long-term problem because of its long half-life (240,000 yrs) and the low drinking water standard (<10{sup -12} M). EDTA was co-disposed with radionuclides (e.g., Pu, {sup 60}Co), formed strong complexes, and enhanced radionuclide transport at several DOE sites. Biodegradation of EDTA should decrease Pu mobility. One objective of this project was to determine the biodegradation of EDTA in the presence of PuEDTA complexes. The aqueous system investigated at pH 7 (10{sup -4} M EDTA and 10{sup -6} M Pu) contained predominantly Pu(OH){sub 2}EDTA{sup 2-}. The EDTA was degraded at a faster rate in the presence of Pu. As the total concentration of both EDTA and PuEDTA decreased (i.e., 10{sup -5} M EDTA and 10{sup -7} M PuEDTA), the presence of Pu decreased the biodegradation rate of the EDTA. It is currently unclear why the concentration of Pu directly affects the increase/decrease in rate of EDTA biodegradation. The soluble Pu concentration decreased, in agreement with thermodynamic predictions, as the EDTA was biodegraded, indicating that biodegradation of EDTA will decrease Pu mobility when the Pu is initially present as Pu(IV)EDTA. A second objective was to investigate how the presence of competing metals, commonly encountered in geologic media, will influence the speciation and biodegradation of Pu(IV)-EDTA. Studies on the solubilities of Fe(OH){sub 3}(s) and of Fe(OH){sub 3}(s) plus PuO{sub 2}(am) in the presence of EDTA and as a function of pH showed that Fe(III) out competes the Pu(IV) for the EDTA complex, thereby showing that Pu(IV) will not form stable complexes with EDTA for enhanced transport of Pu in Fe(III) dominated subsurface systems. A third objective is to investigate the genes and enzymes involved in EDTA biodegradation. BNC1 can use EDTA and another synthetic chelating agent nitrilotriacetate (NTA) as sole carbon and nitrogen sources. The same catabolic enzymes are responsible for both EDTA and NTA degradation except that additional enzymes are required for EDTA degradation. When the catabolic genes were cloned and sequenced, the gene cluster also contained genes encoding a hypothetical ABC-type transporter. RT-PCR analysis showed that the transporter genes and EDTA monooxygenase gene (emoA) are co-transcribed. EppA is one of the transporter genes, and it codes for a periplasmic binding protein responsible for binding to the substrate before transport across the membrane can occur. EppA was cloned, expressed, and purified in Escherichia coli and found to bind, MgEDTA, CaEDTA, Fe(III)EDTA, MgNTA, CaNTA, and Fe(III)NTA. Our data also suggest that BNC1 uses the same ABC-type transporter for both EDTA and NTA uptake. Results from these studies can provide mechanistic understanding and approaches to assist in the bioremediate PuEDTA and other radionuclide-EDTA complexes at DOE sites.

Bolton, H., Jr.; Rai, D.; Xun, L.

2004-03-17T23:59:59.000Z

22

Report on the effectiveness of flocculation for removal of {sup 239}Pu at concentrations of 1 pCi/L and 0.1 pCi/L. RFP Pond Water Characterization and Treatment (LATO-EG&G-91-022): Task C deliverables: 5.1.2 and 5.2.2  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this work is to assess the effectiveness of flocculation for the removal of Pu from Rocky Flats Plant (RFP) pond waters spiked with {sup 239}Pu at the 1.0 and 0.1 pCi/L level. The flocculation treatment procedure is described in detail. Results are presented for treatment studies for the removal of Pu from C-2 pond water spiked with {sup 239}Pu and from distilled water spiked with {sup 239}Pu.

Triay, I.R.; Bayhurst, G.K.; Mitchell, A.J.; Cisneros, M.R.; Efurd, D.W.; Roensch, F.R.; Rokop, D.J.; Aguilar, R.D.; Attrep, M.; Nuttall, H.E. [EG and G Rocky Flats, Inc., Golden, CO (United States)

1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

23

Characterization of a mixed salt of 1-hydroxy-pyridin-2-one Pu(IV)complexes  

SciTech Connect

Most expert analyses of the projected world energy needs show utilization of nuclear energy will be essential for the next few decades, and hence the need to support this technology grows. But as one measure of the supporting science base of this field, as of December 2006, only 25 Pu containing structures were in the Cambridge Structural Database, as compared to 21,807 for Fe. A comparison of the rate of addition to this knowledge base reveals that approximately 500 Fe structures are registered with the Cambridge Structural Database every year, while in the same period only two or three Pu crystal structures are published. A continuing objective of this laboratory has been the development of new sequestering agents for actinide decorporation and selective extractions. This effort has been based on similarities in the properties of Pu(IV) and Fe(III), and the chelating groups in microbial Fe(III) sequestering agents, siderophores. The HOPO ligands (Figure 1) are one such class of chelating group which have been investigated as selective actinide extractants.

Gorden, Anne E.V.; Xu, Jide; Szigethy, Geza; Oliver, Allen; Shuh,David K.; Raymond, Kenneth N.

2007-01-09T23:59:59.000Z

24

Effect of Fe2+ Oxidation on the Removal of 238Pu from Neptunium Solution by Anion Exchange  

SciTech Connect

The effect of ferrous sulfamate (FS) oxidation and variation in nitric acid concentration on the removal of {sup 238}Pu contamination from Np by the HB-Line anion exchange flowsheet has been tested. Significant rejection of {sup 238}Pu was observed by washing with a reductive wash solution containing 6.0 to 6.8 M nitric acid (HNO{sub 3}) with as little as 30% of the Fe{sup 2+} from the FS remaining in its reduced form. To achieve the desired 30% removal of {sup 238}Pu from the process, conditions should be controlled to maintain the Fe{sup 2+}/Fe{sup 3+} ratio in the reductive wash to be greater than 60%/40% (or 1.5). Since Fe{sup 2+} oxidation is strongly affected by temperature and nitric acid concentration, these parameters (as well as time after FS addition) need to be controlled to ensure predictable results. A shortened-height column was utilized in these tests to match changes in the plant equipment. Lab experiments scaled to plant batch sizes of 2000 g Np were observed with modest losses for ''up-flow'' washing. The following are recommended conditions for removing {sup 238}Pu from Np solutions by anion exchange in HB-Line: (1) Feed conditions: ''Up-flow'' 6.4-8.0 M HNO{sub 3}, 0.02 M hydrazine (N{sub 2}H{sub 4}), 0.05 M excess FS. (2) Reductive Wash conditions: ''Up-flow'' 6 Bed volumes (BV) of 6.4 M HNO{sub 3}, 0.05 M FS (minimum 0.03M Fe{sup 2+} during wash cycle), 0.05 M hydrazine, less than 1.8 mL/min/cm{sup 2} flowrate. (3) Decontamination Wash conditions: ''Up-flow'' 1-2 BV of 6.4-8.0 M HNO{sub 3}, no FS, no hydrazine, less than 1.8 mL/min/cm{sup 2} flowrate. (4) Elution conditions: ''Down-flow'' 0.17 M HNO{sub 3}, 0.05 M hydrazine, no FS.

KYSER, EDWARD

2004-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

25

Observation of the 2p?u-1s?g Electronic Spectrum of D2+  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The long-range van der Waals state of D2+ has been characterized through observations of electronic transitions from the ground state.

Alan Carrington; Iain R. McNab; Christine A. Montgomerie

1988-10-03T23:59:59.000Z

26

Modeling of irradiation-induced amorphization in a titanate ceramic. [(CaPuTi/sub 2/O/sub 7/)  

SciTech Connect

Calculations have been carried out to model the alpha decay-induced conversion of a titanate ceramic (CaPuTi/sub 2/O/sub 7/) from the crystalline state to an amorphous condition. Experimental results have shown that the disordered state varies with irradiation temperature and extent of redamage, and so special consideration is given to those factors. Results of these calculations are applied to the analysis of dimensional changes during irradiation at various temperatures and release of stored energy on recovery to the crystalline state. Modeling results appear to show that it is possible to convert to the amorphous state under irradiation by two different processes. Modeling is also employed to extend experimental results on swelling from the present data base to a high damage rate characteristic of ion implantation and the low rates typical of nuclear waste storage and self-damage of natural mineral analogues. 15 refs., 5 figs.; 1 tab.

Coghlan, W.A.; Clinard, F.W. Jr.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

27

Kinetics of the reaction between plutonium dioxide and water from 25?C to 350?C: Formation and properties of the phases PuO 2+ X  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In the areas of plutonium waste disposition and storage and medium to long-term retrievable Pu materials storage the issue of water and other small molecule interactions with pure or impure Pu oxide materials and metal has become a major concern. The interaction of PuO 2 with water was investigated from 100?C to 350?C using a suite of experimental techniques which include microbalance and pressure-volume-temperature (PVT) methods thermal gravimetric analysis (TGA) mass spectrometry (MS) x-ray and neutron diffraction. Reaction rates and oxide compositions were determined from measured increases in sample mass or pressure over time (t). Gaseous and solid products were analyzed using MS and diffraction methods respectively.

L. Morales; T. Allen; J. Haschke

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

28

Distinguishing Pu Metal From Pu Oxide Using Fast Neutron Counting  

SciTech Connect

We describe a method for simultaneously determining the {alpha}-ratio and k{sub eff} for fissile materials using fast neutrons. Our method is a generalization of the Hage-Cifarrelli method for determining k{sub eff} for fissile assemblies which utilizes the shape of the fast neutron spectrum. In this talk we illustrate the method using Monte Carlo simulations of the fast neutrons generated in PuO{sub 2} to calculate the fast neutron spectrum and Feynman correlations.

Verbeke, J M; Chapline, G F; Nakae, L; Wurtz, R; Sheets, S

2012-05-29T23:59:59.000Z

29

Radiolysis of Salts and Long-Term Storage Issues for Both Pure and Impure PuO{sub 2} Materials in Plutonium Storage Containers  

SciTech Connect

The Material Identification and Surveillance (MIS) project sponsored a literature search on the effects of radiation on salts, with focus on alkali chlorides. The goal of the survey was to provide a basis for estimating the magnitude of {alpha} radiation effects on alkali chlorides that can accompany plutonium oxide (PuO{sub 2}) into storage. Chloride radiolysis can yield potentially corrosive gases in plutonium storage containers that can adversely affect long-term stability. This literature search was primarily done to provide a tutorial on this topic, especially for personnel with nonradiation chemistry backgrounds.

Lav Tandon

2000-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

30

Chloride anion exchange coprocessing for recovery of plutonium from pyrochemical residues and Cs sub 2 PuCl sub 6 filtrate  

SciTech Connect

Continuing studies of plutonium recovery from direct oxide reduction (DOR) and electrorefining (ER) pyrochemical process residues show that chloride anion exchange coprocessing is useful and effective. Coprocessing utilizes DOR residue salt as a reagent to supply the bulk of chloride ion needed for the chloride anion exchange process and to improve ER residue salt solubility. ER residue salt and ER scrapeout can be successfully treated, either alone or together, using coprocessing. In addition, chloride anion exchange at 2.0M acidity results in improved process performance by greatly reducing disproportionation of plutonium(IV), eliminating restrictions on oxidation time compared to operation at 1.0M acidity. Laboratory-scale experiments show that below-discard effluent plutonium losses are obtained. Resin capacity was 30 g Pu/{ell} or greater. Furthermore, it is feasible to perform chloride anion exchange recovery of plutonium from filtrate resulting from precipitation of dicesium hexachloroplutonate (Cs{sub 2}PuCl{sub 6}, an oxidant salt to be used in the molten salt extraction process) and integration of its preparation with recovery of DOR salts. 10 refs., 9 figs., 10 tabs.

Muscatello, A.C.; Killion, M.E.

1990-12-07T23:59:59.000Z

31

Pu-238 Fact Sheet  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

and Determination for and Determination for Pu-238 Production Radioisotope power systems enable space exploration and national security missions. T he Department of Energy (DOE) and its predecessors have pro- vided radioisotope power systems that have safely enabled deep space exploration and national security missions for five decades. Radioisotope power systems (RPSs) convert the heat from the decay of the plutonium-238 (Pu-238) isotope into electricity. RPSs are capable of producing heat and electricity under the harsh conditions encountered in deep space for decades. They have proven safe, reliable, and maintenance-free in missions to study the moon and all of the planets in the solar system except Mer- cury. Recent missions include the Mars Science Laboratory rover,

32

Prompt Fission Neutron Spectrum of Pu241  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The energy distribution of prompt neutrons resulting from the thermal-neutron-induced fission of Pu241 is measured. Fast time-of-flight techniques are employed in the neutron energy range 0.3 to 6.0 Mev. Proton recoils in emulsions are utilized for the measurement of neutron energies from 1.6 to 7.0 Mev. The experimentally determined Pu241 fission neutron spectrum is well represented by the Maxwellian distribution, N(E)?E12e-ET, where E is the neutron energy in Mev, N(E) the number of neutrons per unit energy interval, and T=1.3350.034 Mev. The measured average Pu241 fission neutron energy is 2.0020.051 Mev.

A. B. Smith; R. K. Sjoblom; J. H. Roberts

1961-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

33

Bacterial Pu(V) reduction in the absence and presence of Fe(III)?NTA: modeling and experimental approach  

SciTech Connect

Plutonium (Pu), a key contaminant at sites associated with the manufacture of nuclear weapons and with nuclear-energy wastes, can be precipitated to 'immobilized' plutonium phases in systems that promote bioreduction. Ferric iron (Fe{sup 3+}) is often present in contaminated sites, and its bioreduction to ferrous iron (Fe{sup 2+}) may be involved in the reduction of Pu to forms that precipitate. Alternately, Pu can be reduced directly by the bacteria. Besides Fe, contaminated sites often contain strong complexing ligands, such as nitrilotriacetic acid (NTA). We used biogeochemical modeling to interpret the experimental fate of Pu in the absence and presence of ferric iron (Fe{sup 3+}) and NTA under anaerobic conditions. In all cases, Shewanella alga BrY (S. alga) reduced Pu(V)(PuO{sub 2}{sup +}) to Pu(III), and experimental evidence indicates that Pu(III) precipitated as PuPO{sub 4(am)}. In the absence of Fe{sup 3+} and NTA, reduction of PuO{sub 2}{sup +} was directly biotic, but modeling simulations support that PuO{sub 2}{sup +} reduction in the presence of Fe{sup 3+} and NTA was due to an abiotic stepwise reduction of PuO{sub 2}{sup +} to Pu{sup 4+}, followed by reduction of Pu{sup 4+} to Pu{sup 3+}, both through biogenically produced Fe{sup 2+}. This means that PuO{sub 2}{sup +} reduction was slowed by first having Fe{sup 3+} reduced to Fe{sup 2+}. Modeling results also show that the degree of PuPO{sub 4(am)} precipitation depends on the NTA concentration. While precipitation out-competes complexation when NTA is present at the same or lower concentration than Pu, excess NTA can prevent precipitation of PuPO{sub 4(am)}.

Deo, Randhir P.; Rittmann, Bruce E.; Reed, Donald T. (AZU); (Guam); (LANL)

2013-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

34

Co-operativity among defect sites in AnO2+ and An4O9 (An = U, Np or Pu)  

SciTech Connect

Actinide dioxides derived from the AnO{sub 2} fluorite lattice are of high technological relevance due to their application in nuclear reactor fuels. Oxidation of AnO{sub 2} compounds emerges as a central theme in fuel fabrication, reactor operation, long-term storage forms for both spent fuels and surplus weapons materials, and environmental actinide migration. In this paper, we use density functional theory calculations to study the oxidation of uranium, neptunium and plutonium dioxides, AnO{sub 2} (An = U, Np or Pu), in O{sub 2} and O{sub 2}/H{sub 2}O environments. We pay particular attention to the formation of oxygen clusters (co-operativity) in AnO{sub 2+x} and how this phenomenon govern oxidation thermodynamics and the development of ordered An{sub 4}O{sub 9} compounds. The so-called split di-interstitial, which is composed of two nearest neighbor octahedral oxygen interstitials that are distorted in such a way that they dislocate one regular fluorite lattice oxygen ion to form a cluster of triangular geometry, is predicted to be the fundamental building block of the most stable cluster configurations. We also identify how the formation of oxygen defect clusters and the degree of oxidation in AnO{sub 2+x} are both governed by the characer of the An-5f to excess O-2p charger transfer, i.e. the charge transfer to the O-2p orbitals of the interstitial-like (+x) ions, and the ability of the excess O-2p orbitals to hybridize with regular fluorite lattice ions.

Andersson, Anders David [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Lezama Pacheco, Juan [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Uberuaga, Blas P [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Conradson, Steven D [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

35

Reaction of plutonium with water kinetic and equilibrium behavior of binary and ternary phases in the Pu + O + H system  

SciTech Connect

The kinetic and equilibrium behavior of the Pu + O + H system has been studied by measuring the production of hydrogen gas formed by a sequence of hydrolysis reactions. The kinetic dependence of the Pu + H/sub 2/O reaction on salt concentration and temperature has been defined. The metal is quantitatively converted to a fine black powder which has been identified as plutonium monoxide monohydride, PuOH. Other hydrolysis products formed in aqueous media include a second oxide hydride, Pu/sub 7/O/sub 9/H/sub 3/, and the oxides Pu/sub 2/O/sub 3/, Pu/sub 7/O/sub 12/, Pu/sub 9/O/sub 16/, Pu/sub 10/O/sub 18/, Pu/sub 12/O/sub 22/, and PuO/sub 2/. Thermal decomposition products of PuOH include Pu/sub 2/O/sub 2/H and PuO. A tentative phase diagram for Pu + O + H is presented and structural relationships of the oxide hydrides and oxides are discussed. 10 figures, 5 tables.

Haschke, J.M.; Hodges, A.E. III; Bixby, G.E.; Lucas, R.L.

1983-02-03T23:59:59.000Z

36

Complementary Pu Resuspension Study at Palomares, Spain  

SciTech Connect

Soil in an area near Palomares, Spain, was contaminated with plutonium as a result of a mid-air collision of U.S. military aircraft in January 1966. The assessment for potential inhalation dose can be found in Iranzo et al., (1987). Long-term monitoring has been used to evaluate remedial actions (Iranzo et al., 1988) and there are many supporting studies of the Pu contamination at Palomares that have been carried out by the Centro de Investigaciones Energeticas, Medioambientales y Tecnologicas (CIEMAT) in Madrid. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the resuspension of Pu from the soil in terms of Pu-concentrations in air and resuspension rates in a complementary investigation to those of CIEMAT but in an intensive short-term field effort. This study complements the resuspension studies of CIEMAT at Palomares with additional information, and with confirmation of their previous studies. Observed mass loadings (M) were an average of 70 mg/m{sup 3} with peaks in the daytime of 130 mg/m{sup 3} and low values at night below 30 {micro}g/m{sup 3}. The Pu-activity of aerosols (A) downwind of plot 2-1 was 0.12 Bq/g and the enhancement factor (E{sub f}) had a value of 0.3, which is low but similar to a typical value of 0.7 for other undisturbed sites. This E{sub f} value may increase further away from ground zero. The particle size distribution of the Pu in air measured by cascade impactors was approximately lognormal with a median aerodynamic diameter of 3.7 {micro}m and a geometric standard deviation of 3.5 in the respirable range. This peak midway between 1 ? m and 10 {micro}m in the respirable range is commonly observed. Daily fluctuations in the Pu concentration in air (C) detected by the UHV were lognormally distributed with a geometric standard deviation of 4.9 indicating that the 98th percentile would be 24 times as high as the median. Downwind of plot 2-1 the mean Pu concentration in air, C, was 8.5 {micro}Bq/m{sup 3}. The resuspension factor (Sf) was 2.4 x 10{sup -10} m{sup -1} and agrees very well with the values between 10{sup -10} m{sup -1} and 10{sup -9} m{sup -1} previously reported. We observed a mean Pu/Am ratio of 7.1 with a relative variation of 30%, which compares well with a mean value of 6.5 for nearby plot 2-2. The resuspension rate (R) was in the middle of the range, 10{sup -11} s{sup -1} to 10{sup -12} s{sup -1} as observed in other stable sites, and indicates low potential for Pu redistribution.

Shinn, J

2002-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

37

Final Report for Nuclear Resonance Fluorescence Measurements of 239Pu above 2.5 MeV  

SciTech Connect

Nuclear Resonance Fluorescence measurements were performed at the free electron laser facility at UC Santa Barbara using a bremsstrahlung beam. Three endpoint energies were chosen for the bremsstrahlung to cover as much area above 2.5 MeV as possible. We were able to set an upper limit of NRF state strengths between 2.5 and 3.8 MeV at roughly 38(5) eV barns at the 4-sigma level and 9(2) eV barns at the 1-sigma level. Published results on states near 2.4 MeV indicate strengths about 10(2) eV barns. Details of the results are presented in this report.

Johnson, M S; McNabb, D P

2009-01-07T23:59:59.000Z

38

Assessment of Plutonium-238 (Pu-238) Production Alternatives  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Plutonium-238 Plutonium-238 Production Alternatives Briefing for Nuclear Energy Advisory Committee April 21, 2008 Dennis Miotla Deputy Assistant Secretary for Nuclear Power Deployment Miotla - April 2008 NEAC Mtg - DM183874 (2) Statement of Work Desired end state: - Reliable, sustainable, affordable supply of Pu-238 suitable for NASA applications Assumptions: - NASA obtains funding for planned missions - Russia is out of material to sell to US - DOE maintains balance of radioisotope power source infrastructure during period of depleted supply Independently evaluate the Pu-238 heat source requirements for NASA's mission projections and assess Pu-238 production assumptions, strategy and alternatives for meeting those requirements Miotla - April 2008 NEAC Mtg - DM183874 (3)

39

Preliminary molten salt extraction experiments with dicesium hexachloroplutonate (Cs/sub 2/PuCl/sub 6/)  

SciTech Connect

Dicesium hexachloroplutonate was prepared on a 200-gram scale and used as an oxidant in the molten salt extraction process to remove americium from plutonium metal. Single-pass extraction efficiencies exceeding 90% were achieved in molten calcium chloride. 7 refs., 2 figs., 3 tabs.

Thomas, R.L. (ed.); Long, J.L.; Humiston, T.J.; Murray, A.M.

1989-01-30T23:59:59.000Z

40

Microsoft PowerPoint - NEAC Pu-238 Briefing.PPT [Compatibility Mode]  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Pu Pu 238 Supply Recent Pu-238 Supply Developments Briefing for N l E Ad i C itt Nuclear Energy Advisory Committee J 9 2009 June 9, 2009 Alice Caponiti Office of Radioisotope Power Systems Status Update on Pu-238 Supply ● DOE's FY 2010 Congressional budget request includes $30 million to reestablish a domestic Pu-238 production $30 million to reestablish a domestic Pu 238 production capability ▬ NE is making plans for FY2010 should the project get funded g p p j g ● Russian fuel shipment received in December 2008 ▬ NE is continuing negotiations for the remaining shipments ▬ NE is continuing negotiations for the remaining shipments ● National Research Council study concluded that need to reestablish Pu-238 production is urgent p g ▬ Specific findings and recommendations follow 2

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "2 glenwood pu" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Radiation Damage Effects in Candidate Titanates for Pu Disposition: Pyrochlore  

SciTech Connect

Laboratory experiments on titanate ceramics were performed to verify whether certain assumptions are valid regarding the swelling, chemical durability, and microcracking that might occur as 239Pu decays. Titanate ceramics are the material of choice for the immobilization of surplus weapons-grade Pu. The short-lived isotope, 238Pu, was incorporated into the ceramic formulation to accelerate the effects of radiation induced damage. We report on the effects of this damage on the density (volumetric swelling <6%), crystal structure of pyrochlore-bearing specimens (amorphous after about 2?1018 ?/g), and dissolution (no change from fully the crystalline specimen). Even though the specimens became amorphous during the tests, there was no evidence for microcracking in the photomicrographs from the scanning electron microscope. Thus, although pyrochlore is susceptible to radiation-induced damage, the material remains chemically and physically viable as a material for immobilizing surplus weapons-grade Pu.

Strachan, Denis M.; Scheele, Randall D.; Buck, Edgar C.; Icenhower, Jonathan P.; Kozelisky, Anne E.; Sell, Rachel L.; Elovich, Robert J.; Buchmiller, William C.

2005-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

42

Photoemission and the Electronic Structure of PuCoGa5  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The electronic structure of the first Pu-based superconductor PuCoGa5 is explored using photoelectron spectroscopy and a novel theoretical scheme. Exceptional agreement between calculation and experiment defines a path forward for understanding the electronic structure aspects of Pu-based materials. The photoemission results show two separate regions of 5f electron spectral intensity, one at the Fermi energy and another centered 1.2eV below the Fermi level. The results for PuCoGa5 clearly indicate 5f electron behavior on the threshold between localized and itinerant. Comparisons to delta phase Pu metal show a broader framework for understanding the fundamental electronic properties of the Pu5f levels in general within two configurations, one localized and one itinerant.

J. J. Joyce, J. M. Wills, T. Durakiewicz, M. T. Butterfield, E. Guziewicz, J. L. Sarrao, L. A. Morales, A. J. Arko, and O. Eriksson

2003-10-22T23:59:59.000Z

43

Overview of advanced technologies for stabilization of {sup 238}Pu-contaminated waste  

SciTech Connect

This paper presents an overview of potential technologies for stabilization of {sup 238}Pu-contaminated waste. Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) has processed {sup 238}PuO{sub 2} fuel into heat sources for space and terrestrial uses for the past several decades. The 88-year half-life of {sup 238}Pu and thermal power of approximately 0.6 watts/gram make this isotope ideal for missions requiring many years of dependable service in inaccessible locations. However, the same characteristic which makes {sup 238}Pu attractive for heat source applications, the high Curie content (17 Ci/gram versus 0.06 Ci/gram for 239{sup Pu}), makes disposal of {sup 238}Pu-contaminated waste difficult. Specifically, the thermal load limit on drums destined for transport to the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP), 0.23 gram per drum for combustible waste, is impossible to meet for nearly all {sup 238}Pu-contaminated glovebox waste. Use of advanced waste treatment technologies including Molten Salt Oxidation (MSO) and aqueous chemical separation will eliminate the combustible matrix from {sup 238}Pu-contaminated waste and recover kilogram quantities of {sup 238}PuO{sub 2} from the waste stream. A conceptual design of these advanced waste treatment technologies will be presented.

Ramsey, K.B.; Foltyn, E.M. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Heslop, J.M. [Naval Surface Warfare Center, Indian Head, MD (United States)

1998-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

44

Am phases in the matrix of a U-Pu-Zr alloy with Np, Am, and rare-earth elements  

SciTech Connect

Phases and microstructures in the matrix of an as-cast U-Pu-Zr alloy with 3 wt% Am, 2% Np, and 8% rare-earth elements were characterized by scanning and transmission electron microscopy. The matrix consists primarily of two phases, both of which contain Am: ?-(U, Np, Pu, Am) (~70 at% U, 5% Np, 14% Pu, 1% Am, and 10% Zr) and ?-(U, Np, Pu, Am)Zr2 (~25% U, 2% Np, 10-15% Pu, 1-2% Am, and 55-60 at% Zr). These phases are similar to those in U-Pu-Zr alloys, although the Zr content in ?-(U, Np, Pu, Am) is higher than that in ?-(U, Pu) and the Zr content in ?-(U, Np, Pu, Am)Zr2 is lower than that in ?-UZr2. Nanocrystalline actinide oxides with structures similar to UO2 occurred in some areas, but may have formed by reactions with the atmosphere during sample handling. Planar features consisting of a central zone of ?-(U, Np, Pu, Am) bracketed by zones of ?-(U, Np, Pu, Am)Zr2 bound irregular polygons ranging in size from a few micrometers to a few tens of micrometers across. The rest of the matrix consists of elongated domains of ?-(U, Np, Pu, Am) and ?-(U, Np, Pu, Am)Zr2. Each of these domains is a few tens of nanometers across and a few hundred nanometers long. The domains display strong preferred orientations involving areas a few hundred nanometers to a few micrometers across.

Dawn E Janney; J. Rory Kennedy; James W. Madden; Thomas P. O'Holleran

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

45

Delayed neutron measurements for Th-232, Np-237, Pu-239, Pu-241 and depleted uranium.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The neutron emission rates from five very pure actinide samples (Th-232, Np-237, Pu-239, Pu-241 and depleted uranium) were measured following equilibrium irradiation in fast and (more)

Stone, Joseph C.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

46

Delayed neutron measurements for Th-232, Np-237, Pu-239, Pu-241 and depleted uranium  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The neutron emission rates from five very pure actinide samples (Th-232, Np-237, Pu-239, Pu-241 and depleted uranium) were measured following equilibrium irradiation in fast and thermal neutron fluxes. The relative abundances (alphas) for the first...

Stone, Joseph C.

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

47

Highly accurate measurements of the spontaneous fission half-life of 240,242Pu  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Fast spectrum neutron-induced fission cross-section data for transuranic isotopes are of special demand from the nuclear data community. In particular highly accurate data are needed for the new generation IV nuclear applications. The aim is to obtain precise neutron-induced fission cross sections for 240Pu and 242Pu. To do so, accurate data on spontaneous fission half-lives must be available. Also, minimizing uncertainties in the detector efficiency is a key point. We studied both isotopes by means of a twin Frisch-grid ionization chamber with the goal of improving the present data on the neutron-induced fission cross section. For the two plutonium isotopes the high ?-particle decay rates pose a particular problem to experiments due to piling-up events in the counting gas. Argon methane and methane were employed as counting gases, the latter showed considerable improvement in signal generation due to its higher drift velocity. The detection efficiency for both samples was determined, and improved spontaneous fission half-lives were obtained with very low statistical uncertainty (0.13% for 240Pu and 0.04% for 242Pu): for 240Pu, T1/2,SF=1.1651011 yr (1.1%), and for 242Pu, T1/2,SF=6.741010 yr (1.3%). Systematic uncertainties are due to sample mass (0.4% for 240Pu and 0.9% for 242Pu) and efficiency (1%).

P. Salvador-Castieira; T. Bry?; R. Eykens; F.-J. Hambsch; A. Moens; S. Oberstedt; G. Sibbens; D. Vanleeuw; M. Vidali; C. Pretel

2013-12-18T23:59:59.000Z

48

Sources for Pu in near surface air  

SciTech Connect

This paper provides evidence that most of the Pu in the near surface air today is due to resuspension. Vertical and particle size distribution in near surface air over a period of three years were measured. The seasonal variations of Pu in air and the influence of meteorological parameters on these variations are shown. Samples were taken before the Chernobyl accident in an area where only Pu fallout from the atmospheric nuclear tests of the early sixties occurs. The comparison of the behavior of Pu with other trace elements, which were also measured, showed similar behavior of Pu and elements like Ca, Ti and Fe in near surface air. This confirms that most Pu is resuspended because the main source for these elements in air is the soil surface. Resuspension factors and resuspension rate are estimated for all measured elements. A resuspension factor of 0.8 X 10(-8) m-1 and a resuspension rate of 0.09 X 10(-9) s-1 is calculated for Pu.

Hartmann, G.; Thom, C.; Baechmann, K.

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

49

Criticality Safety Controls for 55-Gallon Drums with a Mass Limit of 200 grams Pu-239  

SciTech Connect

The following 200-gram Pu drum criticality safety controls are applicable to RHWM drum storage operations: (1) Mass (Fissile/Pu) - each 55-gallon drum or its equivalent shall be limited to 200 gram Pu or Pu equivalent; (2) Moderation - Hydrogen materials with a hydrogen density greater than that (0.133 g H/cc) of polyethylene and paraffin are not allowed and hydrogen materials with a hydrogen density no greater than that of polyethylene and paraffin are allowed with unlimited amounts; (3) Interaction - a spacing of 30-inches (76 cm) is required between arrays and 200-gram Pu drums shall be placed in arrays for 200-gram Pu drums only (no mingling of 200-gram Pu drums with other drums not meeting the drum controls associated with the 200-gram limit); (4) Reflection - no beryllium and carbon/graphite (other than the 50-gram waiver amount) is allowed, (note that Nat-U exceeding the waiver amount is allowed when its U-235 content is included in the fissile mass limit of 200 grams); and (5) Geometry - drum geometry, only 55-gallon drum or its equivalent shall be used and array geometry, 55-gallon drums are allowed for 2-high stacking. Steel waste boxes may be stacked 3-high if constraint.

Chou, P

2011-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

50

PU IMMOBILIZATION - INDUCTION MELTING ND OFFGAS TESTING  

SciTech Connect

The Cylindrical Induction Melter (CIM) at the Aiken County Technology Laboratory (ACTL) has been operated by the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) to support the Pu Disposition Conceptual Design (CD-0) development effort. The primary purpose of this report is to summarize the offgas sampling tests conducted in the CIM to capture and analyze the particulate and vapors emitted from lanthanide borosilicate (LaBS) Frit X with HfO{sub 2} as a surrogate for PuO{sub 2} and added impurities. In addition, this report describes several initial tests of the CIM for the vitrification of LaBS Frit X with HfO{sub 2}. The activities required to produce Frit X from batch chemical oxides for subsequent milling to yield glass frit of nominally 20 micron particle size are also discussed. The tests with impurities added showed that alkali salts such as NaCl and KCl were substantially emitted into the offgas system as the salt particulate, HCl, or Cl{sub 2}. Retention of Na and K in the glass were about 80 and 55%, respectively. Chloride retention was about 35%; chloride remaining in the glass was 0.29-0.37 wt%. Based on a material balance, approximately 83% of F fed was retained in the glass at about 0.09 wt % (F could not be measured directly at this concentration). Transition metals (Ni, Cu, Fe, Mo, Cr) were also volatilized to varying extents. A very small amount (<0.1 g) of nickel compounds and KCl were found in crystals deposited on the melter offgas line. Overall, about 58-72% of the impurities added were volatilized. Virtually all of the particulate species were collected on the nominal 0.3 {micro}m filter. The particulate evolution rate ranged from 2-8 g/kg glass/h. The particulate was found to be as small as 0.2 {micro}m and have an approximate median size of 0.5 {micro}m. The particulate salt was also found to stick together by forming bridges between particles. Further runs without washable salts are recommended. Measurements of particle size distribution for use in offgas system design and tests of simple impingement devices for particle collection are also recommended for tests in the near future.

Marra, J

2006-11-28T23:59:59.000Z

51

Application of a canine {sup 238}Pu dosimetry model to human bioassay data  

SciTech Connect

Associated with the use of 2{sup 238}Pu in thermoelectric power sources for space probes and power supplies for cardiac devices is the potential for human exposure to {sup 238}Pu, primarily by inhalation. In the event of human internal exposure, a means is needed for assessing the level of intake and calculating radiation doses. Several bioassay/dosimetry models have been developed for {sup 239}Pu. However, results from studies with laboratory animals have indicated that the biokinetics, and therefore the descriptive models, of {sup 238}Pu are significantly different from those for {sup 239}Pu. A canine model accounting for these differences has been applied in this work to urinary excretion data from seven humans occupationally exposed to low levels of an insoluble {sup 238}Pu compound. The modified model provides a good description of the urinary excretion kinetics observed in the exposed humans. The modified model was also used to provide estimates of the initial intakes of {sup 238}Pu for the seven individuals; these estimates ranged from 4.5 nCi (170 Bq) to 87 nCi (3200 Bq). Autopsy data on the amount and distribution of {sup 238}Pu retained in the organs may be used in the future to validate or refute both these estimates and the assumptions used to formulate the human model. Modification of the human model to simulate an injection exposure to {sup 239}Pu gave patterns of retention in the organs and urinary excretion comparable to those seen previously in humans; further modification of the model using fecal data (unavailable for the subjects of this study) is indicated.

Hickman, A.W. Jr. [Florida Univ., Gainesville, FL (United States)

1991-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

52

Surprising Coordination Geometry Differences in Ce(IV)- and Pu(IV)-Maltol Complexes  

SciTech Connect

As part of a study to characterize the detailed coordination behavior of Pu(IV), single crystal X-ray diffraction structures have been determined for Pu(IV) and Ce(IV) complexes with the naturally-occurring ligand maltol (3-hydroxy-2-methyl-pyran-4-one) and its derivative bromomaltol (5-bromo-3-hydroxy-2-methyl-pyran-4-one). Although Ce(IV) is generally accepted as a structural analog for Pu(IV), and the maltol complexes of these two metals are isostructural, the corresponding bromomaltol complexes are strikingly different with respect to ligand orientation about the metal ion: All complexes exhibit trigonal dodecahedral coordination geometry but the Ce(IV)-bromomaltol complex displays an uncommon ligand arrangement not mirrored in the Pu(IV) complex, although the two metal species are generally accepted to be structural analogs.

Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory; Raymond, Kenneth; Szigethy, Geza; Xu, Jide; Gorden, Anne E.V.; Teat, Simon J.; Shuh, David K.; Raymond, Kenneth N.

2008-02-12T23:59:59.000Z

53

Pu Glass Fabrication and Product Consistency Testing  

SciTech Connect

The DOE/EM plans to conduct the Plutonium Vitrification Project at the Savannah River Site (SRS). An important part of this project is to reduce the attractiveness of the plutonium by fabricating a plutonium glass form and immobilizing the Pu form within the high level waste (HLW) glass prepared in the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF). This requires that a project schedule that is consistent with EM plans for DWPF and cleanup of the SRS be developed. Critical inputs to key decisions in the vitrification project schedule are near-term data that will increase confidence that lanthanide borosilicate (LaBS) glass product is suitable for disposal in the Yucca Mountain Repository. A workshop was held on April 28, 2005 at Bechtel SAIC Company facility in Las Vegas, NV to define the near term data needs. Dissolution rate data and the fate of plutonium oxide and the neutron absorbers during the dissolution process were defined as key data needs. A suite of short-term tests were defined at the workshop to obtain the needed data. The objectives of these short-term tests are to obtain data that can be used to show that the dissolution rate of a LaBS glass is acceptable and to show that the extent of Pu separation from neutron absorbers, as the glass degrades and dissolves, is not likely to lead to criticality concerns. An additional data need was identified regarding the degree of macroscopic cracking that occurs during processing of the Pu glass waste form and subsequent pouring of HLW glass in the DWPF. A final need to evaluate new frit formulations that may increase the durability of the plutonium glass and/or decrease the degree to which neutron absorbers separate from the plutonium during dissolution was identified. This task plan covers testing to support a near term data need regarding glass dissolution performance. Separate task plans will be developed for testing to address the degree of macroscopic cracking and the development of alternative frit formulations. The Product Consistency Test (PCT) was identified as a means to provide some of the near term performance data. The PCT is a static test method in which known masses of crushed glass and demineralized water are reacted for a desired duration [1]. There are two reasons to perform the PCT. The first is that the results are used as a measure of acceptance in the Waste Acceptance Product Specifications Document (WAPS) [2]. The second is the need for long-term static test results that can be used to verify the applicability of the degradation model. Thus, the primary focus will be on the use of the PCT Method B (PCT-B) to study the formation and stability of colloids and to study alteration phases formed on the glass surface. The standard 7-day PCT in demineralized water (PCT-A) will be included to demonstrate compliance with the waste acceptance criterion and determine the value of the k{sub E} rate parameter for comparison with the Defense HLW Glass Degradation Model [3].

Marra, James

2005-06-29T23:59:59.000Z

54

Characterization of Pu-238 heat source granule containment  

SciTech Connect

The Milliwatt Radioisotopic Thermoelectric Generator (RTG) provides power for permissive-action links. These nuclear batteries convert thermal energy to electrical energy using a doped silicon-germanium thermopile. The thermal energy is provided by a heat source made of {sup 238}Pu, in the form of {sup 238}PuO{sub 2} granules. The granules are contained in 3 layers of encapsulation. A thin T-111 liner surrounds the {sup 238}PuO{sub 2} granules and protects the second layer (strength member) from exposure to the fuel granules. The T-111 strength member contains the fuel under impact condition. An outer clad of Hastelloy-C protects the T-111 from oxygen embrittlement. The T-111 strength member is considered the critical component in this {sup 238}PuO{sub 2} containment system. Any compromise in the strength member is something that needs to be characterized. Consequently, the T-111 strength member is characterized upon it's decommissioning through Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM), and Metallography. SEM is used in Secondary Electron mode to reveal possible grain boundary deformation and/or cracking in the region of the strength member weld. Deformation and cracking uncovered by SEM are further characterized by Metallography. Metallography sections are mounted and polished, observed using optical microscopy, then documented in the form of photomicrographs. SEM may further be used to examine polished Metallography mounts to characterize elements using the SEM mode of Energy Dispersive X-ray Spectroscopy (EDS). This paper describes the characterization of the metallurgical condition of decommissioned RTG heat sources.

Richardson Ii, P D [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Thronas, D L [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Romero, J P [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Sandoval, F E [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Neuman, A D [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Duncan, W S [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

55

MCSNA: Experimental Benchmarking of Pu Electronic Structure  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this work is to develop and/or apply advanced diagnostics to the understanding of aging of Pu. Advanced characterization techniques such as photoelectron and x-ray absorption spectroscopy will provide fundamental data on the electronic structure of Pu phases. These data are crucial for the validation of the electronic structure methods. The fundamental goal of this project is to narrow the parameter space for the theoretical modeling of Pu aging. The short-term goal is to perform experiments to validate electronic structure calculations of Pu. The long-term goal is to determine the effects of aging upon the electronic structure of Pu. Many of the input parameters for aging models are not directly measurable. These parameters will need to be calculated or estimated. Thus a First Principles-Approach Theory is needed, but it is unclear what terms are important in the Hamiltonian. (H{Psi} = E{Psi}) Therefore, experimental data concerning the 5f electronic structure are needed, to determine which terms in the Hamiltonian are important. The data obtained in this task are crucial for reducing the uncertainty of Task LL-01-developed models and predictions. The data impact the validation of electronic structure methods, the calculation of defect properties, the evaluation of helium diffusion, and the validation of void nucleation models. The importance of these activities increases if difficulties develop with the accelerating aging alloy approach.

Tobin, J G

2007-01-29T23:59:59.000Z

56

COMPUTER SIMULATIONS TO ADDRESS PU-FE EUTECTICISSUE IN 3013 STORAGE VESSEL  

SciTech Connect

On November 22, 2005, the Manager of the Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP) in Richland, WA issued an Occurrence Report involving a potential Pu-Fe eutectic failure mechanism for the stainless steel (SS) 3013 cans containing plutonium (Pu) metal. Four additional reports addressed nuclear safety concerns about the integrity of stainless steel containers holding plutonium during fire scenarios. The reports expressed a belief that the probability and consequences of container failure due to the formation of a plutonium-iron eutectic alloy had been overlooked. Simplified thermal model to address the Pu-Fe eutectic concerns using axisymmetric model similar to the models used in the 9975 SARP were performed. The model uses Rocky Flats configuration with 2 stacked Pu buttons inside a 3013 assembly. The assembly has an outer can, an inner can, and a convenience can, all stainless steel. The boundary conditions are similar to the regulatory 30 minutes HAC fire analyses. Computer simulations of the HAC fire transients lasting 4 hours of burn time show that the interface between the primary containment vessel and the Pu metal in the 9975 package will not reach Pu-Fe eutectic temperature of 400 C.

Gupta, N; Allen Smith, A

2007-03-06T23:59:59.000Z

57

Antineutrino spectra from 241Pu and 239Pu thermal neutron fission products  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The antineutrino spectrum of fission products from thermal neutron induced fission of 241Pu was derived from a measurement of the correlated beta spectrum. The energy range 1.5 MeV to 9 MeV was covered and a precision of 4% was achieved at 4 MeV. A revised version of the antineutrino spectrum from 239Pu fission is also presented.

A.A. Hahn; K. Schreckenbach; W. Gelletly; F. von Feilitzsch; G. Colvin; B. Krusche

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

58

Glenwood, Illinois: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

49°, -87.6022658° 49°, -87.6022658° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":41.5425349,"lon":-87.6022658,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

59

Glenwood, Iowa: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

9437°, -95.7425056° 9437°, -95.7425056° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":41.0469437,"lon":-95.7425056,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

60

Removal of Pu238 from Neptunium Solution by Anion Exchange  

SciTech Connect

A new anion flowsheet for use in HB-Line was tested in the lab with Reillex{trademark} HPQ for removal of Pu{sup 238} contamination from Np. Significant rejection of Pu{sup 238} was observed by washing with 6 to 12 bed volumes (BV) of reductive wash containing reduced nitric acid concentration along with both ferrous sulfamate (FS) and hydrazine. A shortened-height column was utilized in these tests to match changes in the plant equipment. Lab experiments scaled to plant batch sizes of 1500 to 2200 g Np were observed with modest losses for up-flow washing. Down-flow washing was observed to have high losses. The following are recommended conditions for removing Pu{sup 238} from Np solutions by anion exchange in HB-Line: (1) Feed conditions: Up-flow 6.4-8 M HNO{sub 3}, 0.02 M hydrazine, 0.05 M excess FS, less than 5 days storage of solution after FS addition. (2) Reductive Wash conditions: Up-flow 6-12 BV of 6.4 M HNO{sub 3}, 0.05 M FS, 0.05 M hydrazine. 1.8 mL/min/cm{sup 2} flowrate. (3) Decontamination Wash conditions: Up-flow 1-2 BV of 6.4-8 M HNO{sub 3}, no FS, no hydrazine. (4) Elution conditions: Down-flow 0.17 M HNO{sub 3}, 0.05 M hydrazine, no FS.

KYSER, EDWARD

2003-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "2 glenwood pu" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Stabilization of Rocky Flats Pu-contaminated ash within chemically bonded phosphate ceramics  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A feasibility study was conducted on the use of chemically bonded phosphate ceramics for stabilization of combustion residue of high transuranic (TRU) wastes. Using a matrix of magnesium potassium phosphate formed by the room-temperature reaction of MgO and KH2PO4 solution, we made waste forms that contained 5 wt% Pu to satisfy the requirements of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant. The waste forms were ceramics whose compression strength was twice that of conventional cement grout and whose connected porosity was ?50% that of cement grout. Both surrogate and actual waste forms displayed high leaching resistance for both hazardous metals and Pu. Hydrogen generation resulting from the radiolytic decomposition of water and organic compounds present in the waste form did not appear to be a significant issue. Pu was present as PuO2 that was physically microencapsulated in the matrix. In the process, pyrophoricity was removed and leaching resistance was enhanced. The high leaching resistance was due to the very low solubility of PuO2 coupled with superior microencapsulation. As a result, the waste forms satisfied the current Safeguard Termination Limit requirement for storage of TRU combustion residues.

A.S. Wagh; R. Strain; S.Y. Jeong; D. Reed; T. Krause; D. Singh

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

62

Nevada test site fallout atom ratios: /sup 240/Pu//sup 239/Pu and /sup 241/Pu//sup 239/Pu  

SciTech Connect

The exposure of the population in Utah to external gamma radiation from the fallout from nuclear weapons tests carried out between 1951 and 1958 at the Nevada Test Site (NTS) has been reconstructed from recent measurements of /sup 137/Cs and plutonium in soil. The fraction of /sup 137/Cs in the fallout from NTS events was calculated from the total plutonium and the /sup 240/Pu//sup 239/Pu ratios measured in the soil, using the values of 0.180 +- 0.006 and 0.032 +- 0.003 for that ratio in global fallout and NTS fallout, respectively. The total population exposure from NTS events was then calculated on the basis of exposure rates resulting from short-lived radionuclides associated with the /sup 137/Cs at the time of deposition. While the /sup 240/Pu//sup 239/Pu ratio is constant in global fallout, this ratio varies greatly in the fallout from individual events. While the composition of fallout on Utah from NTS events is rather uniform, the Off-Site Radiation Exposure Review Project is currently reconstructing radiation exposures for locations close to NTS where the fallout may be predominantly from one event. Therefore, the authors compiled the pertinent ratios in order to provide information concerning the exposure resulting from any individual event. The plutonium ratios measured at 30 days postshot were compiled from unpublished values in the archives of the Nuclear Chemistry Division of LLNL and INC-11 of LANL. These ratios are pertinent to fallout data. Dates for each event were taken from a publication by the Nevada Operations Office of the Department of Energy. 3 references.

Hicks, H.G.; Barr, D.W.

1984-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

63

Reduction of Np(VI) and Pu(VI) by organic chelating agents  

SciTech Connect

The reduction of NpO{sub 2}{sup 2+} and PuO{sub 2}{sup 2+} by oxalate, citrate, and ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) was investigated in low ionic strength media and brines. This was done to help establish the stability of the An(VI) oxidation state depended on the pH nd relative strength of the various oxidation state-specific complexes. At low ionic strength and pH 6, NpO{sub 2}{sup 2+} was rapidly reduced to form NpO{sub 2}{sup +} organic complexes. At longer times, Np(IV) organic complexes were observed in the presence of citrate. PuO{sub 2}{sup 2+} was predominantly reduced to Pu{sup 4+}, resulting in the formation of organic complexes or polymeric/hydrolytic precipitates. The relative rates of reduction to the An(V) complex were EDTA > citrate > oxalate. Subsequent reduction to An(IV) complexes, however, occurred in the following order: citrate > EDTA > oxalate because of the stability of the An(VI)-EDTA complex. The presence of organic complexants led to the rapid reduction of NpO{sub 2}{sup 2+} and PuO{sub 2}{sup 2+} in G-Seep brine at pHs 5 and 7. At pHs 8 and 10 in ERDA-6 brine, carbonate and hydrolytic complexes predominated and slowed down or prevented the reduction of An(VI) by the organics present.

Reed, D.T.; Wygmans, D.G.; Aase, S.B.; Banaszak, J.E. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)

1998-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

64

Characterization of U/Pu Particles Originating From the Nuclear Weapon Accidents at Palomares, Spain, 1966 And Thule, Greenland, 1968  

SciTech Connect

Following the USAF B-52 bomber accidents at Palomares, Spain in 1966 and at Thule, Greenland in 1968, radioactive particles containing uranium (U) and plutonium (Pu) were dispersed into the environment. To improve long-term environmental impact assessments for the contaminated ecosystems, particles from the two sites have been isolated and characterized with respect to properties influencing particle weathering rates. Low [239]Pu/[235]U (0.62-0.78) and [240]Pu/[239]Pu (0.055-0.061) atom ratios in individual particles from both sites obtained by Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry (ICP-MS) show that the particles contain highly enriched U and weapon-grade Pu. Furthermore, results from electron microscopy with Energy Dispersive X-ray analysis (EDX) and synchrotron radiation (SR) based micrometer-scale X-ray fluorescence ({micro}-XRF) 2D mapping demonstrated that U and Pu coexist throughout the 1-50 {micro}m sized particles, while surface heterogeneities were observed in EDX line scans. SR-based micrometer-scale X-ray Absorption Near Edge Structure Spectroscopy ({micro}-XANES) showed that the particles consisted of an oxide mixture of U (predominately UO[2] with the presence ofU[3][8]) and Pu ((III)/(IV), (V)/(V) or (III), (IV) and (V)). Neither metallic U or Pu nor uranyl or Pu(VI) could be observed. Characteristics such as elemental distributions, morphology and oxidation states are remarkably similar for the Palomares and Thule particles, reflecting that they originate from similar source and release scenarios. Thus, these particle characteristics are more dependent on the original material from which the particles are derived (source) and the formation of particles (release scenario) than the environmental conditions to which the particles have been exposed since the late 1960s.

