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1

City of Glenwood Springs, Colorado (Utility Company) | Open Energy...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Glenwood Springs, Colorado (Utility Company) Jump to: navigation, search Name Glenwood Springs City of Place Colorado Utility Id 7300 Utility Location Yes Ownership M NERC Location...

2

Glenwood Hot Springs Hotel Pool & Spa Low Temperature Geothermal...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Hotel Pool & Spa Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Facility Glenwood Hot Springs Hotel Sector Geothermal energy Type Pool and Spa Location Glenwood Springs, Colorado...

3

Moduli spaces of PU(2)-monopoles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The goal of this article was the S^1-equivariant transversality-problem and the compactification-problem for the moduli spaces of (perturbed) PU(2)-monopoles. A substantially improved version entitled "Moduli spaces of PU(2)-monopoles (revised version)" which gives simpler, clearer proofs of the transversality results, has been published on arxiv in June 99 and appeared in Asian J. Math, see Moduli spaces of PU(2)-Monopoles, Asian J. Math. Vol. 4, No. 2 (2000), 391-436.

Andrei Teleman

1997-02-07T23:59:59.000Z

4

Moduli spaces of PU(2)-monopoles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We study the S^1-equivariant transversality-problem and the compactification-problem for the moduli spaces of (perturbed) PU(2)-monopoles.

Andrei Teleman

1997-02-07T23:59:59.000Z

5

Controls on Soluble Pu Concentrations in PuO2/Magnetite Suspensions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Time-dependent reduction of PuO2(am) was studied over a range of pH values in the presence of aqueous Fe(II) and magnetite (Fe3O4) nanoparticles. At early time frames (up to 56 days) very little aqueous Pu was mobilized from PuO2(am), even though measured pH and redox potentials, coupled to equilibrium thermodynamic modeling indicated the potential for significant reduction of PuO2(am) to relatively soluble Pu(III). Introduction of Eu(III) or Nd(III) to the suspensions as competitive cations to displace possible sorbed Pu(III) resulted in the release of significant concentrations of aqueous Pu. However, the similarity of aqueous Pu concentrations that resulted from the introduction of Eu(III)/Nd(III) to suspensions with and without magnetite indicated that the Pu was displaced from the PuO2(am), not from magnetite. The fact that soluble forms of Pu can be displaced from the surface of PuO2(am) represents a potential, but previously unidentified, source of Pu to aqueous solution or subsurface groundwaters.

Felmy, Andrew R.; Moore, Dean A.; Pearce, Carolyn I.; Conradson, Steven D.; Qafoku, Odeta; Buck, Edgar C.; Rosso, Kevin M.; Ilton, Eugene S.

2012-11-06T23:59:59.000Z

6

Glenwood Hot Springs Lodge Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Lodge Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Lodge Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Glenwood Hot Springs Lodge Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Facility Glenwood Hot Springs Lodge Sector Geothermal energy Type Space Heating Location Glenwood Springs, Colorado Coordinates 39.5505376°, -107.3247762° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[]}

7

PU(2) monopoles and relations between four-manifold invariants  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Using quantum field-theoretic arguments, Witten has established a relation between the Donaldson and Seiberg-Witten invariants of smooth four-manifolds. In this survey article, we describe the program to prove this relation using a moduli space of PU(2) = SO(3) monopoles as a cobordism between the Donaldson moduli space of anti-self-dual SO(3) connections and moduli spaces of U(1) monopoles. We provide an overview of some of our transversality and Uhlenbeck compactness results for PU(2) monopoles, along with some of our calculations of Donaldson invariants in terms of Seiberg-Witten invariants. We give a brief outline of issues concerning the gluing theory, focussing on some of the analytical difficulties that are particular to PU(2) monopoles, and its application to the PU(2) monopole program to prove the relation between Donaldson and Seiberg-Witten invariants.

Paul M. N. Feehan; Thomas G. Leness

1997-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

8

Characterization of a mixed salt of 1-hydroxy-pyridin-2-one Pu(IV) complexes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

X-ray diffraction data for the Pu-(1,2-HOPO) complex wereof the mixed salt of hydroxypyridonate Pu(IV) complexesis presented; [Pu(1,2- HOPO) 3 (H 2 O) 2 ClO 4 ] [Pu(1,2-

Gorden, Anne E.V.; Xu, Jide; Szigethy, Geza; Oliver, Allen; Shuh, David K.; Raymond, Kenneth N.

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

9

PU(2) Monopoles, I: Regularity, Uhlenbeck Compactness, and Transversality  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We prove the existence of perturbations for the PU(2) monopole equations, yielding transversality on the complement of the anti-self-dual or reducible solutions, and the existence of an Uhlenbeck compactification for the moduli space of solutions to these perturbed PU(2) monopole equations. In December 1994, V. Pidstrigach and A. Tyurin and then others proposed a method to prove Witten's conjecture concerning the relation between the Donaldson and Seiberg-Witten invariants of smooth four-manifolds. Their proposal uses a moduli space of solutions to the PU(2) monopole equations, which are a natural generalization of the U(1) monopole equations of Seiberg and Witten and the equation for anti-self-dual SO(3) connections, to construct a cobordism between links of compact moduli spaces of U(1) monopoles of Seiberg-Witten type and the moduli space of anti-self-dual connections, which appear as singularities in this larger moduli space. A basic requirement of this cobordism technique is the existence of an Uhlenbeck compactification for the moduli space of PU(2) monopoles and of generic-parameter transversality results for all the moduli spaces of PU(2) monopoles which appear in this compactification, on the complement of the anti-self-dual and U(1) solutions.

Paul M. N. Feehan; Thomas G. Leness

1997-10-29T23:59:59.000Z

10

PU(2) monopoles. III: Existence of gluing and obstruction maps  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This is the third installment in our series of articles (dg-ga/9712005, dg-ga/9710032) on the application of the PU(2) monopole equations to prove Witten's conjecture (hep-th/9411102) concerning the relation between the Donaldson and Seiberg-Witten invariants of smooth four-manifolds. The moduli space of solutions to the PU(2) monopole equations provides a noncompact cobordism between links of compact moduli spaces of U(1) monopoles of Seiberg-Witten type and the moduli space of anti-self-dual SO(3) connections, which appear as singularities in this larger moduli space. In this paper we prove the first part of a general gluing theorem for PU(2) monopoles, with the proof of the second half to appear in a companion article. The ultimate purpose of the gluing theorem is to provide topological models for neighborhoods of ideal Seiberg-Witten moduli spaces appearing in lower levels of the Uhlenbeck compactification of the moduli space of PU(2) monopoles and thus permit calculations of their contributions to Donaldson invariants using the PU(2)-monopole cobordism.