Lind, O.C.; Salbu, B.; Janssens, K.; Proost, K.; Garcia-Leon, M.; Garcia-Tenorio, R.

2007-07-10T23:59:59.000Z

65

Radiation damage effects in candidate titanates for Pu disposition: Zirconolite  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Results from studies of radiation-induced damage from the alpha decay of 238Pu on the density and crystal structure of a nominally phase-pure zirconolite and two other zirconolite-bearing ceramics are discussed. Macro and micro swelling were found to be temperature independent, whereas the density determined with He gas pycnometry was temperature dependent. Approximately 2.6נ1018?/g were needed to render the specimens X-ray amorphous more to saturate the swelling. Unlike pyrochlore-based ceramics, we did not observe any phase changes associated with storage temperature and damage ingrowth. The forward dissolution rate at a pH value of 2 for material containing essentially all zirconolite is 1.7(4)נ10?3g/(m2d) with very little pH dependence and no dependence on the amount of radiation-induced damage. Even after the radiation-induced swelling saturated, the specimens remained physically intact with no evidence for microcracking. Thus, the material remains physically a viable material for the disposition of surplus weapons-grade Pu.

D.M. Strachan; R.D. Scheele; E.C. Buck; A.E. Kozelisky; R.L. Sell; R.J. Elovich; W.C. Buchmiller

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

66

An isotopic analysis system for plutonium samples enriched in sup 238 Pu  

SciTech Connect

We have designed and built a gamma-ray spectrometer system that measures the relative plutonium isotopic abundances of plutonium oxide enriched in {sup 238}Pu. The first system installed at Westinghouse Savannah River Company was tested and evaluated on plutonium oxide in stainless steel EP60/61 containers. {sup 238}Pu enrichments ranged from 20% to 85%. Results show that 200 grams of plutonium oxide in an EP60.61 container can be measured with {plus minus}0.3% precision and better than {plus minus}1.0% accuracy in the specific power using a counting time of 50 minutes. 3 refs., 2 figs.

Ruhter, W.D.; Camp, D.C.

1991-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

67

Anaerobic Biotransformation and Mobility of Pu and of Pu-EDTA  

SciTech Connect

The enhanced mobility of radionuclides by co-disposed chelating agent, ethylenediaminetetraacetate (EDTA), is likely to occur only under anaerobic conditions. Our extensive effort to enrich and isolate anaerobic EDTA-degrading bacteria has failed. Others has tried and also failed. To explain the lack of anaerobic biodegradation of EDTA, we proposed that EDTA has to be transported into the cells for metabolism. A failure of uptake may contribute to the lack of EDTA degradation under anaerobic conditions. We demonstrated that an aerobic EDTA-degrading bacterium strain BNC1 uses an ABC-type transporter system to uptake EDTA. The system has a periplasmic binding protein that bind EDTA and then interacts with membrane proteins to transport EDTA into the cell at the expense of ATP. The bind protein EppA binds only free EDTA with a Kd of 25 nM. The low Kd value indicates high affinity. However, the Kd value of Ni-EDTA is 2.4 x 10^(-10) nM, indicating much stronger stability. Since Ni and other trace metals are essential for anaerobic respiration, we conclude that the added EDTA sequestrates all trace metals and making anaerobic respiration impossible. Thus, the data explain the lack of anaerobic enrichment cultures for EDTA degradation. Although we did not obtain an EDTA degrading culture under anaerobic conditions, our finding may promote the use of certain metals that forms more stable metal-EDTA complexes than Pu(III)-EDTA to prevent the enhanced mobility. Further, our data explain why EDTA is the most dominant organic pollutant in surface waters, due to the lack of degradation of certain metal-EDTA complexes.

Xun, Luying

2009-11-20T23:59:59.000Z

68

Technical Basis for Safe Operations with Pu-239 in NMS and S Facilities (F and H Areas)  

SciTech Connect

Plutonium-239 is now being processed in HB-Line and H-Canyon as well as FB-Line and F-Canyon. As part of the effort to upgrade the Authorization Basis for H Area facilities relative to nuclear criticality, a literature review of Pu polymer characteristics was conducted to establish a more quantitative vs. qualitative technical basis for safe operations. The results are also applicable to processing in F Area facilities.The chemistry of Pu polymer formation, precipitation, and depolymerization is complex. Establishing limits on acid concentrations of solutions or changing the valence to Pu(III) or Pu(VI) can prevent plutonium polymer formation in tanks in the B lines and canyons. For Pu(IV) solutions of 7 g/L or less, 0.22 M HNO3 prevents polymer formation at ambient temperature. This concentration should remain the minimum acid limit for the canyons and B lines when processing Pu-239 solutions. If the minimum acid concentration is compromised, the solution may need to be sampled and tested for the presence of polymer. If polymer is not detected, processing may proceed. If polymer is detected, adding HNO3 to a final concentration above 4 M is the safest method for handling the solution. The solution could also be heated to speed up the depolymerization process. Heating with > 4 M HNO3 will depolymerize the solution for further processing.Adsorption of Pu(IV) polymer onto the steel walls of canyon and B line tanks is likely to be 11 mg/cm2, a literature value for unpolished steel. This value will be confirmed by experimental work. Tank-to-tank transfers via steam jets are not expected to produce Pu(IV) polymer unless a larger than normal dilution occurs (e.g., >3 percent) at acidities below 0.4 M.

Bronikowski, M.G.

1999-03-18T23:59:59.000Z

69

Nuclear magnetic resonance offers new insights into Pu 239  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

- 1 - Nuclear magnetic resonance offers new insights into Pu 239 May 29, 2012 Nuclear magnetic signal of plutonium 239's unique nuclear magnetic resonance signature has been detected by scientists on the subject, "Observation of 239 Pu Nuclear Magnetic Resonance," was published in the May 18 issue of Science

70

Pu-238 production at the Savannah River Plant  

SciTech Connect

Pu-238 production capability at SRP is dependent on the availability of Np-237 feed material. With continuing operation of three production reactors at SRP, production of 46 kg Pu-238 per year can be sustained. Capacity of auxiliary facilities is adequate to support the production rates.

Roggenkamp, P.L.

1987-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

71

Radiation Damage Effects in Candidate Titanates for Pu Disposition: Zirconolite  

SciTech Connect

This is the second of two papers on the results of radiation-induced damage accumulation in titanate ceramics that potentially could be used for weapons grade plutonium disposition. In the first paper we discussed the results from pyrochlore (betafite) based ceramics. In this paper, we discuss the effects of radiation-induced damage on the density and crystal structure of a nominally phase-pure zirconolite and two other zirconolite-bearing ceramics from the alpha decay of 238Pu. Macro (bulk) and micro (X-ray diffraction) swelling were found to be temperature independent, whereas the density determined with He gas pycnometry was temperature dependent. It took approximately 740 days (2.6?1018 ?/g) for the specimens to become X-ray amorphouslonger for the swelling to saturate. Unlike what we observed for the pyrochlore-based ceramics, we did not observe any phase changes associated with storage temperature and damage ingrowth. The forward dissolution rate at a pH value of 2 for material containing essentially all zirconolite is 1.7(4)?10-3 g/(m2?d). Very little pH dependence was observed for zirconolite specimens and, like we observed for the pyrochlore-bearing ceramics in this study, there was no dependence on the amount of radiation-induced damage. As with the pyrochlore, these materials did not become substantially friable with increasing radiation-induced damage. Even after the radiation-induced swelling saturated, the specimens remained physically intact with no evidence for microcracking. Thus, the material remains physically a viable material for the disposition of surplus weapons-grade Pu.

Strachan, Denis M.; Scheele, Randall D.; Buck, Edgar C.; Kozelisky, Anne E.; Sell, Rachel L.; Elovich, Robert J.; Buchmiller, William C.

2008-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

72

Determination of the 242Pu Branching Ratio via Alpha-Gamma Coincidence  

SciTech Connect

When the burn-up is high, the {sup 242}Pu isotopic content becomes more important. The traditional correlation method will fail. The {sup 242}Pu isotopic content in the sample plays an essential role if the neutron coincidence method is used to quantify the total amount of plutonium. In one of the earlier measurements we had a chance to measure an isotopic pure (> 99.95 %) {sup 242}Pu thick sample and realized that the difference in the branching ratio (BR) value among current nuclear data3) for the two important gamma-rays at 103.5-keV and 158.8-keV. In this study, the thick sample was counted on a 15% ORTEC safeguards type HPGe to further improve BR determination of the 159-keV gamma-ray. Furthermore, we have made a thin {sup 242}Pu sample from the thick sample and performed alpha-gamma coincidence measurements. Our preliminary gamma-ray BR results are 4.37(6) E-4, 2.79(8) E-5, and 2.25(8) E-6 for 44.9-keV, 103.5-keV, and 158.9-keV, respectively.

Wang, T F

2012-05-24T23:59:59.000Z

73

Consistent Data Assimilation of Isotopes: 242Pu and 105Pd  

SciTech Connect

In this annual report we illustrate the methodology of the consistent data assimilation that allows to use the information coming from integral experiments for improving the basic nuclear parameters used in cross section evaluation. A series of integral experiments are analyzed using the EMPIRE evaluated files for 242Pu and 105Pd. In particular irradiation experiments (PROFIL-1 and -2, TRAPU-1, -2 and -3) provide information about capture cross sections, and a critical configuration, COSMO, where fission spectral indexes were measured, provides information about fission cross section. The observed discrepancies between calculated and experimental results are used in conjunction with the computed sensitivity coefficients and covariance matrix for nuclear parameters in a consistent data assimilation. The results obtained by the consistent data assimilation indicate that not so large modifications on some key identified nuclear parameters allow to obtain reasonable C/E. However, for some parameters such variations are outside the range of 1 s of their initial standard deviation. This can indicate a possible conflict between differential measurements (used to calculate the initial standard deviations) and the integral measurements used in the statistical data adjustment. Moreover, an inconsistency between the C/E of two sets of irradiation experiments (PROFIL and TRAPU) is observed for 242Pu. This is the end of this project funded by the Nuclear Physics Program of the DOE Office of Science. We can indicate that a proof of principle has been demonstrated for a few isotopes for this innovative methodology. However, we are still far from having explored all the possibilities and made this methodology to be considered proved and robust. In particular many issues are worth further investigation: Non-linear effects Flexibility of nuclear parameters in describing cross sections Multi-isotope consistent assimilation Consistency between differential and integral experiments

G. Palmiotti; H. Hiruta; M. Salvatores

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

74

Electronic Structure, Localization and 5f Occupancy in Pu Materials  

SciTech Connect

The electronic structure of delta plutonium ({delta}-Pu) and plutonium compounds is investigated using photoelectron spectroscopy (PES). Results for {delta}-Pu show a small component of the valence electronic structure which might reasonably be associated with a 5f{sup 6} configuration. PES results for PuTe are used as an indication for the 5f{sup 6} configuration due to the presence of atomic multiplet structure. Temperature dependent PES data on {delta}-Pu indicate a narrow peak centered 20 meV below the Fermi energy and 100 meV wide. The first PES data for PuCoIn5 indicate a 5f electronic structure more localized than the 5fs in the closely related PuCoGa{sub 5}. There is support from the PES data for a description of Pu materials with an electronic configuration of 5f{sup 5} with some admixture of 5f{sup 6} as well as a localized/delocalized 5f{sup 5} description.

Joyce, John J. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Beaux, Miles F. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Durakiewicz, Tomasz [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Graham, Kevin S. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Bauer, Eric D. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Mitchell, Jeremy N. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Tobash, Paul H. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Richmond, Scott [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2012-05-03T23:59:59.000Z

75

The reduction of Np(VI) and Pu(VI) by organic chelating agents.  

SciTech Connect

The reduction of NpO{sup 2+} and PuO{sub 2}{sup 2+} by oxalate. citrate, and ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) was investigated in low ionic strength media and brines. This was done to help establish the stability of the An(VI) oxidation state in the presence of organic complexants. The stability of the An(VI) oxidation state depended on the pH and relative strength of the various oxidation state-specific complexes. At low ionic strength and pH 6, NpO{sub 2}O{sup 2+} was rapidly reduced to form NpO{sub 2}{sup +} organic complexes. At longer times, Np(IV) organic complexes were observed in the presence of citrate. PuO{sub 2}{sup 2+} was predominantly reduced to Pu{sup 4+}, resulting in the formation of organic complexes or polymeric/hydrolytic precipitates. The relative rates of reduction to the An(V) complex were EDTA > citrate > oxalate. Subsequent reduction to An(IV) complexes, however, occurred in the following order: citrate > EDTA > oxalate because of the stability of the An(V)-EDTA complex. The presence of organic complexants led to the rapid reduction of NpO{sub 2}{sup 2+} and PuO{sub 2}P{sup 2+} in G-seep brine at pHs 5 and 7. At pHs 8 and 10 in ERDA-6 brine, carbonate and hydrolytic complexes predominated and slowed down or prevented the reduction of An(VI) by the organics present.

Reed, D.T.; Aase, S.B.; Banaszak, J.E.

1998-03-19T23:59:59.000Z

76

Elastic properties of gamma-Pu by resonant ultrasound spectroscopy  

SciTech Connect

Despite intense experimental and theoretical work on Pu, there is still little understanding of the strange properties of this metal. We used resonant ultrasound spectroscopy method to investigate the elastic properties of pure polycrystalline Pu at high temperatures. Shear and longitudinal elastic moduli of the {gamma}-phase of Pu were determined simultaneously and the bulk modulus was computed from them. A smooth linear and large decrease of all elastic moduli with increasing temperature was observed. We calculated the Poisson ratio and found that it increases from 0.242 at 519K to 0.252 at 571K.

Migliori, Albert [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Betts, J [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Trugman, A [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Mielke, C H [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Mitchell, J N [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Ramos, M [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Stroe, I [WORXESTER, MA

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

77

Search for the double beta decay of sup 244 Pu  

SciTech Connect

We have searched for the ingrowth of {sup 244}Cm in a 1.45-g sample of {sup 244}Pu. We isolated a curium fraction after an ingrowth period of 1.03 yr; during this time the {sup 244}Pu sample produced {le}0.24 alpha disintegrations per day of {sup 244}Cm (95% C.L.), corresponding to a half-life for the double beta decay of {sup 244}Pu of {ge}1.1{times}10{sup 18} yr.

Moody, K.J.; Lougheed, R.W.; Hulet, E.K. (Nuclear Chemistry Division, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, University of California, Livermore, California 94551 (United States))

1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

78

239Pu Resonance Evaluation for Thermal Benchmark System Calculations  

SciTech Connect

Analyses of thermal plutonium solution critical benchmark systems have indicated a deciency in the 239Pu resonance evaluation. To investigate possible solutions to this issue, the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) Nuclear Energy Agency (NEA) Working Party for Evaluation Cooperation (WPEC) established Subgroup 34 to focus on the reevaluation of the 239Pu resolved resonance parameters. In addition, the impacts of the prompt neutron multiplication (nubar) and the prompt neutron ssion spectrum (PFNS) have been investigated. The objective of this paper is to present the results of the 239Pu resolved resonance evaluation eort.

Leal, Luiz C [ORNL] [ORNL; Noguere, G [French Atomic Energy Commission (CEA), Cadarache, St. Paul lez Durance] [French Atomic Energy Commission (CEA), Cadarache, St. Paul lez Durance; De Saint Jean, C [French Atomic Energy Commission (CEA), Cadarache, St. Paul lez Durance] [French Atomic Energy Commission (CEA), Cadarache, St. Paul lez Durance; Kahler, A. [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL)] [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL)

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

79

An Alternative Model for Electron Correlation in Pu  

SciTech Connect

Using a density functional theory based approach that treats the 5f electrons relativistically, a Pu electronic structure with zero net magnetic moment is obtained, where the 5f orbital and 5f spin moments cancel each other. By combining the spin and orbital specific densities of states with state, spin and polarization specific transition moments, it is possible to reconstruct the experimentally observed photoemission spectra from Pu. Extrapolating to a spin-resolving Fano configuration, it is shown how this would resolve the extant controversy over Pu electronic structure.

Yu, S; Tobin, J; Soderlind, P

2007-10-23T23:59:59.000Z

80

Nuclear magnetic resonance offers new insights into Pu 239  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Nuclear magnetic resonance offers new insights into Pu 239 Nuclear magnetic resonance offers new insights into Pu 239 Nuclear magnetic resonance offers new insights into Pu 239 Fingerprint of element found by LANL/Japanese team. May 29, 2012 How would the detonation of a nuclear energy source afffect an incoming asteroid? Georgios Koutroulakis and H. Yasuoka in the condensed-matter NMR lab at Los Alamos National Laboratory after having observed the magnetic resonance signal of Pu 239 for the first time. Get Expertise Scientist Eric Bauer Condensed Matter & Magnet Science Email Professor Hiroshi Yasuoka Japan Atomic Energy Agency "This discovery of the plutonium 239 magnetic resonance promises to revolutionize our understanding of plutonium solid state physics, chemistry, biology and materials science."

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "2 glenwood pu" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Re-publication of the data from the BILL magnetic spectrometer: The cumulative $?$ spectra of the fission products of $^{235}$U, $^{239}$Pu, and $^{241}$Pu  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In the 1980s, measurements of the cumulative $\\beta$ spectra of the fission products following the thermal neutron induced fission of $^{235}$U, $^{239}$Pu, and $^{241}$Pu were performed at the magnetic spectrometer BILL at the ILL in Grenoble. This data was published in bins of 250 keV. In this paper, we re-publish the original data in a binning of 50 keV for $^{235}$U and 100 keV for $^{239}$Pu and $^{241}$Pu.

N. Haag; W. Gelletly; F. von Feilitzsch; L. Oberauer; W. Potzel; K. Schreckenbach; A. A. Sonzogni

2014-05-14T23:59:59.000Z

82

New heavy-fermion system, NpBe13, with a comparison to UBe13 and PuBe13  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We have prepared single crystals of NpBe13, Np0.68U0.32Be13, and PuBe13 and measured their resistivity, susceptibility, and specific heat down to low temperatures. NpBe13 has an itinerant-electron magnetic transition at 3.4 K, with a large temperature-dependent specific heat above this transition that is quite similar to that observed in the heavy-fermion superconductor UBe13 and a ?(T=0) of approximately 900 mJ/mole K2. PuBe13 may be described as a Kondo-type system, with certain inconsistencies. The data are compared to results for UBe13 and are consistent with a narrow f band at the Fermi energy in UBe13 moving lower in energy with the addition of f electrons in heavier actinide elements to create a Kondo resonance by PuBe13.

G. R. Stewart; Z. Fisk; J. L. Smith; J. O. Willis; M. S. Wire

1984-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

83

Neutron Capture Cross Section Measurement on $^{238}$Pu at DANCE  

SciTech Connect

The proposed neutron capture measurement for {sup 238}Pu was carried out in Nov-Dec, 2010, using the DANCE array at LANSCE, LANL. The total beam-on-target time is about 14 days plus additional 5 days for the background measurement. The target was prepared at LLNL with the new electrplating cell capable of plating the {sup 238}Pu isotope simultaneously on both sides of the 3-{micro}m thick Ti backing foil. A total mass of 395 {micro}g with an activity of 6.8 mCi was deposited onto the area of 7 mm in diameter. The {sup 238}Pu sample was enriched to 99.35%. The target was covered by 1.4 {micro}m double-side aluminized mylar and then inserted into a specially designed vacuum-tight container, shown in Fig. 1, for the {sup 238}Pu containment. The container was tested for leaks in the vacuum chamber at LLNL. An identical container without {sup 238}Pu was made as well and used as a blank for the background measurement.

Chyzh, A; Wu, C Y

2011-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

84

Radiation Damage Effects in Candidate Titanates for Pu Disposition: Zirconolite  

SciTech Connect

Specimens of titanate ceramics containing approximately 10 mass% 238Pu were tested to determine the long-term effects of radiation-induced damage from the ? decay of 239Pu that would have been disposed of in the nuclear-waste repository at Yucca Mountain. These tests provided information on the changes in bulk properties such as dimensions, densities, and chemical durability. Although these materials become amorphous at low doses, the specimens remained physically strong. Even after the radiation-induced swelling saturated, the specimens remained physically intact with no evidence for microcracking. Thus, in combination with results reported previously on similar materials, the material remains a physically viable material for the disposition of surplus weapons-grade Pu.

Strachan, Denis M.; Scheele, Randall D.; Buck, Edgar C.; Kozelisky, Anne E.; Sell, Rachel L.; Elovich, Robert J.; Buchmiller, William C.

2008-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

85

Transuranic concentrations in reef and pelagic fish from the Marshall Islands. [/sup 239/Pu, /sup 240/Pu  

SciTech Connect

Concentrations of /sup 239 + 240/Pu are reported in tissues of several species of reef and pelagic fish caught at 14 different atolls in the northern Marshall Islands. Several regularities that are species dependent are evident in the distribution of /sup 239 + 240/Pu among different body tissues. Concentrations in liver always exceeded those in bone and concentrations were lowest in the muscle of all fish analyzed. A progressive discrimination against /sup 239 + 240/Pu was observed at successive trophic levels at all atolls except Bikini and Enewetak, where it was difficult to conclude if any real difference exists between the average concentration factor for /sup 239 + 240/Pu among all fish, which include bottom feeding and grazing herbivores, bottom feeding carnivores, and pelagic carnivores from different atoll locations. The average concentration of /sup 239 + 240/Pu in the muscle of surgeonfish from Bikini and Enewetak was not significantly different from the average concentrations determined in these fish at the other, lesser contaminated atolls. Concentrations among all 3rd, 4th, and 5th trophic level species are highest at Bikini where higher environmental concentrations are found. The reasons for the anomalously low concentrations in herbivores from Bikini and Enewetak are not known.

Noshkin, V.E.; Eagle, R.J.; Wong, K.M.; Jokela, T.A.

1980-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

86

NMIS With Gamma Spectrometry for Attributes of Pu and HEU, Explosives and Chemical Agents  

SciTech Connect

The concept for the system described herein is an active/passive Nuclear Materials Identification System{sup 2} (NMIS) that incorporates gamma ray spectrometry{sup 3}. This incorporation of gamma ray spectrometry would add existing capability into this system. This Multiple Attribute System can determine a wide variety of attributes for Pu and highly enriched uranium (HEU) of which a selected subset could be chosen. This system can be built using commercial off the shelf (COTS) components. NMIS systems are at All-Russian Scientific Research Institute of Experimental Physics (VNIIEF) and Russian Federal Nuclear Center Institute of Technical Physics, (VNIITF) and measurements with Pu have been performed at VNIIEF and analyzed successfully for mass and thickness of Pu. NMIS systems are being used successfully for HEU at the Y-12 National Security Complex. The use of active gamma ray spectrometry for high explosive HE and chemical agent detection is a well known activation analysis technique, and it is incorporated here. This report describes the system, explains the attribute determination methods for fissile materials, discusses technical issues to be resolved, discusses additional development needs, presents a schedule for building from COTS components, and assembly with existing components, and discusses implementation issues such as lack of need for facility modification and low radiation exposure.

Mihalczo, J. T.; Mattingly, J. K.; Mullens, J. A.; Neal, J. S.

2002-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

87

Modeling and analysis of the latent period of osteosarcomas induced by incorporated 239Pu: The role of immune responses  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper considers the utility of a stochastic model of carcinogenesis, proposed earlier by Yakovlev and Polig, in quantitative analysis of the incidence of radiation-induced osteosarcomas in beagels injected with various amounts of ^2^3^9Pu. The original ... Keywords: Bone tumors, Carcinogenesis models, Immune response, Internal irradiation, Survival analysis

A. D. Tsodikov; F. Bruenger; R. D. Lloyd; S. Miller; E. Polig; A. Yu. Yakovlev

2001-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

88

Radioecologycal study of {sup 239/240}Pu in Bangka Island and Muria Peninsula: Determination of {sup 239/240}Pu in marine sediment and seawater as part of baseline data collecting for sitting of candidates of first Indonesia NPP  

SciTech Connect

Radioisotope Pu-239/240 are alpha emitting nuclides important indicators of radioactive contamination of the marine environment. Global fallout is the main source of plutonium in the marine environment. There are very limited study on {sup 239/240}Pu in Indonesia coastal environments. The data of this radioisotopes is needed for baseline data of nuclear power plant (NPP) site candidates both in Bangka Island and Muria Peninsula. Bottom sediments play an important role in radioecological studies of the marine environment because a large proportion of radioactive substances entering the sea is adsorbed over time onto suspended particulate matter and deposited in sediments. Plutonium is particle reactive and deposited in marine sediment. Radioisotope {sup 239/240}Pu was determinated by alpha spectrometry after radiochemical procedure that was performed in both water and marine sediment from Bangka Island and Muria Peninsula. The sediment baseline of concentration {sup 239/240}Pu in Bangka Island and Muria Peninsula were range from 0.013 to 0.021 Bq.kg{sup ?1} and 0.018 to 0.024 Bq.kg{sup ?1} respectively. The water baseline concentration this isotope were range from 2.73 to 4.05 mBq.m{sup ?3} and 2.98 to 4.50 mBq.m{sup ?3}.

Suseno, Heny, E-mail: henis@batan.go.id [Radioactive Waste Technology Center - The Indonesian National Nuclear Energy Agency (Indonesia); Wisnubroto, Djarot S. [The Indonesian National Nuclear Energy Agency (Indonesia)

2014-03-24T23:59:59.000Z

89

On244Pu in lunar rocks from Fra Mauro and implications regarding their origin  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The evidence forin situ produced fission xenon from244Pu in rock 14321 is presented. The inferred abundance ratio244Pu/238U is found to be consistent with values observed in a meteorite. Data from a stepwise rele...

K. Marti; B. D. Lightner; G. W. Lugmair

90

Biogeochemical Cycling and Environmental Stability of Pu Relevant to Long-Term Stewardship of DOE Sites  

SciTech Connect

The overall objective of this research is to understand the biogeochemical cycling of Pu in environments of interest to long-term DOE stewardship issues. Central to Pu cycling (transport initiation and immobilization) is the role of microorganisms. The hypothesis underlying this work is that microbial activity is the causative agent in initiating the mobilization of Pu in near-surface environments: through the transformation of Pu associated with solid phases, production of extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) carrier phases and the creation of microenvironments. Also, microbial processes are central to the immobilization of Pu species, through the metabolism of organically complexed Pu species and Pu associated with extracellular carrier phases and the creation of environments favorable for Pu transport retardation.

Honeyman, Bruce D.; Francis, A.J.; Gillow, Jeffrey B.; Dodge, Cleveland J.; Santschi, Peter H.; Chin-Chang Hung; Diaz, Angelique; Tinnacher, Ruth; Roberts, Kimberly; Schwehr, Kathy

2006-04-05T23:59:59.000Z

91

Biogeochemical Cycling and Environmental Stability of Pu Relevant to Long-Term Stewardship of DOE Sites  

SciTech Connect

The overall objective of this proposed research is to understand the biogeochemical cycling of Pu in environments of interest to long-term DOE stewardship issues. Central to Pu cycling (transport initiation to immobilization) is the role of microorganisms. The hypothesis underlying this proposal is that microbial activity is the causative agent in initiating the mobilization of Pu in near-surface environments: through the transformation of Pu associated with solid phases, production of extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) carrier phases, and the creation of microenvironments. Also, microbial processes are central to the immobilization of Pu species, through the metabolism of organically complexed Pu species and Pu associated with extracellular carrier phases and the creation of environments favorable for Pu transport retardation.

Francis, Arokiasamy J.; Santschi, Peter H.; Honeyman, Bruce D.

2005-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

92

Biogeochemical Cycling and Environmental Stability of Pu Relevant to Long-Term Stewardship of DOE Sites  

SciTech Connect

The overall objective of this proposed research is to understand the biogeochemical cycling of Pu in environments of interest to long-term DOE stewardship issues. Central to Pu cycling (transport initiation to immobilization) is the role of microorganisms. The hypothesis underlying this proposal is that microbial activity is the causative agent in initiating the mobilization of Pu in near-surface environments: through the transformation of Pu associated with solid phases, production of extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) carrier phases, and the creation of microenvironments. Also, microbial processes are central to the immobilization of Pu species, through the metabolism of organically complexed Pu species and Pu associated with extracellular carrier phases and the creation of environments favorable for Pu transport retardation.

Santschi, Peter H.

2006-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

93

Atomic Structure and Phase Transformations in Pu Alloys  

SciTech Connect

Plutonium and plutonium-based alloys containing Al or Ga exhibit numerous phases with crystal structures ranging from simple monoclinic to face-centered cubic. Only recently, however, has there been increased convergence in the actinides community on the details of the equilibrium form of the phase diagrams. Practically speaking, while the phase diagrams that represent the stability of the fcc {delta}-phase field at room temperature are generally applicable, it is also recognized that Pu and its alloys are never truly in thermodynamic equilibrium because of self-irradiation effects, primarily from the alpha decay of Pu isotopes. This article covers past and current research on several properties of Pu and Pu-(Al or Ga) alloys and their connections to the crystal structure and the microstructure. We review the consequences of radioactive decay, the recent advances in understanding the electronic structure, the current research on phase transformations and their relations to phase diagrams and phase stability, the nature of the isothermal martensitic {delta} {yields} {alpha}{prime} transformation, and the pressure-induced transformations in the {delta}-phase alloys. New data are also presented on the structures and phase transformations observed in these materials following the application of pressure, including the formation of transition phases.

Schwartz, A J; Cynn, H; Blobaum, K M; Wall, M A; Moore, K T; Evans, W J; Farber, D L; Jeffries, J R; Massalski, T B

2008-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

94

Delayed neutron emission measurements for U-235 and Pu-239  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The delayed neutron emission rates of U-235 and Pu-239 samples were measured accurately from a thermal fission reaction. A Monte Carlo calculation using the Geant4 code was used to demonstrate the neutron energy independence of the detector used...

Chen, Yong

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

95

Observation of the negative ions: Ra-, Pa-, and Pu-  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The negative ions of the isotopes Ra226, Pa231, and Pu244 have been observed by means of accelerator mass spectrometry and their properties compared with the negative ions of Th and U. The electron affinities of all these elements have been estimated to be similar and greater than 50 meV.

X.-L. Zhao; M.-J. Nadeau; M. A. Garwan; L. R. Kilius; A. E. Litherland

1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

96

Accelerator Mass Spectrometric (AMS) Measurements of Plutonium Activity Concentrations and 240Pu/239Pu Atom Ratios In Soil Extracts Supplied by the Carlsbad Environmental Monitoring & Research Center  

SciTech Connect

Plutonium-239 ({sup 239}Pu) and plutonium-239+240 ({sup 239+240}Pu) activities concentrations and {sup 240}Pu/{sup 239}Pu atom ratios are reported for a series of chemically purified soil extracts received from the Carlsbad Environmental Monitoring & Research Center (CEMRC) in New Mexico. Samples were analyzed without further purification at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) using accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS). This report also includes a brief description of the AMS system and internal laboratory procedures used to ensure the quality and reliability of the measurement data.

Hamilton, T F; Brown, T A; Marchetti, A A; Martinelli, R E; Kehl, S R

2005-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

97

Characterization of Pu-contaminated soils from Nuclear Site 201 at the Nevada Test Site  

SciTech Connect

Distribution and characteristics of Pu-bearing radioactive particles throughout five soil profiles from Nuclear Site (NS) 201 were investigated. Concentrations of /sup 239/ /sup 240/Pu and /sup 241/Am decreased with depth and most of the contamination was contained in the top 5 cm except in profile 4 where it extended to 10 cm. The mean activity ratio of /sup 239/ /sup 240/Pu to /sup 241/Am and its standard error were 5.8 +- 0.3 (N=42). Most of the total radioactivity of the soils was contributed by 0.25 to 2 mm sand size fraction which comprised 20 to 50% by weight of the soils. The radioactive particles in the 0.25 to 2 mm size fraction occurred as spherical glass particles or as glass coatings on sand particles. The glass coatings had gas voids in the matrix but were not as porous as the radioactive particles from NS 219. After impact grinding the >0.25-mm size fractions for one hour, 85% of the initial activity in a NS 201 sample remained with the particles on the 0.25 mm sieve, whereas in the NS 219 sample only 10% remained. The results show that the radioactive particles from NS 201 were much more stable against the impact grinding force than those from NS 219. Therefore, the NS 201 soils would be expected to have a lower probability of producing respirable-size radioactive particles by saltation during wind erosion. 19 references, 3 figures, 3 tables.

Lee, S.Y.; Tamura, T.; Larsen, I.L.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

98

NR Pu SEIS Advisory 07272012_Clean  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

disposition o f 7 .1 m etric t ons ( MT) o f a dditional w eapons---usable p lutonium f rom p its t hat w ere declared s urplus t o n ational d efense n eeds i n 2 007 but w ere n...

99

Determination of the solubility of Np(IV), Pu(III) - (VI),Am(III) - (VI), and Te(IV), (V) hydroxo compounds in 0.5 - 14 M NaOH solutions  

SciTech Connect

The solubilities of Am(III), Np(IV), Pu(IV), Tc(IV), Np(V), Pu(V), Am(V), and Tc(V) hydroxo compounds were studied in 0.5 to 14 M NaOH solutions at 25{+-}2 {degrees}C. The effects of fluoride, phosphate, carbonate, oxalate, and some other organic complexing agents on the solubilities of Np(IV), Pu(IV), and TC(IV) hydroxides were investigated at 1.0 and 4.0 M NAOH. Some predictions were made on the dissolved (I.V) and (V) species present in alkali solutions.

Delegard, C.H.

1996-09-24T23:59:59.000Z

100

Atmospheric deposition, resuspension, and root uptake of Pu in corn and other grain-producing agroecosystems near a nuclear fuel facility  

SciTech Connect

Plutonium released to the environment may contribute to dose to humans through inhalation or ingestion of contaminated foodstuffs. Plutonium contamination of agricultural plants may result from interception and retention of atmospheric deposition, resuspension of Pu-bearing soil particles to plant surfaces, and root uptake. Plutonium on vegetation surfaces may be transferred to grain surfaces during mechanical harvesting. Data obtained from corn grown near the U.S. Department of Energy's H-Area nuclear fuel chemical separations facility on the Savannah River Site were used to estimate parameters of a simple model of Pu transport in agroecosystems. The parameter estimates for corn were compared to those previously obtained for wheat and soybeans. Despite some differences in parameter estimates among crops, the relative importances of atmospheric deposition, resuspension, and root uptake were similar among crops. For even small deposition rates, the relative importances of processes for Pu contamination of corn grain should be: transfer of atmospheric deposition from vegetation surfaces to grain surfaces during combining greater than resuspension of soil to grain surfaces greater than root uptake. Approximately 3.9 X 10(-5) of a year's atmospheric deposition is transferred to grain. Approximately 6.2 X 10(-9) of the Pu inventory in the soil is resuspended to corn grain, and a further 7.3 X 10(-10) of the soil Pu inventory is absorbed and translocated to grains.

Pinder, J.E. III; McLeod, K.W.; Adriano, D.C.; Corey, J.C.; Boni, A.L. (Savannah River Ecology Laboratory, Aiken, SC (USA))

1990-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "2 glenwood pu" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Glenwood Springs, Colorado: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

5505376°, -107.3247762° 5505376°, -107.3247762° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":39.5505376,"lon":-107.3247762,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

102

Glenwood Springs Vapor Caves Pool & Spa Low Temperature Geothermal...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

poi":true,"imageoverlays":,"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations": The following error has been detected in your syntax: * Display map Temperature No Data Listed...

103

Summary of Pu u O o - Kupaianaha Eruption, Kilauea Volcano, Hawaii | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Summary of Pu u O o - Kupaianaha Eruption, Kilauea Volcano, Hawaii Summary of Pu u O o - Kupaianaha Eruption, Kilauea Volcano, Hawaii Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Web Site: Summary of Pu_u _O_o - Kupaianaha Eruption, Kilauea Volcano, Hawaii Published USGS, Date Not Provided DOI Not Provided Check for DOI availability: http://crossref.org Online Internet link for Summary of Pu_u _O_o - Kupaianaha Eruption, Kilauea Volcano, Hawaii Citation Summary of Pu_u _O_o - Kupaianaha Eruption, Kilauea Volcano, Hawaii [Internet]. 2012. USGS. [cited 06/26/2013]. Available from: http://hvo.wr.usgs.gov/kilauea/summary/ Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Summary_of_Pu_u_O_o_-_Kupaianaha_Eruption,_Kilauea_Volcano,_Hawaii&oldid=682513" Categories: References Uncited References

104

Neutron induced fission of Pu240,242 from 1 eV to 200 MeV  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The neutron induced fission cross sections of Pu240,242 have been measured as a function of incident neutron energy from 1 eV to 200 MeV. This is part of an effort to reduce experimental uncertainties of nuclear data in support of next generation nuclear reactors and transmutation technology. These two plutonium isotopes are nonfissile, and the available data are limited below reaction threshold. The present data demonstrate the presence of a 2.67 eV resonance in the Pu242 fission cross section, which is missing in the ENDF/B-VII evaluation, and resolve discrepancies in the keV region. The measured cross sections are also compared with statistical model calculations made with the nuclear reaction code GNASH.

F. Tovesson; T. S. Hill; M. Mocko; J. D. Baker; C. A. McGrath

2009-01-29T23:59:59.000Z

105

Phase Characteristics of a Number of U-Pu-Am-Np-Zr Metallic Alloys for Use as Fast Reactor Fuels  

SciTech Connect

Metallic fuel alloys consisting of uranium, plutonium, and zirconium with minor additions of americium and neptunium are under evaluation for potential use to transmute long-lived transuranic actinide isotopes in fast reactors. A series of test designs for the Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative (AFCI) have been irradiated in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR), designated as the AFC-1 and AFC-2 designs. Metal fuel compositions in these designs have included varying amounts of U, Pu, Zr, and minor actinides (Am, Np). Investigations into the phase behavior and relationships based on the alloy constituents have been conducted using x-ray diffraction and differential thermal analysis. Results of these investigations, along with proposed relationships between observed behavior and alloy composition, are provided. In general, observed behaviors can be predicted by a ternary U-Pu-Zr phase diagram, with transition temperatures being most dependent on U content. Furthermore, the enthalpy associated with transitions is strongly dependent on the as-cast microstructural characteristics.

Douglas E. Burkes; J. Rory Kennedy; Thomas Hartmann; Cynthia A. Papesch; Denis D. Keiser, Jr.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

106

Reductive Dissolution of Pu(IV) by Clostridium sp. Under Anaerobic Conditions  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

238,239,240Pu (gross alpha activity 1.7 105?pCi/L) isotopes were detected in leachate samples collected from the low-level radioactive-waste disposal sites at West Valley, NY and Maxey Flats, KY (3-5). ... Pu in trench leachates at the Maxey Flats radioactive waste disposal site exists as dissolved species, primarily Pu(IV) complexes with strong org. ... The SIT is used for ionic strength corrections. ...

Arokiasamy J. Francis; Cleveland J. Dodge; Jeffrey B. Gillow

2008-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

107

Nanofibers (PU and PAN) and nanoparticles (Nanoclay and MWNTs) simultaneous effects on polyurethane foam sound absorption  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In this research, simultaneous effects of polyacrylonitrile (PAN) and polyurethane (PU) nanofibers, multi wall carbon nanotubes (MWNTs) and nanoclay incorporation on sound absorption behavior of polyurethane ... ...

Hossein Bahrambeygi; Niloufar Sabetzadeh; Amir Rabbi

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

108

Pb-210 and Pu-239,240 in nearshore Gulf of Mexico sediments  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

sediment resuspension and allows for additional scavenging of Pb-210 and Pu from overlyi. ng waters. Mixing of sediment at depths below the rapidly mixed surface layer also may play a role in increasing sediment inventories of Pb-210 and Pu... Redistribution of Pb-210 and Pu within the Sediment. . . . 17 SAMPLING IN THE GULF OF MEXICO. 19 SAMPLING AND ANALYTICAL TECHNIQUES. 25 Sedi. ment Sampling Pb-210 Analysis 25 25 Pu Analysis 27 Ra-226 Analysis 28 Mn and Al Analysis 29 Carbonate Analysis...

Rotter, Richard Joseph

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

109

Levels in Pu237 populated by Am237 (electron capture) and Cm241(?) decays  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The electron capture decay scheme of Am237 (73 min) has been investigated by measuring the ?-ray and conversion-electron spectra of mass-separated Am237 samples. The ?-ray spectra were measured with a Ge(Li) spectrometer and the conversion-electron spectra were measured with a cooled Si(Li) detector and a magnetic ?-ray spectrometer. Thirty-five ? rays were identified and the multipolarities of most of the transitions were deduced. The half-life of Am237 was determined by following the decay of the 280.2 keV photopeak and was found to be 73.0 1.0 min. The ?-particle energy and ? branching were measured to be 6.042 0.005 MeV and [(2.5 0.3) 10-2]%, respectively. On the basis of the present investigation the following single-particle states have been identified in Pu237: 72-[743],0 +[631], 145.5; 52+[622],280.2; 32+[631],370.4; 52+[633],407.8; 72+[624],473.5; 52-[752],655.3; and 72+[613],908.8 keV. The ground state of Am237 has been deduced to be the 52-[523] Nilsson orbital. The logft values for electron capture transitions to the observed states were derived. The ?-particle spectrum of a mass-separated Cm241 sample was measured with the Argonne double focusing magnetic spectrometer. Eleven ? groups identified in this spectrum populate the members of the ground state, +[631], and 32+[631] bands. The ?-decay hindrance factors are consistent with the Nilsson-state assignments deduced from Am237 electron capture decay.RADIOACTIVITY Am237 [from Np237(?,4n) and Np237(He3,3n))]; measured T12, E?, E?, I?, Ece, Ice, ??- coin, ? branching, Cm241 [from Pu239(?,2n)]; measured E?, I?; deduced hindrance factors. Pu237 deduced levels logft, (EC) ? multipolarity, I, ?, eight single-particle states. Mass-separated Am237 and Cm241. Toroidal ? spectrometer at 0.15% FWHM.

I. Ahmad; F. T. Porter; M. S. Freedman; R. K. Sjoblom; J. Lerner; R. F. Barnes; J. Milsted; P. R. Fields

1975-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

110

V-213: PuTTY SSH Handshake Integer Overflow Vulnerabilities | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

3: PuTTY SSH Handshake Integer Overflow Vulnerabilities 3: PuTTY SSH Handshake Integer Overflow Vulnerabilities V-213: PuTTY SSH Handshake Integer Overflow Vulnerabilities August 7, 2013 - 6:00am Addthis PROBLEM: SEARCH-LAB has reported some vulnerabilities in PuTTY PLATFORM: PuTTY 0.x ABSTRACT: The vulnerabilities can be exploited by malicious people to potentially compromise a user's system. REFERENCE LINKS: Secunia Advisory SA54354 http://cve.mitre.org/cgi-bin/cvename.cgi?name=CVE-2013-3520 CVE-2013-4206 CVE-2013-4207 CVE-2013-4208 CVE-2013-4852 IMPACT ASSESSMENT: Medium DISCUSSION: The vulnerabilities are caused due to some integer overflow errors when handling the SSH handshake and can be exploited to cause heap-based buffer overflows via a negative handshake message length. IMPACT: Successful exploitation of may allow execution of arbitrary code

111

Hydrogen trapping in ?-Pu: insights from electronic structure calculations  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Density functional theory calculations have been performed to provide details of the structural and charge-transfer details related to the solid solution of hydrogen in (?)-plutonium. We follow the Flanagan model that outlines the process by which hydrogen interacts with a metal to produce hydride phases, via a sequence of surface, interstitial and defect-bound (trapped) states. Due to the complexities of the electronic structure in plutonium solid-state systems, we take the pragmatic approach of adopting the 'special quasirandom structure' to disperse the atomic magnetic moments. We find that this approach produces sound structural and thermodynamic properties in agreement with the available experimental data. In ?-Pu, hydrogen has an exothermic binding energy to all of the states relevant in the Flanagan model, and, furthermore, is anionic in all these states. The charge transfer is maximized (i.e.most negative for hydrogen) in the hydride phase. The pathway from surface to hydride is sequentially exothermic, in the order surface

Christopher D Taylor; Sarah C Hernandez; Michael F Francis; Daniel S Schwartz; Asok K Ray

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

112

Exploring simultaneous single and coincident gamma-ray measurements for U/Pu assay in safeguards  

SciTech Connect

Using a broad range of gamma-ray uranium standards and two plutonium samples of known isotopic content, list mode gamma ray information from two Compton suppressed and one planar HPGe detectors were analyzed according to the time information of the signals. Interferences from Cs-137 were introduced. In this study, we extended singles measurements by exploring the potential of simultaneously using both singles and coincidence data for U/Pu assay. The main goals of this exploratory study are: 1) whether one will be able to use coincidence information in addition to the complicated 100-keV unfolding to obtain extra information of uranium and plutonium isotopic ratios, and 2) with higher energy interference gamma-rays from isotopes such as Cs-137, can the coincidence information help to provide the isotopic information. (authors)

Wang, T. F. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, CA 94550 (United States); Horne, S. M. [Nuclear and Radiation Engineering Program, Mechanical Engineering Dept., Univ. of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX 78712 (United States); Henderson, R. A.; Roberts, K. E.; Vogt, D. K. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, CA 94550 (United States)

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

113

Effect of Coulomb Correlations on the Electronic Structure of PuCoGa5  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We investigate the effect of strong Coulomb correlations on the electronic structure of the Pu-based superconductor PuCoGa5 by employing the relativistic local spin density approximation+ Hubbard U (LSDA+U) method. The inclusion of intra-atomic Coulomb U and exchange J parameters leads to a significant reconstruction of the f states electronic structure over that given by the LSDA approach. At variance with the LSDA, the LSDA+U suggests jj-like coupling for the Pu 5f manifold.

Alexander B. Shick, Vclav Jani, and Peter M. Oppeneer

2005-01-03T23:59:59.000Z

114

Isochronal annealing of radiation damage in (alpha)- and (delta)-Pu alloys  

SciTech Connect

Magnetic isochronal annealing curves were measured on specimens of self damaged {alpha}-Pu and several {delta}-Pu alloys stabilized by Ga and Am. These results are compared to one another and to isochronal resistivity annealing curves, where distinct differences are observed between the magnetic and resistive annealing for the case of {delta}-Pu. The first stage of annealing observed in the resistivity measurements is largely missing from the magnetic measurements, indicating that interstitials contribute little if any signal to the magnetization, while the onset of vacancy migration is strongly reflected in the magnetization signal.

McCall, S K; Fluss, M J; Chung, B W; Haire, R G

2009-06-22T23:59:59.000Z

115

RAPID DETERMINATION OF 237 NP AND PU ISOTOPES IN WATER BY INDUCTIVELY COUPLED PLASMA MASS SPECTROMETRY AND ALPHA SPECTROMETRY  

SciTech Connect

A new method that allows rapid preconcentration and separation of plutonium and neptunium in water samples was developed for the measurement of {sup 237}Np and Pu isotopes by inductively-coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) and alpha spectrometry; a hybrid approach. {sup 238}U can interfere with {sup 239}Pu measurement by ICP-MS as {sup 238}UH{sup +} mass overlap and {sup 237}Np via peak tailing. The method provide enhanced removal of uranium by separating Pu and Np initially on TEVA Resin, then moving Pu to DGA resin for additional removal of uranium. The decontamination factor for uranium from Pu is almost 100,000 and the decontamination factor for U from Np is greater than 10,000. This method uses stacked extraction chromatography cartridges and vacuum box technology to facilitate rapid separations. Preconcentration is performed using a streamlined calcium phosphate precipitation method. Purified solutions are split between ICP-MS and alpha spectrometry so that long and short-lived Pu isotopes can be measured successfully. The method allows for simultaneous extraction of 20 samples (including QC samples) in 4 to 6 hours, and can also be used for emergency response. {sup 239}Pu, {sup 242}Pu and {sup 237}Np were measured by ICP-MS, while {sup 236}Pu, {sup 238}Pu, and {sup 239}Pu were measured by alpha spectrometry.

Maxwell, S.; Jones, V.; Culligan, B.; Nichols, S.; Noyes, G.

2010-06-23T23:59:59.000Z

116

Directional correlation between. alpha. particles and L x rays in the decay of sup 238 Pu and sup 244 Cm  

SciTech Connect

Anisotropy in the directional correlation of nuclear radiations and {ital L} x rays has been clearly identified for the first time. {ital L}{sub 3} x-ray groups, {ital L}{sub {ital l}} and {ital L}{alpha}, are observed to be directionally correlated with {alpha} particles in the decays of {sup 238}Pu and {sup 244}Cm. The ratio of anisotropy for {ital L}{sub {ital l}} and {ital L}{alpha} is consistent with the recent observation that {ital L}{sub {ital l}} has a much greater admixture of {ital M}2 than predicted by relativistic calculations.

Johnston, P.N. (Department of Applied Physics, Royal Melbourne Institute of Technology, G.P.O. Box 2476V, Melbourne 3001 (Australia))

1991-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

117

Rigid foam polyurethane (PU) derived from castor oil (Ricinus communis) for thermal insulation in roof systems  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper discusses the response of the thermal insulation lining of rigid foam polyurethane (PU) derived from castor oil (Ricinus communis) in heat conditions, based on dynamic climate approach. Liners have been widely used, because the coverage of buildings is responsible for the greatest absorption of heat by radiation, but the use of PU foam derived from this vegetal oil is unprecedented and has the advantage of being biodegradable and renewable. The hot wire parallel method provided the thermal conductivity value of the foam. The thermogravimetric analysis enabled the study of the foam decomposition and its lifetime by kinetic evaluation that involves the decomposition process. The PU foam thermal behavior analysis was performed by collecting experimental data of internal surface temperature measured by thermocouples and assessed by representative episode of the climatic fact. The results lead to the conclusion that the PU foam derived from castor oil can be applied to thermal insulation of roof systems and is an environmentally friendly material.

Grace Tibrio Cardoso; Salvador Claro Neto; Francisco Vecchia

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

118

The influence of defects on magnetic properties of fcc-Pu  

SciTech Connect

The influence of vacancies and interstitial atoms on magnetism in Pu is considered in the framework of the density functional theory. The crystal structure relaxation arising due to various types of defects is calculated using the molecular dynamics method with a modified embedded atom model. The local density approximation with explicit inclusion of Coulomb and spin-orbit interactions is applied in matrix invariant form to describe correlation effects in Pu with these types of defects. The calculations show that both vacancies and interstitials give rise to local moments in the f-shell of Pu in good agreement with experimental data for aged Pu. Magnetism appears due to the destruction of a delicate balance between spin-orbit and exchange interactions.

Shorikov, A. O.; Anisimov, V. I.; Korotin, M. A. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Institute of Metal Physics (Russian Federation)] [Russian Academy of Sciences, Institute of Metal Physics (Russian Federation); Dremov, V. V., E-mail: vvd0531@mail.ru; Sapozhnikov, Ph. A. [Russian Federal Nuclear Center 'Institute of Technical Physics,' (Russian Federation)] [Russian Federal Nuclear Center 'Institute of Technical Physics,' (Russian Federation)

2013-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

119

Methylbutylmalonamide as an extractant for U(VI), Pu(IV) and Am(III)  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The unsymmetrical diamide methylbuthylmalonamide has been synthesized and used in the extraction of U(VI), Pu(IV) and Am(III) in benzene medium. The distribution ratio for the three cations was found to increa...

G. M. Nair; D. R. Prabhu; G. R. Mahajan

1994-01-03T23:59:59.000Z

120

DETERMINATION OF 237NP AND PU ISOTOPES IN LARGE SOIL SAMPLES BY INDUCTIVELY COUPLED PLASMA MASS SPECTROMETRY  

SciTech Connect

A new method for the determination of {sup 237}Np and Pu isotopes in large soil samples has been developed that provides enhanced uranium removal to facilitate assay by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). This method allows rapid preconcentration and separation of plutonium and neptunium in large soil samples for the measurement of {sup 237}Np and Pu isotopes by ICP-MS. {sup 238}U can interfere with {sup 239}Pu measurement by ICP-MS as {sup 238}UH{sup +} mass overlap and {sup 237}Np via {sup 238}U peak tailing. The method provides enhanced removal of uranium by separating Pu and Np initially on TEVA Resin, then transferring Pu to DGA resin for additional purification. The decontamination factor for removal of uranium from plutonium for this method is greater than 1 x 10{sup 6}. Alpha spectrometry can also be applied so that the shorter-lived {sup 238}Pu isotope can be measured successfully. {sup 239}Pu, {sup 242}Pu and {sup 237}Np were measured by ICP-MS, while {sup 236}Pu and {sup 238}Pu were measured by alpha spectrometry.

Maxwell, S.

2010-07-26T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "2 glenwood pu" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Detection and Quantification of Pu(III, IV, V, and VI) Using a1.0-meter Liquid Core Waveguide  

SciTech Connect

Detection and quantification of the aquo ions of Pu in 1 MHClO4 was carried out using a 1-meter liquid core waveguide (LCW) coupledto a fiber optic UV-Vis spectrometer. Detection limits of 7 x 10-7 M forPu(VI), 1.6 x 10-5 M for Pu(V), 5 x 10-6 M for Pu(IV) and 8 x 10-6 M forPu(III) were achieved. The limits of detection represent increases of 18to 33 times those achievable using a conventional 1-cm path length.Because of the much lower detection limits of the LCW, routineidentification of the oxidation states in dilute Pu solutions can bemade.

Wilson, Richard E.; Hu, Yung-Jin; Nitsche, Heino

2005-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

122

Prompt Gamma Emission in Resonance Neutron Induced Fission of 239Pu  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The scientific interest in the resonance neutron induced capture and fission reactions on 239Pu is continuously rising during the last decade. From a practical point of view, this is because more precise data on capture and fission cross sections, fission fragment mass and kinetic energy distributions, variation of prompt fission neutron and gamma yields in the resonance neutron region, are needed for the modelling of new generation nuclear power plants and for nuclear spent fuel and waste transmutation. From a heuristic and fundamental point of view, such a research improves our knowledge and understanding of the fission phenomena itself. To achieve these goals more powerful neutron sources and more precise fission product detectors have to be used. At the Joint Institute for Nuclear Research (JINR) Frank Laboratory of Neutron Physics (FLNP), where already half a century the thermal and resonance neutron induced nuclear reactions are studied, a new electron accelerator driven white spectrum pulsed neutron source IREN has been built and successfully tested. The improved characteristics of this facility, in comparison with those of the former pulse neutron fast reactor IBR-30, will allow measuring some of the neutron-nuclear reaction data with better precision and accuracy. A new experimental setup for detecting gamma rays (and neutrons) has been designed and is under construction. It will consist of 2 rings (arrays) of 12 NaI(Tl) detectors each (or 1 array of 24 detectors) with variable ring diameter and distance between both rings. Such a setup will make possible not only to measure the multiplicity, energy and angular anisotropy of prompt fission gammas, but also to separate the contribution of prompt fission neutrons by their longer time-of-flight from the fissile target to the detectors. The signals from all the 24 detectors will be recorded simultaneously in digitized form and will be stored on the hard disk of the personal computer for further off-line analysis. The measurement of the prompt gamma-ray emission from 239Pu resonance neutron induced fission is one of the most probable candidates for the first experiments to be performed at IREN using the newly designed gamma-ray detector.

I. Ruskov; Yu.N. Kopatch; Ts. Panteleev; V.R. Skoy; V.N. Shvetsov; E. Dermendjiev; N. Janeva; L.B. Pikelner; Yu.V. Grigoriev; Zh.V. Mezentseva; I. Ivanov

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

123

Plutonium isotopic analysis system for plutonium samples enriched in sup 238 Pu in EP 60/61 containers  

SciTech Connect

This user's manual is addressed to the Savannah River Site personnel (routine operators and supervisors) who perform measurements with the Pu-238 isotopic analysis system. Each chapter begins with a table of contents that lists the section title, illustrations, and tabular data presented in that chapter. The first chapter in this manual is an introduction to the system. Chapter 2 lists required settings for the system's commercial nuclear instrument modules. System operating procedures are given in Chapter 3. Chapter 4 contains routine and supervisorial operator interactions. Chapter 5 describes the system's short- and long-printout output formats. Chapter 6 gives instructions for changing system parameters. Error messages are listed and described Chapter 7. Chapter 8 contains a reference article on measuring relative plutonium isotopics in plutonium samples enriched in Pu-238. All commercial items mentioned in this manual are assumed to be functioning correctly for the purposes of system operation. Users are referred to individual equipment manufacturers' manuals for details of operation, trouble-shooting, and maintenance of this commercial equipment.

Ruhter, W.D.

1990-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

124

Study of Pu consumption in light water reactors: Evaluation of GE advanced boiling water reactor plants, compilation of Phase 1C task reports  

SciTech Connect

This report summarizes the evaluations conducted during Phase 1C of the Pu Disposition Study have provided further results which reinforce the conclusions reached during Phase 1A & 1B: These conclusions clearly establish the benefits of the fission option and the use of the ABWR as a reliable, proven, well-defined and cost-effective means available to disposition the weapons Pu. This project could be implemented in the near-term at a cost and on a schedule being validated by reactor plants currently under construction in Japan and by cost and schedule history and validated plans for MOX plants in Europe. Evaluations conducted during this phase have established that (1) the MOX fuel is licensable based on existing criteria for new fuel with limited lead fuel rod testing, (2) that the applicable requirements for transport, handling and repository storage can be met, and (3) that all the applicable safeguards criteria can be met.

Not Available

1994-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

125

EIS-0299: Proposed Production of Plutonium-238 (Pu-238) for Use in Advanced Radioisotope Power Systems (RPS) for Space Missions  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This EIS is for the proposed production of plutonium-238 (Pu-238) using one or more DOE research reactors and facilities.

126

Event-by-Event Study of Prompt Neutrons from 239Pu  

SciTech Connect

Employing a recently developed Monte Carlo model, we study the fission of {sup 240}Pu induced by neutrons with energies from thermal to just below the threshold for second chance fission. Current measurements of the mean number of prompt neutrons emitted in fission, together with less accurate measurements of the neutron energy spectra, place remarkably fine constraints on predictions of microscopic calculations. In particular, the total excitation energy of the nascent fragments must be specified to within 1 MeV to avoid disagreement with measurements of the mean neutron multiplicity. The combination of the Monte Carlo fission model with a statistical likelihood analysis also presents a powerful tool for the evaluation of fission neutron data. Of particular importance is the fission spectrum, which plays a key role in determining reactor criticality. We show that our approach can be used to develop an estimate of the fission spectrum with uncertainties several times smaller than current experimental uncertainties for outgoing neutron energies of less than 2 MeV.

Vogt, R; Randrup, J; Pruet, J; Younes, W

2010-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

127

Event-by-event study of prompt neutrons from 239Pu(n,f)  

SciTech Connect

Employing a recently developed Monte-Carlo model, we study the fission of {sup 240}Pu induced by neutrons with energies from thermal to just below the threshold for second chance fission. Current measurements of the mean number of prompt neutrons emitted in fission, together with less accurate measurements of the neutron energy spectra, place remarkably fine constraints on predictions of microscopic calculations. In particular, the total excitation energy of the nascent fragments must be specified to within 1MeV to avoid disagreement with measurements of the mean neutron multiplicity. The combination of the Monte-Carlo fission model with a statistical likelihood analysis also presents a powerful tool for the evaluation of fission neutron data. Of particular importance is the fission spectrum, which plays a key role in determining reactor criticality. We show that our approach can be used to develop an estimate of the fission spectrum with uncertainties several times smaller than current experimental uncertainties for outgoing neutron energies of less than 2 MeV.

Vogt, R; Randrup, J; Pruet, J; Younes, W

2009-07-23T23:59:59.000Z

128

Event-by-event study of prompt neutrons from 239Pu(n,f)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Employing a recently developed Monte Carlo model, we study the fission of 240Pu induced by neutrons with energies from thermal to just below the threshold for second chance fission. Current measurements of the mean number of prompt neutrons emitted in fission, together with less accurate measurements of the neutron energy spectra, place remarkably fine constraints on predictions of microscopic calculations. In particular, the total excitation energy of the nascent fragments must be specified to within 1 MeV to avoid disagreement with measurements of the mean neutron multiplicity. The combination of the Monte Carlo fission model with a statistical likelihood analysis also presents a powerful tool for the evaluation of fission neutron data. Of particular importance is the fission spectrum, which plays a key role in determining reactor criticality. We show that our approach can be used to develop an estimate of the fission spectrum with uncertainties several times smaller than current experimental uncertainties for outgoing neutron energies up to 2 MeV.

R. Vogt; J. Randrup; J. Pruet; W. Younes

2009-07-29T23:59:59.000Z

129

6th US-Russian Pu Science Workshop Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

US-Russian Pu Science Workshop US-Russian Pu Science Workshop Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory University of California, Livermore, California July 14 and 15, 2006 Local Chairs: Michael Fluss, James Tobin, Adam Schwartz LLNL, Livermore, USA Alexander V. Petrovtsev, RFNC * VNIITF, Snezhinsk, Russia Boris A. Nadykto, RFNC * VNIIEF, Sarov, Russia Lidia F. Timofeeva, VNIINM, Moscow, Russia Siegfried S. Hecker, (Luis Morales POC) LANL, Los Alamos, USA Valentin E. Arkhipov, IMP, Ural Branch of RAS, Yekaterinburg, Russia This is a satellite meeting of the "Pu Futures-The Science 2006 International Conference", 9-13 July 2006, Asilomar Conference, Grounds, Pacific Grove Ca. The workshop is hosted by LLNL, under the aegis of the United States/Russian Federation Scientific and Technical Collaboration pursuant

130

Correlation-induced anomalies and extreme sensitivity in fcc-PU1  

SciTech Connect

We have used GGA + U density functional theory to study the effects of correlation on the properties offcc-Pu. We found that the structural and elastic properties offcc-Pu are highly sensitive to the Hubbard U parameter. Within an interval of 0.1 eV ofthe U parameter, the equilibrium lattice constants offcc-Pu can change from 0.44 to 0.47 nm. While the bulk modulus can drop by a factor of5 to 10. The pressure derivative, dB/dp, ofthe bulk modulus can rise dramatically from 5 to 16 and then drop to a negative value before recovering to a more normal value. These observations are partially supported by existing experiments and the prediction of a negative dB/dp needs to be tested in future experiments.

Chen, Shao-ping [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

131

Density-functional electronic structure of PuCoGa5  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Density-functional electronic-structure calculations for PuCoGa5 are performed to address the possibility of magnetic interactions in this high-temperature superconductor. Within an itinerant 5f-electron picture, cohesion and crystallographic parameters compares favorably with experiment, whereas only when spin and orbital interactions are accounted for the calculated electronic density of states agrees with photoemission spectra. This fact suggests that spin and orbital correlations are important for a correct description of the PuCoGa5 electronic structure and may play a role in an unconventional mechanism for superconductivity.

P. Sderlind

2004-09-24T23:59:59.000Z

132

Comprehensive appraisal of {sup 239+240}Pu in soils around Rocky Flats, Colorado  

SciTech Connect

Plutonium contamination of soils around Rocky Flats Environmental & Technology Site, near Golden, Colorado, resulted from past outdoor storage practices and subsequent remobilization due to inadequate cleanup practices. Until now human-health risk assessment has not been performed because of a lack of sufficient information regarding the spatial extent of {sup 239+240}Pu in soils. The purpose of this work was to elucidate the extent of plutonium contamination in surface soils, and to assess the uncertainty associated with the spatial distribution of {sup 239+240}Pu around Rocky Flats Environmental & Technology Site.

Litaor, M.I.; Allen, L. [EG& G Rocky Flats, Golden, CO (United States); Ellerbroek, D. [S.M. Stoller Corp., Boulder, CO (United States)] [and others

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

133

Individual and workplace monitoring measurements made after a 240Pu incident and during the clean-up operations  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......were located in a fire-proof safe in...Laboratory, and the release of the 240Pu caused...were stored in a fire-proof, heavy-duty...regular intervals to release the build-up of...catch and retain a fraction of the airborne 240Pu resulting......

R. Hochmann; H. Eisenwagner; T. Benesch; J. Hunt; R. Cruz-Suarez; S. Bulyha; C. Schmitzer

2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

Individual and workplace monitoring measurements made after a 240Pu incident and during the clean-up operations  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......located in a fire-proof safe...Laboratory, and the release of the 240Pu...stored in a fire-proof, heavy-duty...intervals to release the build-up...placed in a glove box through a special...and retain a fraction of the airborne 240Pu resulting......

R. Hochmann; H. Eisenwagner; T. Benesch; J. Hunt; R. Cruz-Suarez; S. Bulyha; C. Schmitzer

2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

135

IN FORMATION PU BLIC ATION SC H EME TITLE Agency plan for The Australian National University  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 | IN FORMATION PU BLIC ATION SC H EME TITLE Agency plan for The Australian National University on its website. It will be directly accessible from the webpage foi.anu.edu.au and be identified possible, provide online content that can be searched by web browsers Provide a search function

136

Beyond Spin-Orbit: Probing Electron Correlation in the Pu 5f States  

SciTech Connect

Experiments planned to address the issue of electron correlation in the Pu 5f states are described herein. The key is the utilization of the Fano Effect, the observation of spin polarization in nonmagnetic systems, using chiral excitation such as circularly polarized X-rays.

Tobin, J G

2006-05-08T23:59:59.000Z

137

EXPERIMENTAL AND CALCULATED RESEARCHES OF NUCLEAR-PHYSICS CHARACTERISTICS OF ASSEMBLIES CONTAINING [237Np + 239Pu(98%)] IN TH  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

And Calculated Researches of Nuclear-Physics Characteristics And Calculated Researches of Nuclear-Physics Characteristics Of Assemblies Containing [ 237 Np + 239 Pu(98%)] in The Core and Reflector of Natural Uranium V.I.Gavrilov, I.Yu.Drozdov, N.V.Zavialov, V.I.Il'in, A.A.Kajgorodov, M.I.Kuvshinov, A.V.Panin Russian Federal Nuclear Center All-Russia Scientific Research Institute of Experimental Physics Neptunium 237 seems to be a promising material as a core component of such systems as pulsed reactors [2] and cascade blankets for electronuclear facilities [1]. To realize calculated simulation of such facilities it is required to know neutron-physics data for the materials included. In this respect 237 Np is a little-studied material. Thus, the rated values of critical mass for a "bare" sphere of

138

Ratio of the ternary-to-binary fission cross sections induced by thermal and resonance neutrons in 241Pu  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The ternary-to-binary fission cross-section ratio (T/B) was determined for 241Pu for neutron induced fission in the energy region from 0.01 eV to 50 eV. The ternary and binary fission time-of-flight spectra were recorded at a 8.1 m flightpath at the CBNM Linac with a bank of four large gold-silicon surface-barrier detectors viewing a 1 mg/cm2 241Pu target. The ternary alpha pulse-height spectrum in the neutron energy region of interest was checked continuously. From the time-of-flight spectra the ratios of the areas of the strongest resonances in ternary and in binary fission were calculated; in the neutron energy region from 0.01 to 0.5 eV ratios were calculated for 18 zones throughout the spectrum. In the energy region from 1 to 50 eV the T/B ratio varies significantly from resonance to resonance, allowing a classification into a high and a low group. Although the statistical accuracy is poorer in the region below 1 eV we deduce from these T/B data that the 0.260 eV resonance probably belongs to the high group and also that there is only a slight difference between the T/B value at 0.260 eV and at thermal energy. We correlate these T/B values with the resonance spin J in terms of the channel theory of fission.

C. Wagemans; A.J. Deruytter

1974-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

139

TRISO-Fuel Element Performance Modeling for the Hybrid LIFE Engine with Pu Fuel Blanket  

SciTech Connect

A TRISO-coated fuel thermo-mechanical performance study is performed for the hybrid LIFE engine to test the viability of TRISO particles to achieve ultra-high burnup of a weapons-grade Pu blanket. Our methodology includes full elastic anisotropy, time and temperature varying material properties for all TRISO layers, and a procedure to remap the elastic solutions in order to achieve fast fluences up to 30 x 10{sup 25} n {center_dot} m{sup -2} (E > 0.18 MeV). In order to model fast fluences in the range of {approx} 7 {approx} 30 x 10{sup 25} n {center_dot} m{sup -2}, for which no data exist, careful scalings and extrapolations of the known TRISO material properties are carried out under a number of potential scenarios. A number of findings can be extracted from our study. First, failure of the internal pyrolytic carbon (PyC) layer occurs within the first two months of operation. Then, the particles behave as BISO-coated particles, with the internal pressure being withstood directly by the SiC layer. Later, after 1.6 years, the remaining PyC crumbles due to void swelling and the fuel particle becomes a single-SiC-layer particle. Unrestrained by the PyC layers, and at the temperatures and fluences in the LIFE engine, the SiC layer maintains reasonably-low tensile stresses until the end-of-life. Second, the PyC creep constant, K, has a striking influence on the fuel performance of TRISO-coated particles, whose stresses scale almost inversely proportional to K. Obtaining more reliable measurements, especially at higher fluences, is an imperative for the fidelity of our models. Finally, varying the geometry of the TRISO-coated fuel particles results in little differences in the scope of fuel performance. The mechanical integrity of 2-cm graphite pebbles that act as fuel matrix has also been studied and it is concluded that they can reliable serve the entire LIFE burnup cycle without failure.

DeMange, P; Marian, J; Caro, M; Caro, A

2010-02-18T23:59:59.000Z

140

Llr. Norgnn of the St. Louis office tolepbonod Dr. ;PuAuff mcently  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Llr. Norgnn of the St. Louis office tolepbonod Dr. ;PuAuff mcently Llr. Norgnn of the St. Louis office tolepbonod Dr. ;PuAuff mcently rtxpeetlng pemlasion to !wu mpmaentatfoee of Uallinckrodt visit 03% to review rare earth smparatlon tmkniquas. Their lntsmst In purev binstrIal In that they hop to indsti- preilnotlon '- emparntlon of thssae elwnts., Dr. %odnUf oheckad ritli Paul -1. : '/I .._ ,,,. . . w!w was will- to ao"rrlon~vit~~'thoir,Pisiffirg.~e Laboratory sliax he did not feel that it lzpliad 8.pmferentia.l tmabmnt of KalllncJwodt. Subsquently, Dr. %odmfP check~wlth Dr. Davidmnof the Office of Industrial Developmemtuho aleodid Mt objsctbutpointed Out that the Vick Chezdcal Company of 122 East l&xi Btmot, f&w PO* 17, N. ,P., had also expressed an intereat ir.having their mbsidi.arg, the J. T. Baker Chemical Coqany, get into the field. BU aeked

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "2 glenwood pu" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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141

Advanced UNpPu fuel to achieve long-life core in heavy water reactor  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The objective of this paper is to look at the possibility of approaching the long-life core comparable with reactor life-time. The main issues are centered on UNpPu fuel in a tight lattice design with heavy water as a coolant. It is found that in a hard neutron spectrum thus obtained, a large fraction of 238Pu produced by neutron capture in 237Np not only protects plutonium against uncontrolled proliferation, but substantially contributes in keeping criticality due to improved fissile properties (its capture-to-fission ratio drops below unit). Equilibrium fuel composition demonstrates excellent conversion properties that yield the burn-up value as high as 200 GWd/t at extremely small reactivity swings.

K. Nikitin; M. Saito; V. Artisyuk; A. Chmelev; V. Apse

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

142

Prompt ?-ray production in neutron-induced fission of 239Pu  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Background: The prompt gamma-ray spectrum from fission is important for understanding the physics of nuclear fission, and also in applications involving fission. Relatively few measurements of the prompt gamma spectrum from 239Pu(n,f) have been published.Purpose: This experiment measured the multiplicity, individual gamma energy spectrum, and total gamma energy spectrum of prompt fission gamma rays from 239Pu(n,f) in the neutron energy range from thermal to 30 keV, to test models of fission and to provide information for applications.Method: Gamma rays from neutron-induced fission of 239Pu were measured using the DANCE gamma-ray calorimeter. Fission events were tagged by detecting fission products in a parallel-plate avalanche counter in the center of DANCE. The measurements were corrected for detector response using a geant4 model of DANCE. A detailed analysis for the gamma rays from the 1+ resonance complex at 10.93 eV is presented.Results: A six-parameter analytical parametrization of the fission gamma-ray spectrum was obtained. A Monte Carlo Hauser-Feshbach calculation provided good general agreement with the data, but some differences remain to be resolved.Conclusions: An analytic parametrization can be made of the gamma-ray multiplicity, energy distribution, and total-energy distribution for the prompt gamma rays following neutron-induced fission of 239Pu. This parametrization may be useful for applications. Modern Monte Carlo Hauser-Feshbach calculations can do a good job of calculating the fission gamma-ray emission spectrum, although some details remain to be understood.

J. L. Ullmann; E. M. Bond; T. A. Bredeweg; A. Couture; R. C. Haight; M. Jandel; T. Kawano; H. Y. Lee; J. M. ODonnell; A. C. Hayes; I. Stetcu; T. N. Taddeucci; P. Talou; D. J. Vieira; J. B. Wilhelmy; J. A. Becker; A. Chyzh; J. Gostic; R. Henderson; E. Kwan; C. Y. Wu

2013-04-11T23:59:59.000Z

143

Spent Nuclear Fuel Self-Induced XRF to Predict Pu to U Content  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

area of interest, would improve input accountability and shipper/receiver differences. XRF measurements were made on individual PWR fuel rods with varying fuel ages and final burn-ups at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) in July 2008 and January... Committee NRF Nuclear Resonance Fluorescence viii ORNL Oak Ridge National Laboratory Pu Plutonium PUREX Plutonium and Uranium Recovery by Extraction PWR Pressurized Water Reactor RPP Reprocessing Plant SNM Special Nuclear Material...

Stafford, Alissa Sarah

2010-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

144

Mass spectrometric characterization of sequence-specific complexes of DNA and transcription factor PU.1 DNA binding domain  

SciTech Connect

Electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS) has been used to study the noncovalent interaction of the 13.5-kDa DNA binding domain of PU.1 (PU.1-DBD) with specific double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) target molecules. Mixtures of PU.1-DBD protein and wildtype target DNA sequence yielded ESI-MS spectra showing only protein-dsDNA complex ions of 1:1 stoichiometry and free dsDNA. When PU.1-DBD protein, wild type target DNA, and a mutant target DNA lacking the consensus sequence were mixed, only the 1:1 complex with the wild-type DNA was observed, consistent with gel electrophoresis mobility shift assay results, demonstrating the observation of sequence-specific protein-dsDNA complexes using ESI-MS. 22 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

Cheng, Xueheng; Harms, A.C.; Bruce, J.E. [Pacific Northwest National Lab., Richland, WA (United States)] [and others] [Pacific Northwest National Lab., Richland, WA (United States); and others

1996-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

145

Shenzhen Prosunpro PengSangPu Solar Industrial Products Corporation | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Prosunpro PengSangPu Solar Industrial Products Corporation Prosunpro PengSangPu Solar Industrial Products Corporation Jump to: navigation, search Name Shenzhen Prosunpro/ PengSangPu Solar Industrial Products Corporation Place Shenzhen, Guangdong Province, China Zip 518055 Sector Solar Product Shenzhen Prosunpro makes and installs flat panel solar passive energy collectors and engineers central solar hot water systems. Coordinates 22.546789°, 114.112556° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":22.546789,"lon":114.112556,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

146

Ceramicrete stabilization of U-and Pu-bearing materials  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method of stabilizing nuclear material is disclosed. Oxides or halides of actinides and/or transuranics (TRUs) and/or hydrocarbons and/or acids contaminated with actinides and/or TRUs are treated by adjusting the pH of the nuclear material to not less than about 5 and adding sufficient MgO to convert fluorides present to MgF.sub.2; alumina is added in an amount sufficient to absorb substantially all hydrocarbon liquid present, after which a binder including MgO and KH.sub.2PO.sub.4 is added to the treated nuclear material to form a slurry. Additional MgO may be added. A crystalline radioactive material is also disclosed having a binder of the reaction product of calcined MgO and KH.sub.2PO.sub.4 and a radioactive material of the oxides and/or halides of actinides and/or transuranics (TRUs). Acids contaminated with actinides and/or TRUs, and/or actinides and/or TRUs with or without oils and/or greases may be encapsulated and stabilized by the binder.

Wagh, Arun S. (Naperville, IL); Maloney, M. David (Evergreen, CO); Thompson, Gary H. (Thornton, CO)

2007-11-13T23:59:59.000Z

147

Plutonium(IV) and plutonium(VI) extraction by 1-hydroxy-6-N-octylcarboxamide-2-(1H)-pyridinone  

SciTech Connect

Extraction of Pu(IV) and Pu(VI) from nitric acid media by the promising new extractant 1-hydroxy-6-N-octylcarboxamide-2(1H)-pyridinone (octyl-1,2-HOPO) has been investigated. The effects of nitric acid, sodium, aluminum and iron(III) nitrates on extraction have been examined. Octyl-1,2-HOPO exhibits high specificity for Pu(IV) over a wide range of acidity and ionic strength. The affinity of octyl-1,2-HOPO for Pu(VI) is much less than for Pu(IV). However, the extraction of Pu(VI) is possible from acidic as well as from highly salted media. Two water soluble ligands, 1-hydroxyethane-1,1,-diphosphonic acid (HEDPA) and H(2,2)-1,2-HOPO, have been shown to be very effective for back extraction.

Romanovski, V.V. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States). Glenn T. Seaborg Inst. for Transactinium Science; Hoffman, D.C. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States). Glenn T. Seaborg Inst. for Transactinium Science]|[Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States). Dept. of Chemistry; White, D.J.; Xu, J.; Raymond, K.N. [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States). Dept. of Chemistry

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

148

Status of solubility data for selected elements (U, Mp, Pu, Am, Te, Ni, and Zr)  

SciTech Connect

This report is an evaluation of solubility data for U, Np, Pu, Am, Tc, Ni and Zr compounds at ambient and elevated temperatures. We review the status of such data in light of the most recently reported experimental results. The focus is on the solid phases that may control solubilities under expected conditions in and near a potential nuclear waste repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. Solubility data or reliable predictions over the temperature range 20 to 150{degrees}C will be used in geochemical modeling studies of the Yucca Mountain Project [96PAL].

Moll, H.; Brachmann, A.; Wruck, D.; Palmer, C.

1997-09-07T23:59:59.000Z

149

Attempt to produce element 120 in the 244Pu + 58Fe reaction  

SciTech Connect

An experiment aimed at the synthesis of isotopes of element 120 has been performed using the {sup 244}Pu({sup 58}Fe,xn){sup 302-x} 120 reaction. No decay chains consistent with fusion-evaporation reaction products were observed during an irradiation with a beam dose of 7.1 x 10{sup 18} 330-MeV {sup 58}Fe projectiles. The sensitivity of the experiment corresponds to a cross section of 0.4 pb for the detection of one decay.

Oganessian, Y T; Utyonkov, V K; Lobanov, Y V; Abdullin, F S; Polyakov, A N; Sagaidak, R N; Shorokovsky, I V; Tsyganov, Y S; Voinov, A A; Mezentsev, A N; Subbotin, V G; Sukhov, A M; Subotic, K; Zagrebaev, V I; Dmitriev, S N; Henderson, R A; Moody, K J; Kenneally, J M; Landrum, J H; Shaughnessy, D A; Stoyer, M A; Stoyer, N J; Wilk, P A

2008-10-24T23:59:59.000Z

150

Electrodeposition of U and Pu on Thin C and Ti Substrates  

SciTech Connect

Physics experiments aimed at deducing key parameters for use in a variety of programs critical to the mission of the National Laboratories require actinide targets placed onto various substrates. The target material quantity and the substrate desired depend upon the type of experiment being designed. The physicist(s) responsible for the experimental campaign will consult with the radiochemistry staff as to the feasibility of producing a desired target/substrate combination. In this report they discuss the production of U and Pu targets on very thin C and Ti substrates. The techniques used, plating cells designed for, tips, and limits is discussed.

Henderson, R A; Gostic, J M

2010-05-19T23:59:59.000Z

151

Criticality Safety Evaluations on the Use of 200-gram Pu Mass Limit for RHWM Waste Storage Operations  

SciTech Connect

This work establishes the criticality safety technical basis to increase the fissile mass limit from 120 grams to 200 grams for Type A 55-gallon drums and their equivalents. Current RHWM fissile mass limit is 120 grams Pu for Type A 55-gallon containers and their equivalent. In order to increase the Type A 55-gallon drum limit to 200 grams, a few additional criticality safety control requirements are needed on moderators, reflectors, and array controls to ensure that the 200-gram Pu drums remain criticality safe with inadvertent criticality remains incredible. The purpose of this work is to analyze the use of 200-gram Pu drum mass limit for waste storage operations in Radioactive and Hazardous Waste Management (RHWM) Facilities. In this evaluation, the criticality safety controls associated with the 200-gram Pu drums are established for the RHWM waste storage operations. With the implementation of these criticality safety controls, the 200-gram Pu waste drum storage operations are demonstrated to be criticality safe and meet the double-contingency-principle requirement per DOE O 420.1.

Chou, P

2011-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

152

PLUTONIUM LOADING CAPACITY OF REILLEX HPQ ANION EXCHANGE COLUMN - AFS-2 PLUTONIUM FLOWSHEET FOR MOX  

SciTech Connect

Radioactive plutonium (Pu) anion exchange column experiments using scaled HB-Line designs were performed to investigate the dependence of column loading performance on the feed composition in the H-Canyon dissolution process for plutonium oxide (PuO{sub 2}) product shipped to the Mixed Oxide (MOX) Fuel Fabrication Facility (MFFF). These loading experiments show that a representative feed solution containing {approx}5 g Pu/L can be loaded onto Reillex{trademark} HPQ resin from solutions containing 8 M total nitrate and 0.1 M KF provided that the F is complexed with Al to an [Al]/[F] molar ratio range of 1.5-2.0. Lower concentrations of total nitrate and [Al]/[F] molar ratios may still have acceptable performance but were not tested in this study. Loading and washing Pu losses should be relatively low (<1%) for resin loading of up to 60 g Pu/L. Loading above 60 g Pu/L resin is possible, but Pu wash losses will increase such that 10-20% of the additional Pu fed may not be retained by the resin as the resin loading approaches 80 g Pu/L resin.

Kyser, E.; King, W.; O'Rourke, P.

2012-07-26T23:59:59.000Z

153

LITERATURE REVIEW OF PUO2 CALCINATION TIME AND TEMPERATURE DATA FOR SPECIFIC SURFACE AREA  

SciTech Connect

The literature has been reviewed in December 2011 for calcination data of plutonium oxide (PuO{sub 2}) from plutonium oxalate Pu(C{sub 2}O{sub 4}){sub 2} precipitation with respect to the PuO{sub 2} specific surface area (SSA). A summary of the literature is presented for what are believed to be the dominant factors influencing SSA, the calcination temperature and time. The PuO{sub 2} from Pu(C{sub 2}O{sub 4}){sub 2} calcination data from this review has been regressed to better understand the influence of calcination temperature and time on SSA. Based on this literature review data set, calcination temperature has a bigger impact on SSA versus time. However, there is still some variance in this data set that may be reflecting differences in the plutonium oxalate preparation or different calcination techniques. It is evident from this review that additional calcination temperature and time data for PuO{sub 2} from Pu(C{sub 2}O{sub 4}){sub 2} needs to be collected and evaluated to better define the relationship. The existing data set has a lot of calcination times that are about 2 hours and therefore may be underestimating the impact of heating time on SSA. SRNL recommends that more calcination temperature and time data for PuO{sub 2} from Pu(C{sub 2}O{sub 4}){sub 2} be collected and this literature review data set be augmented to better refine the relationship between PuO{sub 2} SSA and its calcination parameters.

Daniel, G.

2012-03-06T23:59:59.000Z

154

137Cs(90Sr) and Pu isotopes in the Pacific Ocean sources & trends  

SciTech Connect

The main source of artificial radioactivity in the world`s oceans can be attributed to worldwide fallout from atmospheric nuclear weapons testing. Measurements of selected artificial radionuclides in the Pacific Ocean were first conducted in the 1960`s where it was observed that fallout radioactivity had penetrated the deep ocean. Extensive studies carried out during the 1973-74 GEOSECS provided the first comprehensive data on the lateral and vertical distributions of {sup 9O}Sr, {sup 137}Cs and Pu isotopes in the Pacific on a basin wide scale. Estimates of radionuclide inventories in excess of amounts predicted to be delivered by global fallout alone were attributed to close-in fallout and tropospheric inputs from early U.S. tests conducted on Bikini and Enewetak Atolls in the Equatorial Pacific. In general, levels of fallout radionuclides (including {sup 9O}Sr, {sup 137}Cs and Pu isotopes) in the surface waters of the Pacific Ocean have decreased considerably over the past 4 decades and are now much more homogeneously distributed. Resuspension and the subsequent deposition of fallout radionuclides from previously deposited debris on land has become an important source term for the surface ocean. This can be clearly seen in measurements of fallout radionuclides in mineral aerosols over the Korean Peninsula (Yellow dust events). Radionuclides may also be transported from land to sea in river runoff-these transport mechanisms are more important in the Pacific Ocean where large quantities of river water and suspended sands/fluvial sediments reach the coastal zone. Another unique source of artificial radionuclides in the Pacific Ocean is derived from the slow resolubilization and transport of radionuclides deposited in contaminated lagoon and slope sediments near U.S. and French test sites. Although there is a small but significant flux of artificial radionuclides depositing on the sea floor, > 80% of the total 239, {sup 240}Pu inventory and > 95% of the total {sup 137}Cs inventory remains in the water column. Studies conducted through the 1980`s appear to be consistent with earlier findings and indicate that radionuclide inventories in mid-northern latitudes are at least a factor of two above those expected from global fallout alone. The long term persistence of close-in and/or stratospheric fallout from nuclear weapons testing in the Marshall Islands still appears to be the only plausible explanation for this anomaly.

Hamilton, T.F., Millies-Lacrox, J.C. [Service Mixte de Securite Radologique, Mondhery (France); Hong, G.H. [Korea Ocean Research and Development Institute, Ansan (Korea)

1996-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

155

Glenwood Springs technical conference proceedings. Volume II. Bibliography of publications, state coupled geothermal resource assessment program  

SciTech Connect

The bibliography of publications is divided by state as follows: Alaska, California, Colorado, Hawaii, Montana, Nebraska, New Mexico, New York, North Dakota, Oregon, Texas and Washington. (MHR)

Ruscetta, C.A.; Foley, D. (eds.)

1981-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

156

Neutron spectral reactivity comparison of /sup 235/U, /sup 233/U, /sup 239/Pu  

SciTech Connect

In the process of storing fuel from reactors capable of breeding fissile material, it is possible that the beginning-of-life fissile loadings are not the most reactive for the fuel. In this context, it is necessary to consider the bred fissile isotopes to ensure conservative safety margins on storage of these fuels. Of particular interest for the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant were fuels consisting primarily of /sup 235/U as the fissile isotope, such as those for the Experimental Breeder Reactor (EBR-I and -II) and some light water breeder reactor (LWBR) test elements. This study examines the relative worth of additions of the isotopes /sup 239/Pu, /sup 233/U, and /sup 235/U to a /sup 235/U-fueled critical system. The equivalence relationship between fissile isotopes depends in a complex fashion on the neutron spectrum and the relative abundance of the isotopic species.

McBroom, R.C.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

157

Event-by-event study of prompt neutrons from 239Pu(n,f)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Employing a recently developed Monte Carlo model, we study the fission of 240Pu induced by neutrons with energies from thermal to just below the threshold for second chance fission. Current measurements of the mean number of prompt neutrons emitted in fission, together with less accurate measurements of the neutron energy spectra, place remarkably fine constraints on predictions of microscopic calculations. In particular, the total excitation energy of the nascent fragments must be specified to within 1 MeV to avoid disagreement with measurements of the mean neutron multiplicity. The combination of the Monte Carlo fission model with a statistical likelihood analysis also presents a powerful tool for the evaluation of fission neutron data. Of particular importance is the fission spectrum, which plays a key role in determining reactor criticality. We show that our approach can be used to develop an estimate of the fission spectrum with uncertainties several times smaller than current experimental uncertainties ...

Vogt, R; Pruet, J; Younes, W

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

158

Calculation of 239Pu fission observables in an event-by-event simulation  

SciTech Connect

The increased interest in more exclusive fission observables has demanded more detailed models. We describe a new computational model, FREYA, that aims to meet this need by producing large samples of complete fission events from which any observable of interest can then be extracted consistently, including any interesting correlations. The various model assumptions are described and the potential utility of the model is illustrated. As a concrete example, we use formal statistical methods, experimental data on neutron production in neutron-induced fission of {sup 239}Pu, along with FREYA, to develop quantitative insights into the relation between reaction observables and detailed microscopic aspects of fission. Current measurements of the mean number of prompt neutrons emitted in fission taken together with less accurate current measurements for the prompt post-fission neutron energy spectrum, up to the threshold for multi-chance fission, place remarkably fine constraints on microscopic theories.

Vogt, R; Randrup, J; Pruet, J; Younes, W

2010-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

159

An evaluation of alternate production methods for Pu-238 general purpose heat source pellets  

SciTech Connect

For the past half century, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) has used Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generators (RTG) to power deep space satellites. Fabricating heat sources for RTGs, specifically General Purpose Heat Sources (GPHSs), has remained essentially unchanged since their development in the 1970s. Meanwhile, 30 years of technological advancements have been made in the applicable fields of chemistry, manufacturing and control systems. This paper evaluates alternative processes that could be used to produce Pu 238 fueled heat sources. Specifically, this paper discusses the production of the plutonium-oxide granules, which are the input stream to the ceramic pressing and sintering processes. Alternate chemical processes are compared to current methods to determine if alternative fabrication processes could reduce the hazards, especially the production of respirable fines, while producing an equivalent GPHS product.

Mark Borland; Steve Frank

2009-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

160

Advanced Monte Carlo modeling of prompt fission neutrons for thermal and fast neutron-induced fission reactions on Pu239  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Prompt fission neutrons following the thermal and 0.5 MeV neutron-induced fission reaction of Pu239 are calculated using a Monte Carlo approach to the evaporation of the excited fission fragments. Exclusive data such as the multiplicity distribution P(?), the average multiplicity as a function of fragment mass ??(A), and many others are inferred in addition to the most used average prompt fission neutron spectrum ?(Ein,Eout), as well as average neutron multiplicity ??. Experimental information on these more exclusive data help constrain the Monte Carlo model parameters. The calculated average total neutron multiplicity is ??c=2.871 in very close agreement with the evaluated value ??e=2.8725 present in the ENDF/B-VII.0 library. The neutron multiplicity distribution P(?) is in very good agreement with the evaluation by Holden and Zucker. The calculated average spectrum differs in shape from the ENDF/B-VII.0 spectrum, evaluated with the Madland-Nix model. In particular, we predict more neutrons in the low-energy tail of the spectrum (below about 300 keV) than the Madland-Nix calculations, casting some doubts on how much scission neutrons contribute to the shape of the low-energy tail of the spectrum. The spectrum high-energy tail is very sensitive to the total kinetic energy distribution of the fragments as well as to the total excitation energy sharing at scission. Present experimental uncertainties on measured spectra above 6 MeV are too large to distinguish between various theoretical hypotheses. Finally, comparisons of the Monte Carlo results with experimental data on ??(A) indicate that more neutrons are emitted from the light fragments than the heavy ones, in agreement with previous works.

P. Talou; B. Becker; T. Kawano; M. B. Chadwick; Y. Danon

2011-06-23T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "2 glenwood pu" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Metrology and quality assurance from surveillance of gas compositions over PuO[sub 2  

SciTech Connect

Until the late 1980s, a primary mission of the Department of Energy (DOE) has been the production of nuclear materials for nuclear weapons. Termination of the Cold War in 1989 and the subsequent nuclear weapons treaties dramatically decreased the inventory needs for nuclear weapons. These activities resulted in the consolidation of nuclear material inventories and activities, generating substantial amounts of surplus nuclear materials ranging from plutonium metal and pure oxides to impure plutonium residues. Packaging and storage of these materials in physically and environmentally safe configurations for significant time periods were required. In 1993 the Defense Nuclear Facility Safety Board (DNFSB) and the DOE Office of Nuclear Safety examined the storage of metal and oxides at the Rocky Flats Plant that ultimately resulted in recommendation 94-1, calling for a standard to define the processing and storage of plutonium bearing materials. This recommendation generated a standard for storage of plutonium metals and oxides, DOE-STD-3013-2000, which is now in its fourth revision. The current DOE 3013 Standard is limited to metal and oxides, which contain greater than 30 weight percent plutonium and uranium. The 3013 Standard requires that the oxide be calcined to 950 C for two hours in an oxidizing environment. Before packaging, the oxide is required to have less than 0.5 weight percent moisture. Up to five kilograms of the stabilized oxide material is subsequently sealed in a set of two-nested welded stainless steel container, which must have a power less than 19 Watts.

Worl, L. A. (Laura A.); French, Catherine A.; Kreyer, L. S. (Lawrence S.)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

162

/sup 252/Cf-source-driven neutron noise measurements of subcriticality for a slab tank containing aqueous Pu-U nitrate  

SciTech Connect

In order to study nuclear criticality safety related to the development of fast breeder technology, /sup 252/Cf-source-driven neutron noise analysis measurements were performed with a Pu-U nitrate solution in a slab tank of various heights and thickness varying 11.43 cm to 19.05 cm. The results and conclusions of these experiments are (1) a capability to measure the subcriticality of a multiplying system of slab geometry to a k/sub eff/ as low as 0.7 was demonstrated, (2) calculated neutron multiplication factors agreed with those from the experiments within approx.0.02, and (3) the applicability of the method for plutonium solution systems was demonstrated. This paper describes measurements in which the height of the slab was varied for a fixed thickness and the thickness varied for a fixed height, which are the first applications of this measurement method to slab geometry.

Mihalczo, J.T.; Blakeman, E.D.; Ragan, G.E.; Kryter, R.C.; Robinson, R.C.; Seino, H.

1987-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

163

Developing the Fuels of the Future Road transport accounts for 21% of the CO2 emissions of the UK  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

(-1) + Su,2(-1)2 + Su,3(-1)3 + Su,4(-1)4] x TP T = Tu / 298 K = 0 + (-1) 1 P = Pu / 1 bar = 0 + (-1) 1 bar; x r = 0 Temperature (K) BurningVelocity(cm/s) Figure 9 Iso-octane correlation for Pu = 1 bar

165

Time-dependent density-functional theory for molecular processes in strong fields: Study of multiphoton processes and dynamical response of individual valence electrons of N2 in intense laser fields  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in the exchange ~x!- only limit. In the latter approach @1#, theTime-dependent density-functional theor Study of multiphoton processes and dynam of N2 in inten Xi Chu and Department of Chemistry, University of Kansas, and Kansas Ce ~Received 30 July 2001; pu We...-I CHU PHYSICAL REVIEW A 64 0634041sg 21su 22sg 22su 21pu 43sg 2 . According to the valence bond theory, this molecule has a triple bond formed with 3sg and 1pu electrons. The 3sg orbital is parallel to the internuclear axis and the two degen- erate 1pu...

Chu, Xi; Chu, Shih-I

2001-11-14T23:59:59.000Z

166

Determination of Pu content in a Spent Fuel Assembly by Measuring Passive Total Neutron count rate and Multiplication with the Differential Die-Away Instrument  

SciTech Connect

Inspired by approach of Bignan and Martin-Didier (ESARDA 1991) we introduce novel (instrument independent) approach based on multiplication and passive neutron. Based on simulations of SFL-1 the accuracy of determination of {sup tot}Pu content with new approach is {approx}1.3-1.5%. Method applicable for DDA instrument, since it can measure both multiplication and passive neutron count rate. Comparison of pro's & con's of measuring/determining of {sup 239}Pu{sub eff} and {sup tot}Pu suggests a potential for enhanced diversion detection sensitivity.

Henzl, Vladimir [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Croft, Stephen [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Swinhoe, Martyn T. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Tobin, Stephen J. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2012-07-13T23:59:59.000Z

167

Evaluation of Aqueous and Powder Processing Techniques for Production of Pu-238-Fueled General Purpose Heat Sources  

SciTech Connect

This report evaluates alternative processes that could be used to produce Pu-238 fueled General Purpose Heat Sources (GPHS) for radioisotope thermoelectric generators (RTG). Fabricating GPHSs with the current process has remained essentially unchanged since its development in the 1970s. Meanwhile, 30 years of technological advancements have been made in the fields of chemistry, manufacturing, ceramics, and control systems. At the Department of Energys request, alternate manufacturing methods were compared to current methods to determine if alternative fabrication processes could reduce the hazards, especially the production of respirable fines, while producing an equivalent GPHS product. An expert committee performed the evaluation with input from four national laboratories experienced in Pu-238 handling.

Not Available

2008-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

168

High-precision prompt-?-ray spectral data from the reaction Pu241(nth, f)  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In this paper we present results from the first high-precision prompt-?-ray spectral measurements from the reaction Pu241(nth, f). Apart from one recent experiment, no data are reported in the literature for this fissioning system, which motivated a new dedicated experiment. We have measured prompt-fission ? rays with three cerium-doped LaBr3 (two 5.08cm5.08cm and one 7.62cm7.62cm) and one CeBr3 (5.08cm5.08cm) scintillation detectors, which all exhibit excellent timing and good energy resolution. The average ?-ray multiplicity was determined to be ??=(8.210.09) per fission, the average energy to be ??=(0.780.01)MeV, and the total energy to be E?,tot=(6.410.06) MeV as the weighted average from all detectors. Since the results from all detectors are in excellent agreement, and the total released ? energy is modestly higher than the one in the present evaluated nuclear data files, we suspect that the underestimation of the prompt-? heating in nuclear reactors is due to fast-neutron-induced fission on U238 or rather from fission induced by ? rays from neutron capture in the construction material.

S. Oberstedt; R. Billnert; T. Belgya; T. Bry?; W. Geerts; C. Guerrero; F.-J. Hambsch; Z. Kis; A. Moens; A. Oberstedt; G. Sibbens; L. Szentmiklosi; D. Vanleeuw; M. Vidali

2014-08-26T23:59:59.000Z

169

MNeu NABIR Apr05 2.ppt  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

6.0 5.0 4.0 3.0 2.0 pH 3.0 2.0 1.0 0.0 -1.0 Equivalents of NaOH An(VI) 1 mM 0.1 M NaNO 3 Pu H O Pu O H OH 2 O O O O H 2 O H 2 O H 2 O OH 2 OH 2 U H O U O OH 2 O O O O H 2 O H...

170

Comparison of {sup 241}Am, {sup 239,240}Pu, and {sup 137}Cs concentrations in soil around Rocky Flats  

SciTech Connect

Gamma spectroscopy measurements were used to estimate concentrations of {sup 241}Am and {sup 137}Cs in soil profiles to depths of 21 cm at on-site and off-site locations around the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site and at regional background locations east of the Front Range between Colorado`s borders with New Mexico and Wyoming. Concentrations of these radionuclides were compared with concentrations of {sup 239,240}Pu in the same samples. Concentrations of {sup 241}Am in soil from depths of 0 to 3 cm decreased in an easterly direction from more than 5.3 kBq kg{sup {minus}1} 5 to 7 km away at a rate that was nearly proportional to the inverse square of distance. Deposits of {sup 137}Cs were ubiquitous, averaging 0.12 kBq kg{sup {minus}1} in soil from depths of 0 to 3 cm, but were unevenly distributed around Rocky Flats and the regional background locations. Deviations from the uniform exponential rate at which soil concentrations of {sup 137}Cs typically decreased with depth, {minus}0.25 cm{sup {minus}1} at undisturbed sites, enabled the authors to determine that about 10% of their sampling sites had been disturbed by erosion, tillage, or other factors. The mean rate at which {sup 239,240}Pu decreased with depth was about the same, {minus}0.23 cm{sup {minus}1}, throughout the study area. Soil concentrations of {sup 241}Am decreased with depth at a similar mean rate of {minus}0.22 cm{sup {minus}1} at locations close to the 903 pad where measurements were robust. Ratios between {sup 241}Am or {sup 239,240}Pu and {sup 137}Cs proved more useful for delineating the extent and pattern of contamination from Rocky Flats than did activity concentrations in soil.