Paul M. N. Feehan; Thomas G. Leness

1999-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

11

Microsoft PowerPoint - 2-06_ Marra Pu solubility Tech Exchange - 1.ppt  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

the Solubility and Homogeneity the Solubility and Homogeneity of Plutonium in an Alkali Borosilicate Glass Jim Marra, Charles Crawford and Kevin Fox Savannah River National Laboratory EM Tech Exchange - Atlanta, GA Print Close 2 Outline * Background * Glass composition options * Vitrification processes * Hf as a surrogate for Pu in borosilicate glasses * Lanthanide borosilicate (LaBS) glass * Alkali borosilicate glass * Initial studies * Present study - Pu behavior in HLW glass * Pu behavior in the DWPF melter * Summary Print Close 3 Background * U.S. National Academy of Sciences, 1994 * U.S. and Russian surplus weapons Pu is a "clear and present danger" * U.S. to disposition up to 50 metric tons of surplus Pu * Protect surplus Pu from theft or diversion and reintroduction into nuclear arsenals * Bulk of U.S. material to be dispositioned by fabrication in

12

Glenwood Hot Springs Hotel Pool & Spa Low Temperature Geothermal Facility |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Hotel Pool & Spa Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Hotel Pool & Spa Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Glenwood Hot Springs Hotel Pool & Spa Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Facility Glenwood Hot Springs Hotel Sector Geothermal energy Type Pool and Spa Location Glenwood Springs, Colorado Coordinates 39.5505376°, -107.3247762° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[]}

13

Glenwood Springs Vapor Caves Pool & Spa Low Temperature Geothermal Facility  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Springs Vapor Caves Pool & Spa Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Springs Vapor Caves Pool & Spa Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Glenwood Springs Vapor Caves Pool & Spa Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Facility Glenwood Springs Vapor Caves Sector Geothermal energy Type Pool and Spa Location Glenwood Springs, Colorado Coordinates 39.5505376°, -107.3247762° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[]}

14

Uhlenbeck compactness and transversality for the moduli space of PU(2) monopoles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This research announcement gives a brief report of the main results in our paper "PU(2) monopoles, I: Regularity, Uhlenbeck compactness, and transversality" (Journal of Differential Geometry, to appear). We describe the existence of perturbations for the PU(2) monopole equations, yielding both useful transversality properties and an Uhlenbeck compactification for this perturbed moduli space.

Paul M. N. Feehan; Thomas G. Leness

1997-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

15

Municipal geothermal heat utilization plan for Glenwood Springs, Colorado  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A study has been made of the engineering and economic feasibility of utilizing the geothermal resource underlying Glenwood Springs Colorado, to heat a group of public buildings. The results have shown that the use of geothermal heat is indeed feasible when compared to the cost of natural gas. The proposed system is composed of a wellhead plate heat exchanger which feeds a closed distribution loop of treated water circulated to the buildings which form the load. The base case system was designed to supply twice the demand created by the seven public buildings in order to take advantage of some economies of scale. To increase the utilization factor of the available geothermal energy, a peaking boiler which burns natural gas is recommended. Disposal of the cooled brine would be via underground injection. Considerable study was done to examine the impact of reduced operating temperature on the existing heating systems. Several options to minimize this problem were identified. Economic analyses were completed to determine the present values of heat from the geothermal system and from the present natural gas over a 30 year projected system life. For the base case savings of over $1 million were shown. Sensitivities of the economics to capital cost, operating cost, system size and other parameters were calculated. For all reasonable assumptions, the geothermal system was cheaper. Financing alternatives were also examined. An extensive survey of all existing data on the geology of the study has led to the prediction of resource parameters. The wellhead temperature of produced fluid is suspected to lie between 140 and 180/sup 0/F (60 and 82/sup 0/C). Flowrates may be as high as 1000 gpm (3800 liters per minute) from a reservoir formation that is 300 ft (90 m) thick beginning about 500 ft (150 m) below the suggested drill site in the proposed Two Rivers Park.

Not Available

1980-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

16

Recovery of UO{sub 2}/PuO{sub 2} in IFR electrorefining process  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This invention is comprised of a process for converting PuO{sub 2} and U0{sub 2} present in an electrorefiner to the chlorides, by contacting the PuO{sub 2} and U0{sub 2} with Li metal in the presence of an alkali metal chloride salt substantially free of rare earth and actinide chlorides for a time and at a temperature sufficient to convert the U0{sub 2} and PuO{sub 2} to metals while converting Li metal to Li{sub 2}O. Li{sub 2}O is removed either by reducing with rare earth metals or by providing an oxygen electrode for transporting 0{sub 2} out of the electrorefiner and a cathode, and thereafter applying an emf to the electrorefiner electrodes sufficient to cause the Li{sub 2}O to disassociate to 0{sub 2} and Li metal but insufficient to decompose the alkali metal chloride salt. The U and Pu and excess lithium are then converted to chlorides by reaction with CdCl{sub 2}.

Tomczuk, Z.; Miller, W.E.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

17

Recovery of UO.sub.2 /Pu O.sub.2 in IFR electrorefining process  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process for converting PuO.sub.2 and UO.sub.2 present in an electrorefiner to the chlorides, by contacting the PuO.sub.2 and UO.sub.2 with Li metal in the presence of an alkali metal chloride salt substantially free of rare earth and actinide chlorides for a time and at a temperature sufficient to convert the UO.sub.2 and PuO.sub.2 to metals while converting Li metal to Li.sub.2 O. Li.sub.2 O is removed either by reducing with rare earth metals or by providing an oxygen electrode for transporting O.sub.2 out of the electrorefiner and a cathode, and thereafter applying an emf to the electrorefiner electrodes sufficient to cause the Li.sub.2 O to disassociate to O.sub.2 and Li metal but insufficient to decompose the alkali metal chloride salt. The U and Pu and excess lithium are then converted to chlorides by reaction with CdCl.sub.2.

Tomczuk, Zygmunt (Lockport, IL); Miller, William E. (Naperville, IL)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

18

Recovery of UO[sub 2]/PuO[sub 2] in IFR electrorefining process  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process is described for converting PuO[sub 2] and UO[sub 2] present in an electrorefiner to the chlorides, by contacting the PuO[sub 2] and UO[sub 2] with Li metal in the presence of an alkali metal chloride salt substantially free of rare earth and actinide chlorides for a time and at a temperature sufficient to convert the UO[sub 2] and PuO[sub 2] to metals while converting Li metal to Li[sub 2]O. Li[sub 2]O is removed either by reducing with rare earth metals or by providing an oxygen electrode for transporting O[sub 2] out of the electrorefiner and a cathode, and thereafter applying an emf to the electrorefiner electrodes sufficient to cause the Li[sub 2]O to disassociate to O[sub 2] and Li metal but insufficient to decompose the alkali metal chloride salt. The U and Pu and excess lithium are then converted to chlorides by reaction with CdCl[sub 2].

Tomczuk, Z.; Miller, W.E.

1994-10-18T23:59:59.000Z

19

Effect of particle size on the carrier-distillation analysis of PuO$sub 2$  

SciTech Connect

A study was made to determine the effect of particle size on the carrier- distillation analysis of PuO/sub 2/ and to explain how to avoid the difficulties caused by large PuO/sub 2/ particles. The relative intensity of five elements was determined for three particle sizes and it was shown that it increases as the particle size becomes smaller. Further the line intensity of the added internal standard Co also increased with decreasing particle size. Accurate spectrochemical results were obtained when the PuO/sub 2/ particle size was reduced to 45 mu m or less. (JSR)

Martell, C.J.