Hulse, S.E.; Ibrahim, S.A.; Whicker, F.W.; Chapman, P.L. [Colorado State Univ., Fort Collins, CO (United States)

1999-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

171

Full-length U-xPu-10Zr (x=0, 8, 19 wt%) Fast Reactor Fuel Test in FFTF  

SciTech Connect

The Integral Fast Reactor-1 (IFR-1) experiment performed in the Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF) was the only U-Pu-10Zr (Pu-0, 8 and 19 wt%) metallic fast reactor test with commercial-length (91.4 cm active fuel column length) conducted to date. With few remaining test reactors there is little opportunity for performing another test with a long active fuel column. The assembly was irradiated to the goal burnup of 10 at.%. The beginning of life (BOL) peak cladding temperature of the hottest pin was 608?C, cooling to 522?C at end of life (EOL). Selected fuel pins were examined non destructively using neutron radiography, precision axial gamma scanning, and both laser and spiral contact cladding profilometry. Destructive exams included plenum gas pressure, volume, and gas composition determinations on a number of pins followed by optical metallography, electron probe microanalysis (EPMA), and alpha and beta gamma autoradiography on a single U-19Pu-10Zr pin. The post-irradiation examinations (PIEs) showed very few differences compared to the short-pin (34.3 cm fuel column) testing performed on fuels of similar composition in Experimental Breeder Reactor-II (EBR-II). The fuel column grew axially slightly less than observed in the short pins, but with the same pattern of decreasing growth with increasing Pu content. There was a difference in the fuel-cladding chemical interaction (FCCI) in that the maximum cladding penetration by interdiffusion with fuel/fission products did not occur at the top of the fuel column where the cladding temperature is highest, as observed in EBR-II tests. Instead, the more exaggerated fission-rate profile of the FFTF pins resulted in a peak FCCI at ~0.7 X/L axial location along the fuel column. This resulted from a lower production of rare earth fission products higher in the fuel column as well as a much smaller delta-T between fuel center and cladding, and therefore less FCCI, despite the higher cladding temperature. This behavior could actually help extend the life of a fuel pin in a long pin reactor design to a higher peak fuel burnup.

D. L. Porter; H.C. Tsai

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

172

Release of Pu Isotopes from the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant Accident to the Marine Environment Was Negligible  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Release of Pu Isotopes from the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant Accident to the Marine Environment Was Negligible ... On 11 March 2011, a massive earthquake with a magnitude of M 9.0 occurred in the western North Pacific about 180 km off the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant (FDNPP) in the northeast coast of Japan and it was followed by gigantic tsunami. ... Since the accident at Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant (1FNPP), significant levels of anthropogenic radionuclides have been detected in seabed sediments off the east coast of Japan. ...

Wenting Bu; Miho Fukuda; Jian Zheng; Tatsuo Aono; Takashi Ishimaru; Jota Kanda; Guosheng Yang; Keiko Tagami; Shigeo Uchida; Qiuju Guo; Masatoshi Yamada

2014-07-22T23:59:59.000Z

173

Reactor Decay Heat in 239Pu: Solving the Gamma Discrepancy in the 43000-s Cooling Period  

SciTech Connect

The {beta} feeding probability of {sup 102,104,105,106,107}Tc, {sup 105}Mo, and {sup 101}Nb nuclei, which are important contributors to the decay heat in nuclear reactors, has been measured using the total absorption technique. We have coupled for the first time a total absorption spectrometer to a Penning trap in order to obtain sources of very high isobaric purity. Our results solve a significant part of a long-standing discrepancy in the {gamma} component of the decay heat for {sup 239}Pu in the 4-3000 s range.

Algora, A.; Sonzogni, A.; Algora,A.; Jordan,D.; Tain,J.L.; Rubio,B.; Agramunt,J.; Perez-Cerdan,A.B.; Molina,F; Caballero,L.; Nacher,E.; Krasznahorkay,A.; Hunyadi,M.D.; Gulyas,J; Vitez,A.; Csatlos,M.; Csige,L.; Aysto,J.; Penttila,H.; Moore,I.D.; Eronen,T.; Jokinen,A.; Nieminen,A.; Hakala,J.; Karvonen,P.; Kankainen,A.; Saastamoinen,A.; Rissanen,J.; Kessler,T.; Weber,C.; Ronkainen,J.; Rahaman,S.; Elomaa,V.; Rinta-Antila,S.; Hager,U.; Sonoda,T.; Burkard,K.; Huller,W.; Batist,L.; Gelletly,W.; Nichols,A.L.; Yoshida,T.; Sonzogni,A.A.; Perajarvi,K.

2010-11-08T23:59:59.000Z

174

Measurement/Evaluation Techniques and Nuclear Data Associated with Fission of 239Pu by Fission Spectrum Neutrons  

SciTech Connect

This Panel was chartered to review and assess new evaluations of work on fission product data, as well as the evaluation process used by the two U.S. nuclear weapons physics laboratories. The work focuses on fission product yields resulting from fission spectrum neutrons incident on plutonium, and includes data from measurements that had not been previously published as well as new or revised fission product cumulative yield data, and related quantities such as Q values and R values. This report documents the Panel's assessment of the work presented by Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) and Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). Based on the work presented we have seven key observations: (1) Experiments conducted in the 1970s at LANL, some of which were performed in association with a larger, NIST-led, program, have recently been documented. A preliminary assessment of this work, which will be referred to in this document as ILRR-LANL, shows it to be technically sound. (2) LLNL has done a thorough, unbiased review and evaluation of the available literature and is in the process of incorporating the previously unavailable LANL data into its evaluation of key fission product yields. The results of the LLNL effort, which includes a preliminary evaluation of the ILRR-LANL data, have been documented. (3) LANL has also conducted an evaluation of fission product yields for fission spectrum neutrons on plutonium including a meta-analysis of benchmark data as part of a planned upgrade to the ENDF/B compilation. We found that the approach of using meta-analysis provides valuable additional insight for evaluating the sparse data sets involved in this assessment. (4) Both laboratories have provided convincing evidence for energy dependence in the fission product yield of {sup 147}Nd produced from the bombardment of {sup 239}Pu with fission spectrum neutrons over an incident neutron energy range of 0.2 to 1.9 MeV. (5) Consistent, complete, and explicit treatment of both systematic and statistical uncertainties, including correlations, are critical to the assessment of both the experimental measurements (due to variations between experimental techniques, irradiation conditions, calibration procedures, etc.), and the evaluation of those experiments to extract fundamental nuclear data. A clear example of the importance of uncertainty analysis is in the justification for energy-dependent {sup 147}Nd fission product yield, where the magnitude of the effect is comparable to the uncertainties of the individual fission product yield measurements. Both LANL and LLNL are committed to the inclusion of full uncertainty analysis in their evaluations. (6) The Panel reviewed in detail two methods for determining/evaluating fission product yields from which fission assessments can be made: the K factor method and high-resolution gamma spectroscopy (both described more fully in Sections 3 and 4). The panel concluded that fission product yields, and thus fission assessments, derived using either approach are equally valid, provided that the data were obtained from well understood, direct fission measurements and that the key underlying calibrations and/or data are valid for each technique. (7) The Panel found the process of peer review of the two complementary but independent methods to be an extremely useful exercise. Although work is still ongoing and the numbers presented to the Panel may change slightly, both groups are now in much better agreement on not just one, but four key fission product yields. The groups also have a better appreciation of the strengths and weaknesses of each other's methods.

Baisden, P; Bauge, E; Ferguson, J; Gilliam, D; Granier, T; Jeanloz, R; McMillan, C; Robertson, D; Thompson, P; Verdon, C; Wilkerson, C; Young, P

2010-03-16T23:59:59.000Z

175

Fission gas bubble nucleated cavitational swelling of the alpha-uranium phase of irradiated U-Pu-Zr fuel  

SciTech Connect

Cavitational swelling has been identified as a potential swelling mechanism for the alpha uranium phase of irradiated U-Pu-Zr metal fuels for the Integral Fast Reactor being developed at Argonne National Laboratory. The trends of U-Pu-Zr swelling data prior to fuel cladding contact can be interpreted in terms of unrestrained cavitational driven swelling. It is theorized that the swelling mechanisms at work in the alpha uranium phase can be modeled by single vacancy and single interstitial kinetics with intergranular gas bubbles providing the void nuclei, avoiding the use of complicated defect interaction terms required for the calculation of void nucleation. The focus of the kinetics of fission gas evolution as it relates to cavitational swelling is prior to the formation of a significant amount of interconnected porosity and is on the development of small intergranular gas bubbles which can act as void nuclei. Calculations for the evolution of intergranular fission gas bubbles show that they provide critical cavity sizes (i.e., the size above which the cavity will grow by bias-driven vacancy flux) consistent with the observed incubation dose for the onset of rapid swelling and gas release.

Rest, J.

1992-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

176

Ab initio full charge-density study of the atomic volume of ?-phase Fr, Ra, Ac, Th, Pa, U, Np, and Pu  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We have used a full charge-density technique based on the linear muffin-tin orbitals method in first-principles calculations of the atomic volumes of the light actinides including Fr, Ra, and Ac in their low-temperature crystallographic phases. The good agreement between the theoretical and experimental values along the series support the picture of itinerant 5f electronic states in Th to Pu. The increased deviation between theory and experiment found in Np and Pu may be an indication of correlation effects not included in the local density approximation.

L. Vitos; J. Kollr; H. L. Skriver

1997-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

177

Radiochemical procedures for analysis of Pu, Am, Cs and Sr in water, soil, sediments and biota samples  

SciTech Connect

The Environmental Radioactivity Analysis Laboratory (ERAL) was established as an analytical facility. The primary function of ERAL is to provide fast and accurate radiological data of environmental samples. Over the years, many radiochemical procedures have been developed by the staffs of ERAL. As result, we have found that our procedures exist in many different formats and in many different notebooks, documents and files. Therefore, in order to provide for more complete and orderly documentation of the radiochemical procedures that are being used by ERAL, we have decided to standardize the format and compile them into a series of reports. This first report covers procedures we have developed and are using for the radiochemical analysis of Pu, Am, Cs, and Sr in various matrices. Additional analytical procedures and/or revisions for other elements will be reported as they become available through continuation of these compilation efforts.

Wong, K.M.; Jokela, T.A.; Noshkin, V.E.

1994-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

178

Effects of self-irradiation on local crystal structure and 5flocalization in PuCoGa5  

SciTech Connect

The 18.5 K superconductor PuCoGa{sub 5} has many unusual properties, including those due to damage induced by self-irradiation. The superconducting transition temperature decreases sharply with time, suggesting a radiation-induced Frenkel defect concentration much larger than predicted by current radiation damage theories. Extended x-ray absorption fine-structure measurements demonstrate that while the local crystal structure in fresh material is well ordered, aged material is disordered much more strongly than expected from simple defects, consistent with strong disorder throughout the damage cascade region. These data highlight the potential impact of local lattice distortions relative to defects on the properties of irradiated materials and underscore the need for more atomic-resolution structural comparisons between radiation damage experiments and theory.

Booth, C.H.; Daniel, M.; Wilson, R.E.; Bauer, E.D.; Mitchell,J.N.; Moreno, N.O.; Morales, L.A.; Sarrao, J.L.; Allen, P.G.

2006-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

179

Intrinsic Nanoscience of ? PuGa Alloys: Local Structure and Speciation, Collective Behavior, Nanoscale Heterogeneity, and Aging Mechanisms  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Materials Science and Technology Division, Theoretical Division, Health, Safety, Radiation Protection Division, and ?Nuclear Materials Technology Division, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545, United States ... The EXAFS were calculated as the difference between the full spectra and their smooth atomic backgrounds approximated by an arctangent and Gaussian for the edge and a polynomial spline at higher energies, divided by the atomic absorbance fall off with increasing energy. ... That the Ga environment is only minimally or negligibly affected by aging implies that the aging-induced defects, whether isolated or as novel ordered structures, almost exclusively involve Pu sites and are thus concentrated in Ga-depleted domains in the crystal that must therefore reform if they are lost at some point in the aging process. ...

Steven D. Conradson; Nicolas Bock; Julio M. Castro; Dylan R. Conradson; Lawrence E. Cox; Wojciech Dmowski; David E. Dooley; Takeshi Egami; Francisco J. Espinosa-Faller; Franz J. Freibert; Angel J. Garcia-Adeva; Nancy J. Hess; Erik Holmstrm; Rafael C. Howell; Barbara A. Katz; Jason C. Lashley; Raymond J. Martinez; David P. Moore; Luis A. Morales; J. David Olivas; Ramiro A. Pereyra; Michael Ramos; Jeffrey H. Terry; Phillip M. Villella

2014-03-24T23:59:59.000Z

180

CONTAINMENT VESSEL TEMPERATURE FOR PU-238 HEAT SOURCE CONTAINER UNDER AMBIENT, FREE CONVECTION AND LOW EMISSIVITY COOLING CONDITIONS  

SciTech Connect

The EP-61 primary containment vessel of the 5320 shipping package has been used for storage and transportation of Pu-238 plutonium oxide heat source material. For storage, the material in its convenience canister called EP-60 is placed in the EP-61 and sealed by two threaded caps with elastomer O-ring seals. When the package is shipped, the outer cap is seal welded to the body. While stored, the EP-61s are placed in a cooling water bath. In preparation for welding, several containers are removed from storage and staged to the welding booth. The significant heat generation of the contents, and resulting rapid rise in component temperature necessitates special handling practices. The test described here was performed to determine the temperature rise with time and peak temperature attained for an EP-61 with 203 watts of internal heat generation, upon its removal from the cooling water bath.

Gupta, N.; Smith, A.

2011-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "2 glenwood pu" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

A comparative study of 239,240Pu in soil near the former Rocky Flats Nuclear Weapons Facility, Golden, CO  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The Rocky Flats Nuclear Weapons Plant near Golden, CO released plutonium into the environment during almost 40 years of operation. Continuing concern over possible health impacts of these releases has been heightened by lack of public disclosure of the US Department of Energy (DOE) activities. A dose reconstruction study for the Rocky Flats facilities, begun in 1990, provided a unique opportunity for concerned citizens to design and implement field studies without participation of the DOE, its contractors, or other government agencies. The Citizens Environmental Sampling Committee was formed in late 1992 and conducted a field sampling program in 1994. Over 60 soil samples, including both surface and core samples, were collected from 28 locations where past human activities would have minimal influence on contaminant distributions in soil. Cesium-137 activity was used as a means to assess whether samples were collected in undisturbed locations. The distribution of plutonium (as 239,240Pu) in soil was consistent with past sampling conducted by DOE, the Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment, and others. Elevated levels of 239,240Pu were found immediately east of the Rocky Flats Plant, with concentrations falling rapidly with distance from the plant to levels consistent with background from fallout. Samples collected in areas south, west, and north of the plant were generally consistent with background from fallout. No biases in past sampling due to choice of sampling locations or sampling methodology were evident. The study shows that local citizens, when provided sufficient resources, can design and implement technical studies that directly address community concerns where trust in the regulated community and/or regulators is low.

Todd D. Margulies; Niels D. Schonbeck; Normie C. Morin-Voillequ; Katherine A. James; James M. LaVelle

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

182

LWR spent fuel reduction by the removal of U and the compact storage of Pu with FP for long-term nuclear sustainability  

SciTech Connect

Fast breeder reactors (FBR) nuclear fuel cycle is needed for long-term nuclear sustainability while preventing global warming and maximum utilizing the limited uranium (U) resources. The 'Framework for Nuclear Energy Policy' by the Japanese government on October 2005 stated that commercial FBR deployment will start around 2050 under its suitable conditions by the successive replacement of light water reactors (LWR) to FBR. Even after Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant accident which made Japanese tendency slow down the nuclear power generation activities, Japan should have various options for energy resources including nuclear, and also consider the delay of FBR deployment and increase of LWR spent fuel (LWR-SF) storage amounts. As plutonium (Pu) for FBR deployment will be supplied from LWR-SF reprocessing and Japan will not possess surplus Pu, the authors have developed the flexible fuel cycle initiative (FFCI) for the transition from LWR to FBR. The FFCI system is based on the possibility to stored recycled materials (U, Pu)temporarily for a suitable period according to the FBR deployment rate to control the Pu demand/supply balance. This FFCI system is also effective after the Fukushima accident for the reduction of LWR-SF and future LWR-to-FBR transition. (authors)

Fukasawa, T.; Hoshino, K. [Hitachi-GE Nuclear Energy, Ltd, 3-1-1 Saiwai, Hitachi, Ibaraki, 317-0073 (Japan); Takano, M. [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, 3-1-1 Saiwai, Hitachi, Ibaraki, 317-0073 (Japan); Sato, S. [Hokkaido University, 3-1-1 Saiwai, Hitachi, Ibaraki, 317-0073 (Japan); Shimazu, Y. [Fukui University, 3-1-1 Saiwai, Hitachi, Ibaraki, 317-0073 (Japan)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

183

Melting temperatures of the ZrO{sub 2}-MOX system  

SciTech Connect

Severe accidents occurred at the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant Units 1-3 on March 11, 2011. MOX fuels were loaded in the Unit 3. For the thermal analysis of the severe accident, melting temperature and phase state of MOX corium were investigated. The simulated coriums were prepared from 4%Pu-containing MOX, 8%Pu-containing MOX and ZrO{sub 2}. Then X-ray diffraction, density and melting temperature measurements were carried out as a function of zirconium and plutonium contents. The cubic phase was observed in the 25%Zr-containing corium and the tetragonal phase was observed in the 50% and 75%Zr-containing coria. The lattice parameter and density monotonically changed with Pu content. Melting temperature increased with increasing Pu content; melting temperature were estimated to be 2932 K for 4%Pu MOX corium and 3012 K for 8%Pu MOX corium in the 25%ZrO{sub 2}-MOX system. The lowest melting temperature was observed for 50%Zr-containing corium. (authors)

Uchida, T.; Hirooka, S.; Kato, M.; Morimoto, K. [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, 4-33, Muramatsu, Tokai-mura, Naka-gun, Ibaraki 319-1194 (Japan); Sugata, H.; Shibata, K.; Sato, D. [Inspection Development Company, 4-33, Muramatsu, Tokai-mura, Naka-gun, Ibaraki 319-1194 (Japan)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

184

Cost-benefit analysis of unfired PuO/sub 2/ pellets as an alternative plutonium shipping form  

SciTech Connect

A limited cost-benefit evaluation was performed concerning use of unfired plutonium dioxide pellets as a shipping form. Two specific processing operations are required for this use, one to form the pellet (pelletizing) and a second to reconstitute an acceptable powder upon receipt (reconstitution). The direct costs for the pelletizing operation are approximately $208,000 for equipment and its installation and $122 per kg of plutonium processed (based upon a 20-kg plutonium/day facility). The direct costs for reconstitution are approximately $90,000 for equipment and its installation and $81 per kg of plutonium processed. The indirect cost considered was personnel exposure from these operations. Whole body exposures ranged from 0.04 man-rem per 100 kg of low-exposure plutonium reconstituted to 0.9 man-rem per 100 kg of average-exposure plutonium pelletized. Hand exposures were much higher - 17 man-rem power 100 kg of low-exposure plutonium reconstituted to 67 man-rem per 100 kg of average plutonium pelletized. The principal benefit is a potential twentyfold reduction of airborne release in the event of an accident. An experimental plan is outlined to fill the data gaps uncovered during this study in the areas of pelletizing and reconstitution process parameters and pellet response behavior to accident-generated stresses. A study to enhance the containment potential of the inner packaging used during shipment is also outlined.

Mishima, J.; Brackenbush, L.W.; Libby, R.A.; Soldat, K.L.; White, G.D.

1983-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

185

Table A1. Total First Use (formerly Primary Consumption) of Energy for All Pu  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2" 2" " (Estimates in Trillion Btu)" " "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," ",," " " "," "," ",," "," ",," "," ",," ","Shipments","RSE" "SIC"," ",,"Net","Residual","Distillate",," ",,"Coke and"," ","of Energy Sources","Row" "Code(a)","Industry Group and Industry","Total(b)","Electricity(c)","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(d)","Natural Gas(e)","LPG","Coal","Breeze","Other(f)","Produced Onsite(g)","Factors"

186

Quantitative NDA Measurements of Advanced Reprocessing Product Materials Containing U, NP, PU, and AM  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of this first principle technique have been identified: (1) quantitative measurement of uranium, neptunium, plutonium, and americium materials; (2) quantitative measurement of mixed oxide (MOX) materials; (3) quantitative measurement of uranium materials; and (4...

Goddard, Braden

2013-04-05T23:59:59.000Z

187

Simulating Cl K-edge X-ray absorption spectroscopy in MCl62- (M= U, Np, Pu) complexes and UOCl5- using time-dependent density functional theory  

SciTech Connect

We report simulations of the X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) at the Cl K-edge of actinide hexahalides MCl62- (M = U, Np, Pu) and the UOCl5- complex using linear-response time-dependent density functional theory (LR-TDDFT) extended for core excitations. To the best of our knowledge, these are the first calculations of the Cl K-edge spectra of NpCl62- and PuCl62-. In addition, the spectra are simulated with and without the environmental effects of the host crystal as well as ab initio molecular dynamics (AIMD) to capture the dynamical effects due to atomic motion. The calculated spectra are compared with experimental results, where available and the observed trends are discussed.

Govind, Niranjan; De Jong, Wibe A.

2014-02-21T23:59:59.000Z

188

Coulomb effects in isobaric cold fission from reactions 233U(nth,f), 235U(nth,f), 239Pu(nth,f) and 252Cf(sf)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Coulomb effect hypothesis, formerly used to interpret fluctuations in the curve of maximal total kinetic energy as a function of light fragment mass in reactions 233U(nth,f), 235U(nth,f) and 239Pu(nth,f), is confirmed in high kinetic energy as well as in low excitation energy windows, respectively. Data from reactions 233U(nth,f), 235U(nth,f), 239Pu(nth,f) and 252Cf(sf) show that, between two isobaric fragmentations with similar Q-values, the more asymmetric charge split reaches the higher value of total kinetic energy. Moreover, in isobaric charge splits with different Q-values, similar preference for asymmetrical fragmentations is observed in low excitation energy windows.

Modesto Montoya

2014-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

189

The CIELO Collaboration: Neutron Reactions on 1H, 16O, 56Fe, 235,238U, and 239Pu  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract CIELO (Collaborative International Evaluated Library Organization) provides a new working paradigm to facilitate evaluated nuclear reaction data advances. It brings together experts from across the international nuclear reaction data community to identify and document discrepancies among existing evaluated data libraries, measured data, and model calculation interpretations, and aims to make progress in reconciling these discrepancies to create more accurate ENDF-formatted files. The focus will initially be on a small number of the highest-priority isotopes, namely 1H, 16O, 56Fe, 235,238U, and 239Pu. This paper identifies discrepancies between various evaluations of the highest priority isotopes, and was commissioned by the OECD's Nuclear Energy Agency WPEC (Working Party on International Nuclear Data Evaluation Co-operation) during a meeting held in May 2012. The evaluated data for these materials in the existing nuclear data libraries ENDF/B-VII.1, JEFF-3.1, JENDL-4.0, CENDL-3.1, ROSFOND, IRDFF 1.0 are reviewed, discrepancies are identified, and some integral properties are given. The paper summarizes a program of nuclear science and computational work needed to create the new CIELO nuclear data evaluations.

M.B. Chadwick; E. Dupont; E. Bauge; A. Blokhin; O. Bouland; D.A. Brown; R. Capote; A. Carlson; Y. Danon; C. De Saint Jean; M. Dunn; U. Fischer; R.A. Forrest; S.C. Frankle; T. Fukahori; Z. Ge; S.M. Grimes; G.M. Hale; M. Herman; A. Ignatyuk; M. Ishikawa; N. Iwamoto; O. Iwamoto; M. Jandel; R. Jacqmin; T. Kawano; S. Kunieda; A. Kahler; B. Kiedrowski; I. Kodeli; A.J. Koning; L. Leal; Y.O. Lee; J.P. Lestone; C. Lubitz; M. MacInnes; D. McNabb; R. McKnight; M. Moxon; S. Mughabghab; G. Noguere; G. Palmiotti; A. Plompen; B. Pritychenko; V. Pronyaev; D. Rochman; P. Romain; D. Roubtsov; P. Schillebeeckx; M. Salvatores; S. Simakov; E.Sh. Soukhovitski??; J.C. Sublet; P. Talou; I. Thompson; A. Trkov; R. Vogt; S. van der Marck

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

190

Generalized gamma-ray isotopic analysis software and re-evaluation of the two important 242Pu branching ratios  

SciTech Connect

The goal of the generalized gamma-ray analysis software is to provide precise and accurate isotopic analyses of samples that do not have a standard experimental geometry. This analysis tool will analyze gamma-ray data from all types of measurement scenarios with little or no interaction from the user. This tool also provides complete transparency regarding the gamma-ray peaks and branching intensities used in the analysis with the capability for the user to modify this information. They are currently at the data collected phase of building a validated spectral library. One of the by-products in this data collection phase is enabling them to reevaluate the two important branching ratios in {sup 242}Pu. These branching ratios are required for very high burn-up plutonium fuels. The preliminary analysis shows that the energy of the states are 103.5 keV and 158.82 keV, the branching ratio are 1.36E-5 (9%) and 3.37E-6(7%), respectively. More accurate measurements and analysis are currently being carried out.

Wang, T; Raschke, K; Roberts, K; Dougan, A

2009-07-06T23:59:59.000Z

191

The CIELO Collaboration:Neutron Reactions on 1H, 16O, 56Fe, 235,238U, and 239Pu  

SciTech Connect

CIELO (Collaborative International Evaluated Library Organization) provides a new working paradigm to facilitate evaluated nuclear reaction data advances. It brings together experts from across the international nuclear reaction data community to identify and document discrepancies among existing evaluated data libraries, measured data, and model calculation interpretations, and aims to make progress in reconciling these discrepancies to create more accurate ENDF-formatted files. The focus will initially be on a small number of the highest-priority isotopes, namely 1H, 16O, 56Fe, 235,238U, and 239Pu. This paper identifies discrepancies between various evaluations of the highest priority isotopes, and was commissioned by the OECD's Nuclear Energy Agency WPEC (Working Party on International Nuclear Data Evaluation Co-operation) during a meeting held in May 2012. The evaluated data for these materials in the existing nuclear data libraries ENDF/B-VII.1, JEFF-3.1, JENDL-4.0, CENDL-3.1, ROSFOND, IRDFF 1.0 are reviewed, discrepancies are identified, and some integral properties are given. The paper summarizes a program of nuclear science and computational work needed to create the new CIELO nuclear data evaluations.

Giuseppe Palmiotti; M. B. Chadwick

2014-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

192

INTERPRETATION OF AT-LINE SPECTRA FROM AFS-2 BATCH #3 FERROUS SULFAMATE TREATMENT  

SciTech Connect

Spectra from the at-line spectrometer were obtained during the ferrous sulfamate (FS) valence adjustment step of AFS-2 Batch #3 on 9/18/2013. These spectra were analyzed by mathematical principal component regression (PCR) techniques to evaluate the effectiveness of this treatment. Despite the complications from Pu(IV), we conclude that all Pu(VI) was consumed during the FS treatment, and that by the end of the treatment, about 85% was as Pu(IV) and about 15% was as Pu(III). Due to the concerns about the odd shape of the Pu(IV) peak and the possibility of this behavior being observed in the future, a follow-up sample was sent to SRNL to investigate this further. Analysis of this sample confirmed the previous results and concluded that it odd shape was due to an intermediate acid concentration. Since the spectral evidence shows complete reduction of Pu(VI) we conclude that it is appropriate to proceed with processing of this the batch of feed solution for HB-Line including the complexation of the fluoride with aluminum nitrate.

Kyser, E.; O'Rourke, P.

2013-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

193

Over Batch Analysis for the LLNL Plutonium Packaging System (PuPS)  

SciTech Connect

This document addresses the concern raised in the Savannah River Site (SRS) Acceptance Criteria (Reference 1, Section 6.a.3) about receiving an item that is over batched by 1.0 kg of fissile materials. This document shows that the occurrence of this is incredible. Some of the Department of Energy Standard 3013 (DOE-STD-3013) requirements are described in Section 2.1. The SRS requirement is discussed in Section 2.2. Section 2.3 describes the way fissile materials are handled in the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) Plutonium Facility (B332). Based on the material handling discussed in Section 2.3, there are only three errors that could result in a shipping container being over batched. These are: incorrect measurement of the item, selecting the wrong item to package, and packaging two items into a single shipping container. The analysis in Section 3 shows that the first two events are incredible because of the controls that exist at LLNL. The third event is physically impossible. Therefore, it is incredible for an item to be shipped to SRS that is more than 1.0 kg of fissile materials over batched.

Riley, D; Dodson, K

2007-11-19T23:59:59.000Z

194

137Cs in Urine of Tourists Who Visited Kiev Late in April, 1986. Estimation of the Intake of 137Cs and 239Pu: Due to the Nuclear Reactor Accident  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......Urine of Tourists Who Visited Kiev Late in April, 1986. -Estimation of the Intake of 137Cs and 239Pu: Due to the Nuclear Reactor Accident- Teruhisa Watabe Kohki Sugawara * Division of Radioecology, Laboratory for Radioecology, Isozaki 3609......

Teruhisa Watabe; Kohki Sugawara

1987-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

195

Rational Ligand Design for U(VI) and Pu(IV)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

HOPO ligand with uranyl nitrate and Et 3 N or methanolic KOHbis-Me-3,2-HOPO ligand, uranyl nitrate, and Et 3 N in DMF oruranyl complexes are difficult to separate from the mixture of potassium, tetramethylammonium and nitrate

Szigethy, Geza

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

196

2006 Long Range Development Plan Final Environmental Impact Report  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Glenwood, New Mexico, [WTI 02-1], 1995. Zeiner, D.C. , W.F.Manual, Glenwood, New Mexico, [WTI 02-1], 1995. Yee, Henry,

Philliber, Jeff

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

197

Heavy element radionuclides (Pu, Np, U) and {sup 137}Cs in soils collected from the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory and other sites in Idaho, Montana, and Wyoming  

SciTech Connect

The isotopic composition of Pu in soils on and near the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) has been determined in order to apportion the sources of the Pu into those derived from stratospheric fallout, regional fallout from the Nevada Test Site (NTS), and facilities on the INEEL site. Soils collected offsite in Idaho, Montana, and Wyoming were collected to further characterize NTS fallout in the region. In addition, measurements of {sup 237}Np and {sup 137}Cs were used to further identify the source of the Pu from airborne emissions at the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant (ICPP) or fugitive releases from the Subsurface Disposal Area (SDA) in the Radioactive Waste Management Complex (RWMC). There is convincing evidence from this study that {sup 241}Am, in excess of that expected from weapons-grade Pu, constituted a part of the buried waste at the SDA that has subsequently been released to the environment. Measurements of {sup 236}U in waters from the Snake River Plain aquifer and a soil core near the ICPP suggest that this radionuclide may be a unique interrogator of airborne releases from the ICPP. Neptunium-237 and {sup 238}Pu activities in INEEL soils suggest that airborne releases of Pu from the ICPP, over its operating history, may have recently been overestimated.

Beasley, T.M.; Rivera, W. Jr. [Dept. of Energy, New York, NY (United States). Environmental Measurements Lab.; Kelley, J.M.; Bond, L.A. [Pacific Northwest National Lab., Richland, WA (United States); Liszewski, M.J. [Bureau of Reclamation (United States); Orlandini, K.A. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)

1998-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

198

Spin-orbit holds the heavyweight title for Pu and Am: Exchange regains it for Cm  

SciTech Connect

The conclusions of this paper are: (1) The 5f electrons in Cm are near an LS coupling scheme. (2) This coupling scheme allows for a large spin polarization of the 5f electrons, which in turn stabilizes the Cm III crystal structure. (3) Results for Cm show us the recipe for magnetic stabilization of the crystal structure of metals: (A) The metal must be near the itinerant-localized transition where multiple crystal structures have close energies; (B) The metal is just on the magnetic side of the transition; and (C) There must be a magnetic moment large enough to overcome the energy difference between crystal structures, thus dictating the atomic geometry. (4) These results solidify our understanding of magnetically-stabilized metals, showing us where to look for engineered materials with magnetic applications.

Moore, K; der Laan, G v; Soderlind, P

2008-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

199

PuO 2 surface catalyzed reactions: recombination of H 2 and O 2 and the effects of adsorbed water on surface reactivity  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The Department of Energy/Environmental Management (DOE/EM) is responsible for the management and long-term disposition of a variety of materials located at Rocky Flats Environmental Test Site (RFETS) Hanford Savannah River and other DOE sites. The purpose of this work is to measure the recombination rates of hydrogen/oxygen mixtures in contact with pure and impure plutonium oxides and to test the effects of adsorbed water on the surface reactivity. This was accomplished by using a calibrated pressure-volume-temperature (PVT) apparatus to measure the recombination rates in a fixed volume as the gas mixture was brought into contact with oxide powders whose temperatures ranged from 50?C to 300?C.

Luis Morales

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

200

HOURGLASS FIRE Pingree Park Vicinity  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

needles). Fuel moistures were extremely low throughout Colorado during spring/early summer of 1994 firefighters in a blowup near Glenwood Springs. Table 1 indicates dead fuel moistures in the Pingree Park). Spotting was occurring 1/2 mile in advance of the fire. By this time personnel/engines from Colorado State

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "2 glenwood pu" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

LAKESHORE AVON BR ANT-EDEN ALD EN-LANC ASTER AU BURN W SH ELDON  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

81 81 § ¨ ¦ 81 LAKESHORE AVON BR ANT-EDEN ALD EN-LANC ASTER AU BURN W SH ELDON CALEDONIA HURON C REEK LEIC EST ER COL DEN ASH FORD INDIAN FALLS LAWTONS SAR DINIA RPD-037 -2 GLENWOOD PU LASKI PAVILION CON CORD COL LINS N ELM A ORC HARD PARK-H AMBU RG DANLEY CORNERS ST ILLWAT ER CHAFF EE-ARCAD E FAYETT E-WATERLOO LAKEVIEW JAVA SEN EC A W ELLER Y AU RORA E ZOAR BU FFALO TIOGA SILVER LAKE AKR ON ROM E RAT HBON E ALM A BET HANY WYOMING ULYSSES BR ANCH W SAN DY CREEK COL LINS BLOOMFIELD E LEBANON STATE LINE ALLEN CHUR CHVILLE BATH ATT ICA ELLI COT VILLE ROU LETT E BR ADFORD BU FFALO CREEK PEN N YAN N BEECH HILL-INDEPENDENC E GERRY-CH ARLOTTE STAGECOACH CHIPMUN K HEBRON VIN CENT BALD WI NSVILLE AKELEY OLEAN COWLESVILLE AN NIN SMET HPORT BR ADLEY BR OOK BU STI FIVE MILE BLOOMFIELD W SEN EC A FALLS NILE STAGECOACH LEWIS R UN BR ADFORD CAMDEN VAN ETT EN ROAN OKE SH ARON RICHBU RG FULTON N FINN EGAN H ILL TONAWANDA

202

A Review of Vacuum Degradation Research and the Experimental Outgassing Research of the Core Material- Pu foam on Vacuum Insulation Panels  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Vacuum Insulation Panels(VIPs) have been regarded as a super thermal insulation material with a thermal resistance of about 5-8 times higher than that of equally thick conventional polyurethane boards. In this paper, the researches on factors influencing interior pressure in VIPs, including gas and water vapor permeation through the barrier and outgassing of the core materials, were reviewed respectively. Following this, aiming at the outgassing from open cell PU foam, the specific outgassing rate of the core material is tested not only at room temperature but also at low and high temperatures by an orifice known-conductance method.

C.G. Yang; Y.J. Li; X. Gao; L. Xu

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

203

ANALYSIS OF 2H-EVAPORATOR SCALE WALL [HTF-13-82] AND POT BOTTOM [HTF-13-77] SAMPLES  

SciTech Connect

Savannah River Remediation (SRR) is planning to remove a buildup of sodium aluminosilicate scale from the 2H-evaporator pot by loading and soaking the pot with heated 1.5 M nitric acid solution. Sampling and analysis of the scale material has been performed so that uranium and plutonium isotopic analysis can be input into a Nuclear Criticality Safety Assessment (NCSA) for scale removal by chemical cleaning. Historically, since the operation of the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF), silicon in the DWPF recycle stream combines with aluminum in the typical tank farm supernate to form sodium aluminosilicate scale mineral deposits in the 2Hevaporator pot and gravity drain line. The 2H-evaporator scale samples analyzed by Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) came from the bottom cone sections of the 2H-evaporator pot [Sample HTF-13-77] and the wall 2H-evaporator [sample HTF-13-82]. X-ray diffraction analysis (XRD) confirmed that both the 2H-evaporator pot scale and the wall samples consist of nitrated cancrinite (a crystalline sodium aluminosilicate solid) and clarkeite (a uranium oxy-hydroxide mineral). On as received basis, the bottom pot section scale sample contained an average of 2.59E+00 1.40E-01 wt % total uranium with a U-235 enrichment of 6.12E-01 1.48E-02 %, while the wall sample contained an average of 4.03E+00 9.79E-01 wt % total uranium with a U-235 enrichment of 6.03E-01% 1.66E-02 wt %. The bottom pot section scale sample analyses results for Pu-238, Pu-239, and Pu-241 are 3.16E- 05 5.40E-06 wt %, 3.28E-04 1.45E-05 wt %, and <8.80E-07 wt %, respectively. The evaporator wall scale samples analysis values for Pu-238, Pu-239, and Pu-241 averages 3.74E-05 6.01E-06 wt %, 4.38E-04 5.08E-05 wt %, and <1.38E-06 wt %, respectively. The Pu-241 analyses results, as presented, are upper limit values. These results are provided so that SRR can calculate the equivalent uranium-235 concentrations for the NCSA. Results confirm that the uranium contained in the scale remains depleted with respect to natural uranium. SRNL did not calculate an equivalent U-235 enrichment, which takes into account other fissionable isotopes U-233, Pu-239 and Pu-241. The applicable method for calculation of equivalent U-235 will be determined in the NCSA.

Oji, L.

2013-06-21T23:59:59.000Z

204

Rampant changes in 5f 5/2 and 5f 7/2 filling across the light and middle actinide metals  

SciTech Connect

We examine the branching ratio of the N{sub 4,5} (4d {yields} 5f ) spectra of Th, U, Np, Pu, Am, and Cm metal using electron energy-loss spectroscopy (EELS) in a transmission electron microscope (TEM), together with many-electron atomic spectral calculations and the spin-orbit sum rule. Our results show that: (1) The actinide metals Pu, Am, and Cm exhibit intermediate coupling. (2) The intermediate coupling values for the 5f states as calculated using a many-electron atomic model are correct for the actinides, this being proven by our new results for curium. (3) The EELS branching ratio is sensitive to the degree of 5f electron delocalization, which is illustrated by the transition from LS to intermediate coupling between U and Pu.

Moore, K; der Lann, G v; Wall, M; Schwartz, A; Haire, R

2007-04-03T23:59:59.000Z

205

Corrective Action Decision Document/Closure Report for Corrective Action Unit 485: Cactus Spring Ranch Pu and DU Site, Tonopah Test Range, Nevada  

SciTech Connect

This Corrective Action Decision Document/Closure Report (CADD/CR) has been prepared for Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 485: Cactus Spring Ranch Plutonium (Pu) and Depleted Uranium (DU) Site, in accordance with the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order. Located at the Cactus Spring Ranch on the Tonopah Test Range, Nevada, CAU 485 consists of Corrective Action Site (CAS) TA-39-001-TAGR. This CADD/CR identifies and rationalizes the U.S. Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office's recommendation that no corrective action is deemed necessary for CAU 485. The Corrective Action Decision Document and Closure Report have been combined into one report because sample data collected during the preliminary assessment investigation (PAI) performed in January and February 1998 showed no evidence of contamination at the site. In the past, this CAU included holding pens which housed sheep and burros used to test inhalation uptake from atmospheric releases of Pu and DU, and the animals were sacrificed after the tests. Specifically, the investigation focused on data to determine: if surface activities of alpha, beta, and gamma-emitting radionuclides were present; if potential contaminants of concern (COCs) such as Pu and DU were present; and if plutonium was present in the soil and dung at levels significantly above background levels. Investigation results concluded that surface radiological activities of alpha, beta, and gamma-emitting radionuclides were within range of typical background levels. Evaluation of process knowledge determined plutonium to be the only potential COC, but soil and dung samples tested were not positive for plutonium-238 and only two samples had positive concentrations of plutonium 239/240 (subsequent plutonium alpha spectroscopy results demonstrated that there was no plutonium contamination in the Cactus Spring surface soil or dung). Therefore, the DOE/NV recommended that no corrective action was required at CAU 485; further, no Corrective Action Plan was required. No use restrictions were required to be placed on this CAU because the investigation showed no evidence of contamination at the site.

US Department of Energy Nevada Operations Office

1998-09-18T23:59:59.000Z

206

Measurement of prompt neutron spectra from the 239Pu(n,f) fission reaction for incident neutron energies from 1 to 200 MeV  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Prompt fission neutron spectra in the neutron-induced fission of 239Pu have been measured for incident neutron energies from 1 to 200 MeV at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center. Mean energies deduced from the prompt fission neutron spectra (PFNS) lead to the observation of the opening of the second chance fission at 7 MeV and to indications for the openings of fission channels of third and fourth chances. Moreover, the general trend of the measured PFNS is well reproduced by the different models. The comparison between data and models presents, however, two discrepancies. First, the prompt neutron mean energy seems constant for neutron energy, at least up to 7 MeV, whereas in the theoretical calculations it is continuously increasing. Second, data disagree with models on the shape of the high energy part of the PFNS, where our data suggest a softer spectrum than the predictions.

A. Chatillon; G. Blier; T. Granier; B. Laurent; B. Morillon; J. Taieb; R. C. Haight; M. Devlin; R. O. Nelson; S. Noda; J. M. O'Donnell

2014-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

207

Investigation of the Performance of D2O-Cooled High-Conversion Reactors for Fuel Cycle Calculations  

SciTech Connect

This report presents FY13 activities for the analysis of D2O cooled tight-pitch High-Conversion PWRs (HCPWRs) with U-Pu and Th-U fueled cores aiming at break-even or near breeder conditions while retaining the negative void reactivity. The analyses are carried out from several aspects which could not be covered in FY12 activities. SCALE 6.1 code system is utilized, and a series of simple 3D fuel pin-cell models are developed in order to perform Monte Carlo based criticality and burnup calculations. The performance of U-Pu fueled cores with axial and internal blankets is analyzed in terms of their impact on the relative fissile Pu mass balance, initial Pu enrichment, and void coefficient. In FY12, Pu conversion performances of D2O-cooled HCPWRs fueled with MOX were evaluated with small sized axial/internal DU blankets (approximately 4cm of axial length) in order to ensure the negative void reactivity, which evidently limits the conversion performance of HCPWRs. In this fiscal year report, the axial sizes of DU blankets are extended up to 30 cm in order to evaluate the amount of DU necessary to reach break-even and/or breeding conditions. Several attempts are made in order to attain the milestone of the HCPWR designs (i.e., break-even condition and negative void reactivity) by modeling of HCPWRs under different conditions such as boiling of D2O coolant, MOX with different 235U enrichment, and different target burnups. A similar set of analyses are performed for Th-U fueled cores. Several promising characteristics of 233U over other fissile like 239Pu and 235U, most notably its higher fission neutrons per absorption in thermal and epithermal ranges combined with lower ___ in the fast range than 239Pu allows Th-U cores to be taller than MOX ones. Such an advantage results in 4% higher relative fissile mass balance than that of U-Pu fueled cores while retaining the negative void reactivity until the target burnup of 51 GWd/t. Several other distinctions between U-Pu and Th-U fueled cores are identified by evaluating the sensitivity coefficients of keff, mass balance, and void coefficient. The effect of advanced iron alloy cladding (i.e., FeCrAl) on the performance of Pu conversion in MOX fueled cores is studied instead of using standard stainless-steel cladding. Variations in clad thickness and coolant-to-fuel volume ratio are also exercised. The use of FeCrAl instead of SS as a cladding alloy reduces the required Pu enrichment and improves the Pu conversion rate primarily due to the absence of nickel in the cladding alloy that results in the reduction of the neutron absorption. Also the difference in void coefficients between SS and FeCrAl alloys is nearly 500 pcm over the entire burnup range. The report also shows sensitivity and uncertainty analyses in order to characterize D2O cooled HCPWRs from different aspects. The uncertainties of integral parameters (keff and void coefficient) for selected reactor cores are evaluated at different burnup points in order to find similarities and trends respect to D2O-HCPWR.

Hikaru Hiruta; Gilles Youinou

2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

208

Savannah River Site Public and regulatory involvement in the transuranic (TRU) program and their effect on decisions to dispose of Pu-238 heat source tru waste onsite  

SciTech Connect

The key to successful public involvement at the Savannah River Site (SRS) has been and continues to be vigorous, up-front involvement of the public and state regulators with technical experts. The SRS Waste Management Program includes all forms of radioactive waste. All of the decisions associated with the management of these wastes are of interest to the public and successful program implementation would be impossible without including the public up-front in the program formulation. Serious problems can result if program decisions are made without public involvement, and if the public is informed after key decisions are made. This paper will describe the regulatory and public involvement program and their effects on the decisions concerning the disposal at the Savannah River Site (SRS) of heat source Pu-238 TRU waste. As can be imagined, a decision to dispose of TRU waste onsite versus shipment to the Waste Isolation Pilot Plan (WIPP) in New Mexico for disposal is of considerable interest to the stakeholders in South Carolina. The interaction between the stakeholders not only include the general public, but also the South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control (SCDHEC) and Region IV of the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). The discussions, educational sessions, and negotiations include resolution of equity issues as well and moved forward to an understanding of the difficulties including risk management faced by the Ship-to- WIPP program. Once the program was better understood, the real negotiations concerning equity, safety, and risk to workers from handling Pu-238 waste could begin. This paper will also discuss the technical, regulatory, and public involvement aspects of disposal onsite that must be properly communicated if the program is to be successful. The Risk Based End State Vision Report for the Savannah River Site includes a variance that proposes on-site near surface disposal of waste from the program to produce Pu-238 heat sources for deep space probes. On-site disposal would greatly reduce the risk to workers by eliminating the need to repackage the waste in order to characterize it and ship it to the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant. Significant cost savings can also be realized. A performance assessment was completed to demonstrate that on-site disposal of this waste can be done while meeting the Department of Energy and EPA performance objectives for disposal of TRU waste in a non-WIPP location such as the SRS. This analysis provides a means of demonstrating the technical basis for this alternative to management, stakeholders and regulators. The technical analysis is required to demonstrate that the performance objectives contained in 40 CFR 191, Environmental Protection Standards for the Management and Disposal of Spent Nuclear Fuel, High-Level and Transuranic Radioactive Wastes will be met over a 10,000 year period. This paper will describe the successful results of this technical, regulatory, and public involvement program, explore why and how the accomplishments occurred, and describe the future challenges along with the road map for the future. In doing this, the TRU Ship-to-WIPP program must be described to give the readers an understanding of the technical complexities that must be communicated successfully to achieve constructive stakeholder participation and regulatory approval. (authors)

Bert Crapse, H.M. [U. S. Department of Energy, Washington (United States); Sonny, W.T. [Goldston Washington Savannah River Company (United States)

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

209

Fission Product Data Measured at Los Alamos for Fission Spectrum and Thermal Neutrons on {sup 239}Pu, {sup 235}U, {sup 238}U  

SciTech Connect

We describe measurements of fission product data at Los Alamos that are important for determining the number of fissions that have occurred when neutrons are incident on plutonium and uranium isotopes. The fission-spectrum measurements were made using a fission chamber designed by the National Institute for Standards and Technology (NIST) in the BIG TEN critical assembly, as part of the Inter-laboratory Liquid Metal Fast Breeder Reactor (LMFBR) Reaction Rate (ILRR) collaboration. The thermal measurements were made at Los Alamos' Omega West Reactor. A related set of measurements were made of fission-product ratios (so-called R-values) in neutron environments provided by a number of Los Alamos critical assemblies that range from having average energies causing fission of 400-600 keV (BIG TEN and the outer regions of the Flattop-25 assembly) to higher energies (1.4-1.9 MeV) in the Jezebel, and in the central regions of the Flattop-25 and Flattop-Pu, critical assemblies. From these data we determine ratios of fission product yields in different fuel and neutron environments (Q-values) and fission product yields in fission spectrum neutron environments for {sup 99}Mo, {sup 95}Zr, {sup 137}Cs, {sup 140}Ba, {sup 141,143}Ce, and {sup 147}Nd. Modest incident-energy dependence exists for the {sup 147}Nd fission product yield; this is discussed in the context of models for fission that include thermal and dynamical effects. The fission product data agree with measurements by Maeck and other authors using mass-spectrometry methods, and with the ILRR collaboration results that used gamma spectroscopy for quantifying fission products. We note that the measurements also contradict earlier 1950s historical Los Alamos estimates by {approx}5-7%, most likely owing to self-shielding corrections not made in the early thermal measurements. Our experimental results provide a confirmation of the England-Rider ENDF/B-VI evaluated fission-spectrum fission product yields that were carried over to the ENDF/B-VII.0 library, except for {sup 99}Mo where the present results are about 4%-relative higher for neutrons incident on {sup 239}Pu and {sup 235}U. Additionally, our results illustrate the importance of representing the incident energy dependence of fission product yields over the fast neutron energy range for high-accuracy work, for example the {sup 147}Nd from neutron reactions on plutonium. An upgrade to the ENDF library, for ENDF/B-VII.1, based on these and other data, is described in a companion paper to this work.

Selby, H.D., E-mail: hds@lanl.go [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Mac Innes, M.R.; Barr, D.W.; Keksis, A.L.; Meade, R.A.; Burns, C.J.; Chadwick, M.B.; Wallstrom, T.C. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States)

2010-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

210

Distribution Behavior of U(VI), Pu(IV), Am(III), and Zr(IV) with N,N-Dihexyl Octanamide Under Uranium-Loading Conditions  

SciTech Connect

While the tri-n-butyl phosphate (TBP)-based PUREX process has been the workhorse of the nuclear fuel reprocessing industry for the last four and a half decades, a few drawbacks associated with the use of TBP have caused concern to the separation scientists and technologists. These shortcomings may pose a serious challenge particularly during the reprocessing of (a) short cooled thermal reactor fuels, (b) fast reactor fuels with the larger Pu content and significantly higher burn up, and (c) while treating various waste streams for their disposal to the environment. The N,N-dialkyl aliphatic amides have received particular attention as alternate potential extractants for the reprocessing of spent nuclear fuels in view of (a) the innocuous nature of their degradation products, namely, carboxylic acids/amines and (b) the possibility to incinerate the used solvent leading to reduced volume of secondary waste. The physical and chemical properties of these amides are influenced strongly by the nature of alkyl groups. The extractant N,N-dihexyl octanamide (DHOA) was found to be a promising candidate among a large number of extractants studied. Laboratory batch studies as well as mixer settler studies were performed under process conditions with DHOA and compared with those of TBP. DHOA was found to extract Pu(IV) more efficiently than TBP, both at trace-level concentration as well as under uranium loading conditions. In addition, the extraction behavior of Am(III) and Zr(IV) was studied at varying nitric acid concentrations (1 to 6 M). Extraction behavior of uranium at macroconcentrations (9.9 to 157.7 g/l) was carried out at different temperatures, and it was observed that D{sub U} decreased with the increase in U loading as well as with the increase of temperature (in the range 25 to 45 deg. C) and that the two-phase reaction was exothermic in nature. Mixer settler studies on U(VI) revealed that DHOA is similar to TBP during the extraction cycle but better than TBP during the stripping cycle.