1974-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

20

Configurations de lagrangiens, domaines fondamentaux et sous-groupes discrets de PU(2,1).  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??L'objet de cette thse est l'tude de sous-groupes discrets de PU(2,1), groupe des isomtries holomorphes de l'espace hyperbolique complexe de dimension (complexe) 2. On s'intresse (more)

Paupert, Julien

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "2 glenwood pu" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Oxygen diffusion in UO2+x and (U,Pu)O2+-x  

SciTech Connect

In the first part of this report we revisit an earlier study of oxygen diffusion in UO{sub 2+x}, in which we used density functional theory (DFT) calculations to parameterize a kinetic Monte Carlo (kMC) model. The results from these earlier kMC simulations are reproduced in Fig. 1 and they indicate fairly good agreement with available experiments. This work was later expanded to include a larger temperature range. However, since the publication of this study there have been a number of advancements in DFT methodology for UO{sub 2} and UO{sub 2+x} providing increased accuracy. We have also gained better understanding of the oxygen clustering phenomena occurring in UO{sub 2+x}. For these two reasons, the DFT calculations of the migration barriers of single oxygen interstitials and di-interstitial clusters have been repeated using the LDA+U and GGA+U methodologies. The earlier study used regular GGA and, even though this method captures similar trends as the more advanced LDA+U and GGA+U techniques, it does not fulfill the quantitative requirements set by some applications. Additionally, we have identified a mechanism for the most stable quad-interstitial clusters to migrate and here we calculate the corresponding barriers within both the LDA+U and GGA+U methodologies. The new LDA+U and GGA+U data sets are analyzed in terms of available experiments. In the second part of this report we present initial results for the impact of Pu on oxygen diffusion in UO{sub 2}. The first step in understanding this process is to calculate the binding energies of oxygen vacancies and interstitials to a Pu ion in the UO{sub 2} matrix. Possible diffusion mechanisms are discussed for (U,Pu)O{sub 2-x}, (U,Pu)O{sub 2} and (U,Pu)O{sub 2+x}.

Andersson, Anders D. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Liu, Xiang-Yang [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2012-05-03T23:59:59.000Z

22

Groupes libres, groupes triangulaires et tore point dans PU(2,1).  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??ette thse se situe dans le domaine de l'tude des reprsentations de groupes de surfaces dans le groupe de Lie rel non-compact PU(2,1), groupe des (more)

Will, Pierre

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

23

A la Fock-Goncharov coordinates for PU(2,1)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We describe a set of coordinates on the PU(2,1)-representation variety of the fundamental group of an oriented punctured surface $S$ with negative Euler characteristic. The main technical tool we use is a set of geometric invariants of a triple of flags in the complex hyperpolic plane. We establish a bijection between a set of decorations of an ideal triangulation of $S$ and a subset of the PU(2,1)-representation variety of $\\pi_1(S)$.

Marche, Julien

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

24

/sup 238/PuO/sub 2/ surface contamination of radioisotopic heat sources  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Surface contamination and cleaning characteristics of two radioisotopic heat sources are discussed. The Milliwatt Generator is a small (4/sup 1///sub 2/ W) heat source which is successfully cleaned by hand in a series of hot acid baths.The Multi-Hundred Watt Isotopic Heat Source presents additional problems in removing the surface contamination because of its large size (100 W) and its grit-blasted surface. A study has characterized the behavior of the Pu during aging of the surface at the heat source service temperature of 1350/sup 0/C. Results from this study show that normal decontamination effectively removes the superficial Pu but does not extract the Pu which is deep within the grit-blasted structure. Subsequent heating results in migration of microcurie amounts of Pu out of the grit-blasted surface.

Schaeffer, D.R.; Brewer, C.Q.

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

25

Physics calculations for mixed PuO{sub 2}-UO{sub 2} NPR loadings  

SciTech Connect

At the request of NRD (NPR Physics Subsection) a study was initiated to determine the physics characteristics of various plutonium-uranium composites as fuel for the NPR. From this study, the PuO{sub 2}-UO{sub 2} fuel system was selected to receive major attention. The effect of adding a burnable poison, B-10, in intimate contact with the mixed oxide fuel was also is to be considered. The present report summarizes the results of these investigations.

Bennett, C.L.

1964-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

26

The toxicity of inhaled particles of sup 238 PuO sub 2 in dogs  

SciTech Connect

This study was conducted to determine the toxicity of inhaled {sup 238}PuO{sub 2} in the dog. Inhalation was selected because it is the mostly likely route of human exposure in the event of an accidental airborne release. Of 166 dog in the study, 72 inhaled 1.5{mu}m and 72 inhaled 3.0 {mu}m activity median aerodynamic diameter particles of {sup 238}PuO{sub 2}. Another 24 dogs inhaled the aerosol vector without plutonium. The aerosol exposures resulted in initial pulmonary burdens ranging from 37 to 0.11 and 55.5 to 0.37 kBq of {sup 238}Pu/kg body mass, of 1.5 {mu}m and 3.0 {mu}, particles, respectively. The particles dissolved slowly resulting in translocation of the Pu to liver, bone and other sites. The dogs were observed for biological effects over their life span. Necropsies were performed at death, and tissues were examined microscopically. The principal late-occurring effects were tumors of the lung, skeleton, and liver. Risk factors estimated for these cancers were 2800 lung cancers/10{sup 4} Gy, 800 liver cancers/10{sup 4} Gy, and 6200 bone cancers/10{sup 4} Gy for dogs. The potential hazard from {sup 238}Pu to humans may include tumors of the lung, bone and liver because of the likelihood of similarity of the dose patterns for the two species. 10 refs., 1 fig., 3 tabs.

Muggenburg, B.A.; Guilmette, R.A.; Griffith, W.C. Jr.; Hahn, F.F.; Boecker, B.B. (Lovelace Biomedical and Environmental Research Inst., Albuquerque, NM (United States). Inhalation Toxicology Research Inst.); Gillett, N.A. (Genentech, Inc., San Francisco, CA (United States))

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

27

Heterogeneous Reduction of PuO2 with Fe(II): Importance of the Fe(III) Reaction Product  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Abstract Heterogeneous reduction of actinides in higher and more soluble oxidation states to lower more insoluble oxidation states by reductants such as Fe(II) has been the subject of intensive study for more than two decades. However, Fe(II)-induced reduction of sparingly soluble Pu(IV) to the more soluble lower oxidation state Pu(III) has been much less studied even though such reactions can potentially increase the mobility of Pu in the subsurface. Thermodynamic calculations are presented that show how differences in the free energy of various possible solid-phase Fe(III) reaction products can greatly influence aqueous Pu(III) concentrations resulting from reduction of PuO2(am) by Fe(II). We present the first experimental evidence that reduction of PuO2(am) to Pu(III) by Fe(II) was enhanced when the Fe(III) mineral goethite was spiked into the reaction. The effect of goethite on reduction of Pu(IV) was demonstrated by measuring the time-dependence of total aqueous Pu concentration, its oxidation state, and system pe/pH. We also re-evaluated established protocols for determining Pu(III) [(Pu(III) + Pu(IV)) - Pu(IV)] by using thenoyltrifluoroacetone (TTA) in toluene extractions; the study showed that it is important to eliminate dissolved oxygen from the TTA solutions for accurate determinations. More broadly, this study highlights the importance of the Fe(III) reaction product in actinide reduction rate and extent by Fe(II).

Felmy, Andrew R.; Moore, Dean A.; Rosso, Kevin M.; Qafoku, Odeta; Rai, Dhanpat; Buck, Edgar C.; Ilton, Eugene S.