Manchanda, V.K.; Ruikar, P.B.; Sriram, S.; Nagar, M.S.; Pathak, P.N.; Gupta, K.K.; Singh, R.K.; Chitnis, R.R.; Dhami, P.S.; Ramanujam, A. [Bhabha Atomic Research Centre (India)

2001-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

211

The Dynamics of Life. I. Death from Internal Irradiation by 239Pu and 226Ra, Aging, Cancer, and Other Diseases  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...readily operable cancer such as cancer of the skin. The rightmost...5 10.9 2.28 0 Aging and cancer 18 0 4 .4 1 .87 2443 Epilepsy...in the case of radium. The depleted reserve, as indicated by 30...atomic bomb survivors, the uranium miners, and the Marshall Islanders...

Betsy J. Stover; Henry Eyring

1970-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

212

dases de la salive d'abeille. La structure de L1 et de L2 n'a pas pu tre dtermine si  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

) The pollution of honeys from the uranium mining area in Thuringia with the natural radionuclides 235U, 238U, 226. The pollution of honey with natural radionuclides in the area of former ura- nium mines in Thuringia (Wismut the mining area is not dangerous for humans. Contamination du miel par des radionu- cléides naturels dans l

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

213

Calibration of a long counter for fast neutrons with energies from 2 to 14 MeV  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

To determine if a Hansen and McKibben type shielded long counter has a flat response from 2 MeV to 14 Mev detector efficiency was experimentally measured using a PuBe source. Calculations using the Monte Carlo program, MCNP, were performed...

Orr, Michael Lee

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

214

Potential health risks from postulated accidents involving the Pu-238 RTG (radioisotope thermoelectric generator) on the Ulysses solar exploration mission  

SciTech Connect

Potential radiation impacts from launch of the Ulysses solar exploration experiment were evaluated using eight postulated accident scenarios. Lifetime individual dose estimates rarely exceeded 1 mrem. Most of the potential health effects would come from inhalation exposures immediately after an accident, rather than from ingestion of contaminated food or water, or from inhalation of resuspended plutonium from contaminated ground. For local Florida accidents (that is, during the first minute after launch), an average source term accident was estimated to cause a total added cancer risk of up to 0.2 deaths. For accidents at later times after launch, a worldwide cancer risk of up to three cases was calculated (with a four in a million probability). Upper bound estimates were calculated to be about 10 times higher. 83 refs.

Goldman, M. (California Univ., Davis, CA (USA)); Nelson, R.C. (EG and G Idaho, Inc., Idaho Falls, ID (USA)); Bollinger, L. (Air Force Inspection and Safety Center, Kirtland AFB, NM (USA)); Hoover, M.D. (Lovelace Biomedical and Environmental Research Inst., Albuquerque, NM (USA). Inhalation Toxicology Research Inst.); Templeton, W. (Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (USA)); Anspaugh, L. (Lawren

1990-11-02T23:59:59.000Z

215

Analysis Of 2H-Evaporator Scale Wall [HTF-13-82] And Pot Bottom [HTF-13-77] Samples  

SciTech Connect

Savannah River Remediation (SRR) is planning to remove a buildup of sodium aluminosilicate scale from the 2H-evaporator pot by loading and soaking the pot with heated 1.5 M nitric acid solution. Sampling and analysis of the scale material has been performed so that uranium and plutonium isotopic analysis can be input into a Nuclear Criticality Safety Assessment (NCSA) for scale removal by chemical cleaning. Historically, since the operation of the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF), silicon in the DWPF recycle stream combines with aluminum in the typical tank farm supernate to form sodium aluminosilicate scale mineral deposits in the 2H-evaporator pot and gravity drain line. The 2H-evaporator scale samples analyzed by Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) came from two different locations within the evaporator pot; the bottom cone sections of the 2H-evaporator pot [Sample HTF-13-77] and the wall 2H-evaporator [sample HTF-13-82]. X-ray diffraction analysis (XRD) confirmed that both the 2H-evaporator pot scale and the wall samples consist of nitrated cancrinite (a crystalline sodium aluminosilicate solid) and clarkeite (a uranium oxyhydroxide mineral). On ''as received'' basis, the bottom pot section scale sample contained an average of 2.59E+00 {+-} 1.40E-01 wt % total uranium with a U-235 enrichment of 6.12E-01 {+-} 1.48E-02 %, while the wall sample contained an average of 4.03E+00 {+-} 9.79E-01 wt % total uranium with a U-235 enrichment of 6.03E-01% {+-} 1.66E-02 wt %. The bottom pot section scale sample analyses results for Pu-238, Pu-239, and Pu-241 are 3.16E-05 {+-} 5.40E-06 wt %, 3.28E-04 {+-} 1.45E-05 wt %, and <8.80E-07 wt %, respectively. The evaporator wall scale samples analysis values for Pu-238, Pu-239, and Pu-241 averages 3.74E-05 {+-} 6.01E-06 wt %, 4.38E-04 {+-} 5.08E-05 wt %, and <1.38E-06 wt %, respectively. The Pu-241 analyses results, as presented, are upper limit values. For these two evaporator scale samples obtained at two different locations within the evaporator pot the major radioactive components (on a mass basis) in the additional radionuclide analyses were Sr-90, Cs-137 Np-237, Pu-239/240 and Th-232. Small quantities of americium and curium were detected in the blanks used for Am/Cm method for these radionuclides. These trace radionuclide amounts are assumed to come from airborne contamination in the shielded cells drying or digestion oven, which has been replaced. Therefore, the Am/Cm results, as presented, may be higher than the true Am/Cm values for these samples. These results are provided so that SRR can calculate the equivalent uranium-235 concentrations for the NCSA. Results confirm that the uranium contained in the scale remains depleted with respect to natural uranium. SRNL did not calculate an equivalent U-235 enrichment, which takes into account other fissionable isotopes U-233, Pu-239 and Pu-241. The applicable method for calculation of equivalent U-235 will be determined in the NCSA. With a few exceptions, a comparison of select radionuclides measurements from this 2013 2H evaporator scale characterization (pot bottom and wall scale samples) with those measurements for the same radionuclides in the 2010 2H evaporator scale analysis shows that the radionuclide analysis for both years are fairly comparable; the analyses results are about the same order of magnitude.

Oji, L. N.

2013-09-11T23:59:59.000Z

216

Measurements of cross sections and decay properties of the isotopes of elements 112, 114, and 116 produced in the fusion reactions {sup 233,238}U, {sup 242}Pu, and {sup 248}Cm+{sup 48}Ca  

SciTech Connect

We have studied the dependence of the production cross sections of the isotopes {sup 282,283}112 and {sup 286,287}114 on the excitation energy of the compound nuclei {sup 286}112 and {sup 290}114. The maximum cross section values of the xn-evaporation channels for the reaction {sup 238}U({sup 48}Ca,xn){sup 286-x}112 were measured to be {sigma}{sub 3n}=2.5{sub -1.1}{sup +1.8} pb and {sigma}{sub 4n}=0.6{sub -0.5}{sup +1.6} pb; for the reaction {sup 242}Pu({sup 48}Ca,xn){sup 290-x}114: {sigma}{sub 2n}{approx}0.5 pb, {sigma}{sub 3n}=3.6{sub -1.7}{sup +3.4} pb, and {sigma}{sub 4n}=4.5{sub -1.9}{sup +3.6} pb. In the reaction {sup 233}U({sup 48}Ca,2-4n){sup 277-279}112 at E*=34.9=2.2 MeV we measured an upper cross section limit of {sigma}{sub xn}{<=}0.6 pb. The observed shift of the excitation energy associated with the maximum sum evaporation residue cross section {sigma}{sub ER}(E*) to values significantly higher than that associated with the calculated Coulomb barrier can be caused by the orientation of the deformed target nucleus in the entrance channel of the reaction. An increase of {sigma}{sub ER} in the reactions of actinide targets with {sup 48}Ca is consistent with the expected increase of the survivability of the excited compound nucleus upon closer approach to the closed neutron shell N=184. In the present work we detected 33 decay chains arising in the decay of the known nuclei {sup 282}112, {sup 283}112, {sup 286}114, {sup 287}114, and {sup 288}114. In the decay of {sup 287}114({alpha}){yields}{sup 283}112({alpha}){yields}{sup 279}110(SF), in two cases out of 22, we observed decay chains of four and five sequential {alpha} transitions that end in spontaneous fission of {sup 271}Sg (T{sub {alpha}}{sub /SF}=2.4{sub -1.0}{sup +4.3} min) and {sup 267}Rf (T{sub SF}{approx}2.3 h), longer decay chains than reported previously. We observed the new nuclide {sup 292}116 (T{sub {alpha}}=18{sub -6}{sup +16} ms,E{sub {alpha}}=10.66{+-}0.07 MeV) in the irradiation of the {sup 248}Cm target at a higher energy than in previous experiments. The observed nuclear decay properties of the nuclides with Z=104-118 are compared with theoretical nuclear mass calculations and the systematic trends of spontaneous fission properties. As a whole, they give a consistent pattern of decay of the 18 even-Z neutron-rich nuclides with Z=104-118 and N=163-177. The experiments were performed with the heavy-ion beam delivered by the U400 cyclotron of the FLNR (JINR, Dubna) employing the Dubna gas-filled recoil separator.

Oganessian, Yu.Ts.; Utyonkov, V.K.; Lobanov, Yu.V.; Abdullin, F.Sh.; Polyakov, A.N.; Shirokovsky, I.V.; Tsyganov, Yu.S.; Gulbekian, G.G.; Bogomolov, S.L.; Gikal, B.N.; Mezentsev, A.N.; Iliev, S.; Subbotin, V.G.; Sukhov, A.M.; Voinov, A.A.; Buklanov, G.V.; Subotic, K.; Zagrebaev, V.I.; Itkis, M.G.; Patin, J.B. [Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, 141980 Dubna (Russian Federation); Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, University of California, Livermore, California 94551 (United States); Russian Federal Nuclear Center, All-Russian Research Institute of Experimental Physics, 607190 Sarov (Russian Federation)] [and others

2004-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

217

2  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Ocean Atmosphere buoy, providing the longest time series of seawater CO2 data on a coral reef ..... Power spectra of atmospheric and oceanic parameters. (Fig.

2001-05-24T23:59:59.000Z

218

2  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

- SYSTEM DRAWINGS - SYSTEM DRAWINGS Figure A-1. APS Alternative Fuel Pilot Plant Facility Plan View Figure A-2. APS Alternative Pilot Plant Production Equipment Plan Figure A-3. APS Alternative Pilot Plant Production And Control Room Plan View Figure A-4. APS Alternative Pilot Plant Production Hydrogen System Piping and Instrument Diagram Figure A-5. APS Alternative Pilot Plant Production CNG System Piping and Instrument Diagram Appendix A - System Drawings: Page 1 Figure A-1. APS Alternative Fuel Pilot Plant Facility Plan View Appendix A - System Drawings: Page 2 Figure A-2. APS Alternative Pilot Plant Production Equipment Plan Appendix A - System Drawings: Page 4 Figure A-3. APS Alternative Pilot Plant Production And Control Room Plan View Appendix A - System Drawings: Page 6

219

2  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Oil & Natural Gas Technology Oil & Natural Gas Technology DOE Award No.: ESD12-011 Topical Report Properties of Hydrate-Bearing Sediments Subjected to Changing Gas Compositions Submitted by: Timothy Kneafsey, Project PI Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory 1 Cyclotron Road Berkeley, CA 94720 Prepared for: United States Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory Submitted: 2/5/2013 August 7, 2012 Office of Fossil Energy 2 Behavior of methane hydrate when exposed to a 23% carbon dioxide -77% nitrogen gas under conditions similar to the ConocoPhillips 2012 Iġnik Sikumi Gas Hydrate Field Trial Topical Report Timothy J. Kneafsey Seiji Nakagawa Sharon E. Borglin February 5, 2013 ESD12-011 Tasks 2.0 and 3.0 Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

220

Hycon2 Benchmark: Power Network System Stefano Riverso  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

steps and produce the required power. We consider thermal power stations with single-stage turbines nominal value (p.u.) Pvi Deviation of the steam valve position from nominal value (p.u.) Prefi Deviation

Ferrari-Trecate, Giancarlo

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "2 glenwood pu" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

2  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

C - GASEOUS HYDROGEN PIPING SPECIFICATION C - GASEOUS HYDROGEN PIPING SPECIFICATION February 19, 2001, Rev. 0 C.1 GENERAL This specification provides guidelines for designing and installing the gaseous low-pressure (<275 psig) and high-pressure (276 to 7,000 psig) high-purity hydrogen process piping. For both low- and high- pressure, stainless steel (303, 304, 316) tubing, piping, fittings, and components are preferred. Piping systems should be designed and built to meet ANSI/ASME B31.3 for process piping. Specifications for the tubing are ASTM A269 TP 304 and 316. Maximum hardness is 80 Rb. C.2 MAXIMUM ALLOWABLE WORKING PRESSURE Maximum allowable working pressures (MAWP) for commercially available tubing and piping are given below. Piping systems must be designed so that the process pressure of the gas will not exceed the

222

2  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Fuel Cycle Subcommittee Fuel Cycle Subcommittee of the Nuclear Energy Advisory Committee December 9, 2010 Washington D.C. Burton Richter (Chairman) Darleane Hoffman Raymond Juzaitis Sekazi Mtingwa Ron Omberg Joy Rempe Dominique Warin 2 1. Introduction and Summary The Fuel Cycle Subcommittee (FCSC) of NEAC met in Washington, August 17- 19, 2010. DOE's new science-based approach to all matters related to nuclear energy is being implemented. The general approach was outlined to NEAC in the briefing on the NE Roadmap. There are many new directions being considered, and this meeting of the FCSC was to brief the Subcommittee on new directions in nuclear energy that might go beyond our present 4.5% enriched LWRs. The goal is to develop new concepts that have advantages over present systems in some combination of cost,

223

2  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

G - COMPRESSED NATURAL GAS SYSTEM OPERATIONS G - COMPRESSED NATURAL GAS SYSTEM OPERATIONS Rev. 0, July 9, 2001 G.1 NORMAL STARTUP To conduct normal startup, proceed as follows: 1. Open the supply from Southwest Gas (V-101) and activate AOV-102. a. Open one filter (V-105/V-108 or V-109/V-112), with the other filter line closed and filter drains closed. b. Verify that the SWG supply pressure is 30 psi (PI 104 and PI 118). c. Verify that the blowdown filter is set to drain. 2. Open the by-pass supply to Gemini V-119 and V-18. 3. Gemini discharge valve configuration: a. Open V-19, -20, -20A. b. Valve into operation one set of coalescening filters: Open V-21 and V-22 and Close V-23 and V-24 Or Close V-21 and V-22 and Open V-23 and V-24. 4. Open V-25 at fill and dispenser cabinet 1. 5. Optional the booster blower or Hy-Bon compressor:

224

Sediment studies at Bikini Atoll part 2. inventories of transuranium elements in surface sediments  

SciTech Connect

This is the second of three reports on Bikini sediment studies, which discusses the concentrations and inventories of {sup 241}Am and {sup 239+240}Pu in sediments from the lagoon. Surface sediment samples were collected from 87 locations over the entire lagoon at Bikini Atoll during 1979. The collections were made to map the distribution of long-lived radionuclides associated with the bottom material and to show what modifications occurred in the composition of the sediment as a result of the testing program. Present inventories for {sup 241}Am and {sup 239+240}Pu in the surface 2 cm of sediment are estimated to be 14 and 17 TBq, respectively. These values are estimated to represent only 14% of the total inventory in the sediment column. Sediment inventories of {sup 239+240}Pu and {sup 241}Am are changing only slowly with time through chemical- physical processes that continuously mobilize small amounts of the transuranics to the water column. The lowest concentrations and inventories are associated with deposits logoonward of the eastern reef.

Noshkin, V.E.; Eagle, R.J.; Wong, K.M.; Robison, W.L.

1997-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

225

Estimation of multi-group cross section covariances for {sup 235,238}U, {sup 239}Pu, {sup 241}Am, {sup 56}Fe, {sup 23}Na and {sup 27}Al  

SciTech Connect

This paper presents the methodology used to estimate multi-group covariances for some major isotopes used in reactor physics. The starting point of this evaluation is the modelling of the neutron induced reactions based on nuclear reaction models with parameters. These latest are the vectors of uncertainties as they are absorbing uncertainties and correlation arising from the confrontation of nuclear reaction model to microscopic experiment. These uncertainties are then propagated towards multi-group cross sections. As major breakthroughs were then asked by nuclear reactor physicists to assess proper uncertainties to be used in applications, a solution is proposed by the use of integral experiment information at two different stages in the covariance estimation. In this paper, we will explain briefly the treatment of all type of uncertainties, including experimental ones (statistical and systematic) as well as those coming from validation of nuclear data on dedicated integral experiment (nuclear data oriented). We will illustrate the use of this methodology with various isotopes such as {sup 235,238}U, {sup 239}Pu, {sup 241}Am, {sup 56}Fe, {sup 23}Na and {sup 27}Al. (authors)

De Saint Jean, C.; Archier, P.; Noguere, G.; Litaize, O.; Vaglio-Gaudard, C.; Bernard, D.; Leray, O. [CEA, DEN, DER, Cadarache, F-13108 Saint-Paul-lez-Durance (France)

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

226

Microsoft PowerPoint - 2_THOMAS_MORELLO_NMMSS_2014_Powerpoint...  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Plutonium. Reporting of PU-238 is to be to the nearest tenth of one gram of the PU-238 isotope. - Why are reportable quantities or greater important to DOENRCIAEA? - There is a...

227

Tank 241U102 Grab Samples 2U-99-1 and 2U-99-2 and 2U-99-3 Analytical Results for the Final Report  

SciTech Connect

This document is the final report for tank 241-U-102 grab samples. Five grab samples were collected from riser 13 on May 26, 1999 and received by the 222-S laboratory on May 26 and May 27, 1999. Samples 2U-99-3 and 2U-99-4 were submitted to the Process Chemistry Laboratory for special studies. Samples 2U-99-1, 2U-99-2 and 2U-99-5 were submitted to the laboratory for analyses. Analyses were performed in accordance with the Compatibility Grab Sampling and Analysis Plan for Fiscal year 1999 (TSAP) (Sasaki, 1999) and the Data Quality Objectives for Tank Farms Waste Compatibility Program (DQO) (Fowler 1995, Mulkey and Miller 1998). The analytical results are presented in the data summary report. None of the subsamples submitted for differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), total organic carbon (TOC) and plutonium 239 (Pu239) analyses exceeded the notification limits as stated in TSAP.

STEEN, F.H.

1999-08-03T23:59:59.000Z

228

Analytical Capability of Plasma Spectrometry Team  

SciTech Connect

Samples analyzed were: (1) Pu and U metal; (2) Pu oxide for nuclear fuel; (3) {sup 238}Pu oxide for heat source; and (4) Nuclear forensic samples - filters, swipes. Sample preparations that we did were: metal dissolution, marple filter dissolution, Pu oxide closed vessel acid digestion, and column separation to remove Pu.

Gallimore, David L. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2012-07-19T23:59:59.000Z

229

Atomistic Calculations of the Effect of Minor Actinides on Thermodynamic and Kinetic Properties of UO{sub 2{+-}x}  

SciTech Connect

The team will examine how the incorporation of actinide species important for mixed oxide (MOX) and other advanced fuel designs impacts thermodynamic quantities of the host UO{sub 2} nuclear fuel and how Pu, Np, Cm and Am influence oxygen mobility. In many cases, the experimental data is either insufficient or missing. For example, in the case of pure NpO2, there is essentially no experimental data on the hyperstoichiometric form it is not even known if hyperstoichiometry NpO{sub 2{+-}x} is stable. The team will employ atomistic modeling tools to calculate these quantities

Chaitanya Deo; Davis Adnersson; Corbett Battaile; Blas uberuaga

2012-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

230

Microsoft PowerPoint - Campbell-2.ppt  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

MCU Startup and Operations Summary MCU Startup and Operations Summary Seth Campbell ARP/MCU Process Engineer Washington Savannah River Co. May 20, 2009 Waste Management Technical Exchange LWO-LWE-2009-00131 2 MCU Startup and Operations Summary Agenda Mission Process Overview Test Results Startup Processing Results Issues & Resolution Examples Summary 3 MCU Startup and Operations Summary MCU Mission Process dissolved salt solution for disposal - Receive Pu/Sr depleted and clarified waste from ARP - Remove Cs-137 (DF ≥ 12) - Transfer to Tank 50H for Saltstone disposal Provide operational experience for SWPF - Equipment reliability - Process chemistry - Lessons learned 4 MCU Startup and Operations Summary MCU Design Basis Feed - ≤ 1.1 Ci/gal - CSS from 512-S (i.e. filtered) - 4 gpm nominal CSSX

231

Nuclear resonance fluorescence in 240Pu  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Nuclear Research Center (BNRC) through the 00F8F4 University of California Lab Fees Research Program. [

Quiter, Brian

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

232

Radiation-Induced Decomposition of U(VI) Phase to Nanocrystals of UO2  

SciTech Connect

U{sup 6+}-phases are common alteration products, under oxidizing conditions, of uraninite and the UO{sub 2} in spent nuclear fuel. These U{sup 6+}-phases are subjected to a radiation field caused by the {alpha}-decay of U, or in the case of spent nuclear fuel, incorporated actinides, such as {sup 239}Pu and {sup 237}Np. In order to evaluate the effects of {alpha}-decay events on the stability of the U{sup 6+}-phases, we report, for the first time, the results of ion beam irradiations (1.0 MeV Kr{sup 2+}) of U{sup 6+}-phases. The heavy-particle irradiations are used to simulate the ballistic interactions of the recoil-nucleus of an {alpha}-decay event with the surrounding structure. The Kr{sup 2+}-irradiation decomposed the U{sup 6+}-phases to UO{sub 2} nanocrystals at doses as low as 0.006 displacements per atom (dpa). U{sup 6+}-phases accumulate substantial radiation doses ({approx}1.0 displacement per atom) within 100,000 years if the concentration of incorporated {sup 239}Pu is as high as 1 wt%. Similar nanocrystals of UO{sub 2} were observed in samples from the natural fission reactors at Oklo, Gabon. Multiple cycles of radiation-induced decomposition to UO{sub 2} followed by alteration to U{sup 6+}-phases provide a mechanism for the remobilization of incorporated radionuclides.

S. Utsunomiya; R.C. Ewing; L. Wang

2005-06-13T23:59:59.000Z

233

Supercritical-fluid carbon dioxide (SCCO{sub 2}) cleaning of nuclear weapon components  

SciTech Connect

Supercritical fluid carbon dioxide (SCCO{sub 2}) has been evaluated as a cleaning solvent for the cleaning of plutonium (Pu) metal parts. The results of the evaluation show that SCCO{sub 2} is an effective alternative to halogenated solvents that are conventionally used for removing organic and inorganic contaminants from the surface of these parts. The cleaning process was demonstrated at the laboratory scale for steel and uranium substrates and has been found to be compatible with Pu. The efficacy of this cleaning method is found to be dependent on process conditions of pressure, temperature, fluid-flow rate, as well as cleaning time. Process parameters of P > 2,500 psi, T > 40 C, and moderate fluid flow rates, produced good cleaning results in less than 10 minutes using a simple flow-through process configuration. Within the parameter range studied, cleaning efficiency generally improved with increasing process pressure and flow rate. SCCO{sub 2} cleaning is suitable for a variety of component cleaning tasks and is adaptable to precision cleaning requirements. The SCCO{sub 2} cleaning process is currently being developed for deployment for weapons production at LANL.

Taylor, C.M.V.; Sivils, L.D.; Rubin, J.B.

1998-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

234

Analysis Of 2H-Evaporator Scale Pot Bottom Sample [HTF-13-11-28H  

SciTech Connect

Savannah River Remediation (SRR) is planning to remove a buildup of sodium aluminosilicate scale from the 2H-evaporator pot by loading and soaking the pot with heated 1.5 M nitric acid solution. Sampling and analysis of the scale material from the 2H evaporator has been performed so that the evaporator can be chemically cleaned beginning July of 2013. Historically, since the operation of the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF), silicon in the DWPF recycle stream combines with aluminum in the typical tank farm supernate to form sodium aluminosilicate scale mineral deposits in the 2H-evaporator pot and gravity drain line. The 2H-evaporator scale samples analyzed by Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) came from the bottom cone sections of the 2H-evaporator pot. The sample holder from the 2H-evaporator wall was virtually empty and was not included in the analysis. It is worth noting that after the delivery of these 2H-evaporator scale samples to SRNL for the analyses, the plant customer determined that the 2H evaporator could be operated for additional period prior to requiring cleaning. Therefore, there was no need for expedited sample analysis as was presented in the Technical Task Request. However, a second set of 2H evaporator scale samples were expected in May of 2013, which would need expedited sample analysis. X-ray diffraction analysis (XRD) confirmed the bottom cone section sample from the 2H-evaporator pot consisted of nitrated cancrinite, (a crystalline sodium aluminosilicate solid), clarkeite and uranium oxide. There were also mercury compound XRD peaks which could not be matched and further X-ray fluorescence (XRF) analysis of the sample confirmed the existence of elemental mercury or mercuric oxide. On ''as received'' basis, the scale contained an average of 7.09E+00 wt % total uranium (n = 3; st.dev. = 8.31E-01 wt %) with a U-235 enrichment of 5.80E-01 % (n = 3; st.dev. = 3.96E-02 %). The measured U-238 concentration was 7.05E+00 wt % (n=3, st. dev. = 8.25E-01 wt %). Analyses results for Pu-238 and Pu-239, and Pu-241 are 7.06E-05 {+-} 7.63E-06 wt %, 9.45E-04 {+-} 3.52E-05 wt %, and <2.24E-06 wt %, respectively. These results are provided so that SRR can calculate the equivalent uranium-235 concentrations for the NCSA. Because this 2H evaporator pot bottom scale sample contained a significant amount of elemental mercury (11.7 wt % average), it is recommended that analysis for mercury be included in future Technical Task Requests on 2H evaporator sample analysis at SRNL. Results confirm that the uranium contained in the scale remains depleted with respect to natural uranium. SRNL did not calculate an equivalent U-235 enrichment, which takes into account other fissionable isotopes U-233, Pu-239 and Pu-241.

Oji, L. N.

2013-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

235

AFCI-2.0 Library of Neutron Cross Section Covariances  

SciTech Connect

Neutron cross section covariance library has been under development by BNL-LANL collaborative effort over the last three years. The primary purpose of the library is to provide covariances for the Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative (AFCI) data adjustment project, which is focusing on the needs of fast advanced burner reactors. The covariances refer to central values given in the 2006 release of the U.S. neutron evaluated library ENDF/B-VII. The preliminary version (AFCI-2.0beta) has been completed in October 2010 and made available to the users for comments. In the final 2.0 release, covariances for a few materials were updated, in particular new LANL evaluations for {sup 238,240}Pu and {sup 241}Am were adopted. BNL was responsible for covariances for structural materials and fission products, management of the library and coordination of the work, while LANL was in charge of covariances for light nuclei and for actinides.

Herman, M.; Herman,M.; Oblozinsky,P.; Mattoon,C.; Pigni,M.; Hoblit,S.; Mughabghab,S.F.; Sonzogni,A.; Talou,P.; Chadwick,M.B.; Hale.G.M.; Kahler,A.C.; Kawano,T.; Little,R.C.; Young,P.G.

2011-06-26T23:59:59.000Z

236

2 VARIABILITY OF ENVIRONMENTAL RADIOACTIVITY AND RADIATION  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......Doctor (1985) 241Am Grassland, Rocky Flats, Colorado, USA 104 0.13-1...1992) 239,240Pu Grassland, Rocky Flats, Colorado 104 0.25-1.38...densities in soil samples near Rocky Flats, Colorado, USA, varied from......

2 VARIABILITY OF ENVIRONMENTAL RADIOACTIVITY AND RADIATION

2006-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

237

RussiaLLNL2-web.indd  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

perform numerical quantum mechanical studies of perform numerical quantum mechanical studies of material properties of selected actinides at or near ambient pressure (~1 atmosphere) and with temperatures in the range of T = 0 K to near room temperature (T = 300 K) to better understand the nature of highly correlated electron systems. This project included a study of Np, including equilibrium geometry, total and partial density of states, magnetic moments, and diff erential with respect to energy magnetic moments. In addition, it provided comparison of the magnetic and electronic properties in the row U-Np-Pu-Am-Cm. Calculations of the total and partial density of states, and of the magnetic structure for Pu 3 Al, Pu 3 Ga and Pu 3 In were performed. In addition, the formation energies for non-spin-polarized and spin-polarized cases were evaluated.

238

Examining 239Pu and 240Pu Nuclear Resonance Fluorescence Measurements on Spent Fuel for Nuclear Safeguards  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

on Spent Fuel for Nuclear Safeguards Brian J. Quiter, ?resonances on nuclear safeguards measurements will be

Quiter, Brian

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

239

Compared performances of ENDF/B-VI and JEF-2.2 for MOX core physics  

SciTech Connect

The United States is currently evaluating the use of mixed-oxide (MOX) fuel in commercial light water reactors for reducing weapons-grade Pu stockpiles. The design and licensing processes will require that the validity of the nuclear data libraries and codes used in the effort be demonstrated. Unfortunately, there are only a very limited number of relatively old and nonrepresentative integral experiments freely available to the US programs. This lack of adequate experimental data can be partially remediated by comparing the results of well-validated European codes with the results of candidate US codes. The authors have compared the performances of the JEF-2.2 and ENDF/B-VI.4 libraries for a series of benchmarks for k{sub eff}, void worth, and pin power distributions. Note that JEF-2.2 has been extensively validated for MOX applications. To obtain systematic comparisons between JEF-2.2 and ENDF/B-VI results, the two libraries were implemented with the same processing code options in two independent code systems: (1) VIM, a continuous-energy Monte Carlo code developed at Argonne National Laboratory, with its own processing codes independent of NJOY; and (2) DRAGON, a two-dimensional lattice code developed at Ecole Polytechnique de Montreal. A standard 172-energy-group structure was used in the NJOY processing code.

Finck, P.J.; Laurin-Kovitz, K.; Palmiotti, G.; Stenberg, C. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)

1998-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

240

Microsoft Word - NEAC Meeting Agenda for June 9th v2.DOC  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Renoir Room, 2 Renoir Room, 2 nd Floor Washington, D.C. 20024 June 9, 2009 8:30 a.m. Continental Breakfast NEAC members 9:00 a.m. Welcome and Opening Remarks Chairman Bill Martin and Shane Johnson, Acting Assistant Secretary NE 9:15 a.m. Under Secretary Kristina Johnson 9:35 a.m. NE's FY 2009 Budget and FY 2010 Shane Johnson Budget Request 10:30 a.m. Break 10:45 a.m. University Programs Marsha Lambregts and John Gilligan (INL) 11:45 a.m. Lunch Degas Room 12:45 p.m. Advanced Nuclear Transformation Burton Richter Technology report for approval 1:15 p.m. Pu-238 report John Ahearne, Mike Corridini, and Alice Caponiti 2:00 p.m. ATR Management Assistance Dennis Miotla, Deputy Assist. Secretary, NE Subcommittee

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "2 glenwood pu" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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241

Compared performances of ENDF/B-VI and JEF-2.2 for MOX core physics.  

SciTech Connect

The US is currently evaluating the use of MOX fuel in commercial LWR's for reducing weapons grade Pu stockpiles. The design and licensing processes will require that the validity of the nuclear data libraries and codes used in the effort be demonstrated. Unfortunately, there are only a very limited number of relatively old and non representative integral experiments' freely available to the US programs. This lack of adequate experimental data can be partially remediated by comparing the results of well validated European codes with the results of candidate US codes. The demonstration can actually be divided in two components: a code to code (Monte Carlo) comparison can easily demonstrate the validity and limits of the proposed algorithms; and the performances of nuclear data libraries should be compared, major trends should be observed, and their origins should be explained in terms of differences in evaluated nuclear data; In this paper, we have compared the performances of the JEF-2.2 and ENDF/B-VI.4 libraries for a series of benchmarks for k{sub eff}, void worth, and pin power distributions. Note that JEF-2.2 has been extensively validated for MOX applications.

Finck, P. J.

1998-07-08T23:59:59.000Z

242

Criticality Calculations for Step?2 GPHS Modules  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The Multi?Mission Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generator (MMRTG) will use an improved version of the General Purpose Heat Source (GPHS) module as its source of thermal power. This new version referred to as the Step?2 GPHS Module has additional and thicker layers of carbon fiber material (Fine Weaved Pierced Fabric) for increased strength over the original GPHS module. The GPHS uses alpha decay of 238 Pu in the oxide form as the primary source of heat and small amounts of other actinides are also present in the oxide fuel. Criticality calculations have been performed by previous researchers on the original version of the GPHS module (Step 0). This paper presents criticality calculations for the present Step?2 version. The Monte Carlo N?Particle eXtended code (MCNPX) was used for these calculations. Numerous configurations of GPHS module arrays surrounded by wet sand and other materials (to reflect the neutrons back into the stack with minimal absorption) were modeled. For geometries with eight GPHS modules (from a single MMRTG) surrounded by wet sand the configuration is extremely sub?critical; k eff is about 0.3. It requires about 1000 GPHS modules (from 125 MMRTGs) in a close?spaced stack to approach criticality ( k eff ?=?1.0) when surrounded by wet sand. The effect of beryllium in the MMRTG was found to be relatively small.

Ronald J. Lipinski; Danielle L. Hensen

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

243

Criticality Calculations for Step-2 GPHS Modules  

SciTech Connect

The Multi-Mission Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generator (MMRTG) will use an improved version of the General Purpose Heat Source (GPHS) module as its source of thermal power. This new version, referred to as the Step-2 GPHS Module, has additional and thicker layers of carbon fiber material (Fine Weaved Pierced Fabric) for increased strength over the original GPHS module. The GPHS uses alpha decay of {sup 238}Pu in the oxide form as the primary source of heat, and small amounts of other actinides are also present in the oxide fuel. Criticality calculations have been performed by previous researchers on the original version of the GPHS module (Step 0). This paper presents criticality calculations for the present Step-2 version. The Monte Carlo N-Particle eXtended code (MCNPX) was used for these calculations. Numerous configurations of GPHS module arrays surrounded by wet sand and other materials (to reflect the neutrons back into the stack with minimal absorption) were modeled. For geometries with eight GPHS modules (from a single MMRTG) surrounded by wet sand, the configuration is extremely sub-critical; k{sub eff} is about 0.3. It requires about 1000 GPHS modules (from 125 MMRTGs) in a close-spaced stack to approach criticality (k{sub eff} = 1.0) when surrounded by wet sand. The effect of beryllium in the MMRTG was found to be relatively small.

Lipinski, Ronald J. [Advanced Nuclear Concepts Department, Sandia National Laboratories, P.O Box 5800, Albuquerque, NM 87185 (United States); Hensen, Danielle L. [Risk and Reliability Department Sandia National Laboratories, P.O Box 5800, Albuquerque, NM 87185 (United States)

2008-01-21T23:59:59.000Z

244

Criticality calculations for Step-2 GPHS modules.  

SciTech Connect

The Multi-Mission Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generator (MMRTG) will use an improved version of the General Purpose Heat Source (GPHS) module as its source of thermal power. This new version, referred to as the Step-2 GPHS Module, has additional and thicker layers of carbon fiber material (Fine Weaved Pierced Fabric) for increased strength over the original GPHS module. The GPHS uses alpha decay of {sup 238}Pu in the oxide form as the primary source of heat, and small amounts of other actinides are also present in the oxide fuel. Criticality calculations have been performed by previous researchers on the original version of the GPHS module (Step 0). This paper presents criticality calculations for the present Step-2 version. The Monte Carlo N-Particle eXtended code (MCNPX) was used for these calculations. Numerous configurations of GPHS module arrays surrounded by wet sand and other materials (to reflect the neutrons back into the stack with minimal absorption) were modeled. For geometries with eight GPHS modules (from a single MMRTG) surrounded by wet sand, the configuration is extremely sub-critical; k{sub eff} is about 0.3. It requires about 1000 GPHS modules (from 125 MMRTGs) in a close-spaced stack to approach criticality (k{sub eff} = 1.0) when surrounded by wet sand. The effect of beryllium in the MMRTG was found to be relatively small.

Hensen, Danielle Lynn; Lipinski, Ronald J.

2007-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

245

Microsoft PowerPoint - IPRC_2012_Rappleye  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Method Method for Determining Deposition Rates in an Electrorefiner Using Electrode Potentials D. S. Rappleye, M. S. Yim, R. M. Cumberland 2012 International Pyroprocessing Research Conference August 26 - 29, 2012 Fontana, WI Objective * Determine species deposition rates at the cathode - Product optimization - Safeguards * Selected measures: - Electrode potentials - Cell current 8/28/2012 2 Background * "Normal" operating condition - Only uranium U U U U Zr Zr U U U U U U U U U Pu Pu 8/28/2012 3 Background * Two "abnormal" scenarios - Zirconium co-deposition U Zr Zr U U U U U U U U U Pu Pu 8/28/2012 4 Background * Two "abnormal" scenarios - Plutonium co-deposition Pu Pu U Pu U U U U Pu U U U U Pu Pu 8/28/2012 5 Theory * Notation and Symbols 8/28/2012 6 electrode area electrode potential Faraday's constant current i current density c mass transfer coefficient n electrons

246

Microsoft PowerPoint - 2_Thursday 5-23 9 NMMSS_2013_Obligations...  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Communications DOEFAC1 ANSTO-999-11 AUSFAC1, KoalaTown, Australia DOEFAC1, Intheboonies, AL DOE LEU, PU 75,000g U (3,000g U235), 5,000g PU NONE 11101, 11102, 11103 Obligations Case...

247

nature CHeMICaL BIOLOGY | vol 8 | december 2012 | www.nature.com/naturechemicalbiology 969 puBLIsHed OnLIne: 28 OCtOBer 2012 | dOI: 10.1038/nCHeMBIO.1108  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

an SN2-type direct displacement catalytic mechanism (reviewed in ref. 6), which is believed to require or retaining) of the reactions they catalyze5 . OGT is a metal-independent enzyme that uses the nucleotide than 1,000 acceptor proteins in the human cell. The reaction proceeds with inversion of stereochemistry

van Aalten, Daan

248

Investigation on the coprecipitation of transuranium elements from alkaline solutions by the method of appearing reagents. Study of the effects of waste components on decontamination from Np(IV) and Pu(IV)  

SciTech Connect

The third stage of the study on the homogeneous coprecipitation of neptunium and plutonium from alkaline high-level radioactive waste solutions by the Method of Appearing Reagents has been completed. Alkaline radioactive wastes exist at the U.S. Department of Energy Hanford Site. The recent studies investigated the effects of neptunium chemical reductants, plutonium(IV) concentration, and the presence of bulk tank waste solution components on the decontamination from tetravalent neptunium and plutonium achieved by homogeneous coprecipitation. Data on neptunium reduction to its tetravalent state in alkaline solution of different NaOH concentrations are given. Eleven reductants were tested to find those most suited to remove neptunium, through chemical reduction, from alkaline solution by homogeneous coprecipitation. Hydrazine, VOSO{sub 4}, and Na{sub 2}S{sub 2}O{sub 4} were found to be the most effective reductants. The rates of reduction with these reductants were comparable with the kinetics of carrier formation. Solution decontamination factors of about 400 were attained for 10{sup -6}M neptunium. Coprecipitation of plutonium(IV) with carriers obtained as products of thermal hydrolysis, redox transformations, and catalytic decomposition of [Co(NH{sub 3}){sub 6}]{sup 3+}, [Fe(CN){sub 5}NO]{sup 2-}, Cr(NO{sub 3}){sub 3}, KMnO{sub 4}, and Li{sub 4}UO{sub 2}(O{sub 2}){sub 3} was studied and results are described. Under optimum conditions, a 100-fold decrease of plutonium concentration was possible with each of these reagents.

Bessonov, A.A.; Budantseva, N.A.; Gelis, A.V.; Nikonov, M.V.; Shilov, V.P. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow (Russian Federation). Institute of Physical Chemistry

1997-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

249

Reflection Coefficient of Sine-Gordon Systems: Application to Josephson Junctions  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......Klein-Gordon type equation, 520 }Jro~ress lSetters Vol. 87, No.2 ;Pu ;Pu (;Pu) at2 - ax2 +u= Q(x) C1 ax2- C2U . (2) The solutions of Eq.(2) have the harmonic form exp(i(kx-wkt , where the frequencies Wk obey the dispersion......

Hikaru Yamamoto

1992-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

250

NEUTRONINDUCED FISSION CROSS SECTIONS OF 232 Th, 233 U, 238 U, 237 Np, 239 Pu, nat Pb AND 209 Bi RELATIVE TO 235 U IN THE ENERGY RANGE 1--200 MeV  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. A water­cooled lead target situated inside the vacuum chamber of the accelerator is used as a pulsed, Russia 2 Nuclear Data Center/JAERI, Tokai­mura, Naka­gun, Ibaraki­ken, 319-1195, Japan 3 Radiation for actinides above 20 MeV, the most important are accelerator­driven transmutation of waste reactor materials

Titov, Anatoly

251

Preliminary Neutronic Study of D2O-cooled High Conversion PWRs  

SciTech Connect

This paper presents a preliminary neutronics analysis of tight-pitch D2O-cooled high-conversion PWRs loaded with MOX fuel aiming at high Pu conversion and negative void coefficient. SCALE6.1 has been exclusively utilized for this study. The analyses are performed in two separate parts. The first part of this paper investigates the performance of axial and internal blankets and seeks break-even or near-breeder core even without the presence of radial blankets. The second part of this paper performs sensitivity and uncertainty analyses of integral parameters (keff and void coefficient) for selected systems in order to analyze the characters of this high-conversion PWR from different aspects.

Hikaru Hiruta; Gilles Youinou

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

252

Ion exchange separation of plutonium and gallium (1) resource and inventory requirements, (2) waste, emissions, and effluent, and (3) facility size  

SciTech Connect

The following report summarizes an effort intended to estimate within an order-of-magnitude the (1) resource and inventory requirements, (2) waste, emissions, and effluent amounts, and (3) facility size, for ion exchange (IX) separation of plutonium and gallium. This analysis is based upon processing 3.5 MT-Pu/yr. The technical basis for this summary is detailed in a separate document, {open_quotes}Preconceptual Design for Separation of Plutonium and Gallium by Ion Exchange{close_quotes}. The material balances of this separate document are based strictly on stoichiometric amounts rather than details of actual operating experience, in order to avoid classification as Unclassified Controlled Nuclear Information. This approximation neglets the thermodynamics and kinetics which can significantly impact the amount of reagents required. Consequently, the material resource requirements and waste amounts presented here would normally be considered minimums for processing 3.5 MT-Pu/yr; however, the author has compared the inventory estimates presented with that of an actual operating facility and found them similar. Additionally, the facility floor space presented here is based upon actual plutonium processing systems and can be considered a nominal estimate.

DeMuth, S.

1997-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

253

HB-LINE ANION EXCHANGE PURIFICATION OF AFS-2 PLUTONIUM FOR MOX  

SciTech Connect

Non-radioactive cerium (Ce) and radioactive plutonium (Pu) anion exchange column experiments using scaled HB-Line designs were performed to investigate the feasibility of using either gadolinium nitrate (Gd) or boric acid (B as H{sub 3}BO{sub 3}) as a neutron poison in the H-Canyon dissolution process. Expected typical concentrations of probable impurities were tested and the removal of these impurities by a decontamination wash was measured. Impurity concentrations are compared to two specifications - designated as Column A or Column B (most restrictive) - proposed for plutonium oxide (PuO{sub 2}) product shipped to the Mixed Oxide (MOX) Fuel Fabrication Facility (MFFF). Use of Gd as a neutron poison requires a larger volume of wash for the proposed Column A specification. Since boron (B) has a higher proposed specification and is more easily removed by washing, it appears to be the better candidate for use in the H-Canyon dissolution process. Some difficulty was observed in achieving the Column A specification due to the limited effectiveness that the wash step has in removing the residual B after ~4 BV's wash. However a combination of the experimental 10 BV's wash results and a calculated DF from the oxalate precipitation process yields an overall DF sufficient to meet the Column A specification. For those impurities (other than B) not removed by 10 BV's of wash, the impurity is either not expected to be present in the feedstock or process, or recommendations have been provided for improvement in the analytical detection/method or validation of calculated results. In summary, boron is recommended as the appropriate neutron poison for H-Canyon dissolution and impurities are expected to meet the Column A specification limits for oxide production in HB-Line.

Kyser, E. A.; King, W. D.

2012-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

254

HB-LINE ANION EXCHANGE PURIFICATION OF AFS-2 PLUTONIUM FOR MOX  

SciTech Connect

Non-radioactive cerium (Ce) and radioactive plutonium (Pu) anion exchange column experiments using scaled HB-Line designs were performed to investigate the feasibility of using either gadolinium nitrate (Gd) or boric acid (B as H{sub 3}BO{sub 3}) as a neutron poison in the H-Canyon dissolution process. Expected typical concentrations of probable impurities were tested and the removal of these impurities by a decontamination wash was measured. Impurity concentrations are compared to two specifications - designated as Column A or Column B (most restrictive) - proposed for plutonium oxide (PuO{sub 2}) product shipped to the Mixed Oxide (MOX) Fuel Fabrication Facility (MFFF). Use of Gd as a neutron poison requires a larger volume of wash for the proposed Column A specification. Since boron (B) has a higher proposed specification and is more easily removed by washing, it appears to be the better candidate for use in the H-Canyon dissolution process. Some difficulty was observed in achieving the Column A specification due to the limited effectiveness that the wash step has in removing the residual B after {approx}4 BV's wash. However a combination of the experimental 10 BV's wash results and a calculated DF from the oxalate precipitation process yields an overall DF sufficient to meet the Column A specification. For those impurities (other than B) not removed by 10 BV's of wash, the impurity is either not expected to be present in the feedstock or process, or recommendations have been provided for improvement in the analytical detection/method or validation of calculated results. In summary, boron is recommended as the appropriate neutron poison for H-Canyon dissolution and impurities are expected to meet the Column A specification limits for oxide production in HB-Line.

Kyser, E.; King, W.

2012-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

255

Characterization of the C1 and C2 waste tanks located in the BVEST system at ORNL  

SciTech Connect

There was a major effort to sample and analyze the Active Liquid Low-Level Waste (LLLW) tanks at ORNL which include the Melton Valley Storage Tanks (MVST) and the Bethel Valley Evaporator Service Tanks (BVEST). The characterization data summarized in this report was needed to address waste processing options, address concerns dealing with the performance assessment (PA) data for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP), evaluate the waste characteristics with respect to the waste acceptance criteria (WAC) for WIPP and Nevada Test Site (NTS), address criticality concerns, and meet DOT requirements for transporting the waste. This report discusses the analytical characterization data for the supernatant and sludge in the BVEST waste tanks C-1 and C-2. The isotopic data presented in this report supports the position that fissile isotopes of uranium ({sup 233}U and {sup 235}U) and plutonium ({sup 239}Pu and {sup 241}Pu) were denatured as required by the administrative controls stated in the ORNL LLLW waste acceptance criteria (WAC). In general, the sludge in tanks C1 and C2 was found to be hazardous based on RCRA characteristics and the transuranic alpha activity was well above the 100 nCi/g limit for TRU waste. Additional characteristics of the C1 and C2 sludge inventory relative to the WIPP WAC limits for fissile gram equivalent, plutonium equivalent activity, and thermal power from decay heat were estimated from the data in this report and found to be far below the upper boundary for any of the remote-handled transuranic waste (RH-TRU) requirements for disposal of the waste in WIPP.

Keller, J.M.; Giaquinto, J.M.

1998-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

256

Plutonium Oxidation and Subsequent Reduction by Mn (IV) Minerals  

SciTech Connect

Plutonium sorbed to rock tuff was preferentially associated with manganese oxides. On tuff and synthetic pyrolusite (Mn{sup IV}O{sub 2}), Pu(IV) or Pu(V) was initially oxidized, but over time Pu(IV) became the predominant oxidation state of sorbed Pu. Reduction of Pu(V/VI), even on non-oxidizing surfaces, is proposed to result from a lower Gibbs free energy of the hydrolyzed Pu(IV) surface species versus that of the Pu(V) or Pu(VI) surface species. This work suggests that despite initial oxidation of sorbed Pu by oxidizing surfaces to more soluble forms, the less mobile form of Pu, Pu(IV), will dominate Pu solid phase speciation during long term geologic storage. The safe design of a radioactive waste or spent nuclear fuel geologic repository requires a risk assessment of radionuclides that may potentially be released into the surrounding environment. Geochemical knowledge of the radionuclide and the surrounding environment is required for predicting subsurface fate and transport. Although difficult even in simple systems, this task grows increasingly complicated for constituents, like Pu, that exhibit complex environmental chemistries. The environmental behavior of Pu can be influenced by complexation, precipitation, adsorption, colloid formation, and oxidation/reduction (redox) reactions (1-3). To predict the environmental mobility of Pu, the most important of these factors is Pu oxidation state. This is because Pu(IV) is generally 2 to 3 orders of magnitude less mobile than Pu(V) in most environments (4). Further complicating matters, Pu commonly exists simultaneously in several oxidation states (5, 6). Choppin (7) reported Pu may exist as Pu(IV), Pu(V), or Pu(VI) oxic natural groundwaters. It is generally accepted that plutonium associated with suspended particulate matter is predominantly Pu(IV) (8-10), whereas Pu in the aqueous phase is predominantly Pu(V) (2, 11-13). The influence of the character of Mn-containing minerals expected to be found in subsurface repository environments on Pu oxidation state distributions has been the subject of much recent research. Kenney-Kennicutt and Morse (14), Duff et al. (15), and Morgenstern and Choppin (16) observed oxidation of Pu facilitated by Mn(IV)-bearing minerals. Conversely, Shaughnessy et al. (17) used X-ray Absorption near-edge spectroscopy (XANES) to show reduction of Pu(VI) by hausmannite (Mn{sup II}Mn{sub 2}{sup III}O{sub 4}) and manganite ({gamma}-Mn{sup III}OOH) and Kersting et al., (18) observed reduction of Pu(VI) by pyrolusite (Mn{sup IV}O{sub 2}). In this paper, we attempt to reconcile the apparently conflicting datasets by showing that Mn-bearing minerals can indeed oxidize Pu, however, if the oxidized species remains on the solid phase, the oxidation step competes with the formation of Pu(IV) that becomes the predominant solid phase Pu species with time. The experimental approach we took was to conduct longer term (approximately two years later) oxidation state analyses on the Pu sorbed to Yucca Mountain tuff (initial analysis reported by Duff et al., (15)) and measure the time-dependant changes in the oxidation state distribution of Pu in the presence of the Mn mineral pyrolusite.