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

28

Local structure and vibrational properties of alpha'-Pu martensite in Ga-stabilized delta-Pu  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

) Figure 6. Page 36 of 37, E. J. Nelson et al. , PRB Pu-Pud-Pu q c D= 120 K Pu-Pu Debye-Waller factor s 2 ( 2 ) a'-Pu q c D =

Nelson, E.J.; Blobaum, K.J.M.; Wall, M.A.; Allen, P.G.; Schwartz, A.J.; Booth, C.H.

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

29

Conceptual designs for a long term {sup 238}PuO{sub 2} storage vessel  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This is a report on conceptual designs for a long term, 250 years, storage container for plutonium oxide ([sup 238]PuO[sub 2]). These conceptual designs are based on the use of a quartz filter to release the helium generated during the plutonium decay. In this report a review of filter material selection, design concepts, thermal modeling, and filter performance are discussed.

Kwon, D.M.; Replogle, W.C.

1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

30

A theoretical study of the ground state and lowest excited states of PuO0/+/+2 and PuO20/+/+2  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

values. KEYWORDS Plutonium oxides; multiconfigurationalcertainly widely studied. Plutonium systems have also beenthermodynamics of elementary plutonium oxide molecules PuO

Gibson, John K.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

31

In-Pu (Indium - Plutonium)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In-Pu crystallographic data...Pu Pearson symbol Space group (In) 0 tI 2 I 4/ mmm In 3 Pu 42 to 44 cP 4 Pm m In 5 Pu 3 56.1 ? (a) InPu 66 to 70 tP 2 tI 2 P 4/ mmm I 4/ mmm η 73.8 to 81 ? ? InPu 3 84.5 to 88 cP 4 cF 4 Pm m Fm m (εPu) 99.3 to 100 cI 2 Im m (δ?Pu) 100 tI 2 I 4/ mmm (δPu) 99 to 100 cF 4 Fm m (γPu) 100 oF 8 Fddd...

32

Examining 239Pu and 240Pu Nuclear Resonance Fluorescence Measurements on Spent Fuel for Nuclear Safeguards  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

resonance fluorescence in 240 Pu, Submitted to Phys. Rev.near 2 MeV in 235 U and 239 Pu, Phys. Rev. C 041601(R) (Examining Pu and Pu Nuclear Resonance Fluorescence

Quiter, Brian

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

33

Generic metrics, irreducible rank-one PU(2) monopoles, and transversality  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We prove that the moduli space of solutions to the PU(2) monopole equations is a smooth manifold of the expected dimension for simple, generic parameters such as (and including) the Riemannian metric on the given four-manifold. In a previous article, dg-ga/9710032, we proved transversality using an extension of the holonomy-perturbation methods of Donaldson, Floer, and Taubes, together with the existence of an Uhlenbeck compactification for the perturbed moduli space. However, it remained an important and interesting question to see whether there were simpler, more intrinsic alternatives to the holonomy perturbations and this is the issue we settle here. The idea that PU(2) monopoles might lead to a proof of Witten's conjecture (hep-th/9411102, hep-th/9709193) concerning the relation between the two types of four-manifold invariants was first proposed by Pidstrigach and Tyurin in 1994 (dg-ga/9507004): the space of PU(2) monopoles contains the moduli space of anti-self-dual connections together with copies of the various Seiberg-Witten moduli spaces, these forming singular loci in the higher-dimensional space of PU(2) monopoles. Results in this direction, due to the author and Leness, are surveyed in dg-ga/9709022, with a detailed account appearing in dg-ga/9712005. Our transversality theorem ensures that the anti-self-dual and Seiberg-Witten loci are the only singularities and that the PU(2) monopole moduli space forms a smooth - though non-compact, because of bubbling - cobordism between the links of the singularities.

Paul M. N. Feehan

1998-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

34

Purification of {sup 238}PuO{sub 2} scrap for heat source fuel  

SciTech Connect

The Nuclear Materials Technology (NMT) Division of Los Alamos National Laboratory has initiated a development program to recover and purify plutonium-238 oxide from impure feed sources in a glove box environment. A glove box line has been designed and a chemistry flowsheet developed to perform this recovery task at large scale. The initial demonstration effort focused on purification of {sup 238}PuO{sub 2} fuel by HNO{sub 3}/HF dissolution, followed by plutonium(III) oxalate precipitation and calcination to an oxide. Decontamination factors for most impurities of concern in the fuel were very good, producing {sup 238}PuO{sub 2} fuel significantly better in purity than specified by General Purpose Heat Source (GPHS) fuel powder specifications. A sufficient quantity of purified {sup 238}PuO{sub 2} fuel was recovered from the process to allow fabrication of a GPHS unit for testing. The results are encouraging for recycle of relatively impure plutonium-238 oxide and scrap residue items into fuel for useful applications. The high specific activity of plutonium-238 magnifies the consequences and concerns of radioactive waste generation. This work places an emphasis on development of waste minimization technologies to complement the aqueous processing operation. Results from experiments on neutralized solutions of plutonium-238 resulted in decontamination to about 1 millicurie/L. Combining ultrafiltration treatment with addition of a water soluble polymer designed to coordinate Pu, allowed solutions to be decontaminated to about 1 microcurie/L. Efforts continue to develop a capability for efficient, safe, cost effective, and environmentally acceptable methods to recover and purify {sup 238}PuO{sub 2} fuel.

Schulte, L.D.; Purdy, G.M.; Jarvinen, G.D.; Ramsey, K.; Silver, G.L.; Espinoza, J.; Rinehart, G.H.

1997-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

35

The Association of Inbreeding With Lung Fibrosis Incidence in Beagle Dogs That Inhaled 238PuO2 or 239PuO2.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Studies of health effects in animals after exposure to internally deposited radionuclides were intended to supplement observational studies in humans. Both nuclear workers and Beagle dogs have exhibited plutonium associated lung fibrosis; however, the dogs smaller gene pool may limit the applicability of findings to humans. Data on Beagles that inhaled either plutonium-238 dioxide (238PuO2) or plutonium-239 dioxide (239PuO2) were analyzed. Wright's Coefficient of Inbreeding was used to measure genetic or familial susceptibility and was assessed as an explanatory variable when modeling the association between lung fibrosis incidence and plutonium exposure. Lung fibrosis was diagnosed in approximately 80% of the exposed dogs compared with 23.7% of the control dogs. The maximum degree of inbreeding was 9.4%. Regardless of isotope, the addition of inbreeding significantly improved the model in female dogs but not in males. In female dogs an increased inbreeding coefficient predicted decreased hazard of a lung fibrosis diagnosis. Lung fibrosis was common in these dogs with inbreeding affecting models of lung fibrosis incidence in females but not in males. The apparent protective effect in females predicted by these models of lung fibrosis incidence is likely to be minimal given the small degree of inbreeding in these groups.

Wilson, Dulaney A.; Brigantic, Andrea M.; Morgan, William F.