KAPLAN, DANIEL

2005-09-13T23:59:59.000Z

257

NR Pu SEIS Advisory 07152010 _final_.doc  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

SRS: Jim Giusti, (803) 952-7697 Thursday, July 15, 2010 SRS: Jim Giusti, (803) 952-7697 Thursday, July 15, 2010 james-r.giusti@srs.gov CBO: Deb Gill, (575) 234-7270 deg.gill@wipp.ws TVA: Terry Johnson, (423) 751-6875 twjohnson@tva.gov DOE Announces Modification of Supplemental Environmental Study on Plutonium Disposition WASHINGTON, DC -- The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) National Nuclear Security Administration is announcing its intent to modify the scope of the ongoing Surplus Plutonium

258

Low power DIPS design for NASA missions. [Pu 238  

SciTech Connect

Conceptual designs of low power dynamic isotope power systems (DIPS) for NASA's future deep space missions are being developed to characterize the power system's unique features in the 0.5--1.0 kilowatt-electric (kWe) range. The August 1990 Mariner Mark II spacecraft design was used for the spacecraft integration study. One basic design with slight mission specific variations was developed for the Cassini, Comet Nucleus Sample Return, and Outer Planet Orbiter Probe missions. A low power DIPS flight unit offers comparable specific power values to the MOD-RTG unit with a factor-of-three improvement in radioisotope fuel requirements. This was accomplished by fully exploiting the dynamic power conversion technology available in the DIPS program.

Johnson, R.A.; Determan, W. (Rockwell International, Rocketdyne Division, 6633 Canoga Avenue, Canoga Park, CA (USA)); Shirbacheh, M. (Jet Propulsion Laboratory, 4800 Oak Grove Drive, Pasadena, CA (USA))

1991-01-05T23:59:59.000Z

259

Photochemical oxidation of oxalate in Pu-238 process streams  

SciTech Connect

For over forty years, NASA has relied on plutonium-238 in Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generator (RTG) units and Radioisotope Heater Units ( W s ) to provide power and heat for many space missions including Transit, Pioneer, Viking, Voyager, Galileo, Ulysses and Cassini. RHUs provide heat to keep key components warm in extremely cold environments found on planets, moons, or in deep space. RTGs convert heat generated from the radioactive decay of plutonium-238 into electricity using a themocouple, Plutonium-238 has proven to be an excellent heat source far deep space missions because of its high thermal power density, useful lifetime, minimal shielding requirements, and oxide stability.

Long, K. M. (Kristy M.); Ford, D. K. (Doris K.); Trujillo, L. A. (Leonardo A.)

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

260

CONTAINMENT EVALUATION OF PU-METAL TRANSPORT USING MULTIPLE BARRIERS  

SciTech Connect

A methodology was developed previously by SRNL to show that Al-SNF with cladding breaches can be directly transported in standard casks and maintained within the allowable release rates. This novel approach may be extended to other nuclear material systems. Utilizing an adaptation to the methodology, a containment analysis has been performed for the scenario of non-routine transfer of a damaged 9975 package containing plutonium metal from K-area monitored storage to F-area on the Savannah River Site. A multiple barrier system with each barrier having a defined leakage rate of less than 1 x 10{sup -3} cm{sup 3}/sec of air at Standard Temperature and Pressure was analyzed to determine the number of barriers needed to transport the package under normal transportation conditions to meet transportation requirements for containment. The barrier system was analyzed parametrically to achieve a composite system that met the federal requirements for the maximum permissible release rate. The multiple barrier system acts to retard the release of radioactivity. That is, a build-up in the radioactivity release rate occurs with time. For example, a system with three barriers (e.g., sealed plastic barrier) with a total free volume of 4,500 cm{sup 3} could be transported for a total time of up to approximately 10 days with a release rate within the permissible rate. Additional number of barriers, or volume of the barriers, or both, would extend to this period of time. For example, a system with seven barriers with a total free volume of 4,500 cm{sup 3} could be transported for up to 100 days. Plastic bags are one type of barrier used in movement of radioactive materials and capable of achieving a leak rate of 1 x 10{sup -3} cm{sup 3}/sec of air at STP. Low-density polyethylene bags can withstand high temperature (up to 180 C); a barrier thickness of 10 mils should be suitable for the barrier system.

Vinson, D.

2011-07-18T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "2 glenwood pu" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Dynamic Restructuring of Transactions Gail E. Kaiser and Calton Pu  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

or aborted independently of the others. Join­transaction merges two or more transactions transaction, and all their work is now committed or aborted together. Split­transaction is useful­ action atomicity properties. Uncertain duration results in long transactions 1 with two specific problems

262

RADIATION-INDUCED DECOMPOSITION OF U(VI) ALTERATION PHASES OF UO2  

SciTech Connect

U{sup 6+}-phases are common alteration products of spent nuclear fuel under oxidizing conditions, and they may potentially incorporate actinides, such as long-lived {sup 239}Pu and {sup 237}Np, delaying their transport to the biosphere. In order to evaluate the ballistic effects of {alpha}-decay events on the stability of the U{sup 6+}-phases, we report, for the first time, the results of ion beam irradiations (1.0 MeV Kr{sup 2+}) for six different structures of U{sup 6+}-phases: uranophane, kasolite, boltwoodite, saleeite, carnotite, and liebigite. The target uranyl-minerals were characterized by powder X-ray diffraction and identification confirmed by SAED (selected area electron diffraction) in TEM (transmission electron microscopy). The TEM observation revealed no initial contamination of uraninite in these U{sup 6+} phases. All of the samples were irradiated with in situ TEM observation using 1.0 MeV Kr{sup 2+} in the IVEM (intermediate-voltage electron microscope) at the IVEM-Tandem Facility of Argonne National Laboratory. The ion flux was 6.3 x 10{sup 11} ions/cm{sup 2}/sec. The specimen temperatures during irradiation were 298 and 673 K, respectively. The Kr{sup 2+}-irradiation decomposed the U{sup 6+}-phases to nanocrystals of UO{sub 2} at doses as low as 0.006 dpa. The cumulative doses for the pure U{sup 6+}-phases, e.g., uranophane, at 0.1 and 1 million years (m.y.) are calculated to be 0.009 and 0.09 dpa using SRIM2003. However, with the incorporation of 1 wt.% {sup 239}Pu, the calculated doses reach 0.27 and {approx}1.00 dpa in ten thousand and one hundred thousand years, respectively. Under oxidizing conditions, multiple cycles of radiation-induced decomposition to UO{sub 2} followed by alteration to U{sup 6+}-phases should be further investigated to determine the fate of trace elements that may have been incorporated in the U{sup 6+}-phases.

S. Utsunomiya; R.C. Ewing

2005-09-08T23:59:59.000Z

263

BEAMLINE 2-2  

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2 2 CURRENT STATUS: Open with limited support SUPPORTED TECHNIQUES: White light station MAIN SCIENTIFIC DISCIPLINES: X-ray optics characterization and development % TIME GENERAL USE: 100% SCHEDULING: Proposal Submittal and Scheduling Procedures Current SPEAR and Beam Line Schedules SOURCE: Bend Magnet Side Station BEAM LINE SPECIFICATIONS: energy range resolution DE/E spot size flux angular acceptance unfocused 1000-40000 eV NA 4.0 x 8.0 mm NA 0.4 mrad OPTICS: None MONOCHROMATOR: None (white beam) ABSORPTION: 673 microns Be, 12.4 meters He, 15.2 microns C INSTRUMENTATION: X-Y stages, ion chambers, PMT DATA ACQUISITION AND ANALYSIS: SPEC For questions and issues related to SPEC, contact beam line staff or send an email to M$SPEC@ssrl.slac.stanford.edu SUPER

264

(1) a2 = b2 + c2 ?2bccos? (2)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

At 2:00 PM, a ship leaves port and travels N40E at the rate of 30 mph. Another ship leaves the same port at 3:00 PM, and travels N75W at the rate of 20 mph.

charlotb

2010-07-02T23:59:59.000Z

265

Appendix 2  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Errors of steps 1, 5, 10: 0.0052, 0.0382, 0.1245, approximately. 19. (error 0.0093), ... y0ekt ? 2y0, ek ? 2 (1 week), e2k ? 22 (2 weeks), e4k ? 24 y ? x arctan (x3...

266

Monte Carlo analysis of burnup-dependent plutonium concentration profiles in UO{sub 2} and MOX fuel pins  

SciTech Connect

The ability to accurately predict fuel performance is an essential requirement for fuel design studies. Prediction of plutonium concentration profiles in an irradiated fuel pin is important for fuel performance analysis and spent-fuel storage. The MCNP coupling with ORIGEN2 (MCWO) burnup calculation code as demonstrated in this paper can analyze the rim effect in UO{sub 2} and mixed-oxide (MOX) fuel pins. Acceptance of a code such as MCWO depends very strongly on its validation. Validation involves the benchmark of the code predictions to the in-pile experimental data and results of post-irradiation examinations (PIEs). In this paper, a validation was made by comparing the MCWO calculated results with the VIM-BURN code, which has been validated against PIE data. The validated MCWO can provide the best-estimate neutronic characteristics of fuel burnup performance analysis. In this paper, Pu concentration (wt%) and fission power profiles versus burnup of UO{sub 2} and reactor-grade (RG)-MOX fuel pins were calculated with MCWO, and results are discussed.

Chang, G.S. [Lockheed Martin Idaho Technologies, Idaho Falls, ID (United States). Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Lab.

1998-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

267

Adaptive excitation control in power systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

control input pu? and output gE? , we have puBxAx ?+?=? ? (2.25) xig ? (2.26) where ?? ? ?? ? ?== 6667 2 rJA , ?? ? ?? ?= 67 0 iB , [ ]08213.1=C 32....38) or puBxAx ?+?=? ? (2.39) xip ? (2.40) where p is a measurable output and iii C are uncertain system parameters. In the Chapter IV, we apply our adaptive control approaches to the real DAE system. We...

Chiu, Pei-Chen

2006-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

268

Plutonium partitioning in uranium and plutonium co-recovery system for fast reactor fuel recycling with enhanced nuclear proliferation resistance  

SciTech Connect

For enhancement of nuclear proliferation resistance, a 'co-processing' method for U and Pu co-recovery was studied. Two concepts, no U scrubbing and no Pu reduction partitioning, were employed to formulate two types of flow sheets by using a calculation code. Their process performance was demonstrated using radioactive solutions derived from an irradiated fast reactor fuel. These experimental results indicated that U and Pu were co-recovered in the U/Pu product, and the Pu content in the U/Pu product increased approximately 2.3 times regardless of using reductant. The proposed no U scrubbing and no Pu reductant flow sheet is applicable to fast reactor fuel reprocessing and enhances its resistance to nuclear proliferation. (authors)

Nakahara, Masaumi; Koma, Yoshikazu; Nakajima, Yasuo [Japan Atomic Energy Agency: 4-33 Muramatsu, Naka-gun, Tokai-mura, Ibaraki 319-1194 (Japan)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

269

The Application of an Alpha Autoradiographic Technique for Determination of Boron-10 Concentrations in a Study of Intratumoral Injection of BSH and CBU-2  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The accurate measurement of 10B distributions in biological samples with a sensitivity in the ppm range is essential for evaluating the potential usefulness of various boron-containing compounds for BNCT1. The pu...

Yirun Jiang; Sherry Ng; Thomas E. Blue; Joan Rotaru

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

270

New bifunctional anion-exchange resins for nuclear waste treatment: Part 2  

SciTech Connect

Additional bifunctional anion-exchange resins have been designed, synthesized and evaluated for their ability to take up Pu(IV) from nitric acid solutions. Bifunctionality is achieved by adding a second anion-exchange site to the pyridine nitrogen (also an anion-exchange site) of the base poly(4-vinylpyridine) resin. Previous work focused on the effect of varying the chemical properties of the added site along with the length of an alkylene spacer between the two sites. Here the authors examine four new 3- and 4-picolyl derivatives which maintain more rigidly defined geometries between the two nitrogen cationic sites. These materials, which have the two anion-exchange sites separated by three and four carbons, respectively, exhibit lower overall Pu(IV) distribution coefficients than the corresponding N-alkylenepyridium derivatives with more flexible spacers. Methylation of the second pyridium site results in a ca. 20% increase in the Pu(IV) distribution coefficients.

Marsh, S.F.; Jarvinen, G.D.; Barr, M.E. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Bartsch, R.A. [Texas Tech Univ., Lubbock, TX (United States). Dept. of Chemistry and Biochemistry

1997-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

271

() 2 () 3  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

RNF8 HR DNA DNA PARP-BRCA synthetic lethality PARP DNA HR BRCA1 BRCA2 HR PARP;3 DNA 4 DNA DNA DNA DNA DNA DNA DNA NHEJ DNA DNA HR 2 DNA DNA DNA topic DNA DNA DNA DNA DNA DNA DNA ATM - 2007 ATM DNA E3 RNF8 Lys 63-linked

Takada, Shoji

272

Assignment 2  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

(See Figure 2 and the following chart, where the results of other stretching ... For instance, in order to get the graph of y = 2 cos x we multiply the y-coordinate of each ..... the average brightness (or magnitude) of the star is 4.0, and its brightness...

273

ch_2  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

10 10 Background 2.2 High-Level Waste Overview 2.2.1 HIGH-LEVEL WASTE DESCRIPTION According to Section 2(12) of the Nuclear Waste Policy Act (42 USC 10101), high-level radioac- tive waste means: In July 1999, DOE issued Order 435.1 Radioactive Waste Management. This Order and its associated Manual and Guidance set forth the authorities, responsibilities, and requirements for the management of DOE's inventory of HLW, transuranic waste, and low-level waste. Specific to HLW, DOE uses the Nuclear Waste Policy Act definition but has jurisdictional authority consistent with existing law to deter- mine if the waste requires permanent isolation as the appropriate disposal mechanism. This authority is based on enabling legislation in the Atomic Energy Act, sections 202(3) and 202(4)

274

Beamline 12.2.2  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

2.2 2.2 Beamline 12.2.2 Print Tuesday, 20 October 2009 09:31 High-Pressure (California High-Pressure Science Observatory: Calipso) Endstations: Medium pressure High pressure laser heating GENERAL BEAMLINE INFORMATION Operational Yes Proposal cycle Proposals for General Sciences Beamlines (6-month cycle) Source characteristics Superbend magnet, 1.9GeV, 5.29Tesla, 500mA Monochromator Si(111) or Multilayer Energy range 6-40 keV for Si(111), 14-28 keV for Multilayer Resolving power (E/ΔE) Si(111) = 7000, Multilayer =100 Beam size (HxV) Focused: 10 x 10 micron Unfocused: 90 x 100 micron Scientific applications High-pressure science Scientific disciplines Earth sciences, materials science, construction materials, chemistry, energy. Endstations Medium pressure High pressure laser heating

275

Beamline 12.2.2  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Beamline 12.2.2 Beamline 12.2.2 Beamline 12.2.2 Print Tuesday, 20 October 2009 09:31 High-Pressure (California High-Pressure Science Observatory: Calipso) Endstations: Medium pressure High pressure laser heating GENERAL BEAMLINE INFORMATION Operational Yes Proposal cycle Proposals for General Sciences Beamlines (6-month cycle) Source characteristics Superbend magnet, 1.9GeV, 5.29Tesla, 500mA Monochromator Si(111) or Multilayer Energy range 6-40 keV for Si(111), 14-28 keV for Multilayer Resolving power (E/ΔE) Si(111) = 7000, Multilayer =100 Beam size (HxV) Focused: 10 x 10 micron Unfocused: 90 x 100 micron Scientific applications High-pressure science Scientific disciplines Earth sciences, materials science, construction materials, chemistry, energy. Endstations Medium pressure

276

Electronic structure and ionicity of actinide oxides from first principles L. Petit,1,2,* A. Svane,1 Z. Szotek,2 W. M. Temmerman,2 and G. M. Stocks3  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

isotopes through irradiation, thus taking part in the fuel cycle and reducing the long-term nuclear-waste, and Cf. In original, "once through" reactors, the highly radioactive waste that was produced re- sulted in very troublesome long-time storage requirements; particularly of Pu. However, it was soon realized

Svane, Axel Torstein

277

Beamline 12.2.2  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

2.2 Print 2.2 Print High-Pressure (California High-Pressure Science Observatory: Calipso) Endstations: Medium pressure High pressure laser heating GENERAL BEAMLINE INFORMATION Operational Yes Proposal cycle Proposals for General Sciences Beamlines (6-month cycle) Source characteristics Superbend magnet, 1.9GeV, 5.29Tesla, 500mA Monochromator Si(111) or Multilayer Energy range 6-40 keV for Si(111), 14-28 keV for Multilayer Resolving power (E/ΔE) Si(111) = 7000, Multilayer =100 Beam size (HxV) Focused: 10 x 10 micron Unfocused: 90 x 100 micron Scientific applications High-pressure science Scientific disciplines Earth sciences, materials science, construction materials, chemistry, energy. Endstations Medium pressure High pressure laser heating Experimental techniques High pressure, diffraction, x-ray imaging, XAS, laser heating

278

Beamline 12.2.2  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

2.2 Print 2.2 Print High-Pressure (California High-Pressure Science Observatory: Calipso) Endstations: Medium pressure High pressure laser heating GENERAL BEAMLINE INFORMATION Operational Yes Proposal cycle Proposals for General Sciences Beamlines (6-month cycle) Source characteristics Superbend magnet, 1.9GeV, 5.29Tesla, 500mA Monochromator Si(111) or Multilayer Energy range 6-40 keV for Si(111), 14-28 keV for Multilayer Resolving power (E/ΔE) Si(111) = 7000, Multilayer =100 Beam size (HxV) Focused: 10 x 10 micron Unfocused: 90 x 100 micron Scientific applications High-pressure science Scientific disciplines Earth sciences, materials science, construction materials, chemistry, energy. Endstations Medium pressure High pressure laser heating Experimental techniques High pressure, diffraction, x-ray imaging, XAS, laser heating

279

Beamline 12.2.2  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

2.2 Print 2.2 Print High-Pressure (California High-Pressure Science Observatory: Calipso) Endstations: Medium pressure High pressure laser heating GENERAL BEAMLINE INFORMATION Operational Yes Proposal cycle Proposals for General Sciences Beamlines (6-month cycle) Source characteristics Superbend magnet, 1.9GeV, 5.29Tesla, 500mA Monochromator Si(111) or Multilayer Energy range 6-40 keV for Si(111), 14-28 keV for Multilayer Resolving power (E/ΔE) Si(111) = 7000, Multilayer =100 Beam size (HxV) Focused: 10 x 10 micron Unfocused: 90 x 100 micron Scientific applications High-pressure science Scientific disciplines Earth sciences, materials science, construction materials, chemistry, energy. Endstations Medium pressure High pressure laser heating Experimental techniques High pressure, diffraction, x-ray imaging, XAS, laser heating

280

Beamline 12.2.2  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

2.2 Print 2.2 Print High-Pressure (California High-Pressure Science Observatory: Calipso) Endstations: Medium pressure High pressure laser heating GENERAL BEAMLINE INFORMATION Operational Yes Proposal cycle Proposals for General Sciences Beamlines (6-month cycle) Source characteristics Superbend magnet, 1.9GeV, 5.29Tesla, 500mA Monochromator Si(111) or Multilayer Energy range 6-40 keV for Si(111), 14-28 keV for Multilayer Resolving power (E/ΔE) Si(111) = 7000, Multilayer =100 Beam size (HxV) Focused: 10 x 10 micron Unfocused: 90 x 100 micron Scientific applications High-pressure science Scientific disciplines Earth sciences, materials science, construction materials, chemistry, energy. Endstations Medium pressure High pressure laser heating Experimental techniques High pressure, diffraction, x-ray imaging, XAS, laser heating

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "2 glenwood pu" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Beamline 12.2.2  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

2.2 Print 2.2 Print High-Pressure (California High-Pressure Science Observatory: Calipso) Endstations: Medium pressure High pressure laser heating GENERAL BEAMLINE INFORMATION Operational Yes Proposal cycle Proposals for General Sciences Beamlines (6-month cycle) Source characteristics Superbend magnet, 1.9GeV, 5.29Tesla, 500mA Monochromator Si(111) or Multilayer Energy range 6-40 keV for Si(111), 14-28 keV for Multilayer Resolving power (E/ΔE) Si(111) = 7000, Multilayer =100 Beam size (HxV) Focused: 10 x 10 micron Unfocused: 90 x 100 micron Scientific applications High-pressure science Scientific disciplines Earth sciences, materials science, construction materials, chemistry, energy. Endstations Medium pressure High pressure laser heating Experimental techniques High pressure, diffraction, x-ray imaging, XAS, laser heating

282

Beamline 12.2.2  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

2.2 Print 2.2 Print High-Pressure (California High-Pressure Science Observatory: Calipso) Endstations: Medium pressure High pressure laser heating GENERAL BEAMLINE INFORMATION Operational Yes Proposal cycle Proposals for General Sciences Beamlines (6-month cycle) Source characteristics Superbend magnet, 1.9GeV, 5.29Tesla, 500mA Monochromator Si(111) or Multilayer Energy range 6-40 keV for Si(111), 14-28 keV for Multilayer Resolving power (E/ΔE) Si(111) = 7000, Multilayer =100 Beam size (HxV) Focused: 10 x 10 micron Unfocused: 90 x 100 micron Scientific applications High-pressure science Scientific disciplines Earth sciences, materials science, construction materials, chemistry, energy. Endstations Medium pressure High pressure laser heating Experimental techniques High pressure, diffraction, x-ray imaging, XAS, laser heating

283

Beamline 12.2.2  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

2.2 Print 2.2 Print High-Pressure (California High-Pressure Science Observatory: Calipso) Endstations: Medium pressure High pressure laser heating GENERAL BEAMLINE INFORMATION Operational Yes Proposal cycle Proposals for General Sciences Beamlines (6-month cycle) Source characteristics Superbend magnet, 1.9GeV, 5.29Tesla, 500mA Monochromator Si(111) or Multilayer Energy range 6-40 keV for Si(111), 14-28 keV for Multilayer Resolving power (E/ΔE) Si(111) = 7000, Multilayer =100 Beam size (HxV) Focused: 10 x 10 micron Unfocused: 90 x 100 micron Scientific applications High-pressure science Scientific disciplines Earth sciences, materials science, construction materials, chemistry, energy. Endstations Medium pressure High pressure laser heating Experimental techniques High pressure, diffraction, x-ray imaging, XAS, laser heating

284

Beamline 12.2.2  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

2.2 Print 2.2 Print High-Pressure (California High-Pressure Science Observatory: Calipso) Endstations: Medium pressure High pressure laser heating GENERAL BEAMLINE INFORMATION Operational Yes Proposal cycle Proposals for General Sciences Beamlines (6-month cycle) Source characteristics Superbend magnet, 1.9GeV, 5.29Tesla, 500mA Monochromator Si(111) or Multilayer Energy range 6-40 keV for Si(111), 14-28 keV for Multilayer Resolving power (E/ΔE) Si(111) = 7000, Multilayer =100 Beam size (HxV) Focused: 10 x 10 micron Unfocused: 90 x 100 micron Scientific applications High-pressure science Scientific disciplines Earth sciences, materials science, construction materials, chemistry, energy. Endstations Medium pressure High pressure laser heating Experimental techniques High pressure, diffraction, x-ray imaging, XAS, laser heating

285

August 2  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

2 2 August 2 Attending: Eric, Jay, Craig, JeffA, JeffP, Marjorie Utilization: Cluster mostly full, some free cycles on the weekends. Mostly STAR jobs but quite a lot of groups have been running some. Recent Outages: Nothing major in the past two weeks. Upcoming Downtimes: We will schedule something soon probably for the week of 8/15. Probably an eight hour downtime to complete the /common migration as well as redo some network cabling related to the problems a few weeks ago (borrowed cable from network group). Procurements/New Hardware: Requisition will go out today or tomorrow at the latest. Mostly we're getting nodes but also some networking equipment and miscellaneous as well as a second dtn. ATLAS, STAR, ALICE and dayabay were sent a spreadsheet detailing what the new shares will be. They will

286

UPC Events All on BG/P Systems | Argonne Leadership Computing Facility  

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Events All on BG/P Systems Events All on BG/P Systems BG/P Hardware Events - Complete List Event Number Mode Counter Number Name Hardware Unit Description 0 0 0 BGP_PU0_JPIPE_INSTRUCTIONS P0 CPU J-pipe instructions 1 0 1 BGP_PU0_JPIPE_ADD_SUB P0 CPU Add/Sub in J-pipe 2 0 2 BGP_PU0_JPIPE_LOGICAL_OPS P0 CPU Logical operations in J-pipe 3 0 3 BGP_PU0_JPIPE_SHROTMK P0 CPU J-pipe shift/rotate/mask instructions 4 0 4 BGP_PU0_IPIPE_INSTRUCTIONS P0 CPU I-pipe instructions 5 0 5 BGP_PU0_IPIPE_MULT_DIV P0 CPU Mult/Div in I-pipe 6 0 6 BGP_PU0_IPIPE_ADD_SUB P0 CPU Add/Sub in I-pipe 7 0 7 BGP_PU0_IPIPE_LOGICAL_OPS P0 CPU Logical operations in I-pipe 8 0 8 BGP_PU0_IPIPE_SHROTMK P0 CPU I-pipe shift/rotate/mask instructions 9 0 9 BGP_PU0_IPIPE_BRANCHES P0 CPU Branches

287

Colloque C4, supplkment au no 4, Tome 40, avril 1979, page C4-24 Self-diffusion of U and Pu in (U, Pu)C and (U,Pu)N  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and swell- ing during reactor operation of these advanced LMFBR fuel candidates. Since these diffusion pro

Boyer, Edmond

288

Beamline 8.2.2  

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2 Print 2 Print Berkeley Center for Structural Biology (BCSB) Multiple-Wavelength Anomalous Diffraction (MAD) and Macromolecular Crystallography (MX) GENERAL BEAMLINE INFORMATION Operational Yes Proposal cycle Proposals for Structural Biology Beamlines (2-month cycle) Source characteristics Superbend (5.0 T, single pole) Energy range 5-16 keV Monochromator Double crystal, Si(111) Measured flux (1.9 GeV, 400 mA) 3.0 x 1011 photons/sec Resolving power (E/ΔE) 7,000 Divergence (max at sample) 3.0(h) x 0.5(v) mrad Measured spot size at sample (FWHM) 100 µm Endstations Minihutch Detectors 3x3 CCD array (ADSC Q315) Sample format Single crystals of biological molecules Sample preparation Support labs available Sample environment Ambient or ~100 K Special notes Computers for data processing and analysis are available

289

Beamline 8.2.2  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

2 Print 2 Print Berkeley Center for Structural Biology (BCSB) Multiple-Wavelength Anomalous Diffraction (MAD) and Macromolecular Crystallography (MX) GENERAL BEAMLINE INFORMATION Operational Yes Proposal cycle Proposals for Structural Biology Beamlines (2-month cycle) Source characteristics Superbend (5.0 T, single pole) Energy range 5-16 keV Monochromator Double crystal, Si(111) Measured flux (1.9 GeV, 400 mA) 3.0 x 1011 photons/sec Resolving power (E/ΔE) 7,000 Divergence (max at sample) 3.0(h) x 0.5(v) mrad Measured spot size at sample (FWHM) 100 µm Endstations Minihutch Detectors 3x3 CCD array (ADSC Q315) Sample format Single crystals of biological molecules Sample preparation Support labs available Sample environment Ambient or ~100 K Special notes Computers for data processing and analysis are available

290

Beamline 8.2.2  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

2 Print 2 Print Berkeley Center for Structural Biology (BCSB) Multiple-Wavelength Anomalous Diffraction (MAD) and Macromolecular Crystallography (MX) GENERAL BEAMLINE INFORMATION Operational Yes Proposal cycle Proposals for Structural Biology Beamlines (2-month cycle) Source characteristics Superbend (5.0 T, single pole) Energy range 5-16 keV Monochromator Double crystal, Si(111) Measured flux (1.9 GeV, 400 mA) 3.0 x 1011 photons/sec Resolving power (E/ΔE) 7,000 Divergence (max at sample) 3.0(h) x 0.5(v) mrad Measured spot size at sample (FWHM) 100 µm Endstations Minihutch Detectors 3x3 CCD array (ADSC Q315) Sample format Single crystals of biological molecules Sample preparation Support labs available Sample environment Ambient or ~100 K Special notes Computers for data processing and analysis are available

291

Beamline 8.2.2  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

2 Print 2 Print Berkeley Center for Structural Biology (BCSB) Multiple-Wavelength Anomalous Diffraction (MAD) and Macromolecular Crystallography (MX) GENERAL BEAMLINE INFORMATION Operational Yes Proposal cycle Proposals for Structural Biology Beamlines (2-month cycle) Source characteristics Superbend (5.0 T, single pole) Energy range 5-16 keV Monochromator Double crystal, Si(111) Measured flux (1.9 GeV, 400 mA) 3.0 x 1011 photons/sec Resolving power (E/ΔE) 7,000 Divergence (max at sample) 3.0(h) x 0.5(v) mrad Measured spot size at sample (FWHM) 100 µm Endstations Minihutch Detectors 3x3 CCD array (ADSC Q315) Sample format Single crystals of biological molecules Sample preparation Support labs available Sample environment Ambient or ~100 K Special notes Computers for data processing and analysis are available

292

Beamline 8.2.2  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

2 Print 2 Print Berkeley Center for Structural Biology (BCSB) Multiple-Wavelength Anomalous Diffraction (MAD) and Macromolecular Crystallography (MX) GENERAL BEAMLINE INFORMATION Operational Yes Proposal cycle Proposals for Structural Biology Beamlines (2-month cycle) Source characteristics Superbend (5.0 T, single pole) Energy range 5-16 keV Monochromator Double crystal, Si(111) Measured flux (1.9 GeV, 400 mA) 3.0 x 1011 photons/sec Resolving power (E/ΔE) 7,000 Divergence (max at sample) 3.0(h) x 0.5(v) mrad Measured spot size at sample (FWHM) 100 µm Endstations Minihutch Detectors 3x3 CCD array (ADSC Q315) Sample format Single crystals of biological molecules Sample preparation Support labs available Sample environment Ambient or ~100 K Special notes Computers for data processing and analysis are available

293

Beamline 8.2.2  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

2 Print 2 Print Berkeley Center for Structural Biology (BCSB) Multiple-Wavelength Anomalous Diffraction (MAD) and Macromolecular Crystallography (MX) GENERAL BEAMLINE INFORMATION Operational Yes Proposal cycle Proposals for Structural Biology Beamlines (2-month cycle) Source characteristics Superbend (5.0 T, single pole) Energy range 5-16 keV Monochromator Double crystal, Si(111) Measured flux (1.9 GeV, 400 mA) 3.0 x 1011 photons/sec Resolving power (E/ΔE) 7,000 Divergence (max at sample) 3.0(h) x 0.5(v) mrad Measured spot size at sample (FWHM) 100 µm Endstations Minihutch Detectors 3x3 CCD array (ADSC Q315) Sample format Single crystals of biological molecules Sample preparation Support labs available Sample environment Ambient or ~100 K Special notes Computers for data processing and analysis are available

294

Beamline 8.2.2  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

2 Print 2 Print Berkeley Center for Structural Biology (BCSB) Multiple-Wavelength Anomalous Diffraction (MAD) and Macromolecular Crystallography (MX) GENERAL BEAMLINE INFORMATION Operational Yes Proposal cycle Proposals for Structural Biology Beamlines (2-month cycle) Source characteristics Superbend (5.0 T, single pole) Energy range 5-16 keV Monochromator Double crystal, Si(111) Measured flux (1.9 GeV, 400 mA) 3.0 x 1011 photons/sec Resolving power (E/ΔE) 7,000 Divergence (max at sample) 3.0(h) x 0.5(v) mrad Measured spot size at sample (FWHM) 100 µm Endstations Minihutch Detectors 3x3 CCD array (ADSC Q315) Sample format Single crystals of biological molecules Sample preparation Support labs available Sample environment Ambient or ~100 K Special notes Computers for data processing and analysis are available

295

Beamline 8.2.2  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

2 Print 2 Print Berkeley Center for Structural Biology (BCSB) Multiple-Wavelength Anomalous Diffraction (MAD) and Macromolecular Crystallography (MX) GENERAL BEAMLINE INFORMATION Operational Yes Proposal cycle Proposals for Structural Biology Beamlines (2-month cycle) Source characteristics Superbend (5.0 T, single pole) Energy range 5-16 keV Monochromator Double crystal, Si(111) Measured flux (1.9 GeV, 400 mA) 3.0 x 1011 photons/sec Resolving power (E/ΔE) 7,000 Divergence (max at sample) 3.0(h) x 0.5(v) mrad Measured spot size at sample (FWHM) 100 µm Endstations Minihutch Detectors 3x3 CCD array (ADSC Q315) Sample format Single crystals of biological molecules Sample preparation Support labs available Sample environment Ambient or ~100 K Special notes Computers for data processing and analysis are available

296

2.PDF  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

OPM 7 OPM 7 Appendix 2 THE DIRECTOR EXECUTIVE OFFICE OF THE PRESIDENT OFFICE OF MANAGEMENT AND BUDGET WASHINGTON, D.C. 20503 April 19, 1993 BULLETIN NO. 93-11 TO THE HEADS OF EXECUTIVE DEPARTMENTS AND ESTABLISHMENTS SUBJECT: Fiscal Responsibility and Reducing Perquisites 1 . P u r p o s e . This Bulletin provides guidance and instructions to agencies concerning implementation of the F e b r u a r y 10, 1993 Presidential memorandum on "Use of Government Vehicles," "Restricted Use of Government Aircraft," and "Government Fiscal Responsibility and Reducing Perquisites." 2 . Background . O n F r i d a y F e b r u a r y 1 0 , 1 9 9 3 t h e P r e s i d e n t s i g n e d three memoranda to Executive Departments instructing them to curtail use of Government vehicles, government aircraft,

297

Section 2  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Figure 1. Box plots of differences of 2-minute aver- Figure 1. Box plots of differences of 2-minute aver- ages of TB and PWV for non-precipitating conditions. The box encloses 50% of the data; the line inside the box indicates the median. The vertical lines enclose 100% of the data; the circles above and below indicate statistical outliers. The outliers are due to broken cloud fields transiting the radiometers' fields of view at slightly different times. The Liebe-87 model was used to predict the TB at the ARM frequencies from those measured with the ETL radiometer. A Comparison of Integrated Water Vapor Sensors: WVIOP-96 J. C. Liljegren Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Richland, Washington E. R. Westwater and Y. Han NOAA/Cooperative Institute for Research in the Environmental Sciences (CIRES) University of Colorado

298

Untitled-2  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

3 3 Visit us at http://energy.gov/lm/ Welcome to the July-September 2013 issue of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Legacy Management (LM) Program Update. This publication is designed to provide a status of activities within LM. Please direct all comments and inquiries to . lm@hq.doe.gov Program Update Legacy Management Continued on page 2 Inside this Update: LM Work Progresses on Defense-Related

299

A practical strategy for reducing the future security risk of United States spent nuclear fuel  

SciTech Connect

Depletion calculations show that advanced oxide (AOX) fuels can be used in existing light water reactors (LWRs) to achieve and maintain virtually any desired level of US (US) reactor-grade plutonium (R-Pu) inventory. AOX fuels are composed of a neutronically inert matrix loaded with R-Pu and erbium. A 1/2 core load of 100% nonfertile, 7w% R-Pu AOX and 3.9 w% UO{sub 2} has a net total plutonium ({sup TOT}Pu) destruction rate of 310 kg/yr. The 20% residual {sup TOT}Pu in discharged AOX contains > 55% {sup 242}Pu making it unattractive for nuclear explosive use. A three-phase fuel-cycle development program sequentially loading 60 LWRs with 100% mixed oxide, 50% AOX with a nonfertile component displacing only some of the {sup 238}U, and 50% AOX, which is 100% nonfertile, could reduce the US plutonium inventory to near zero by 2050.

Chodak, P. III; Buksa, J.J. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States). Nuclear Systems Design and Analysis Group

1997-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

300

P-2  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

P-2 P-2 7~ \k 29 ' 9 1 11:34 IJ.S EPFI 26 FED.PLK% .,' p-ji-j= Q UNITED STATES El$ViRONMENTAL PROTECTION A6iZNCY ~ RESION II JAC+ i, JAW78 FEDl!RAL BUILDING ', NW YORK. NEW YORK 10278 March,29,,1991' - ' Mr. Joseph A/Kelly 201 East 66th Street. New York, New York 10021 Re: Documents Available et Radium Chemical Company,. 60-06 27th Avenue, woodaide, Queens County, New York Dear Mr. Kelly: I have attempted to reach.youby telephone on several occasion& over.the past two veeks to give you an update on the availability of your personal papers r@maining in the referenced facility. Your personal papers and documents (such as your military records) are now availabliz at the facility. You had stated in an earlier conversation thatfit would be more convenient for you to pick up these documents in Woo.dside as opposed to our offices in

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "2 glenwood pu" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Graduates 0 2 3 2 2 1 2 2 1 1 2 Percent of Graduates with  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

D Completions and Placement, Ten Year Trend 2002-2003 to 2011-2012 French and Italian Placement Category As of 4/2/2013 #12;12 Number of Grads with Placement Info French and Italian, PhD Graduates First First Placement Category by Broad Field Category 77% 14% 18% 60% 11% 68% 36% 18% 3% 13% 42% 11% 3% 4% 7

Grzybowski, Bartosz A.

302

Type B Accident Investigation on the August 5, 2003, Pu-238 Multiple Uptake Event at the Pu Facility, Los Alamos National Laboratory  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

On August 5, 2003, a release of plutonium-238 occurred in a storage room at the Plutonium Facility, Los Alamos National Laboratory, resulting in radiation doses to two workers in the room. The Accident Investigation Board concluded that the direct cause of the accident was the release of airborne contamination from a degraded package that contained cellulose material and plutonium-238 residues.

303

Distribution of sup 137 Cs, sup 90 Sr, sup 238 Pu, sup 239 Pu, sup 241 Am and sup 244 Cm in Pond B, Savannah River Site  

SciTech Connect

The gradual senescence of present-day operating nuclear facilities, and resultant contamination of aquatic and terrestrial ecosystems, emphasize the importance of understanding the behavior of radionuclides in the environment. Observations and deductions concerning mechanisms of radionuclide transport can contribute significantly to knowledge of fundamental ecological processes. This study emphasized the ecosystem-level distribution of several long-lived radionuclides in an abandoned reactor cooling impoundment after a twenty year period of chemical and biological equilibration. 90 refs., 14 figs., 5 tabs.

Whicker, F.W. (Colorado State Univ., Fort Collins, CO (USA)); Pinder, J.E. III; Bowling, J.W. (Savannah River Ecology Lab., Aiken, SC (USA)); Alberts, J.J. (Georgia Univ., Sapelo Island, GA (USA). Marine Inst.); Brisbin, I.L. Jr. (Savannah River Ecology Lab., Aiken, SC (USA))

1989-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

304

WEATHER, p. 2 Volume 132, Number 18 Friday, April 13, 2012  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

°f | 45°f Partly cloudy SAT: 69°f | 53°f Partly cloudy SuN: 72°f | 57°f Chance of showers puTIN, ROuNd THREE How did Putin get elected a third time? opinion, p. 5 HOW dId THE COSmOS START? Impey's new guide

305

Winter Session 2013/14 Term 2 EECE 549: Assignment 4  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, March 17th (in class) Develop a Simulink model (in per-unit) of a 325-MVA Hydro-Turbine Generator (book p. 220). There are two sets of parameters in the book, use the pu values. The generator initial conditions and Exfd = 0. Implement start-up transient similar to induction machine (starting

Pulfrey, David L.

306

fixed2  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Part Deux Part Deux Painless Physics Articles BEAM COOLING August 2, 1996 By Leila Belkora, Office of Public Affairs ACCELERATION August 16, 1996 By Dave Finley, Accelerator Division Head RF August 30, 1996 By Pat Colestock, Accelerator Division FIXED TARGET PHYSICS September 20, 1996 By Peter H. Garbincius, Physics Section FIXED TARGET PHYSICS PART DEUX October 16, 1996 By Peter H. Garbincius, Physics Section and Leila Belkora, Office of Public Affaris CROSS SECTION November 1, 1996 By Doreen Wackeroth, Theoretical Physics Edited by Leila Belkora, Office of Public Affaris MAGNETS PART I November 15, 1996 By Hank Glass, Technical Support Section Edited by Donald Sena, Office of Public Affairs MAGNETS PART II January 10, 1997 By Hank Glass, Technical Support Section Edited by Donald Sena, Office of Public Affairs

307

Untitled-2  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

APRIL 2003 APRIL 2003 DOE/FE-0452 INTEGRATED DRY NO X /SO 2 EMISSIONS CONTROL SYSTEM PUBLIC SERVICE COMPANY OF COLORADO Disclaimer This report was prepared using publicly available information, including the Final Technical Report and other reports prepared pursuant to a cooperative agreement with the U.S. Department of Energy. Neither the United States Government nor any agency, employee, contractor, or representative thereof, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe upon privately owned rights. Reference herein to any specific commercial product, process, or service by trade name, trademark, manufacturer,

308

ch_2  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

4 4 Background 2.1.3 CURRENT MISSION The current INEEL mission is to develop, demonstrate, and deploy advanced engineering technology and systems to improve national competitiveness and security, to make the pro- duction and use of energy more efficient, and to improve the quality of the environment. Areas of primary emphasis at INEEL include waste management and waste minimization, environ- mental engineering and restoration, energy effi- ciency, renewable energy, national security and defense, nuclear technologies, and advanced technologies and methods. INEEL is the lead laboratory for the National Spent Nuclear Fuel Management Program, which sets standards for developing and maintaining the capability to safely manage DOE's spent nuclear fuel. DOE considers the Environmental Management

309

MA.2  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

IS .:,I. ;' IS .:,I. ;' MA.2 0 y-AU Mr. M ichael Matt W a tertown Redevelopment Authority 319 Arlington Street W a tertown, Massachusetts 02172 Dear Mr. Matt: The Department of Energy is evaluating the radiological condition of sites that were utilized under the Manhattan Engineer District and/or the Atomic Energy C o m m ission in the early years of nuclear energy development to determine whether they need remedial action and whether the Department has authority to perform such action. As you know from information previously sent to you, portions of the W a tertown Arsenal in W a tertown, Massachusetts, were identified as possible sites. The areas investigated included those areas which were the sites of Buildings 34, 41, and 421 and the GSA site. The enclosed documents, which represent the Department's review of the

310

magnets2  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

II II Painless Physics Articles BEAM COOLING August 2, 1996 By Leila Belkora, Office of Public Affairs ACCELERATION August 16, 1996 By Dave Finley, Accelerator Division Head RF August 30, 1996 By Pat Colestock, Accelerator Division FIXED TARGET PHYSICS September 20, 1996 By Peter H. Garbincius, Physics Section FIXED TARGET PHYSICS PART DEUX October 16, 1996 By Peter H. Garbincius, Physics Section and Leila Belkora, Office of Public Affaris CROSS SECTION November 1, 1996 By Doreen Wackeroth, Theoretical Physics Edited by Leila Belkora, Office of Public Affaris MAGNETS PART I November 15, 1996 By Hank Glass, Technical Support Section Edited by Donald Sena, Office of Public Affairs MAGNETS PART II January 10, 1997 By Hank Glass, Technical Support Section Edited by Donald Sena, Office of Public Affairs

311

Rutherford backscattering analysis of gallium implanted 316 stainless steel  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Experimental Procedure Sample Analysis 3 3 . 9 . 11 HI THEORY. . IH. 1 Backscattering Principles HI. 2 The RBS Spectrum IH. 3 The Surface Energy Approximation . . . HI. 4 Stainless Steel 316. . IV RESULTS AND DISCUSSION . . 13 . 13 15... for the disposition of weapons grade (WG) plutonium (Pu) in the United States: MOX fuel conversion and immobilization. The first option uses nuclear reactors to transmutate WG Pu and the second imbeds the WG Pu in glass logs for deep burial. Due to the large amount...

Ortensi, Javier

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

312

Wind resuspension of trace amounts of plutonium particles from soil in a semi-arid climate  

SciTech Connect

This study of resuspension of soil containing minute amounts of plutonium (Pu-239) has been in progress at the Rocky Flats (RF) Plant since 1978. It is one of several studies initiated after wind relocated small amounts of soil-borne Pu-239 during cleanup of an outdoor storage area. The Pu-239-settled field is now sparsely covered with prairie grass typical of the area. Past studies were limited to comparisons of bulk soil activity with total activity in the airborne dust. This work covers the physics of the particle resuspension process. This report covers the following: (1) Pu-239 resuspension rate versus wind speed, (2) mechanisms of soil particle resuspension, (3) vertical concentration profile of Pu-239 particles, (4) Pu-239 and host particle size distribution and activity concentration. 5 references, 1 table.

Langer, G.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

313

Former Worker Medical Screening Program 2012 Annual Report  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Published February 2013 Published February 2013 Pu Pu Publ b blis s ishe he hed d d Fe Fe Febr br brua ua u ry ry 2 201 013 3 FORMER WORKER MEDICAL SCREENING PROGRAM ANNUAL REPORT ANNUAL REPORT 2 0 1 2 STC STONETURN CONSULTANTS 2012 Former Worker Medical Screening Program * i Table of Contents Abbreviations ............................................................................................................................................iii Foreword .................................................................................................................................................... v Executive Summary .................................................................................................................................

314

X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopic determination of plutonium speciation at the Rocky Flats environmental technology  

SciTech Connect

X-ray Absorption Fine Structure spectroscopy was used to probe the speciation of the ppm level Pu in thirteen soil and concrete samples from the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site in support of the site remediation effort that has been successfully completed since these measurements. In addition to X-ray Absorption Near Edge Spectra, two of the samples yielded Extended X-ray Absorption Fine Structure spectra that could be analyzed by curve-fits. Most of these spectra exhibited features consistent with PU(IV), and more specificaJly, PuO{sub 2+x}-type speciation. Two were ambiguous, possibly indicating that Pu that was originally present in a different form was transforming into PuO{sub 2+x}, and one was interpreted as demonstrating the presence of an unusual Pu(VI) compound, consistent with its source being spills from a PUREX purification line onto a concrete floor and the resultant extreme conditions. These experimental results therefore validated models that predicted that insoluble PuO{sub 2+x} would be the most stable form of Pu in equilibrium with air and water even when the source terms were most likely Pu metal with organic compounds or a Pu fire. A corollary of these models' predictions and other in situ observations is therefore that the minimal transport of Pu that occurred on the site was via the resuspension and mobilization of colloidal particles. Under these conditions, the small amounts of diffusely distributed Pu that were left on the site after its remediation pose only a negligible hazard.

Lezama-pacheco, Juan S [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Conradson, Steven D [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Clark, David L [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

315

Two?photon dissociation of vibrationally excited HD+: The inhomogeneous differential equation approach  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Dalgamo and Lewis,6 we write S2(kj /J,v j jj) = (,6kh(1su) I,uTlx~,i), (21) and S3(kj /J,v j j;) = (,6kh(2pu) I~D Ix~,i), where (22) (,6Vj (2pu) I~T l(,6v) (Isu X(T)(R) - '" ' , . A.. (2:pu) v,j, - ~ EVj (2pu) - Ev,j, (Isu) _ fIm '{'vj (23...( )(R) - '" ' , . A.. (1su) v,j, - ~ EVj (Isu) - Evd, (Isu) _ fIm '('vj , (25) so that SI(kj/J,v j j;) = (,6kh(1su)I,uDlx~~:(R and S4(kj/J,vj j;) = (,6kjf(2pu)I,uTlx~~:(R, where X~~: (R) satisfies the IDE: {~_ j(j+ I) dR 2 R2 + 2: [EVd, + f...

Chu, Shih-I; Laughlin, Cecil; Datta, Krishna K.

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

316

Results from NNWSI [Nevada Nuclear Waste Storage Investigations] Series 2 bare fuel dissolution tests  

SciTech Connect

The dissolution and radionuclide release behavior of spent fuel in groundwater is being studied by the Nevada Nuclear Waste Storage Investigations (NNWSI) Project. Two bare spent fuel specimens plus the empty cladding hulls were tested in NNWSI J-13 well water in unsealed fused silica vessels under ambient hot cell air conditions (25{degree}C) in the currently reported tests. One of the specimens was prepared from a rod irradiated in the H. B. Robinson Unit 2 reactor and the other from a rod irradiated in the Turkey Point Unit 3 reactor. Results indicate that most radionuclides of interest fall into three groups for release modeling. The first group principally includes the actinides (U, Np, Pu, Am, and Cm), all of which reached solubility-limited concentrations that were orders of magnitude below those necessary to meet the NRC 10 CFR 60.113 release limits for any realistic water flux predicted for the Yucca Mountain repository site. The second group is nuclides of soluble elements such as Cs, Tc, and I, for which release rates do not appear to be solubility-limited and may depend on the dissolution rate of fuel. In later test cycles, {sup 137}Cs, {sup 90}Sr, {sup 99}Tc, and {sup 129}I were continuously released at rates between about 5 {times} 10{sup {minus}5} and 1 {times} 10{sup {minus}4} of inventory per year. The third group is radionuclides that may be transported in the vapor phase, of which {sup 14}C is of primary concern. Detailed test results are presented and discussed. 17 refs., 15 figs., 21 tabs.

Wilson, C.N.