2011-09-12T23:59:59.000Z

36

Ostwald Ripening and Its Effect on PuO2 Particle Size in Hanford Tank Waste  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Between 1944 and 1989, the Hanford Site produced 60 percent (54.5 metric tons) of the United States weapons plutonium and produced an additional 12.9 metric tons of fuels-grade plutonium. High activity wastes, including plutonium lost from the separations processes used to isolate the plutonium, were discharged to underground storage tanks during these operations. Plutonium in the Hanford tank farms is estimated to be {approx}700 kg but may be up to {approx}1000 kg. Despite these apparent large quantities, the average plutonium concentration in the {approx}200 million liter tank waste volume is only about 0.003 grams per liter ({approx}0.0002 wt%). The plutonium is largely associated with low solubility metal hydroxide/oxide sludges where its low concentration and intimate mixture with neutron-absorbing elements (e.g., iron) are credited in nuclear criticality safety. However, concerns have been expressed that plutonium, in the form of plutonium hydrous oxide, PuO{sub 2} {center_dot} xH{sub 2}O, could undergo sufficient crystal growth through Ostwald ripening in the alkaline tank waste to potentially be separable from neutron absorbing constituents by settling or sedimentation. It was found that plutonium that entered the alkaline tank waste by precipitation through neutralization from acid solution is initially present as 2- to 3-nm (0.002- to 0.003-{mu}m) scale PuO{sub 2} {center_dot} xH{sub 2}O crystallite particles and grows from that point at exceedingly slow rates, posing no risk to physical segregation. These conclusions are reached by both general considerations of Ostwald ripening and specific observations of the behaviors of PuO{sub 2} and PuO{sub 2} {center_dot} xH{sub 2}O upon aging in alkaline solution.

Delegard, Calvin H.

2011-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

37

Groups generated by two elliptic elements in PU(2,1)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Let $f$ and $g$ be two elliptic elements in $\\mathbf{PU}(2,1)$ of order $m$ and $n$ respectively, where $m\\geq n>2$. We prove that if the distance $\\delta(f,g)$ between the complex lines or points fixed by $f$ and $g$ is large than a certain number, then the group $$ is discrete nonelementary and isomorphic to the free product $\\mathbf{Z}_{m}*\\mathbf{Z}_{n}$.

Xie, Baohua

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

38

Anaerobic Biotransformation and Mobility of Pu and Pu-EDTA  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The complexation of radionuclides (e.g., plutonium (Pu) and {sup 60}Co) by co-disposed ethylenediaminetetraacetate (EDTA) has enhanced their transport in sediments at DOE sites. Pu(IV)-EDTA is not stable in the presence of relatively soluble Fe(III) compounds. Since most DOE sites have Fe(III) containing sediments, Pu(IV) is likely not the mobile form of Pu-EDTA. The only other Pu-EDTA complex stable in groundwater relevant to DOE sites would be Pu(III)-EDTA, which only forms under anaerobic conditions. Research is therefore needed to investigate the biotransformation of Pu and Pu-EDTA under anaerobic conditions and the anaerobic biodegradation of Pu-EDTA. The biotransformation of Pu and Pu-EDTA under various anaerobic regimes is poorly understood including the reduction kinetics of Pu(IV) to Pu(III) from soluble (Pu(IV)-EDTA) and insoluble Pu(IV), the redox conditions required for this reduction, the strength of the Pu(III)-EDTA, how the Pu(III)-EDTA competes with other dominant anoxic soluble metals (e.g., Fe(II)), and the oxidation kinetics of Pu(III)-EDTA. Finally, soluble Pu(III)-EDTA under anaerobic conditions would require anaerobic degradation of the EDTA to limit Pu(III) transport. Anaerobic EDTA degrading microorganisms have never been isolated. Recent results have shown that Shewanella oneidensis MR-1, a dissimilatory metal reducing bacterium, can reduce Pu(IV) to Pu(III). The Pu(IV) was provided as insoluble PuO2. The highest rate of Pu(IV) reduction was with the addition of AQDS, an electron shuttle. Of the total amount of Pu solubilized (i.e., soluble through a 0.36 nm filter), approximately 70% was Pu(III). The amount of soluble Pu was between 4.8 and 3.2 micromolar at day 1 and 6, respectively, indicating rapid reduction. The micromolar Pu is significant since the drinking water limit for Pu is 10{sup -12} M. On-going experiments are investigating the influence of EDTA on the rate of Pu reduction and the stability of the formed Pu(III). We have also begun to enrich and isolate bacteria capable of aerobic and anaerobic degradation of EDTA. Environmental samples (e.g., sludges, river sediments) were incubated aerobically and anaerobically with EDTA or NTA as the sole carbon and energy source. Aerobic enrichment with EDTA has not resulted in any cultures, but NTA has provided several isolates. Partial 16S rRNA gene sequence and sequence comparison identified four separate strains closely related to Microbacterium oxydans, Aminobacter sp., Achromobacter sp., Aminobacter sp., respectively. Anaerobic enrichments with either EDTA or NTA are still in progress since metabolism and growth is relatively slow. In addition to the biotransformation experiments, studies are underway to determine/validate complexation constants of Pu(III) with EDTA and the influence of competing ions on Pu(III)-EDTA complexes. These data are being obtained through solubility studies of PuPO{sub 4}(s) and Pu(OH){sub 3}(s) as a function of time, pH, and EDTA and competing ion concentrations. These results have begun to fill-in knowledge gaps of how anaerobic conditions will influence Pu and Pu-EDTA fate and transport to assess, model, and design approaches to stop Pu transport in groundwater at DOE sites.

Bolton, H., Jr.; Bailey, V.L.; Plymale, A.E.; Rai, D.; Xun, L.

2006-04-05T23:59:59.000Z

39

Bending Fuchsian representations of fundamental groups of cusped surfaces in PU(2,1)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We describe a family of representations of $\\pi_1(\\Sigma)$ in PU(2,1), where $\\Sigma$ is a hyperbolic Riemann surface with at least one deleted point. This family is obtained by a bending process associated to an ideal triangulation of $\\Sigma$. We give an explicit description of this family by describing a coordinates system in the spirit of shear coordinates on the Teichm\\"uller space. We identify within this family new examples of discrete, faithful and type-preserving representations of $\\pi_1(\\Sigma)$. In turn, we obtain a 1-parameter family of embeddings of the Teichm\\"uller space of $\\Sigma$ in the PU(2,1)-representation variety of $\\pi_1(\\Sigma)$. These results generalise to arbitrary $\\Sigma$ the results obtained in a previous paper for the 1-punctured torus.

Will, Pierre

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

40

Anaerobic Biotransformation and Mobility of Pu and Pu-EDTA  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The complexation of radionuclides (e.g., plutonium (Pu) and {sup 60}Co) by codisposed ethylenediaminetetraacetate (EDTA) has enhanced their transport in sediments at DOE sites. Our previous NABIR research investigated the aerobic biodegradation and biogeochemistry of Pu(IV)-EDTA. Plutonium(IV) forms stable complexes with EDTA under aerobic conditions and an aerobic EDTA degrading bacterium can degrade EDTA in the presence of Pu and decrease Pu mobility. However, our recent studies indicate that while Pu(IV)-EDTA is stable in simple aqueous systems, it is not stable in the presence of relatively soluble Fe(III) compounds (i.e., Fe(OH){sub 3}(s)--2-line ferrihydrite). Since most DOE sites have Fe(III) containing sediments, Pu(IV) in likely not the mobile form of Pu-EDTA in groundwater. The only other Pu-EDTA complex stable in groundwater relevant to DOE sites would be Pu(III)-EDTA, which only forms under anaerobic conditions. Research is therefore needed in this brand new project to investigate the biotransformation of Pu and Pu-EDTA under anaerobic conditions. The biotransformation of Pu and Pu-EDTA under various anaerobic regimes is poorly understood including the reduction kinetics of Pu(IV) to Pu(III) from soluble (Pu(IV)-EDTA) and insoluble Pu(IV) as PuO2(am) by metal reducing bacteria, the redox conditions required for this reduction, the strength of the Pu(III)-EDTA complex, how the Pu(III)-EDTA complex competes with other dominant anoxic soluble metals (e.g., Fe(II)), and the oxidation kinetics of Pu(III)-EDTA. Finally, the formation of a stable soluble Pu(III)-EDTA complex under anaerobic conditions would require degradation of the EDTA complex to limit Pu(III) transport in geologic environments. Anaerobic EDTA degrading microorganisms have not been isolated. These knowledge gaps preclude the development of a mechanistic understanding of how anaerobic conditions will influence Pu and Pu-EDTA fate and transport to assess, model, and design approaches to stop Pu transport in groundwater at DOE sites.

Bolton, H., Jr.; Rai, D.; Xun, L.

2005-04-18T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "2 glenwood pu" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Thermal conductivity of $sup 238$PuO$sub 2$ powder, intermediates, and dense fuel forms  

SciTech Connect

The thermal conductivities of porous $sup 238$PuO$sub 2$ powder (calcined oxalate), milled powder, and high-density granules were calculated from direct measurements of steady-state temperature profiles resulting from self- heating. Thermal conductivities varied with density, temperature, and gas content of the pores. Errors caused by thermocouple heat conduction were less than 5 percent when the dimensions of the thermal conductivity cell and the thermocouple were properly selected. (auth)

Bickford, D.F.; Crain, B. Jr.

1975-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

42

Nuclear Resonance Fluorescence Excitations around 2 MeV in U-235 and Pu-239  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A search for nuclear resonance fluorescence excitations in U and Pu within the energy range of 1.0- to 2.5-MeV was performed using a 4-MeV, continuous, bremsstrahlung source at the High Voltage Research Laboratory at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Measurements utilizing high purity Ge detectors at back angles identified 9 photopeaks in U-235 and 13 photopeaks in Pu-239 in this energy range, most likely dipole excitations. These resonances provide unique signatures that allow the materials to be non-intrusively detected in a variety of environments including fuel cells, waste drums, vehicles and containers. The presence and properties of these states may prove useful in understanding the nuclear structure of even - odd nuclei.

Bertozzi, William; Caggiano, Joseph A.; Hensley, Walter K.; Johnson, Micah S.; Korbly, Steve; Ledoux, Robert; McNabb, Dennis P.; norman, E. B.; Park, William H.; Warren, Glen A.

2008-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

43

Biotransformation of PuEDTA: Implications to Pu Immobilization  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This project integrates three distinct goals to develop a fundamental understanding of the potential fate and disposition of plutonium in sediments that are co-contaminated with EDTA. The three objectives are: (1) Develop thermodynamic data for Pu-EDTA species and determine the dominant mobile form of Pu under anaerobic conditions. (2) Elucidate the mechanism and rates of Pu(IV) and Pu(IV)-EDTA reduction by metal-reducing bacteria and determine where the Pu is located (in solution, biosorbed, bioaccumulated). (3) Enrich and isolate anaerobic EDTA-degrading microorganisms to investigate the anaerobic biodegradation of Pu-EDTA.

Bolton, Harvey, Jr.

2006-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

44

Pu-Zr (Plutonium - Zirconium)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Pu-Zr crystallographic data...0 to 100 cI 2 Im m (δ?Pu) 0 to 0.76 tI 2 I 4/ mmm (δPu) 0 to 47 cF 4 Fm m (γPu) 0 to 1.1 oF 8 Fddd (βPu) 0 to 2.7 mC 34 C 2/ m (αPu) 0 to 0.57 mP 16 P 2 1 / m θ (or Pu 4 Zr) 4 to 14 tP 80 P 4/ ncc κ (or PuZr 3 ) 52 hP 3 P 6/ mmm (αZr) 71 to 100 hP 2 P 6 3 / mmm...

45

DENSITY-FUNCTIONAL STUDY OF Zr-BASED ACTINIDE ALLOYS: 2. U-Pu-Zr SYSTEM  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Density-functional theory, previously used to describe phase equilibria in the U-Zr alloys [1], is applied to study ground state properties of the bcc U-Pu-Zr solid solutions. Calculated heats of formation of the Pu-U and Pu-Zr alloys are in a good agreement with CALPHAD assessments. We found that account for spin-orbit coupling is important for successful description of Pu-containing alloys.

Landa, A; Soderlind, P; Turchi, P; Vitos, L; Ruban, A

2009-02-09T23:59:59.000Z

46

Moduli Spaces of PU(2)-Instantons on Minimal Class VII Surfaces with b_2=1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We describe explicitly the moduli spaces $M^{pst}_g(S,E)$ of polystable holomorphic structures $E$ with $\\det E\\cong K$ on a rank 2 vector bundle $E$ with $c_1(E)=c_1(K)$ and $c_2(E)=0$ for all minimal class VII surfaces $S$ with $b_2(S)=1$ and with respect to all possible Gauduchon metrics $g$. These surfaces $S$ are non-elliptic and non-Kaehler complex surfaces and have recently been completely classified. When $S$ is a half or parabolic Inoue surface, $M^{pst}_g(S,E)$ is always a compact one-dimensional complex disc. When $S$ is an Enoki surface, one obtains a complex disc with finitely many transverse self-intersections whose number becomes arbitrarily large when $g$ varies in the space of Gauduchon metrics. $M^{pst}_g(S,E)$ can be identified with a moduli space of PU(2)-instantons. The moduli spaces of simple bundles of the above type leads to interesting examples of non-Hausdorff singular one-dimensional complex spaces.

Schbel, Konrad

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

47

PU(2) monopoles and a conjecture of Marino, Moore, and Peradze  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this article we show that some of the recent results of Marino, Moore, and Peradze (math.DG/9812042, hep-th/9812055) -- in particular their conjecture that all closed, smooth four-manifolds with b_2^+ > 1 (and Seiberg-Witten simple type) are of `superconformal simple type' -- can be understood using a simple mathematical argument via the PU(2)-monopole cobordism of Pidstrigach and Tyurin (dg-ga/9507004) and results of the first and third authors (dg-ga/9712005, dg-ga/9709022).

Paul M. N. Feehan; Peter B. Kronheimer; Thomas G. Leness; Tomasz S. Mrowka

1998-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

48

Stability constants important to the understanding of plutonium in environmental waters, hydroxy and carbonate complexation of PuO{sub 2}{sup +}  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The formation constants for the reactions PuO{sub 2}{sup +} + H{sub 2}O = PuO{sub 2}(OH) + H{sup +} and PuO{sub 2}{sup +} + CO{sub 3}{sup 2} = PuO{sub 2}(CO{sub 3}){sup {minus}} were determined in aqueous sodium perchlorate solutions by laser-induced photoacoustic spectroscopy. The molar absorptivity of the PuO{sub 2}{sup +} band at 569 nm decreased with increasing hydroxide concentration. Similarly, spectral changes occurred between 540 and 580 nm as the carbonate concentration was increased. The absorption data were analyzed by the non-linear least-squares program SQUAD to yield complexation constants. Using the specific ion interaction theory, both complexation constants were extrapolated to zero ionic strength. These thermodynamic complexation constants were combined with the oxidation-reduction potentials of Pu to obtain Eh versus pH diagrams. 120 refs., 35 figs., 12 tabs.