1990-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

317

app_c2  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

2 2 Air Resources C.2-iii DOE/EIS-0287 Idaho HLW & FD EIS TABLE OF CONTENTS Section Page Appendix C.2 Air Resources C.2-1 C.2.1 Introduction C.2-1 C.2.2 Air Quality Standards and Regulations C.2-2 C.2.2.1 Ambient Air Quality Standards C.2-4 C.2.2.2 Prevention of Significant Deterioration C.2-4 C.2.2.3 National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants C.2-6 C.2.2.4 State of Idaho Permit Programs C.2-6 C.2.2.5 State of Idaho Rules for Toxic Air Pollutants C.2-7 C.2.2.6 Standards for Hazardous Waste and Toxic Substance Control C.2-8 C.2.2.7 U.S. Department of Energy Orders and Guides C.2-8 C.2.3 Air Quality Impact Assessment Methodology C.2-9 C.2.3.1 Source Term Estimation C.2-9 C.2.3.2 Radiological Assessment Methodology C.2-13 C.2.3.3 Nonradiological Assessment Methodology C.2-19 C.2.4

318

Investigation of the behavior of plutonium(V) in alkaline media  

SciTech Connect

The stability of the plutonium(V) oxidation state in alkaline media was studied with respect to the neighboring Pu(IV) and Pu(VI) oxidation states. Tests were conducted in 1 M or higher NaOH solutions in the presence and absence of other components of Hanford Site high-level tank waste. Spectrophotometric techniques were found to be effective in studying the behavior of plutonium(V) in alkaline solution at plutonium concentrations above 10{sup -3} M. To this end, plutonium(V) and plutonium(VI) in NaOH were prepared and their spectra characterized. In alkaline solutions with NaOH concentration below 8 M, plutonium(V) was found to be unstable to disproportionation occurring according to the reaction 2 Pu(V)(aq) {yields} Pu(VI)(aq) + Pu(IV)(s). The disproportionation of Pu(V) is complicated by at least two simultaneous processes: (1) the sorption of a significant fraction of the Pu(V) onto the forming Pu(IV) hydrous oxide precipitate, and (2) partial reduction of Pu(VI) by water {alpha}-radiolysis products.

Budantseva, N.A.; Tananaev, I.G.; Fedoseev, A.M.; Bessonov, A.A. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow (Russian Federation). Institute of Physical Chemistry] [and others

1997-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

319

ED2 to Saguaro No. 2  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ED2 to Saguaro No. 2 Transmission Line Rebuild Project (DOEEA-1972) Project Description: Western proposes to replace the ED2 Saguaro No. 2 115-kV Transmission Line's wood H-frame...

320

Practical implications of neutron survey instrument performance  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......252Cf 241Am-Be GCR PWR Spent fuel flask PuO2 store Fuel processing R H (10) (90...incidence through the electronics and batteries, and the connections to the detector...252Cf 241Am-Be GCR PWR Spent fuel flask PuO2 store Fuel processing......

R. J. Tanner; D. T. Bartlett; L. G. Hager; L. N. Jones; C. Molinos; N. J. Roberts; G. C. Taylor; D. J. Thomas

2004-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "2 glenwood pu" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

A new technique to reject dc-link voltage ripple in PWM inverters  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

on the rlc-link, is numerically calculated. Let us assume, Inverfer output frequency f, ? 60 Hz Vs, = 1 pu Dc ? link voltage rrpple = k Vs, ? 0. 2 x Vge = . 2 pu Dc ? link voltage ripple frequency f, = 120 Hz :tfodulation index ? 0. 5 Frequency spectrum...

Shireen, Wajiha

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

322

Plutonium(IV) precipitates formed in alkaline media in the presence of various anions  

SciTech Connect

The tendency of Pu(IV) to hydrolyze and form true solutions, colloid solutions, or insoluble precipitates has been known since the Manhattan Project. Since then, specific studies have been performed to examine in detail the equilibria of Pu(IV) hydrolytic reactions in various media. Great attention also has been paid to the preparation, structure, and properties of Pu(IV) polymers or colloids. These compounds found an important application in sol-gel technology for the preparation of nuclear fuel materials. A most important result of these works was the conclusion that Pu(IV) hydroxide, after some aging, consists of very small PuO{sub 2} crystallites and should therefore be considered to be Pu(IV) hydrous oxide. However, studies of the properties and behavior of solid Pu(IV) hydroxide in complex heterogeneous systems are rare. The primary goal of this investigation was to obtain data on the composition and properties of Pu(IV) hydrous oxide or other compounds formed in alkaline media under different conditions. Such information is important to understand Pu(IV) behavior and the forms of its existence in the Hanford Site alkaline tank waste sludge. This knowledge then may be applied in assessing plutonium criticality hazards in the storage, retrieval, and treatment of Hanford Site tank wastes as well as in understanding its contribution to the transuranic waste inventory (threshold at 100 nCi/g or about 5 {times} 10{sup {minus}6} M) of the separate solution and solid phases.

Krot, N.N.; Shilov, V.P.; Yusov, A.B.; Tananaev, I.G.; Grigoriev, M.S.; Garnov, A.Yu.; Perminov, V.P.; Astafurova, L.N.

1998-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

323

AFCI-2.0 Neutron Cross Section Covariance Library  

SciTech Connect

The cross section covariance library has been under development by BNL-LANL collaborative effort over the last three years. The project builds on two covariance libraries developed earlier, with considerable input from BNL and LANL. In 2006, international effort under WPEC Subgroup 26 produced BOLNA covariance library by putting together data, often preliminary, from various sources for most important materials for nuclear reactor technology. This was followed in 2007 by collaborative effort of four US national laboratories to produce covariances, often of modest quality - hence the name low-fidelity, for virtually complete set of materials included in ENDF/B-VII.0. The present project is focusing on covariances of 4-5 major reaction channels for 110 materials of importance for power reactors. The work started under Global Nuclear Energy Partnership (GNEP) in 2008, which changed to Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative (AFCI) in 2009. With the 2011 release the name has changed to the Covariance Multigroup Matrix for Advanced Reactor Applications (COMMARA) version 2.0. The primary purpose of the library is to provide covariances for AFCI data adjustment project, which is focusing on the needs of fast advanced burner reactors. Responsibility of BNL was defined as developing covariances for structural materials and fission products, management of the library and coordination of the work; LANL responsibility was defined as covariances for light nuclei and actinides. The COMMARA-2.0 covariance library has been developed by BNL-LANL collaboration for Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative applications over the period of three years, 2008-2010. It contains covariances for 110 materials relevant to fast reactor R&D. The library is to be used together with the ENDF/B-VII.0 central values of the latest official release of US files of evaluated neutron cross sections. COMMARA-2.0 library contains neutron cross section covariances for 12 light nuclei (coolants and moderators), 78 structural materials and fission products, and 20 actinides. Covariances are given in 33-energy groups, from 10?5 eV to 19.6 MeV, obtained by processing with LANL processing code NJOY using 1/E flux. In addition to these 110 files, the library contains 20 files with nu-bar covariances, 3 files with covariances of prompt fission neutron spectra (238,239,240-Pu), and 2 files with mu-bar covariances (23-Na, 56-Fe). Over the period of three years several working versions of the library have been released and tested by ANL and INL reactor analysts. Useful feedback has been collected allowing gradual improvements of the library. In addition, QA system was developed to check basic properties and features of the whole library, allowing visual inspection of uncertainty and correlations plots, inspection of uncertainties of integral quantities with independent databases, and dispersion of cross sections between major evaluated libraries. The COMMARA-2.0 beta version of the library was released to ANL and INL reactor analysts in October 2010. The final version, described in the present report, was released in March 2011.

Herman, M.; Herman, M; Oblozinsky, P.; Mattoon, C.M.; Pigni, M.; Hoblit, S.; Mughabghab, S.F.; Sonzogni, A.; Talou, P.; Chadwick, M.B.; Hale, G.M.; Kahler, A.C.; Kawano, T.; Little, R.C.; Yount, P.G.

2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

324

The polygallides: Yb{sub 3}Ga{sub 7}Ge{sub 3} and YbGa{sub 4}Ge{sub2}.  

SciTech Connect

Yb{sub 3}Ga{sub 7}Ge{sub 3} and YbGa{sub 4}Ge{sub 2} were obtained from reactions of Yb and Ge in excess liquid gallium. The crystal structure of Yb{sub 3}Ga{sub 7}Ge{sub 3} was refined using X-ray and neutron diffraction data on selected single crystals. Yb{sub 3}Ga{sub 7}Ge{sub 3} crystallizes in the monoclinic space group C2/c with lattice constants a = 12.2261(20) {angstrom}, b = 10.7447(20) {angstrom}, c = 8.4754(17) {angstrom} and {beta} = 110.288(30){sup o} (neutron diffraction data). The crystal structure of Yb{sub 3}Ga{sub 7}Ge{sub 3} is an intergrowth of planar layers of YbGa{sub x}Ge{sub y} and puckered layers of (Ge)n. YbGa{sub 4}Ge{sub 2} crystallizes in a modified PuGa{sub 6} structure type in the tetragonal polar space group I4cm with lattice constants a = b = 5.9874(6) {angstrom} and c = 15.1178(19) {angstrom}. The structure of YbGa{sub 4}Ge{sub 2} is an intergrowth of puckered Ga layers and puckered Ga{sub x}Ge{sub y} layers with Yb atoms residing within the channels formed by the connection of the two layers. Physical properties, resistivity ({rho}), magnetic susceptibility ({chi}) and specific heat (C) were measured for Yb{sub 3}Ga{sub 7}Ge{sub 3}. No magnetic ordering was observed. It was found that at low temperatures, {rho} varied as T{sup 2} and C{alpha}T, indicating Fermi-liquid regime in Yb{sub 3}Ga{sub 7}Ge{sub 3} at low temperatures.

Peter, S. C.; Malliakas, C. D.; Nakotte, H.; Kothapilli, K.; Rayaprol, S.; Schultz, A. J.; Kanatzidis, M. G. (Materials Science Division); ( XSD); (Northwestern Univ.); (Jawaharlal Nehru Centre for Adv. Sci. Res.); (New Mexico State Univ.); (Los Alamos Nat. Lab.); (UGC-DAE Consortium for Sci. Res.)

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

325

Solubility and Diffusivity of CO2 in Isotactic Polypropylene/Nanomontmorillonite Composites in Melt and Solid States  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Some other polymer/nanoclay composites were also used for the preparation of polymer composite foams including PS/nanoclay,(38) HDPE/nanoclay,(39) PLA/nanoclay,(40) PC/nanoclay,(41) and PU/nanoclay(42) composites, etc. ... fluid (SCF) facilitated the intercalation and exfoliation of nanoclays in the microcellular injection molding process. ...

Dongdong Hu; Jie Chen; Shaojun Sun; Tao Liu; Ling Zhao

2014-01-30T23:59:59.000Z

326

A mutation in the putative Mg(2+)-binding site of Gs alpha prevents its activation by receptors.  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...10 p.M GTPyS and 10 ,uM isoproterenol (Iso) (A, *, *). A wt S49 4 ISO T10 JM o- S~~~~TP GpS 0- - B CYC- /54N a sI 10 AM XGPy S VOL...filled symbols) of 10 puM isoproterenol (Iso). preference for guanine nucleotide diphosphates...

J D Hildebrandt; R Day; C L Farnsworth; L A Feig

1991-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

327

Photosynthesis Respiration CH2O + O2 CO2 + H2O  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Energy and life Photosynthesis Respiration CH2O + O2 CO2 + H2O hv Biomass CO2 + H2O CH2O + O2 ASSOCIATED WITH PHOTOSYNTHESIS) #12;ATP*: the "energy currency" of the cell *Adenosine triphospahte) PHOTOSYNTHESIS Light provides the energy for high energy electrons. The source of electrons is water OXIDATIVE

328

PLUTONIUM UPTAKE AND BEHAVIOR IN PLANTS OF THE DESERT SOUTHWEST: A PRELIMINARY ASSESSMENT  

SciTech Connect

Eight species of desert vegetation and associated soils were collected from the Nevada National Security Site (N2S2) and analyzed for 238Pu and 239+240Pu concentrations. Amongst the plant species sampled were: atmospheric elemental accumulators (moss and lichen), the very slow growing, long-lived creosote bush and the rapidly growing, short-lived cheatgrass brome. The diversity of growth strategies provided insight into the geochemical behavior and bio-availability of Pu at the N2S2. The highest concentrations of Pu were measured in the onion moss (24.27 Bq kg-1 238Pu and 52.78 Bq kg-1 239+240Pu) followed by the rimmed navel lichen (8.18 Bq kg-1 and 18.4 Bq kg-1 respectively), pointing to the importance of eolian transport of Pu. Brome and desert globemallow accumulated between 3 and 9 times higher concentrations of Pu than creosote and sage brush species. These results support the importance of species specific elemental accumulation strategies rather than exposure duration as the dominant variable influencing Pu concentrations in these plants. Total vegetation elemental concentrations of Ce, Fe, Al, Sm and others were also analyzed. Strong correlations were observed between Fe and Pu. This supports the conclusion that Pu was accumulated as a consequence of the active accumulation of Fe and other plant required nutrients. Cerium and Pu are considered to be chemical analogs. Strong correlations observed in plants support the conclusion that these elements displayed similar geochemical behavior in the environment as it related to the biochemical uptake process of vegetation. Soils were also sampled in association with vegetation samples. This allowed for the calculation of a concentration ratio (CR). The CR values for Pu in plants were highly influenced by the heterogeneity of Pu distribution among sites. Results from the naturally occurring elements of concern were more evenly distributed between sample sites. This allowed for the development of a pattern of plant species that accumulated Ce, Sm, Fe and Al. The highest accumulators of these elements were onion moss, lichen flowed by brome. The lowest accumulators were creosote bush and fourwing saltbush. This ranked order corresponds to plant accumulations of Pu.

Caldwell, E.; Duff, M.; Ferguson, C.

2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

329

Savannah River Site: Plutonium Preparation Project (PuPP) at Savannah River Site  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Revieir of the Plutonium Revieir of the Plutonium Preparation Project at Savannah River Site October 2008 Dr. David S. Kosson, Vanderbilt University Dr. David R. Gallay, Logistics Management Institute Dr. R. Bruce Mathews, Consultant Mr. David Nulton, National Nuclear Security Administration (ret.) Dr. Kenneth Okafor, South Carolina State University Dr. Steven Krahn, U. S. Department of Energy I I External Technical Review of the Plutonium Preparation Project October 2008 - I Acknowledgements The Review Team thanks Ms. Michelle Ewart, Savantiah River Site, and Mr. Ricky Bell, for their exceptional support during this review. Ms. Ewart was the lead DOE representative responsible for organizing reviews held on-site by the Review Team. Mr. Theodore Venetz (Fluor Hanford Company) served as an observer to this review. The

330

Serial Replica Exchange Morten Hagen, Byungchan Kim, Pu Liu, Richard A. Friesner, and B. J. Berne*  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

enables the study of biological systems on worldwide distributed computing environments, such as Folding@Home

Berne, Bruce J.

331

Coprocessed nuclear fuels containing (U, Pu) values as oxides, carbides or carbonitrides  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Method for direct coprocessing of nuclear fuels derived from a product stream of fuels reprocessing facility containing uranium, plutonium, and fission product values comprising nitrate stabilization of said stream vacuum concentration to remove water and nitrates, neutralization to form an acid deficient feed solution for the internal gelation mode of sol-gel technology, green spherule formation, recovery and treatment for loading into a fuel element by vibra packed or pellet formation technologies.

Lloyd, M.H.

1981-01-09T23:59:59.000Z

332

Microsoft Word - Template_SLAC Proprietary Use Agreement_PU 11...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Officer approval for substantive changes cannot be obtained, Work for Others (WFOs) and Cooperative Research and Development Agreements (CRADAs) may be more appropriate due to...

333

RELATIVE ATTENUATION CHARACTERISTICS OF SOME SHIELDING MATERIALS FOR PuB NEUTRONS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1: Polyethylene Water Spodumene-gypsum Gypsum, wet and dryconstituents of the spodumene-gypsum, and gypsum shields.SPODUMENK,GYPSUM SHIELD 30% Spodumene by weight 40% Gypsum

Bringham, P.S.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

334

Versatile dynamic isotope power systems for the exploration of space. [Pu 238  

SciTech Connect

Dynamic, isotope-heated power systems are needed to carry out the exploration of space and are major elements identified by NASA for the Space Exploration Inititative (SEI). The Dynamic Isotope Power System (DIPS) Demonstration Program is aimed at establishing the advanced technology as well as the system designs and hardware for the SEI and other exploratory missions. Several conceptual designs of DIPS systems have been developed to provide compact, reliable, and long-lived power systems.

Johnson, R.A.; Stadnik, A.G. (Rockwell International Rocketdyne Division, 6633 Canoga Ave Canoga Park, CA (USA)); Cataldo, R. (National Aeronautics and Space Administration-Lewis Research Center, Cleveland, OH (USA)); Williams, R. (US Department of Energy, Germantown, MD (USA))

1991-01-05T23:59:59.000Z

335

Effects of Self Irradiation from 238Pu on Candidate Ceramics for Plutonium Immobilization  

SciTech Connect

In this document, we describe the results of radiation damage testing and characterization for specimens that were resintered to re-establish crystallinity. The phases in these specimens have become amorphous from radiation induced damage over the 8 months since sintering.

Strachan, Denis M.; Scheele, Randall D.; Kozelisky, Anne E.; Sell, Rachel L.

2003-05-30T23:59:59.000Z

336

Comparisons of 239Pu inhalation doses calculated with ICRP 67 and proposed systemic models  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......depositions for workers and members of...system for Mayak workers(6), part...of the public after inhalation of...of many Mayak workers might have influenced...intravenously to man. (1950) Los Alamos...energies. (1993) Oak Ridge, TN: Oak Ridge......

W. B. Li; U. Oeh; H. G. Paretzke

2007-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

337

Clearwater: Extensible, Flexible, Modular Code Generation Galen S. Swint, Calton Pu,  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in two non-trivial code generators: the In- fopipe Stub Generator (ISG) to support distributed flow for distributed systems soft- ware has been an established technique since the introduction of RPC stub generator life span of code generation tools developed for distributed system software. Two of our recent

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

338

RELATIVE ATTENUATION CHARACTERISTICS OF SOME SHIELDING MATERIALS FOR PuB NEUTRONS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for the Neutron Conversion Factors," Health Physics Flux-to~to dose-equivalent conversion factors are those taken fromsion factors " The conversion factors for neutrons

Bringham, P.S.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

339

El TRANSITION PROBABILITIES FROM Kn= O-AND Kn=1- STATES OF 238Pu  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ratio 1:8x1o-6 Americium and curium were separated fromthen separated from the americium by elution from a cation-

Lederer, C. Michael

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

340

Table A1. Total First Use (formerly Primary Consumption) of Energy for All Pu  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1 " 1 " " (Estimates in Btu or Physical Units)" " "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," ",," " " "," "," ",," "," ",," "," ","Coke and"," ","Shipments"," " " "," ",,"Net","Residual","Distillate","Natural Gas(e)"," ","Coal","Breeze"," ","of Energy Sources","RSE" "SIC"," ","Total(b)","Electricity(c)","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(d)","(billion","LPG","(1000","(1000","Other(f)","Produced Onsite(g)","Row"

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "2 glenwood pu" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

QSAR OF DISTRIBUTION COEFFICIENTS FOR PU (NO3)062-COMPLEXES USING MOLECULAR MECHANICS  

SciTech Connect

Computer-aided modeling has been very successful in the design of chelating ligands for the formation of selective metal complexes. We report herein preliminary efforts to extend the principles developed for ion-specific chelating ligands to the weaker, more diffuse electrostatic interactions between complex anions and dicationic sites of anion-exchange resins. Calculated electrostatic affinity between plutonium (IV) hexanitrato dianions and analogue of dicationic anion-exchange sites correlate well with empirically-determined distribution coefficients. This Quantitative Structure Activity Relationship (QSAR) is useful in the determination of the overall trend within a select series of bifunctional resins and which structural modifications are most likely to be advantageous. Ultimately, we hope to refine this methodology to allow the a priori determination of ion-exchange behavior for abroad class of materials.

M. BARR; G. JARVINEN; E. MOODY

2000-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

342

Genomedata Documentation Release 1.2.2  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Genomedata Documentation Release 1.2.2 Michael M. Hoffman August 12, 2010 #12;#12;CONTENTS 1 Genomedata 1.2 documentation 3 1.1 Installation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15 2 Indices and tables 17 Python Module Index 19 Index 21 i #12;ii #12;Genomedata Documentation

Noble, William Stafford

343

CAPABILITY TO RECOVER PLUTONIUM-238 IN H-CANYON/HB-LINE  

SciTech Connect

Plutonium-238 is used in Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generators (RTGs) to generate electrical power and in Radioisotope Heater Units (RHUs) to produce heat for electronics and environmental control for deep space missions. The domestic supply of Pu-238 consists of scrap material from previous mission production or material purchased from Russia. Currently, the United States has no significant production scale operational capability to produce and separate new Pu-238 from irradiated neptunium-237 targets. The Department of Energy - Nuclear Energy is currently evaluating and developing plans to reconstitute the United States capability to produce Pu-238 from irradiated Np-237 targets. The Savannah River Site had previously produced and/or processed all the Pu-238 utilized in Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generators (RTGs) for deep space missions up to and including the majority of the plutonium for the Cassini Mission. The previous full production cycle capabilities included: Np-237 target fabrication, target irradiation, target dissolution and Np-237 and Pu-238 separation and purification, conversion of Np-237 and Pu-238 to oxide, scrap recovery, and Pu-238 encapsulation. The capability and equipment still exist and could be revitalized or put back into service to recover and purify Pu-238/Np-237 or broken General Purpose Heat Source (GPHS) pellets utilizing existing process equipment in HB-Line Scrap Recovery, and H-anyon Frame Waste Recovery processes. The conversion of Np-237 and Pu-238 to oxide can be performed in the existing HB-Line Phase-2 and Phase-3 Processes. Dissolution of irradiated Np-237 target material, and separation and purification of Np-237 and Pu-238 product streams would be possible at production rates of ~ 2 kg/month of Pu-238 if the existing H-Canyon Frames Process spare equipment were re-installed. Previously, the primary H-Canyon Frames equipment was removed to be replaced: however, the replacement project was stopped. The spare equipment is stored and still available for installation. Out of specification Pu-238 scrap material can be purified and recovered by utilizing the HB-Line Phase-1 Scrap Recovery Line and the Phase-3 Pu-238 Oxide Conversion Line along with H-Canyon Frame Waste Recovery process. In addition, it also covers and describes utilizing the Phase-2 Np-237 Oxide Conversion Line, in conjunction with the H-Canyon Frames Process to restore the H-Canyon capability to process and recover Np-237 and Pu-238 from irradiated Np-237 targets and address potential synergies with other programs like recovery of Pu-244 and heavy isotopes of curium from other target material.

Fuller, K.; Smith, Robert H. Jr.; Goergen, Charles R.

2013-01-09T23:59:59.000Z

344

Capability to Recover Plutonium-238 in H-Canyon/HB-Line - 13248  

SciTech Connect

Plutonium-238 is used in Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generators (RTGs) to generate electrical power and in Radioisotope Heater Units (RHUs) to produce heat for electronics and environmental control for deep space missions. The domestic supply of Pu-238 consists of scrap material from previous mission production or material purchased from Russia. Currently, the United States has no significant production scale operational capability to produce and separate new Pu-238 from irradiated neptunium-237 targets. The Department of Energy - Nuclear Energy is currently evaluating and developing plans to reconstitute the United States capability to produce Pu-238 from irradiated Np-237 targets. The Savannah River Site had previously produced and/or processed all the Pu-238 utilized in Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generators (RTGs) for deep space missions up to and including the majority of the plutonium for the Cassini Mission. The previous full production cycle capabilities included: Np- 237 target fabrication, target irradiation, target dissolution and Np-237 and Pu-238 separation and purification, conversion of Np-237 and Pu-238 to oxide, scrap recovery, and Pu-238 encapsulation. The capability and equipment still exist and could be revitalized or put back into service to recover and purify Pu-238/Np-237 or broken General Purpose Heat Source (GPHS) pellets utilizing existing process equipment in HB-Line Scrap Recovery, and H-Canyon Frame Waste Recovery processes. The conversion of Np-237 and Pu-238 to oxide can be performed in the existing HB-Line Phase-2 and Phase- 3 Processes. Dissolution of irradiated Np-237 target material, and separation and purification of Np-237 and Pu-238 product streams would be possible at production rates of ?2 kg/month of Pu-238 if the existing H-Canyon Frames Process spare equipment were re-installed. Previously, the primary H-Canyon Frames equipment was removed to be replaced: however, the replacement project was stopped. The spare equipment is stored and still available for installation. Out of specification Pu-238 scrap material can be purified and recovered by utilizing the HB-Line Phase- 1 Scrap Recovery Line and the Phase-3 Pu-238 Oxide Conversion Line along with H-Canyon Frame Waste Recovery process. In addition, it also covers and describes utilizing the Phase-2 Np-237 Oxide Conversion Line, in conjunction with the H-Canyon Frames Process to restore the H-Canyon capability to process and recover Np-237 and Pu-238 from irradiated Np-237 targets and address potential synergies with other programs like recovery of Pu-244 and heavy isotopes of curium from other target material. (authors)

Fuller, Kenneth S. Jr.; Smith, Robert H. Jr.; Goergen, Charles R. [Savannah River Nuclear Solutions, LLC, Savannah River Site, Aiken, SC 29802 (United States)] [Savannah River Nuclear Solutions, LLC, Savannah River Site, Aiken, SC 29802 (United States)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

345

LMS-AMC-S01980-0-0.cdr  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Amchitka Data for Inclusion in the Database Amchitka Data for Inclusion in the Database This page intentionally left blank Table D-1. Actinide Concentration Determined by Analysis 1 of Biota Samples Collected by CRESP 2 Composite ID Coded Sample ID Weight (grams) Tissue Coded Species Species Location Collector Serial No Am-241 (Bq/kg) Am-241 s.d. Am-241 MDA Am-241 Detects Pu-238 (Bq/kg) Pu-238 s.d. Pu-238 MDA Pu-238 Detects Pu-239+240 (Bq/kg) Pu-239+240 s.d. Pu-239+240 MDA Pu-239+240 Detects Sr-90 (Bq/kg) Sr-90 s.d. Sr-90 MDA Sr-90 Detects ATKA-Ki2-JW-C551 B-A-163-B 15 B A ATKA Ki2 JW C551 0.025 0.0256 0.0255 0 -0.001 0.0057 0.0287 0 0.0037 0.0112 0.0287 0 -0.227 0.477 1.95 0 BROCK-KI-AL-C503 B-B-154-B 15 B B BROCK KI AL C503 0.0289 0.0266 0.0281 1 0.0042 0.0119 0.031 0 0.0243 0.0346 0.031 0 -0.177 0.53 2.16 0

346

variability 1. Dry areas reasonable  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

.g., wind energy #12;Marine Core Service Organisation Wind KNMI lead DU at IFREMER L3 PU at KNMI L4 PU, .. ), QuikScat (NSCAT3, NWP Ocean Calibration) Documentation, verification #12;Plans Wind Constellation Description Platform NASA, Rapidscat, ISS · HY2A not NRT yet #12;Global constellation users OSI SAF Message

Haak, Hein

347

NASA's Planetary Science Program Support of Radioisotope  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for Mars 2020 · Advanced Stirling Radioisotope Generator ­ 2 Pu-238 General Purpose Heat Source Modules Inventory 4 #12;Radioisotope Power Systems · Multi-Mission Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generator ­ 8 Pu-238;Looking Ahead · Multi-Mission Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generator (MMRTG) -- working well on Mars

Rathbun, Julie A.

348

Monte Carlo simulation of embedded 241Am activity in injured palm  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......Pu isotopes (17.5 keV) and neptunium L X-rays (17.8 keV) of 241Am...uranium L X-rays due to Pu and neptunium L X-rays due to 241Am. Ratio...wounds incurred by former workers at rocky flats. Health Phys. (2006) 91(2......

M. Y. Nadar; H. K. Patni; D. K. Akar; Lokpati Mishra; I. S. Singh; D. D. Rao; P. K. Sarkar

2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

349

tokamakreactors University ,  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory Presented at PPPL PS&T seminar Jan 12, 2001, Princeton, NJ #12; 1, PU, Jan.18, 2001, Princeton NJ PRINCETON PLASMA PHYSICS LABORATORY PPPL 2 #12; INTRODUCTION Plasma reactor. Leonid E. Zakharov, PPPL Theory seminar, PU, Jan.18, 2001, Princeton NJ PRINCETON PLASMA PHYSICS

Zakharov, Leonid E.

350

The complexation behavior of neptunium and plutonium with nitrilotriacetic acid  

SciTech Connect

The first stability constant of NpO{sub 2}{sup +} with nitrilotriacetic acid (NTA) was determined at four ionic strengths (0.5, 1.0, 2.0, 3.0 M) using spectrophotometry. Nonlinear least-squares data fitting identified the complex as NpO{sub 2}NTA{sup 2-}. The Specific Ion Interaction Theory (S.I.T) approximation method was used to determine the stability constants at infinite dilution. First results on Pu{sup 4+} and PuO{sub 2}{sup 2+} complexation with NTA are reported. The stability constant for the Pu(NTA){sup +} complex at I = 0.1 M strength is given. From results for PuO{sub 2}{sup 2+} complexation with NTA (I = 1 M) at pH < 3, the stability constant was derived for PuO{sub 2} NTA{sup {minus}}. At pH > 3, NTA partially reduced PuO{sub 2}{sup 2+} to PuO{sub 2}{sup +}. 3 refs., 5 figs., 4 tabs.

Nitsche, H.; Becraft, K.

1990-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

351

US Department of Energy Nevada Operations Office annual site environmental report: 1993. Volume 2: Appendices  

SciTech Connect

This report is comprised of appendices which support monitoring and surveillance on and around the Nevada Test Site (NTS) during 1993. Appendix A contains onsite Pu-238, gross beta, and gamma-emitting radionuclides in air. Appendix B contains onsite tritium in air. Appendix C contains onsite Pu-238, Sr-90, gross alpha and beta, gamma-emitting radionuclides, Ra-226, Ra-228 and tritium in water. A summary of 1993 results of offsite radiological monitoring is included in Appendix D. Appendix E contains radioactive noble gases in air onsite. Appendix F contains onsite thermoluminescent dosimeter data. Historical trends in onsite thermoluminescent dosimeter data are contained in Appendix G. Appendix H summarizes 1993 compliance at the DOE/NV NTS and non-NTS facilities. Appendix I summarizes the 1993 results of non radiological monitoring.

Black, S.C.; Glines, W.M.; Townsend, Y.E.

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

352

Part 2 of 11  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

backskin m-2.2.5 Complete design of backski n modification machine m-2.2 .6 Complete identification of pick and place robot Milestones due no later th an December 31, 2003...

353

CANMET CO2 Consortium - O2/CO2 Recycle Combustion  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

CANMET CO CANMET CO 2 Consortium - O 2 /CO 2 Recycle Combustion Background The mission of the U.S. Department of Energy/National Energy Technology Laboratory (DOE/NETL) Existing Plants, Emissions & Capture (EPEC) Research & Development (R&D) Program is to develop innovative environmental control technologies to enable full use of the nation's vast coal reserves, while at the same time allowing the current fleet of coal-fired power plants to comply with existing and emerging environmental

354

& /001 ( & 2 911 :0;/05 & ! 2  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. H. Dempster2 , S. Williams1 (1 HSBC Global Markets, 8 Canada Square, London E14 5HQ; 2 Center of years. Over the last 18 months a joint project with HSBC Global Markets has looked at how the bank

Fernandez, Thomas

355

Legislative seminars ..............2 Pavement conference..............2  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

· Legislative seminars ..............2 · Pavement conference..............2 · Bike center conference .................4 A monthly report on transportation research, education, and outreach activities at the University of Minnesota April 2009 Pricing continued on page 2 Inside Conference continued on page 4

Minnesota, University of

356

Measured solubilities and speciations of neptunium, plutonium, and americium in a typical groundwater (J-13) from the Yucca Mountain region; Milestone report 3010-WBS 1.2.3.4.1.3.1  

SciTech Connect

Solubility and speciation data are important in understanding aqueous radionuclide transport through the geosphere. They define the source term for transport retardation processes such as sorption and colloid formation. Solubility and speciation data are useful in verifying the validity of geochemical codes that are part of predictive transport models. Results are presented from solubility and speciation experiments of {sup 237}NpO{sub 2}{sup +}, {sup 239}Pu{sup 4+}, {sup 241}Am{sup 3+}/Nd{sup 3+}, and {sup 243}Am{sup 3+} in J-13 groundwater (from the Yucca Mountain region, Nevada, which is being investigated as a potential high-level nuclear waste disposal site) at three different temperatures (25{degree}, 60{degree}, and 90{degree}C) and pH values (5.9, 7.0, and 8.5). The solubility-controlling steady-state solids were identified and the speciation and/or oxidation states present in the supernatant solutions were determined. The neptunium solubility decreased with increasing temperature and pH. Plutonium concentrations decreased with increasing temperature and showed no trend with pH. The americium solutions showed no clear solubility trend with increasing temperature and increasing pH.

Nitsche, H.; Gatti, R.C.; Standifer, E.M. [and others] [Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States)

1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

357

Effects of lump characteristics on plutonium self absorption correction methods  

SciTech Connect

An evaluation study has been undertaken to assess the robustness of several published Pu self-absorption correction methods against variation in size, shape, density etc. for use in the gamma assay of nuclear waste. The correction methods studied are a numerical plutonium self absorption correction (PuSAC) technique, the Fleissner 2-line, Fleissner 3-line and Infinite Energy Extrapolation methods with both linear and polynomial extrapolation to 1/E=0. The performance of these methods has been compared for a limited set of measured encapsulated PuO{sub 2} sources plus a range of modelled unencapsulated Pu lumps. An indication of the magnitude of the uncertainties of the numerical PuSAC method has been determined for cases of blind assays where the Pu material, shape and distribution are unknown with the aim of ultimately applying it to real waste. The importance of the range of Pu lumps used in the baseline modelled dataset has been examined. Data are presented to illustrate how the uncertainties in the method are affected by the shape, composition, density, number and mass distribution of Pu particles in a sample for a given modelled base dataset. (authors)

Curtis, D. C.; Wormald, M. R. [Canberra UK Ltd (United Kingdom); Croft, S. [Canberra Industries Inc., 800 Research Parkway, Meriden, CT 06450 (United States)

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

358

Reactivity of high plutonium-containing glasses for the immobilization of surplus fissile materials  

SciTech Connect

Experiments have been performed on glasses doped with 2 and 7 wt % plutonium to evaluate factors that may be important in the performance of these high-Pu-loaded glasses for repository storage. The high Pu loadings result from the need to dispose of excess Pu from weapons dismantling. The glasses were reacted in water vapor to simulate aging that may occur under unsaturated storage conditions prior to contact with liquid water. They were also reacted with liquid water under standard static leach test conditions. The results were compared with similar tests of a reference glass (202 glass) containing only 0.01 wt % Pu. In vapor hydration testing to date, at 2 wt % loading, the Pu was incorporated into the glass without phase separation, and reaction in water vapor proceeded at a rate comparable with that of the 202 glass. At wt % loading, a Pu phase separated and was not uniformly incorporated into the glass. The vapor reaction of this glass proceeded at a more rapid rate. This phase separation was manifested in the static leach tests, where colloidal phases of Pu-rich material remained suspended in solution, thereby increasing the absolute Pu release when compared to the 202 glass.

Bates, J.K.; Hoh, J.C.; Emery, J.W.; Buck, E.C.; Fortner, J.A.; Wolf, S.F.; Johnson, T.R.

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

359

TableHC2.2.xls  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Fewer than 500............................................ Fewer than 500............................................ 3.1 Q Q 0.6 1.7 0.4 500 to 999................................................... 22.2 3.5 1.1 4.2 10.2 3.2 1,000 to 1,499............................................. 19.1 9.0 1.6 1.8 4.0 2.6 1,500 to 1,999............................................. 14.4 11.1 1.8 0.5 0.5 0.4 2,000 to 2,499............................................. 12.8 11.3 1.0 0.2 Q Q 2,500 to 2,999............................................. 10.1 9.0 0.7 Q Q Q 3,000 to 3,499............................................. 8.2 7.6 0.5 Q N Q 3,500 to 3,999............................................. 5.7 5.5 Q Q Q N 4,000 or More.............................................. 15.7 14.9 0.7 Q Q N Heated Floorspace None............................................................

360

Statistical Nonparametric Model for Natural Salt Estimation James R. Prairie1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and the Colorado River basin in the western United States are afflicted with salinity problems. In the Colorado ; Terrance J. Fulp3 ; and Edith A. Zagona, M.ASCE4 Abstract: Many rivers in the Western U.S. suffer from high the nonparametric model. We apply this model to data from a stream gauge at Glenwood Springs, Colo., on the Colorado

Balaji, Rajagopalan

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "2 glenwood pu" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Still Flying Issue 2  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Straits Chinese 101 Puzzles All the best Firefly-related stuff in the ?Verse! #1;#2;#3;#4;#5;#6;#2;#7;#8;#5;#7; #7;#2;#11;#8;#12;#2;#6;#2;#3; #7;#14;#2;#3; #8;#2;#15;#7;#16;#17;#17;#18;#2;#7;#19;#20;#20;#7;#7;#1;#2;#7; #21;#5;#3;#5;#22;#16...;#17;#2;#7;#21;#12;#5;#23;#18;#17;#2;#3; #7;#23;#5;#12;#7;#3;#2;#8;#8;#16; #22;#7;#8;#24;#16;#17;#7;#17;#3;#16;#21;#25;#7;#24;#5;#21;#2;#23;#18;#3;#3; #25;#7; #16;#8;#7;#26;#5; #27;#8;#7;#24; #21;#21;#2; #7; #22; #16; #20;#7; #7; #7...

362

Microsoft PowerPoint - Zr_behavior [Compatibility Mode]  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Reduction Reduction Behaviors of Zirconium Oxide Compounds in LiCl-Li 2 O Melt International Pyroprocessing Research Conference August 29, 2012 Fontana, Wisconsin, USA Y. Sakamura, M. Iizuka and T. Koyama Central Research Institute of Electric Power Industry (CRIEPI) S. Kitawaki, A. Nakayoshi and H. Kofuji Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA) Pyrochemical Reprocessing for Spent LWR Fuels LWR Reduction product (U-Pu-MA +FP) MO 2 + 4e - M + 2O 2- Electrolytic reduction U-Pu-MA, U metal Spent oxide fuel Electrorefining O 2- LiCl (650 o C) O 2 3 V FP(Cs,Sr,etc) U U,Pu MA 液体Cd 陰極 固体陰極 陽極 還元物 U LiCl-KCl (500 o C) U,Pu MA Liquid Cd cathode Solid cathode Anode RE 3+ Pu 3+ U 3+ MA 3+ Metal fuel Pyrochemical Reprocessing for Spent LWR Fuels LWR Reduction product (U-Pu-MA +FP) MO 2 + 4e - M + 2O 2- Electrolytic reduction U-Pu-MA, U metal Spent oxide fuel Electrorefining

363

ICCS Area 2, Phase 2 Renewal Applications  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

10, 2010 10, 2010 1. When does Phase II start date? Assume July 1? Answer: Per the FOA, "Projects that are selected for Phase 2 will receive no more than a 4 month extension to Phase 1 to allow DOE and the Phase 2 Recipient(s) sufficient time to negotiate the full scope and budget for Phase 2. DOE reserves the right to award Phase 2 anytime during this 4 month period". DOE will not extend a Phase 1 project beyond September 30, 2010; therefore, it is likely that no more than a 3 month extension will be provided. Further, depending upon the positive cooperation and responsiveness of the Phase 2 Recipient, DOE will be able to make the full Phase 2 award more quickly. Any start date proposed by the Recipient is subject to negotiation with DOE if the project is selected.

364

H2 Safety Snapshot - Vol. 2, Issue 2, July 2011  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

of Energy Fuel Cell Technologies Program (www.h2bestpractices.orgsafetyplanning) u FMEA Info Centre, a non-commercial web-based inventory dedicated to the promotion of FMEA...

365

Argonne Chemical Sciences & Engineering - Nuclear & Environmental Processes  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

f-Element Polyoxoanion Chemistry f-Element Polyoxoanion Chemistry PuPreyssler The trans-uranium chemistry of the Preyssler heteropolyanion was extended to include the synthesis of the Pu(III) complex, [PuP5W30O110]12-, whose electroanalytical characterization reveals dual redox activity involving the 1-electron Pu(III)/Pu(IV) couple of the guest ion at +0.96 V vs. Ag/AgCl and the 5 × 2-electron reductive electrochemistry of the P-W-O host framework at potentials between -0.6 and 0 V, and electrostatic ion solvation behavior. Details are presented in the article by Antonio and Chiang, Inorg. Chem. 2008, 47, 8285. Polyoxoanions of general composition [XaMbOc]d- (X º P, Si; M º W, Mo) have applications in various disciplines including medicine, catalysis, and separations science. In prospective applications relating to nuclear waste

366

Delocalization and occupancy effects of 5f orbitals in plutonium intermetallics using L3-edge resonant X-ray emission spectroscopy  

SciTech Connect

Although actinide (An) L3 -edge X-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES) spectroscopy has been very effective in determining An oxidation states in insulating, ionically bonded materials, such as in certain coordination compounds and mineral systems, the technique fails in systems featuring more delocalized 5f orbitals, especially in metals. Recently, actinide L3-edge resonant X-ray emission spec- troscopy (RXES) has been shown to be an effective alternative. This technique is further demonstrated here using a parameterized partial unoccupied density of states method to quantify both occupancy and delocalization of the 5f orbital in ?-Pu, ?-Pu, PuCoGa5 , PuCoIn5 , and PuSb2. These new results, supported by FEFF calculations, highlight the effects of strong correlations on RXES spectra and the technique?s ability to differentiate between f-orbital occupation and delocalization.

Booth, C. H.; Medling, S. A.; Jiang, Yu; Bauer, E. D.; Tobash, P. H.; Mitchell, J. N.; Veirs, D. K.; Wall, M. A.; Allen, P. G.; Kas, J. J.; Sokaras, D.; Nordlund, D.; Weng, T.-C.

2014-06-24T23:59:59.000Z

367

LEDs_2LEDs_2 radiative recombination efficiency  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

· heterojunction band diagrams · current efficiency · extraction efficiency · wall-plug efficiency #12;2 Non. 8.1] #12;6 Materials for highMaterials for high--brightnessbrightness LEDsLEDsSecs. 8.1, 8.2.1 Why system Gas handling system Computer Control Reactor #12;8 Examples ofExamples of colourcolour

Pulfrey, David L.

368

T2WELL/ECO2N  

Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

002966IBMPC00 T2Well/ECO2N Version 1.0: Multiphase and Non-Isothermal Model for Coupled Wellbore-Reservoir Flow of Carbon Dioxide and Variable Salinity Water http:..esd.lbl.gov/tough/licensing.html

369

table2.2_02.xls  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 Nonfuel (Feedstock) Use of Combustible Energy, 2002; 2 Nonfuel (Feedstock) Use of Combustible Energy, 2002; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources; Unit: Trillion Btu. RSE NAICS Residual Distillate Natural LPG and Coke Row Code(a) Subsector and Industry Total Fuel Oil Fuel Oil(b) Gas(c) NGL(d) Coal and Breeze Other(e) Factors Total United States RSE Column Factors: 1.4 0.4 1.6 1.2 1.2 1.1 0.7 1.2 311 Food 8 * Q 7 0 0 * * 10.2 311221 Wet Corn Milling * 0 * 0 0 0 0 * 0.7 31131 Sugar * 0 * * 0 0 * * 0.9 311421 Fruit and Vegetable Canning * * * 0 0 0 0 * 1.7 312 Beverage and Tobacco Products 1 * * * 0 0 0 1 2.3 3121 Beverages * * * 0 0 0 0 * 28.9 3122 Tobacco 1 0 0 * 0 0 0 1 0.8 313 Textile Mills 1 0 * 1 0 0 0 * 0.8 314 Textile Product Mills * 0 0 * 0 * 0 * 2 315 Apparel

370

CO2 sequestration | EMSL  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

CO2 sequestration CO2 sequestration Leads No leads are available at this time. Low-Temperature Carbon Monoxide Oxidation Catalysed by Regenerable Atomically Dispersed Palladium on...

371

Polymerizable 2(2-hydroxynaphthyl)2H-benzotriazole compounds  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Benzotriazole compounds having the formula: ##STR1## wherein R.sub.1 is H, Cl, or OCH.sub.3 ; R.sub.2 is a hydroxynaphthyl group; and R.sub.3 is a vinyl unsaturated polymerizable group. Homopolymers or copolymers thereof are effective as UV light stabilizers and absorbers.

Gomez, P.M.; Neidlinger, H.H.

1991-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

372

H2 Safety Snapshot - Vol. 2, Issue 2, July 2011 | Department...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

2, July 2011 H2 Safety Snapshot - Vol. 2, Issue 2, July 2011 This third issue describes hazard analysis in H2 facility design and operations. h2snapshotv2i2.pdf More Documents &...

373

Rigidity theory for matroids  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the (squared) edge lengths Q(pu pv), for fu;vg2E, where Q(x) = Pdi=1x2i ? (II.) What is the dimension of the space of in nitesimal motions p that preserve all the edge directions pu pv regarded as slopes, that is, up to scaling? The answers... to these questions are known to be determined by certain linear dependence matroids repre- sented over transcendental extensions of R, as we now explain. First, the d-dimensional rigidity matroid Rd(G) is the matroid represented by the vectors (2) f(eu ev) (pu pv...

Develin, Mike; Martin, Jeremy L.; Reiner, Victor

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

374

Neutron field characterisation at mixed oxide fuel plant  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......plutonium oxide (PuO2) and 70 % depleted uranium oxide (UO2) are blended together...and typical field conditions. Health Phys. (1990) 58(6):691-704...Power Plants Quality Assurance, Health Care Radiation Dosage Radiation......

C. Passmore; M. Million; M. Kirr; J. Bartz; M. S. Akselrod; A. Devita; J. Berard

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

375

Mineralization of Basalts in the CO2-H2O-SO2-O2 System. | EMSL  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

SO2-O2 System. Mineralization of Basalts in the CO2-H2O-SO2-O2 System. Abstract: Sequestering carbon dioxide (CO2) containing minor amounts of co-contaminants in geologic...

376

ICCS Area 2, Phase 2 Renewal Applications  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

4, 2010 4, 2010 1. Question: In Phase 2 we anticipate a couple of large capital purchases for demonstration equipment. I am curious if because this is a federally funded program if California State Sales Tax wouldn't apply. Answer: Being a Recipient of a federally funded financial assistance agreement does not make the Recipient tax exempt from state sales taxes. 2. Question: In the Renewal Application clause, Part III, under project narrative content relating to Criteria 4: "Project Organization and Project Management Plan", there is a description for the content of the Project Management Plan. Under Item 4, "Funding and Costing Profile", it states,

377

FY 2013 Volume 2  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

2 2 Volume 2 f Department of Energy FY 2013 Congressional B d R Budget Request Other Defense Activities Departmental Administration Inspector General Working Capital F nd Working Capital Fund Safeguards and Security Crosscut Pensions February 2012 Office of Chief Financial Officer Volume 2 DOE/CF-0072 Volume 2 f Department of Energy FY 2013 Congressional B d R Budget Request Other Defense Activities Departmental Administration Inspector General Working Capital F nd Working Capital Fund Safeguards and Security Crosscut Pensions February 2012 Office of Chief Financial Officer Volume 2 Printed with soy ink on recycled paper Department of Energy/ Volume 2 FY 2013 Congressional Budget Volume 2 Table of Contents Page Appropriation Account Summary .............................................................................................................3

378

Solutions to Test 2  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

March 27, 2014. Math 373. Test 2. Fall 2013. October 17, 2013. 1. You are given the following table of interest rates: Year 1. Year 2. Year 3. Portfolio. Year. 2007.

jeffb_000

2014-03-26T23:59:59.000Z

379

...................................................................................................... 1 (1) ........................................................................ 2  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, - ...................................................................................................... 1 - (1) ........................................................................ 2 . //98546 (1) - , - . : 1. : ) 81 . 3057/2002 � . 2725/1999, - � ( 239/2003 � - � ( 146). 2. ' . 8595/12.10.2007 - . 3. - , : 1 28 . 2121/1993 ( ' 25

Kouroupetroglou, Georgios

380

Exam 2 Information  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Math 13900. Exam 2 Information. Spring 2014. Exam 2 for Math 13900 will take place on Monday, March 10 th at 8:00 pm in ARMS 1010. Please arrive 15...

User

2014-02-19T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "2 glenwood pu" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Exam 2 Information  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Math 13800. Exam 2 Information. Fall 2014. Exam 2 for Math 13800 will take place on Monday, October 20, 2014 in LWSN B155 at 8:00 pm. Please arrive 15

User

2014-10-09T23:59:59.000Z

382

Exam 2 Information  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Mar 10, 2014 ... Math 13800. Exam 2 Information. Spring 2014. Exam 2 for Math 13800 will take place on Monday, March 10, 2014 in WTHR 104 at 8:00 pm.

User

2014-02-20T23:59:59.000Z

383

Computer News, Volume 2  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

[mandelbrot set] MATH DEPT Computer News, Volume 2. How to handle .pdf files on the web: acroread, distill, and Netscape...

384

2, 14031427, 2002 Polarization  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, University of Bremen, Germany 2 GKSS Research Center Geesthacht GmbH, Geesthacht, Germany Received: 30 August

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

385

Network Inference Objects, Version 2.2  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2008 are: Alexander J. Hartemink, Ph.D. Assistant Professor Department of Computer Science Duke School of Engineering Office of Licensing & Ventures Duke University Box 90083 Durham, NC 27708 of products that will be sold or offered for sale, or distribution of Software commercially. 2. LICENSE GRANT

Hartemink, Alexander

386

Quality Assurance Exchange June 2006, Volume 2 Issue 2 | Department...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

June 2006, Volume 2 Issue 2 Quality Assurance Exchange June 2006, Volume 2 Issue 2 Quality Assurance Exchange June 2006, Volume 2 Issue 2 U.S. Department of Energy, Office of...