Bennett, D.A. [California Univ., Berkeley, CA (USA). Dept. of Chemistry]|[Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (USA). Nuclear Science Div.

1990-04-20T23:59:59.000Z

49

/sup 238/PuO/sub 2//Mo-50 wt% Re compatibility at 800 and 1000/sup 0/C  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The compatibility of Mo-50 wt % Re with /sup 238/PuO/sub 2/ was investigated after heat treatments of up to 720 days at 800/sup 0/C and 180 days at 1000/sup 0/C. At 800/sup 0/C, a 1-..mu..m thick, continuous layer of molybdenum oxide resulted. At 1000/sup 0/C, the oxide reaction product contained some plutonium and did not appear continuous. At 1000/sup 0/C, a layer of intermetallic formed at the Mo-Re edge, beneath the oxide layer, creating a barrier between the Mo-50 wt % Re and the /sup 238/PuO/sub 2/. The intermetallic layer was promoted by the iron impurity in the /sup 238/PuO/sub 2/.

Schaeffer, D.R.; Teaney, P.E.

1980-07-18T23:59:59.000Z

50

PU(2) monopoles and links of top-level Seiberg-Witten moduli spaces  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This is the first of two articles in which we give a proof - for a broad class of four-manifolds - of Witten's conjecture that the Donaldson and Seiberg-Witten series coincide, at least through terms of degree less than or equal to c-2, where c is a linear combination of the Euler characteristic and signature of the four-manifold. This article is a revision of sections 1-3 of an earlier version of the article dg-ga/9712005, now split into two parts, while a revision of sections 4-7 of that earlier version appears in a recently updated dg-ga/9712005. In the present article, we construct virtual normal bundles for the Seiberg-Witten strata of the moduli space of PU(2) monopoles and compute their Chern classes.

Paul M. N. Feehan; Thomas G. Leness

2000-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

51

Charge distribution and local structure and speciation in the UO{sub 2+x} and PuO{sub 2+x} binary oxides for x=<0.25  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The local structure and chemical speciation of the mixed valence, fluorite-based oxides UO{sub 2+x} (0.00=PuO{sub 2+x}/PuO{sub 2+x-y}(OH){sub 2y}.zH{sub 2}O have been determined by U/Pu L{sub III} XAFS spectroscopy. The U spectra indicate (1) that the O atoms are incorporated as oxo groups at short (1.75A) U-O distances consistent with U(VI) concomitant with a large range of U displacements that reduce the apparent number of U neighbors and (2) that the UO{sub 2} fraction remains intact implying that these O defects interact to form clusters and give the heterogeneous structure consistent with the diffraction patterns. The PuO{sub 2+x} system, which does not show a separate phase at its x=0.25 endpoint, also displays (1) oxo groups at longer 1.9A distances consistent with Pu(V+{delta}), (2) a multisite Pu-O distribution even when x is close to zero indicative of the formation of stable species with H{sub 2}O and its hydrolysis products with O{sup 2-}, and (3) a highly disordered, spectroscopically invisible Pu-Pu component. The structure and bonding in AnO{sub 2+x} are therefore more complicated than have previously been assumed and show both similarities but also distinct differences among the different elements.

Conradson, Steven D. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Chemistry Division, Materials Science and Technology Division and Nuclear Materials Technology Division, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States)]. E-mail: conradson@lanl.gov; Begg, Bruce D. [Australian Nuclear Science and Technolgy Organisation, Menai, NSW 2234 (Australia); Clark, David L. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Chemistry Division, Materials Science and Technology Division and Nuclear Materials Technology Division, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States)] [and others

2005-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

52

8-group relative delayed neutron yields for monoenergetic neutron induced fission of sup 2 sup 3 sup 9 Pu  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The energy dependence of the relative yield of delayed neutrons in an 8-group model representation was obtained for monoenergetic neutron induced fission of sup 2 sup 3 sup 9 Pu. A comparison of this data with the available experimental data by other was made in terms of the mean half-life of the delayed neutron precursors.

Piksaikin, V M; Kazakov, L E; Korolev, G G; Roshchenko, V A; Tertychnyj, R G

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

53

Neutron cross section evaluations for actinides at intermediate energies sup 2 sup 3 sup 9 Pu  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Investigations aimed at the development of neutron cross section evaluations for actinides performed at IPPE in collaboration with Royal Institute of Technology, Stockholm at intermediate energies in the range of 0-200 MeV are briefly described on the example of sup 2 sup 3 sup 9 Pu. The coupled-channels optical model is used to calculate the neutron total, elastic and reaction cross sections and the elastic scattering angular distributions. Evaluations of the neutron and charged particle emission cross sections and of the fission cross sections are obtained on the basis of the statistical description that includes direct, preequilibrium and equilibrium mechanisms of nuclear reactions. The Kalbach parametrization of angular distributions is used to describe the double-differential cross sections of emitted neutrons and charged particles in ENDF/B-VI format. These investigations resulted in creation of complete neutron and proton data files for sup 2 sup 3 sup 8 U and sup 2 sup 3 sup 2 Th and neutron data file...

Ignatyuk, A V; Gudowski, W; Lunev, V P; Shubin, Yu N; Titarenko, N N

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

54

Interactions of /sup 238/PuO/sub 2/ heat sources with terrestrial and aquatic environments. Interim summary  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Observations and some conclusions made of the interactions of /sup 238/PuO/sub 2/ heat sources with terrestrial and aquatic environments may be used in predicting heat source behavior in the event of contact of these heat sources with land or ocean and in assessing the risk to the environment. These studies indicate that plutonium transport from the heat sources is mostly a physical process involving the movement of extremely fine particles rather than the chemical migration of plutonium ions.

Patterson, J.H.; Steinkruger, F.J.; Matlack, G.M.

1980-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

55

Fabrication of granule and pellet heat sources from oxalate-based $sup 238$PuO$sub 2$  

SciTech Connect

Suitable fuel forms for radioisotopic thermoelectric generators are granules of high internal density (greater than 95 percent of theoretical) or geometric shapes (80 to 90 percent dense) such as pellets or spheres. Both forms can be made from calcined $sup 238$Pu(III) oxalate. The conditions for processing PuO$sub 2$ are controlled during fuel form fabrication to ensure pellet integrity; to control density, grain size, and porosity distribution; and to minimize the fraction of potentially respirable fines. The competing phenomena of expansion caused by radiation damage (including helium generation from radioactive decay of plutonium) and shrinkage caused by sintering must be controlled to assure dimensional stability. The variation of microstructure and related physical properties with process parameters is discussed. (auth)

Bickford, D.F.; Rankin, D.T.