387

No. 2 Distillate Prices - Residential  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

592 3.219 2.386 2.798 - - 1978-2012 592 3.219 2.386 2.798 - - 1978-2012 East Coast (PADD 1) 2.593 3.223 2.412 2.829 - - 1983-2012 New England (PADD 1A) 2.584 3.206 2.412 2.804 - - 1983-2012 Connecticut 2.615 3.195 2.487 2.835 - - 1978-2012 Maine 2.540 3.199 2.382 2.639 - - 1978-2012 Massachusetts 2.576 3.197 2.358 2.850 - - 1978-2012 New Hampshire 2.535 3.207 2.377 2.680 - - 1978-2012 Rhode Island 2.602 3.210 2.376 2.927 - - 1978-2012 Vermont 2.679 3.323 2.593 2.795 - - 1978-2012 Central Atlantic (PADD 1B) 2.623 3.243 2.430 2.878 - - 1983-2012 Delaware 2.584 3.187 2.421 2.951 - - 1978-2012 District of Columbia W W W W - - 1978-2012 Maryland 2.668 3.273 2.473 2.925 - - 1978-2012 New Jersey 2.664 3.267 2.404 2.973 - - 1978-2012

388

FY 2009 Volume 2  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

2 2 DOE/CF-025 Volume 2 Other Defense Activities Departmental Administration Inspector General Loan Guarantee Program Working Capital Fund Energy Information Administration Safeguards and Security Crosscut February 2008 Office of Chief Financial Officer Department of Energy FY 2009 Congressional Budget Request Volume 2 DOE/CF-025 Volume 2 Other Defense Activities Departmental Administration Inspector General Loan Guarantee Program Working Capital Fund Energy Information Administration Safeguards and Security Crosscut Printed with soy ink on recycled paper Other Defense Activities Departmental Administration Inspector General Loan Guarantee Program Working Capital Fund Energy Information Administration Safeguards and Security Crosscut Other Defense Activities Departmental Administration

389

FY 2007 Volume 2  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

2 2 DOE/CF-003 Volume 2 Other defense activities Security & Safety Performance assurance Environment, safety & health Legacy management Nuclear energy Defense related administrative support Hearings and appeals Safeguards & security crosscut Department of Energy FY 2007 Congressional Budget Request February 2006 Office of Chief Financial Officer Volume 2 DOE/CF-003 Volume 2 Printed with soy ink on recycled paper Other defense activities Security & Safety Performance assurance Environment, safety & health Legacy management Nuclear energy Defense related administrative support Hearings and appeals Safeguards & security crosscut Other Defense Activities Safeguards and Security Crosscut Other Defense Activities Safeguards and Security Crosscut Department of Energy/

390

FY 2006 Volume 2  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

2 2 February 2005 DOE/ME-0047 Volume 2 Other Defense Activities Security & Performance Assurance Environment, Safety & Health Legacy Management Nuclear Energy Defense Related Administrative Support Office of Hearings & Appeals Safeguards & Security Crosscut Department of Energy FY 2006 Congressional Budget Request Office of Management, Budget and Evaluation/CFO Volume 2 February 2005 DOE/ME-0047 Volume 2 Other Defense Activities Security & Performance Assurance Environment, Safety & Health Legacy Management Nuclear Energy Defense Related Administrative Support Office of Hearings & Appeals Safeguards & Security Crosscut Printed with soy ink on recycled paper Other Defense Activities Safeguards and Security Crosscut Other Defense Activities Safeguards and Security Crosscut

391

FY 2010 Volume 2  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

2 2 DOE/CF-036 Volume 2 Other Defense Activities Departmental Administration Inspector General Advanced Technology Vehicles Manufacturing Loan Program Title 17 Innovative Technology Loan Guarantee Program Working Capital Fund Energy Information Administration Safeguards and Security Crosscut May 2009 Office of Chief Financial Officer FY 2010 Congressional Budget Request Volume 2 DOE/CF-036 Volume 2 Other Defense Activities Departmental Administration Inspector General Advanced Technology Vehicles Manufacturing Loan Program Title 17 Innovative Technology Loan Guarantee Program Working Capital Fund Energy Information Administration Safeguards and Security Crosscut Printed with soy ink on recycled paper Other Defense Activities Departmental Administration Inspector General Advanced Technology Vehicles Manufacturing Loan Program

392

FY 2011 Volume 2  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

2 2 DOE/CF-0048 Volume 2 Other Defense Activities Departmental Administration Inspector General Advanced Technology Vehicles Manufacturing Loan Program Title 17 Innovative Technology Loan Guarantee Program Working Capital Fund Energy Information Administration Safeguards and Security Crosscut Domestic Utility Fee Pensions Department of Energy FY 2011 Congressional Budget Request February 2010 Office of Chief Financial Officer Volume 2 DOE/CF-0048 Volume 2 Other Defense Activities Departmental Administration Inspector General Advanced Technology Vehicles Manufacturing Loan Program Title 17 Innovative Technology Loan Guarantee Program Working Capital Fund Energy Information Administration Safeguards and Security Crosscut Domestic Utility Fee Pensions Department of Energy FY 2011 Congressional

393

table3.2  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Fuel Consumption, 2002; Fuel Consumption, 2002; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources; Unit: Trillion Btu. Total United States RSE Column Factors: 0.8 0.8 1.1 1.6 0.9 1.8 0.7 0.7 1.1 311 Food 1,116 230 13 19 575 5 184 1 90 7.6 311221 Wet Corn Milling 217 23 * * 61 * 121 0 11 1.2 31131 Sugar 111 2 2 1 22 * 37 1 46 1 311421 Fruit and Vegetable Canning 47 7 1 1 36 Q 0 0 1 12.5 312 Beverage and Tobacco Products 104 26 2 2 46 1 17 0 10 4.4 3121 Beverages 85 22 1 2 42 1 8 0 10 5.9 3122 Tobacco 19 4 1 * 4 * 10 0 * 1 313 Textile Mills 205 86 4 2 74 2 22 0 15 15.7 314 Textile Product Mills 60 17 2 Q 29 1 Q 0 Q 21.7 315 Apparel 30 12 * 1 16 * 0 0 * 23.2 316 Leather and Allied Products 7 2 * * 4 * 0 0 * 8.5 321 Wood Products 375 72 1 10 57 5 1 0 229 4.5 321113 Sawmills

394

NETL: CO2 Compression  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

CO2 Compression CO2 Compression The CO2 captured from a power plant will need to be compressed from near atmospheric pressure to a pressure between 1,500 and 2,200 psi in order to be transported via pipeline and then injected into an underground sequestration site. Read More! CO2 Compression The compression of CO2 represents a potentially large auxiliary power load on the overall power plant system. For example, in an August 2007 study conducted for DOE/NETL, CO2 compression was accomplished using a six-stage centrifugal compressor with interstage cooling that required an auxiliary load of approximately 7.5 percent of the gross power output of a subcritical pressure, coal-fired power plant. As a result, DOE/NETL is sponsoring R&D to develop novel methods that can significantly decrease the

395

BEAMLINE 10-2  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

0-2 0-2 CURRENT STATUS: Open SUPPORTED TECHNIQUES: 10-2a: X-ray absorption spectroscopy; XAS imaging 10-2b: X-ray scattering MAIN SCIENTIFIC DISCIPLINES: Biology / Materials / Environmental % TIME GENERAL USE: 100% SCHEDULING: Proposal Submittal and Scheduling Procedures Current SPEAR and Beam Line Schedules SOURCE: 30-pole, 1.45-Tesla Wiggler ID End Station BEAM LINE SPECIFICATIONS: energy range resolution DE/E spot size flux angular acceptance focused 4500 - 30000 eV 0.2 x .43 mm 1.5 mrad unfocused 4500 - 45000 eV 2.0 x 20.0 mm 1.5 mrad OPTICS: Bent cylinder, Rh-coated, single crystal Si, M0 mirror Radii: 1500 m (adjustable) x 32.9 mm Cut off energy: 22 keV, Mean angle of incidence: 2.7 mrad MONOCHROMATOR: Si(111) f=90° or Si(220) f=90° Liquid nitrogen-cooled,

396

PANS turbulence model: investigation of computational and physical closure issues in flow past a circular cylinder  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

p = P +pu (2.4) The cut-o can be arbitrary but the lter must commute with temporal and spatial di erentiation (Germano 1992). When the lter is applied, we get hVii = Ui and 7 hpi= P. However, this decomposition is unlike that of the statistical one... of the unresolved kinetic energy equation emerges. @ku @t +Uj @ku @xj = Pu u +Tku (2.19) This is the generalized form of the unresolved kinetic energy evolution equation with ku = 12 (Vi;Vj) where Pu = 12 (Vi;Vj) @Ui@xj . In PANS closure at the two-equation level...

Reyes, Dasia Ann

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

397

Thermodynamic Systems for Tier 2 Bin 2 Diesel Engines | Department...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Systems for Tier 2 Bin 2 Diesel Engines Thermodynamic Systems for Tier 2 Bin 2 Diesel Engines Discusses engine technology enablers that help achieve overall system integration...

398

ESH100.2.GEN.2  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

GEN.2 GEN.2 Procedure Title Determine, Complete, and Document Required ES&H Training Procedure Manager HOLLEY, BELINDA M. Status Active Subject Matter Expert Linda P. Wilson Dorrance E. McLean-CA Contact Applicability, Exceptions, and Consequences This corporate procedure applies to all Members of the Workforce, except as noted below. This procedure addresses two types of ES&H Training: corporate-managed and line-managed training. Descriptions of these types of training are in the Ownership by Activity table on the Corporate Learning and Professional Development (CL&PD) website. This procedure does not address the performance-based training processes required at nuclear facilities and for safeguards and security. Those organizations may have to meet certain DOE requirements for

399

ESH100.2.OTH.2  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

2 2 Procedure Title Relocated - Perform Hot Work Safely Status Relocated Applicability, Exceptions, and Consequences For large populations of the work force, use this standard language: This corporate procedure applies to all Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) organizations, all management elements, all SNL sites, and all Members of the Workforce. If the above statement is not applicable to any particular groups, identify each excluded group here (e.g.,"Students are excluded from this procedure."). For small populations or subsets of populations, complete the follow standard phrase: This corporate procedure applies to all... (e.g., managers, students, radiation workers) Next, use the following standard language for exceptions and consequences: Exceptions to, or deviations from this procedure shall be approved through

400

a2.xls  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

North North east Mid- west South West All Buildings North- east Mid- west South West All Buildings .................................... 4,859 761 1,305 1,873 920 71,658 13,995 18,103 26,739 12,820 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 ................................... 2,586 374 728 985 499 6,922 1,059 1,908 2,618 1,337 5,001 to 10,000 ................................. 948 155 228 386 179 7,033 1,169 1,676 2,844 1,343 10,001 to 25,000 ............................... 810 138 211 308 152 12,659 2,122 3,317 4,859 2,361 25,001 to 50,000 ............................... 261 39 75 96 50 9,382 1,388 2,712 3,474 1,808 50,001 to 100,000 ............................. 147 31 35 58 22 10,291 2,272 2,376 4,059 1,584 100,001 to 200,000 ........................... 74 15 18 30 10 10,217 2,238 2,486 4,140 1,353 200,001 to 500,000 ...........................

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "2 glenwood pu" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Beamline 7.2  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

2 Print 2 Print Diagnostic beamline GENERAL BEAMLINE INFORMATION Operational Yes, but not open to users Source characteristics Bend magnet Energy range Port 1: ~17 keV transmission though Mo filters Port 2: IR-visible from large-angle synchrotron radiation; UV-x-ray for beam position monitor (BPM) Endstations Port 1: Hard x-ray to visible converter (phosphor) Port 2: None (available for temporary experiments) Both ports are inside the ALS shielding. Characteristics Port 1: Pinhole-based x-ray system for transverse measurements Port 2: IR/visible port available for temporary experiments; x-ray BPM based on electron secondary emission induced in metallic blades by synchrotron radiation Spatial resolution Port 1: <25 µm transverse Port 2: ~1 µm position; <1 µrad angle (x-ray BPM)

402

Geologic CO2 Sequestration  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Geologic CO2 Sequestration Geologic CO2 Sequestration Geologic reservoirs offer promising option for long- term storage of captured CO 2 Accumulations of gases (including CO 2 ) in geologic reservoirs, by natural processes or through enhanced oil recovery operations, demonstrate that gas can be stored for long periods of time and provide insights to the efficacy and impacts of geological gas storage. Los Alamos scientists in the Earth and Environmental Sciences (EES) Division have been involved in geologic CO 2 storage research for over a decade. Research Highlights * Led first-ever US field test on CO 2 sequestration in depleted oil reservoirs * Participant in two Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnerships (Southwest Regional and Big Sky) * Part of the National Risk Assessment Partnership (NRAP) for CO

403

Beamline 7.2  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

2 Print 2 Print Diagnostic beamline GENERAL BEAMLINE INFORMATION Operational Yes, but not open to users Source characteristics Bend magnet Energy range Port 1: ~17 keV transmission though Mo filters Port 2: IR-visible from large-angle synchrotron radiation; UV-x-ray for beam position monitor (BPM) Endstations Port 1: Hard x-ray to visible converter (phosphor) Port 2: None (available for temporary experiments) Both ports are inside the ALS shielding. Characteristics Port 1: Pinhole-based x-ray system for transverse measurements Port 2: IR/visible port available for temporary experiments; x-ray BPM based on electron secondary emission induced in metallic blades by synchrotron radiation Spatial resolution Port 1: <25 µm transverse Port 2: ~1 µm position; <1 µrad angle (x-ray BPM)

404

BEAMLINE 4-2  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

2 2 CURRENT STATUS: Open SUPPORTED TECHNIQUES: Biological Small Angle X-ray Scattering/Diffraction Macromolecular solution x-ray scattering Lipid membrane diffraction Fiber diffraction Time-resolved x-ray scattering/diffraction Small-angle single crystal diffraction Ultra small-angle x-ray scattering (under development) MAIN SCIENTIFIC DISCIPLINES: Biology % TIME GENERAL USE: 100% SCHEDULING: Proposal Submittal and Scheduling Procedures Current SPEAR and Beam Line Schedules SOURCE: 20-pole, 2.0-Tesla Wiggler ID End Station BEAM LINE SPECIFICATIONS: energy range grating type resolution DE/E spot size flux angular acceptance focused (crystal) 6000-18000 eV ~5 x 10-4 ~0.2 x 1.0mm < 1.0 mrad focused (multilayers) 8000-12000 eV ~3 x 10-2 ~0.2 x 1.0mm < 1.0 mrad

405

Beamline 7.2  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

2 Print 2 Print Diagnostic beamline GENERAL BEAMLINE INFORMATION Operational Yes, but not open to users Source characteristics Bend magnet Energy range Port 1: ~17 keV transmission though Mo filters Port 2: IR-visible from large-angle synchrotron radiation; UV-x-ray for beam position monitor (BPM) Endstations Port 1: Hard x-ray to visible converter (phosphor) Port 2: None (available for temporary experiments) Both ports are inside the ALS shielding. Characteristics Port 1: Pinhole-based x-ray system for transverse measurements Port 2: IR/visible port available for temporary experiments; x-ray BPM based on electron secondary emission induced in metallic blades by synchrotron radiation Spatial resolution Port 1: <25 µm transverse Port 2: ~1 µm position; <1 µrad angle (x-ray BPM)

406

Beamline 7.2  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

2 Print 2 Print Diagnostic beamline GENERAL BEAMLINE INFORMATION Operational Yes, but not open to users Source characteristics Bend magnet Energy range Port 1: ~17 keV transmission though Mo filters Port 2: IR-visible from large-angle synchrotron radiation; UV-x-ray for beam position monitor (BPM) Endstations Port 1: Hard x-ray to visible converter (phosphor) Port 2: None (available for temporary experiments) Both ports are inside the ALS shielding. Characteristics Port 1: Pinhole-based x-ray system for transverse measurements Port 2: IR/visible port available for temporary experiments; x-ray BPM based on electron secondary emission induced in metallic blades by synchrotron radiation Spatial resolution Port 1: <25 µm transverse Port 2: ~1 µm position; <1 µrad angle (x-ray BPM)

407

BNL | CO2 Laser  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

CO2 Laser CO2 Laser The ATF is one of the only two facilities worldwide operating picosecond, terawatt-class CO2 lasers. Our laser system consists of a picoseconds pulse-injector based on fast optical switching from the output of a conventional CO2 laser oscillator, and a chain of high-pressure laser amplifiers. It starts with a wavelength converter wherein a near-IR picosecond solid-state laser with l»1 μm produces a mid-IR 10-μm pulse. This process employs two methods; semiconductor optical switching, and the Kerr effect. First, we combine the outputs from a multi-nanosecond CO2 laser oscillator with a picosecond Nd:YAG laser on a germanium Brewster-plate to produce an ~200 ps, 10μm pulse by semiconductor optical switching. Co-propagating this pulse with a Nd:YAG's 2nd harmonic in a

408

FY 2008 Volume 2  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

2 2 DOE/CF-015 Volume 2 Other Defense Activities Health, Safety and Security Legacy Management Nuclear Energy Defense-Related Administrative Support Hearings and Appeals Safeguards and Security Crosscut Department of Energy FY 2008 Congressional Budget Request February 2007 Office of Chief Financial Officer Volume 2 DOE/CF-015 Volume 2 Other Defense Activities Health, Safety and Security Legacy Management Nuclear Energy Defense-Related Administrative Support Hearings and Appeals Safeguards and Security Crosscut Printed with soy ink on recycled paper Other Defense Activities Safeguards and Security Crosscut Other Defense Activities Safeguards and Security Crosscut Department of Energy/ Other Defense Activities FY 2008 Congressional Budget Volume 2 Table of Contents Page

409

) " (2010: 1. KI + I2 .  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

."'.' . ,'., ,.' '. '., ,) '(. . ­ ? ,, .-. - - . . ! 2. : SrCl2 NaCl CaCl2 . . ? . ("-Mass Spectrum: : NaCl ­ 58,60 CaCl2 ­ 110- , CO3 2- ., .) .( 4.2.,SrCO3-CaCO3,-HCl)CO2( CaCl2-SrCl2.,crown ether ,: 4.3.HCl,tungstosilicic acid,18

Maoz, Shahar

410

Biogeochemical Processes Responsible for the Enhanced Transport of Plutonium Under transient Unsaturated Ground Water Conditions  

SciTech Connect

To better understand longer-term vadose zone transport in southeastern soils, field lysimeter experiments were conducted at the Savannah River Site (SRS) near Aiken, SC, in the 1980s. Each of the three lysimeters analyzed herein contained a filter paper spiked with different Pu solutions, and they were left exposed to natural environmental conditions (including the growth of annual weed grasses) for 11 years. The resulting Pu activity measurements from each lysimeter core showed anomalous activity distributions below the source, with significant migration of Pu above the source. Such results are not explainable by adsorption phenomena alone. A transient variably saturated flow model with root water uptake was developed and coupled to a soil reactive transport model. Somewhat surprisingly, the fully transient analysis showed results nearly identical to those of a much simpler steady flow analysis performed previously. However, all phenomena studied were unable to produce the upward Pu transport observed in the data. This result suggests another transport mechanism such as Pu uptake by roots and upward transport due to transpiration. Thus, the variably saturated flow and reactive transport model was extended to include uptake and transport of Pu within the root xylem, along with computational methodology and results. In the extended model, flow velocity in the soil was driven by precipitation input along with transpiration and drainage. Water uptake by the roots determined the flow velocity in the root xylem, and this along with uptake of Pu in the transpiration stream drove advection and dispersion of the two Pu species in the xylem. During wet periods with high potential evapotranspiration, maximum flow velocities through the xylem would approached 600 cm/hr, orders of magnitude larger that flow velocities in the soil. Values for parameters and the correct conceptual viewpoint for Pu transport in plant xylem was uncertain. This motivated further experiments devoted to Pu uptake by corn roots and xylem transport. Plants were started in wet paper wrapped around each corn seed. When the tap roots were sufficiently long, the seedlings were transplanted to a soil container with the tap root extending out the container bottom. The soil container was then placed over a nutrient solution container, and the solution served as an additional medium for root growth. To conduct an uptake study, a radioactive substance, such as Pu complexed with the bacterial siderophore DFOB, was added to the nutrient solution. After a suitable elapsed time, the corn plant was sacrificed, cut into 10 cm lengths, and the activity distribution measured. Experimental results clarified the basic nature of Pu uptake and transport in corn plants, and resulting simulations suggested that each growing season Pu in the SRS lysimeters would move into the plant shoots and be deposited on the soil surface during the Fall dieback. Subsequent isotope ratio analyses showed that this did happen. OVERALL RESULTS AND CONCLUSIONS - (1) Pu transport downward from the source is controlled by advection, dispersion and adsorption, along with surface-mediated REDOX reactions. (2) Hysteresis, extreme root distribution functions, air-content dependent oxidation rate constants, and large evaporation rates from the soil surface were not able to explain the observed upward migration of Pu. (3) Small amounts of Pu uptake by plant roots and translocation in the transpiration stream creates a realistic mechanism for upward Pu migration (4) Realistic xylem cross-sectional areas imply high flow velocities under hot, wet conditions. Such flow velocities produce the correct shape for the observed activity distributions in the top 20 cm of the lysimeter soil. (5) Simulations imply that Pu should have moved into the above-ground grass tissue each year during the duration of the experiments, resulting in an activity residual accumulating on the soil surface. An isotope ratio analysis showed that the observed surface Pu residue was from the buried sources, not atmospheric fallout. (6) The

Fred J. Molz, III

2010-05-28T23:59:59.000Z

411

FY 2012 Volume 2  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

8 8 Volume 2 f Department of Energy FY 2012 Congressional B d R Budget Request Other Defense Activities Other Defense Activities Departmental Administration Inspector General Advanced Technology Vehicles Manufacturing Loan Program Title 17 Innovative Technology Loan Guarantee Program Better Building Pilot Loan Guarantee Initiative for Universities Schools and Hospitals Universities, Schools, and Hospitals Working Capital Fund Energy Information Administration Safeguards and Security Crosscut February 2011 Office of Chief Financial Officer Volume 2 g y Pensions Printed with soy ink on recycled paper Department of Energy/ Volume 2 FY 2012 Congressional Budget Volume 2 Table of Contents Page Appropriation Account Summary .............................................................................................................3

412

Phase 1 -- 2  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

2 2 Revised 8/7/02 " "Sample Statement of Work - Standard Service Offerings for Contractor-Identified Project" "Task #","Task Title","Work Scope","Deliverable","Agency Requirements" " " "Phase Two - Initial Project Development" "2-1","DO RFP Development - Direct Support","Based upon interviews Agency/site staff and consultation support, FEMP Services will prepare DO RFP for Agency/site. FEMP Services will provide onsite or telecon review of draft DO RFP with agency staff. FEMP Services will prepare 2nd draft DO RFP based on telecon and written agency review comments and recommendations. ","Draft DO RFP Document. On-site review of draft DO RFP.

413

Bio2Nano  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

correlated molecular networks based on a viral system and have begun to combine these networks with our micro- and nanofabricated environments. Moving forward, the Bio2Nano...

414

Computer News, Volume 2  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

MATH DEPT Computer News, Volume 2. How to add acroread and distill to your path. Click on RELOAD now. This page is frequently updated and you might be...

415

304 MATLAB.2  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

304. MATLAB.2 zation. To find where a function attains its minimum on an interval we use the fmin corrmand. example. First we make a M-file.

416

CRAC2 model description  

SciTech Connect

The CRAC2 computer code is a revised version of CRAC (Calculation of Reactor Accident Consequences) which was developed for the Reactor Safety Study. This document provides an overview of the CRAC2 code and a description of each of the models used. Significant improvements incorporated into CRAC2 include an improved weather sequence sampling technique, a new evacuation model, and new output capabilities. In addition, refinements have been made to the atmospheric transport and deposition model. Details of the modeling differences between CRAC2 and CRAC are emphasized in the model descriptions.

Ritchie, L.T.; Alpert, D.J.; Burke, R.P.; Johnson, J.D.; Ostmeyer, R.M.; Aldrich, D.C.; Blond, R.M.

1984-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

417

Task 2: Boiler Corrosion,  

SciTech Connect

For continued use of coal for power generation, there are needs to: Improve efficiency Decrease emissions (esp. CO2) Use alternate fuels or fuel mixes

G. R. Holcomb, B. S. Covino, Jr., H.-S. Shim, K. Davis, D. A. Eden, M. White, and H. Ban

2009-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

418

EMSL - CO2 sequestration  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

co2-sequestration en Low-Temperature Carbon Monoxide Oxidation Catalysed by Regenerable Atomically Dispersed Palladium on Alumina. http:www.emsl.pnl.govemslwebpublications...

419

EMSL - SPEX Fluorolog 2  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

spex-fluorolog-2 en Structures and Stabilities of (MgO)n Nanoclusters. http:www.emsl.pnl.govemslwebpublicationsstructures-and-stabilities-mgon-nanoclusters

420

Random coincidence of $2\  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Two neutrino double $\\beta$ decay can create irremovable background even in high energy resolution detectors searching for neutrinoless double $\\beta$ decay due to random coincidence of $2\

D. M. Chernyak; F. A. Danevich; A. Giuliani; E. Olivieri; M. Tenconi; V. I. Tretyak

2013-01-17T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "2 glenwood pu" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Computer Project # 2  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

being the resistance, inductance and capacitance, respectively, and E(t) I applied voltage), then. Kircho?'s Laws give the following 2'"d order differential equation...

422

L2-PNSO-0113  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

L2-PNSO-0113 L2-PNSO-0113 Department of Energy Pacific Northwest Site Office P.O. Box 350, K9-42 Richland, Washington 99352 JAW 2 4 2012 MEMORANDUM FOR TIMOTHY G. LYNCH OFFICE OF LITIGATION AND ENFORCEMENT GC-30, HQ FROM: SUBJECT: ROGER E. SNYDER MANAGER PNSO 2012 ANNUAL NATIONAL ENVIRONMENTAL POLICY ACT (NEPA) PLANNING SUMMARY in accordance with Section 5(a)(7)of DOE Order 45 LIB Change 2, NEPA Compliance Program each Secretarial Officer and Head of Field Organization arc required to submit an annual NEPA

423

Phase 1 --2  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

2 2 Rev 4-01-05 " "Statement of Work - Standard Service Offerings for Contractor-Identified Project at (insert project site)" "Task #","Task Title","Work Scope","Deliverable","Agency Requirements" " " "Phase Two - Initial Project Development" "2-1","DO RFP Development - Direct Support","Based upon interviews Agency/site staff and consultation support, FEMP Services will prepare DO RFP for Agency/site. FEMP Services will provide onsite or telecon review of draft DO RFP with agency staff. FEMP Services will prepare 2nd draft DO RFP based on telecon and written agency review comments and recommendations. ","Draft DO RFP Document. On-site review of draft DO RFP.

424

Star Canticle Issue 2  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

StA ft CANtJClt 2 * 1 1 STAR CANTICLE 2 DOTTY BARRY PRICE: P.O. BOX 921 $5.50 1st class CLAREMONT, CA 91711 4.50 book rate CON TEN TS 2 Prelude 3 Poetry ?Untitled Dotty Barry k Fiction ?"Scotty? s Decision" Joy Mancinelli 6.... .Poetry..." Rayelle Roe m Poetry ?"Shouldn't You Ask Me First?" .Susan Meek k>2 Poetry ?"Storm Haven" Ellen Kobrin ^3 Poetry ?"Fire and Ice" ? ? .Gerry Downes kk Fiction ?"Viewpoint" Kay McElvain ty Poetry ?"Threads" Susan Burr 48 Poetry ?"The Starless Sky" Liz...

Multiple Contributors

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

425

Preserving Plutonium-244 as a National Asset  

SciTech Connect

Plutonium-244 (244 Pu) is an extremely rare and long-lived isotope of plutonium with a half-life of 80 million years. Measureable amounts of 244 Pu are found in neither reactor-grade nor weapons-grade plutonium. Production of this isotope requires a very high thermal flux to permit the two successive neutron captures that convert 242 Pu to 243 Pu to 244 Pu, particularly given the short (about 5 hour) half-life of 243 Pu. Such conditions simply do not exist in plutonium production processes. Therefore, 244 Pu is ideal for precise radiochemical analyses measuring plutonium material properties and isotopic concentrations in items containing plutonium. Isotope dilution mass spectrometry is about ten times more sensitive when using 244 Pu rather than 242 Pu for determining plutonium isotopic content. The isotope can also be irradiated in small quantities to produce superheavy elements. The majority of the existing global inventory of 244 Pu is contained in the outer housing of Mark-18A targets at the Savannah River Site (SRS). The total inventory is about 20 grams of 244 Pu in about 400 grams of plutonium distributed among the 65 targets. Currently, there are no specific plans to preserve these targets. Although the cost of separating and preserving this material would be considerable, it is trivial in comparison to new production costs. For all practical purposes, the material is irreplaceable, because new production would cost billions of dollars and require a series of irradiation and chemical separation cycles spanning up to 50 years. This paper will discuss a set of options for overcoming the significant challenges to preserve the 244 Pu as a National Asset: (1) the need to relocate the material from SRS in a timely manner, (2) the need to reduce the volume of material to the extent possible for storage, and (3) the need to establish an operational capability to enrich the 244 Pu in significant quantities. This paper suggests that if all the Mark-18A plutonium is separated, it would occupy a small volume and would be inexpensive to store while an enrichment capability is developed. Very small quantities could be enriched in existing mass separators to support critical needs.

Patton, Bradley D [ORNL; Alexander, Charles W [ORNL; Benker, Dennis [ORNL; Collins, Emory D [ORNL; Romano, Catherine E [ORNL; Wham, Robert M [ORNL

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

426

Controlled Nucleation and Growth Process of Li2S2/Li2S in Lithium...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Nucleation and Growth Process of Li2S2Li2S in Lithium-Sulfur Batteries. Controlled Nucleation and Growth Process of Li2S2Li2S in Lithium-Sulfur Batteries. Abstract:...

427

P2.xls  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

P2. Energy Production Estimates in Trillion Btu, 2011 P2. Energy Production Estimates in Trillion Btu, 2011 Alabama 468.7 226.8 48.6 411.8 0.0 245.3 245.3 1,401.2 Alaska 33.5 404.7 1,188.0 0.0 0.0 15.7 15.7 1,641.9 Arizona 174.8 0.2 0.2 327.3 7.8 107.4 115.2 617.7 Arkansas 3.0 1,090.9 34.1 148.5 0.0 113.5 113.5 1,390.0 California 0.0 279.7 1,123.4 383.6 25.0 812.8 837.8 2,624.6 Colorado 586.8 1,831.2 226.9 0.0 17.7 84.0 101.7 2,746.7 Connecticut 0.0 0.0 0.0 166.7 0.0 29.9 29.9 196.5 Delaware 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 3.8 3.8 3.8 District of Columbia 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.1 0.1 0.1 Florida 0.0 15.4 11.7 230.4 0.0 266.7 266.7 524.2 Georgia 0.0 0.0 0.0 338.1 14.2 192.1 206.3 544.4 Hawaii 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 19.1 19.1 19.1 Idaho 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 7.6 172.8 180.4 180.4 Illinois 864.2 3.7 53.6 1,002.7 174.0 102.3 276.3 2,200.5 Indiana 841.0 9.2 11.5 0.0 130.5 71.2 201.7 1,063.4 Iowa 0.0 0.0 0.0 54.6 505.3 140.7 645.9 700.5 Kansas 0.8 356.8 240.7 76.6 61.8

428

LANL Volume 2_Final  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Emergency Emergency Management Programs at the Los Alamos National Laboratory Office of Independent Oversight and Performance Assurance Office of the Secretary of Energy April 2002 Volume II INDEPENDENT OVERSIGHT INSPECTION OF EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT AT THE LOS ALAMOS NATIONAL LABORATORY Volume II April 2002 Table of Contents 1.0 Introduction ................................................................................................................................1 2.0 Results .......................................................................................................................................2 3.0 Conclusions .................................................................................................................................4

429

Trek Encore Issue 2  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

[ENTERCOt+1 2; Marjorie McKenna et ai, eds] ???? ...-............ ,. ............. ,. ?????????? THE HOTTEST FIRE [ VAULT OF TOMORROW 4; Mar i on McChesney, ed] ..................... ,.. ?.?? ??? ?????????????? 14 ONLY HUMAN [BERENGARIA 9; Vicki R. Kirlin..., ed] ??????????????????????????????? 1' ???? " ????? ,. ?????.????? ????? 93 THE ANSWER [MAINE(LYl TREK 2; Mary Ann Drach & Kathleen S. Lynch, eds ? ............ ??? ? ., ..... r ?????? , ???? 94 THE CHRISTMAS TREE [A CONTACT CHRISTMAS; Beverly...

Lacroix, Ginna

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

430

Two-dimensional superconformal gravity with the local symmetry supergroups OSP(1?2)OSP(2?2) and SP(2)OSP(2?2)  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The algebra of OSP(1?2)OSP(2?2) is given and all its matter multiplets are constructed. It is shown that only one multiplet can be used to form a two-dimensional superconformal gravity theory. The SP(2)OSP(2?2) two-dimensional superconformal gravity is also constructed with the normal spin (0,1/2) matter multiplet as well as with a constrained multiplet that transforms nontrivially only under a subgroup of the SP(2)OSP(2?2) group. These theories are quantized, and some of the consequences of anomalies in the conformal symmetries are analyzed in detail.

J. McCabe

1986-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

431

Isotope correlations for determining the isotopic composition of plutonium produced in research and power reactors using the experimental data obtained by alpha and mass spectrometry  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Correlations have been developed for obtaining the isotopic composition of Pu produced in Indian research (CIRUS, DHRUVA) and power (PHWR) reactors. The experimental data obtained on 238Pu/(239Pu + 240Pu) alpha activity ratio using alpha spectrometry and on 240Pu/239Pu, 241Pu/239Pu, 242Pu/239Pu atom ratios by thermal ionisation mass spectrometry were used for developing isotope correlations.

S.K. Aggarwal; D. Alamelu

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

432

Microsoft Word - ADM 2  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

ADM 2 ADM 2 Rev 2 September 2010 ADMINISTRATIVE RECORDS SCHEDULE 2: PAYROLL AND PAY ADMINISTRATION RECORDS September 2010 Revision 2 Payrolling and pay administration records pertain to the disbursements employees receive in return for their personal services. This schedule covers commonly used pay records. Title 6, "Pay, Leave, and Allowances" in the GAO Policy and Procedures Manual provides guidance for preparing and maintaining Departmental pay accounts. Payroll systems use a leave record for submitting data to the payroll system. Information is posted to this leave record from the detailed records kept by the time and attendance clerks. Depending on the type of system, the leave record may be a hard copy input form or alternatively, input to the system may be by electronic means.

433

February 2, 2010  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

2 2 February 2 PDSF Users Meeting 2/2/10 Attending: Eric, Jay and Iwona from PDSF and users Andrei, Marjorie, and Jeff P. Cluster status: Utilization has been light Outages: None Upcoming downtimes: None, but Jay mentioned sending a list of nodes for retirement to the pdsf-pi email list. New hardware: Data transfer node has been reaced and has power and installation should be completed this week We will keep the old node alive for a while. ATLAS storage order has been placed. /eliza11 will be retired at the end of July. New db nodes are coming for STAR in about 1 week. ATLAS grid activities. Bestman passes tests, and ATLAS people will continue testing. SL5 news: pdsf1 and pdsf5 now have SL5 and the other interactives will be upgraded in the next few weeks. We will send out instructions on how to run

434

BEAMLINE 6-2  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

6-2 6-2 CURRENT STATUS: Open SUPPORTED TECHNIQUES: BL6-2a: Rapid-scanning xRF imaging Advanced x-ray spectroscopy (XES, XRS, RIXS) XES: Resonant and non-resonant x-ray emission spectroscopy XRS: Non-resonant x-ray Raman scattering BL6-2b: Rapid-scanning xRF imaging Advanced x-ray spectroscopy (XES, XRS, RIXS) XES: Resonant and non-resonant x-ray emission spectroscopy XRS: Non-resonant x-ray Raman scattering BL6-2c: Transmission X-ray Microscopy MAIN SCIENTIFIC DISCIPLINES: Biology / Materials / Environmental % TIME GENERAL USE: 100% SCHEDULING: Proposal Submittal and Scheduling Procedures Current SPEAR and Beam Line Schedules SOURCE: 56-pole, 0.9-Tesla Wiggler ID End Station BEAM LINE SPECIFICATIONS: energy range resolution DE/E spot size flux angular acceptance

435

EMDEX 2 system documentation  

SciTech Connect

The EPRI EMDEX 2 system consists of hardware and software for characterizing electric and magnetic field exposures. The EMDEX 2 meter is a computer-based portable unit that samples, at a user- programmable rate, the three vector components of magnetic flux density, and a measure of the average electric field acting on the torso of the wearer (if an optional sensor is worn). Modules of the EMCALC software package are used to program the EMDEX 2, retrieve data at the end of a measurement session, analyze EMDEX 2 data, and prepare tabular and graphical data summaries. The User Manual is designed to provide instruction on the use of the exposure system hardware and software. The Technical Reference Manual provides additional, detailed descriptions of the hardware, software and methodologies used in the EMDEX 2 system. 64 figs., 4 tabs.

Silva, J.M. (Enertech Consultants, Campbell, CA (United States))

1991-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

436

DOE-2 basics  

SciTech Connect

DOE-2 provides the building design and research communities with an up-to-date, unbiased, well-documented public-domain computer program for building energy analysis. DOE-2 predicts the hourly energy use and energy cost of a building given hourly weather information and a description of the building and its HVAC equipment and utility rate structure. DOE-2 is a portable FORTRAN program that can be used on a large variety of computers, including PC's. Using DOE-2, designers can determine the choice of building parameters that improve energy efficiency while maintaining thermal comfort. The purpose of DOE-2 is to aid in the analysis of energy usage in buildings; it is not intended to be the sole source of information relied upon for the design of buildings. The judgment and experience of the architect/engineer still remain the most important elements of building design.

Not Available

1991-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

437

DOE-2 basics  

SciTech Connect

DOE-2 provides the building design and research communities with an up-to-date, unbiased, well-documented public-domain computer program for building energy analysis. DOE-2 predicts the hourly energy use and energy cost of a building given hourly weather information and a description of the building and its HVAC equipment and utility rate structure. DOE-2 is a portable FORTRAN program that can be used on a large variety of computers, including PC`s. Using DOE-2, designers can determine the choice of building parameters that improve energy efficiency while maintaining thermal comfort. The purpose of DOE-2 is to aid in the analysis of energy usage in buildings; it is not intended to be the sole source of information relied upon for the design of buildings. The judgment and experience of the architect/engineer still remain the most important elements of building design.

Not Available

1991-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

438

RTDS-Based Design and Simulation of Distributed P-Q Power Resources in Smart Grid  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1.2 MW grid-connected solar panel at bus 8. The power outputis as in Figure 5.11 [104]. Solar Panel Power Injection (pu)The daily output of the solar panel during a cloudy day.

Taylor, Zachariah David

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

439

E-Print Network 3.0 - acids reduce myeloid Sample Search Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

for: acids reduce myeloid Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 PU.1 Is a Lineage-specific Regulator of Tyrosine Phosphatase CD45* Received for publication, October 5, 2000, and in...

440

AN INVESTIGATION OF THE ISOTOPES OF AMERICIUM AND CURIUM  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

OF THE ISOTOPES OF AMERICIUM AND CURIUM Gary Hoyt Higgins (of alpha particles of americium produced by bombarding puMU3507 Fig. 2. Decay of americium produced by bombardment of

Higgins, Gary Hoyt.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "2 glenwood pu" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Mucrobial Stabilization of Plutonium in the Subsurface Environment  

SciTech Connect

This report outlines the results of work performed at the Colorado School of Mines, Brookhaven National Laboratory and Texas A and M University during the second reporting phase of this project. The sub-projects focused on this year include: (1) Biotransformation of Pu-contaminated soil; (2) Environmental colloids at the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site; (3) Production, isolation and characterization of EPS (exopolymeric substances, or exopolysaccharides); (4) Colloid trapping; (5) Determination of stability constants of complexes of Pu(IV) with organic ligands; and (6) The role of bacterial EPS in the transport of Pu through saturated porous media.

BJ Honeyman, AJ Francis, CJ Dodge, JB Gillow, PH Santschi

2004-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

442

SU?E?T?153: Proton Linearity and Energy Dependence Studies of Optically Stimulated Luminescent Detectors for Remote Audits of Proton Beam Calibrations by the Radiological Physics Center  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Purpose: Implement Optically Stimulated Luminescent Detectors (OSLD) into Radiological Physics Center's (RPC) remote audit quality assurance (QA) program for protons. Methods: The OSLDs were aluminum oxide (Al2O3:C) nanoDots from Landauer Inc. (Glenwood IL.). A standard RPC remote audit electron phantom with detector inserts at two different locations with three scatter rings and slabs of water equivalent plastic phantom added on top of the phantom to place both dosimeter locations within the SOBP were used. Two nanoDots were placed in each detector insert of the phantom. For the linearity study a 250 MeV proton beam with reference setup (FS = 10 10 cm2 10cm SOBP) was used with the beam isocenter located between the two detector depths. Doses of 25 50 100 200 300 350 cGy at isocenter were delivered. For the energy dependence study doses of 200 cGy each were delivered with the reference setup for 250 200 and 160 MeV proton beams. Co?60 measurement was performed as a standardization process. The OSLDs were read on a MicroStar reader from Landauer between 5 to 7 days after irradiation. Results: The OSLD irradiated had a linear dose response of y=?8.3513E?5x+1.0084 with an R2 = 1.000 over the dose range where y=Kl (dose linearity factor) and x=dose. The energy dependence of the OSLD for the three different energies was less than 3% for the irradiation conditions and fluctuation for different OSLDs less than 1% for the same energy used for the RPC remote audit program. Conclusions: The OSLD showed a linear dose response and consistent energy dependence for three proton energies at the MD Anderson Cancer Center Proton Center. OSLD can be used to replace the TLD for RPC's remote audit QA program for proton beam output.

J Cho; P Alvarez; D Followill; M Gillin; G Ibbott

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

443

An Investigation of the Use of Fully Ceramic Microencapsulated Fuel for Transuranic Waste Recycling in Pressurized Water Reactors  

SciTech Connect

An investigation of the utilization of TRistructural- ISOtropic (TRISO)-coated fuel particles for the burning of plutonium/neptunium (Pu/Np) isotopes in typical Westinghouse four-loop pressurized water reactors is presented. Though numerous studies have evaluated the burning of transuranic isotopes in light water reactors (LWRs), this work differentiates itself by employing Pu/Np-loaded TRISO particles embedded within a silicon carbide (SiC) matrix and formed into pellets, constituting the fully ceramic microencapsulated (FCM) fuel concept that can be loaded into standard LWR fuel element cladding. This approach provides the capability of Pu/Np burning and, by virtue of the multibarrier TRISO particle design and SiC matrix properties, will allow for greater burnup of Pu/Np material, plus improved fuel reliability and thermal performance. In this study, a variety of heterogeneous assembly layouts, which utilize a mix of FCM rods and typical UO2 rods, and core loading patterns were analyzed to demonstrate the neutronic feasibility of Pu/Np-loaded TRISO fuel. The assembly and core designs herein reported are not fully optimized and require fine-tuning to flatten power peaks; however, the progress achieved thus far strongly supports the conclusion that with further rod/assembly/core loading and placement optimization, Pu/Np-loaded TRISO fuel and core designs that are capable of balancing Pu/Np production and destruction can be designed within the standard constraints for thermal and reactivity performance in pressurized water reactors.

Gentry, Cole A [ORNL] [ORNL; Godfrey, Andrew T [ORNL] [ORNL; Terrani, Kurt A [ORNL] [ORNL; Gehin, Jess C [ORNL] [ORNL; Powers, Jeffrey J [ORNL] [ORNL; Maldonado, G Ivan [ORNL] [ORNL

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

444

TMI-2 core examination  

SciTech Connect

The examination of the damaged core at the Three Mile Island Unit 2 (TMI-2) reactor is structured to address the following safety issues: fission product release, transport, and deposition; core coolability; containment integrity; and recriticality during severe accidents; as well as zircaloy cladding ballooning and oxidation during so-called design basis accidents. The numbers of TMI-2 components or samples to be examined, the priority of each examination, the safety issue addressed by each examination, the principal examination techniques to be employed, and the data to be obtained and the principal uses of the data are discussed in this paper.

Hobbins, R.R.; MacDonald, P.E.; Owen, D.E.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

445

Method of calculation of heat generation rates for DWPF glass. Revision 2  

SciTech Connect

The Waste Acceptance Preliminary Specifications (WAPS) require estimates of the heat generation rate of DWPF waste glasses. Estimates of the heat generation rates of projected glass compositions are to be reported in the Waste Form Qualification Report. Similar estimates for actual production glasses are to be reported in the Production Records. In this report, a method of calculating the heat generation rate from the radionuclide inventory is provided. Application of the method to the DWPF Design-Basis glass indicates that the heat generation rate can be accurately estimated from the Sr-90, Y-90, Cs-137, Ba-137m, and Pu-238 contents alone.

Plodinec, M.J.

1993-02-04T23:59:59.000Z

446

No. 2 Distillate Prices - Industrial  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

31 3.206 1.914 2.409 - - 1983-2012 31 3.206 1.914 2.409 - - 1983-2012 East Coast (PADD 1) 2.213 3.191 1.967 2.380 - - 1983-2012 New England (PADD 1A) 2.344 3.173 2.029 2.381 - - 1983-2012 Connecticut 2.289 3.101 1.976 2.400 - - 1983-2012 Maine 2.332 3.151 2.017 2.452 - - 1983-2012 Massachusetts 2.329 3.248 1.985 NA - - 1983-2012 New Hampshire 2.551 3.251 2.117 2.482 - - 1983-2012 Rhode Island 2.385 3.232 2.020 2.559 - - 1983-2012 Vermont 2.426 3.142 2.182 2.492 - - 1983-2012 Central Atlantic (PADD 1B) 2.299 3.186 1.921 2.380 - - 1983-2012 Delaware 2.304 3.183 1.964 2.344 - - 1983-2012 District of Columbia W W W W - - 1983-2012 Maryland 2.184 3.083 1.835 2.287 - - 1983-2012 New Jersey 2.257 3.145 1.916 2.315 - - 1983-2012

447

ARM - Datastreams - pars2  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Datastreamspars2 Datastreamspars2 Documentation Data Quality Plots ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Datastream : PARS2 OTT Parsivel2 Laser Disdrometer Active Dates 2012.09.24 - 2013.09.26 Measurement Categories Atmospheric State, Cloud Properties Originating Instrument Laser Disdrometer (LDIS) Measurements Only measurements considered scientifically relevant are shown below by default. Show all measurements Measurement Units Variable Altitude above mean sea level m alt Base time in Epoch seconds since 1970-1-1 0:00:00 0:00 base_time Class size width mm class_size_width ( particle_size ) Diameter of largest drop observed mm diameter_max ( time ) Diameter of smallest drop observed mm diameter_min ( time )

448

Focus Area 2 Deliverables  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

2 - Adequate NQA-1 Suppliers 2 - Adequate NQA-1 Suppliers Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 J U N 2 2 2069 MEMORANDUM FOR DISTRIBUTION FROM: DAE Y. CHUNG DEPUTY ASSISTANT SECRETARY FOR SAFETY MANAGEMENT AND OPERATIONS ENVIRONlMENTAL MANAGEMENT SUBJECT: Issuance of the Office of Environmental Management Nuclear Supplier Alert System The Office of Environmental Management (EM) and the Energy Facility Contractors Group (EFCOG) Quality Assurance (QA) Corporate Board has developed a Nuclear Supplier Alert System as part of its EMIEFCOG QA Improvement Project Plan. This Corporate Board deliverable was approved by the voting members in the last meeting held on March 19,2009. This system is critical to mitigating past weaknesses in supplier qualification and oversight that have resulted in: I

449

BEAMLINE 13-2  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

2 2 CURRENT STATUS Open RESPONSIBLE STAFF: Dan Brehmer Hirohito Ogasawara EXPERIMENTS: Photoemission; NEXAFS (see also: Spectroscopic Techniques) SCHEDULING: BL13 Schedules Proposal Submittal and Scheduling Procedures Current SPEAR and Beam Line Schedules SOURCE: Elliptically polarized undulator OPTICS: M0 vertical deflecting spherical, water-cooled M2 horizontal deflecting spherical M3 vertical deflecting elliptical MONOCHROMATOR: Spherical Grating Monochromator (SGM) SLITS : 0-1000 µm. Entrance slit cooled and movable ± 200 mm along optical axis GRATINGS : 3 water-cooled interchangeable HORIZONTAL ANGULAR ACCEPTANCE : 0.25 mrad ENERGY RANGE : 300 l/mm: 150 - 400 E/DE 10000 600 l/mm: 250 - 700 E/DE 10000 1100 l/mm: 500 - 1200 E/DE 10000 SPOT SIZE : 0.01 x 0.075 mm2

450

ARM - Datastreams - aerich2  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Datastreamsaerich2 Datastreamsaerich2 Documentation Data Quality Plots Citation DOI: 10.5439/1025144 [ What is this? ] Generate Citation ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Datastream : AERICH2 Atmospheric Emitted Radiance Interferometer (AERI): channel 2 data Active Dates 1994.01.10 - 2014.01.02 Measurement Categories Radiometric Originating Instrument Atmospheric Emitted Radiance Interferometer (AERI) Measurements Only measurements considered scientifically relevant are shown below by default. Show all measurements Measurement Units Variable AERI instrument unit serial number unitless AERIunitNumber ( time ) Observation Altitude m Altitude ( time ) Temperature of the AERI blackbody support structure K BBsupportStructureTemp ( time )

451

ARM - Datastreams - dlrhi2  

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Datastreamsdlrhi2 Datastreamsdlrhi2 Documentation Data Quality Plots Citation DOI: 10.5439/1025188 [ What is this? ] Generate Citation ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Datastream : DLRHI2 Doppler Lidar - Range-Height Indicator #2 Active Dates 2010.10.21 - 2010.11.21 Measurement Categories Aerosols, Cloud Properties Originating Instrument Doppler Lidar (DL) Measurements Only measurements considered scientifically relevant are shown below by default. Show all measurements Measurement Units Variable Altitude above mean sea level m alt Backscattered radiation Attenuated backscatter 1/(m sr) attenuated_backscatter ( time, range ) Azimuth relative to true north degrees azimuth ( time ) Base time in Epoch seconds since 1970-1-1 0:00:00 0:00 base_time

452

BEAMLINE 7-2  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

7-2 7-2 CURRENT STATUS: Open SUPPORTED TECHNIQUES: X-ray scattering X-ray diffraction MAIN SCIENTIFIC DISCIPLINES: Materials / Environmental % TIME GENERAL USE: 100% SCHEDULING: Proposal Submittal and Scheduling Procedures Current SPEAR and Beam Line Schedules SOURCE: 20-pole, 2-Tesla Wiggler ID End Station BEAM LINE SPECIFICATIONS: energy range resolution DE/E spot size flux angular acceptance focused 4600 - 16500 eV 0.12 x 0.50 mm 0.4 mrad OPTICS: Bent cylinder, single crystal Si, Rh-coated M0 mirror Radii: 2945 m (adjustable) x 56.1 mm Mean angle of incidence: 3.81 mrad Cut off energy: 17.7 keV Magnification: 1.0 MONOCHROMATOR: LN2-cooled, sagitally focusing, double crystal Si(111) Upward reflecting Monochromator Crystal Glitch Library Crystal changes need to be scheduled and coordinated in advance with BL