1975-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

56

Microstructural damage produced by helium in aged /sup 238/PuO/sub 2/ fuels  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Microstructural damage is produced in aged /sup 238/PuO/sub 2/ fuels used to power radioisotopic heat sources by the generation and release of the helium arising from alpha decay of the fuel. We obtained information about the nature and extent of this damage from metallographic examination of fuel pellets ranging in density from 87 to 94% with a grain size range of 6 to 30 ..mu..m that either were stored at ambient temperature for 18 months and then heated at 900, 1150, or 1360/sup 0/C or were stored at 900, 1150, or 1350/sup 0/C for 27 months. Microstructural damage was not observed in the fuel pellets stored at ambient temperature and then heated at 900/sup 0/C, but grain boundary bubble damage was observed in the pellets stored at ambient temperature and then heated at either 1150 or 1350/sup 0/C. More extensive damage occurred in those pellets heated at 1350/sup 0/C. Four of the higher density pellets (92 and 94% dense) stored at 900/sup 0/C shattered during storage and the rest appeared to be highly strained. The pellets stored at 1150/sup 0/C were damaged only slightly but were somewhat strained and appeared to have released their helium inventory only partially. All pellets stored at 1350/sup 0/C showed swelling and extensive void agglomeration. These data suggest that the best fuel operating temperature, as far as helium damage is concerned, would be approx. 1200/sup 0/C because below this temperature the fuel becomes highly strained and above this temperature the fuel swells ad becomes somewhat friable. Both these situations could adversely affect the impact behavior of the fuel from the standpoint of strength and fines generation.

Land, C.C.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

57

Conceptual design for a receiving station for the nondestructive assay of PuO/sub 2/ at the fuels and materials examination facility  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We propose a conceptual design for a receiving station for input accountability measurements on PuO/sub 2/ received at the Fuels and Materials Examination Facility at the Hanford Engineering Development Laboratory. Nondestructive assay techniques are proposed, including neutron coincidence counting, calorimetry, and isotopic determination by gamma-ray spectroscopy, in a versatile data acquisition system to perform input accountability measurements with precisions better than 1% at throughputs of up to 2 M.T./yr of PuO/sub 2/.

Sampson, T.E.; Speir, L.G.; Ensslin, N.; Hsue, S.T.; Johnson, S.S.; Bourret, S.; Parker, J.L.

1981-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

58

Appendices of an appraisal for the use of geothermal energy in state-owned buildings in Colorado. Section E. Glenwood Springs  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The State Highway Department Buildings in Glenwood Springs have been evaluated in this appraisal for the use of geothermal energy in state-owned buildings. Glenwood Springs is the location of surface hot springs and has been assessed by various parties for several geothermal applications. The Glenwood Highway Department Buildings consist of an office building and a maintenance garage. These two building140 gpm. currently use an array of natural gas forced air furnaces and electric heaters for space/heating purpose; a propane unit is used for one water heater. Retrofit engineering for geothermal heating is based upon a central plate-in-frame heat exchanger coupled to several fan coil heaters and unit heaters. Design heating can be accomplished with 150/sup 0/F geothermal water at 140 gpm. The geothermal energy economics are evaluated for a single deep well, with and without a proration of the total production well cost for the required 140 gpm out of the 1000 gpm production capacity. Only the prorated well cost option provides an economically feasible geothermal system. The feasibility, therefore, depends on the use of the excess geothermal water by private or municipal facilities. The principal institutional/environmental issue for a geothermal heating sytem for the Highway Department Buildings is the question of whether or not the states owns the geothermal rights on the state property.

Meyer, R.T.; Coe, B.A.; Dick, J.D.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

59

PU(2) monopoles. II: Top-level Seiberg-Witten moduli spaces and Witten's conjecture in low degrees  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this article we complete the proof---for a broad class of four-manifolds---of Witten's conjecture that the Donaldson and Seiberg-Witten series coincide, at least through terms of degree less than or equal to c-2, where c is a linear combination of the Euler characteristic and signature of the four-manifold. This article is a revision of sections 4--7 of an earlier version, while a revision of sections 1--3 of that earlier version now appear in a separate companion article (math.DG/0007190). Here, we use our computations of Chern classes for the virtual normal bundles for the Seiberg-Witten strata from the companion article (math.DG/0007190), a comparison of all the orientations, and the PU(2) monopole cobordism to compute pairings with the links of level-zero Seiberg-Witten moduli subspaces of the moduli space of PU(2) monopoles. These calculations then allow us to compute low-degree Donaldson invariants in terms of Seiberg-Witten invariants and provide a partial verification of Witten's conjecture.

Paul M. N. Feehan; Thomas G. Leness

1997-12-08T23:59:59.000Z

60

High-precision molecular dynamics simulation of UO2-PuO2: pair potentials comparison  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Our series of articles is devoted to high-precision molecular dynamics simulation of mixed actinide-oxide (MOX) fuel in the rigid ions approximation using high-performance graphics processors (GPU). In the first article we assess 10 most relevant interatomic sets of pair potentials (SPP) by reproduction of solid phase properties of uranium dioxide (UO2) - temperature dependences of the lattice constant, bulk modulus, enthalpy and heat capacity. Measurements were performed with 1K accuracy in a wide temperature range from 300K up to melting point. The best results are demonstrated by two recent SPPs MOX-07 and Yakub-09, which both had been fitted to the recommended thermal expansion in the range of temperatures 300-3100K. Compared with them, the widely used SPPs Basak-03 and Morelon-03 reproduce the experimental data noticeably worse at temperatures above 2500K.

Potashnikov, S I; Nekrasov, K A; Kupryazhkin, A Ya

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "2 glenwood pu" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

The Spectroscopic Signature of Aging in (delta)-Pu(Ga)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The electronic structure of Pu is briefly discussed, with emphasis upon Aging effects. Photoelectron Spectroscopy and X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy have contributed greatly to our improved understanding of Pu electronic structure. (See Figure 1.) From these and related measurements, the following has been determined: (1) The Pu 5f spin-orbit splitting is large; (2) The number of Pu5f electrons is 5; and (3) The Pu 5f spin-orbit splitting effect dominates 5f itineracy.

Tobin, J G; Yu, S; Chung, B W

2009-04-29T23:59:59.000Z

62

Biotic and Abiotic Reduction and Solubilization of Pu(IV)O2xH2O(am) as Affected by Anthraquinone-2,6-disulfonate (AQDS) and Ethylenediaminetetraacetate (EDTA)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In the presence of hydrogen (H{sub 2}), the synthetic chelating agent ethylenediaminetetraacetate (EDTA), and the electron shuttle anthraquinone-2,6-disulfonate (AQDS), the dissimilatory metal-reducing bacteria (DMRB) Shewanella oneidensis and Geobacter sulfurreducens both reductively solubilized 100% of added 0.5 mM plutonium (IV) hydrous oxide (Pu(IV)O{sub 2} {lg_bullet} xH{sub 2}O{sub (am)}) in {approx}24 h at pH 7 in a non-complexing buffer. In the absence of AQDS, bioreduction was much slower ({approx}22 days) and less extensive ({approx}83-94%). In the absence of DMRB but under comparable conditions, 89% (without AQDS) to 98% (with AQDS) of added 0.5 mM PuO{sub 2} {lg_bullet} xH{sub 2}O{sub (am)} was reductively solubilized over 418 days. Under comparable conditions but in the absence of EDTA, Pu(aq) increased by as much as an order of magnitude in some EDTA-free treatments, both biotic and abiotic, and increases in solubility were associated with the production of both Pu(OH)3(am) and Pu(III)(aq). Incubation with DMRB in the absence of EDTA increased the polymeric and crystalline content of the PuO{sub 2} {lg_bullet} xH{sub 2}O{sub (am)} and also decreased Pu solubility in 6-N HCl. Results from an in vitro assay demonstrated electron transfer to PuO{sub 2} {lg_bullet} xH{sub 2}O{sub (am)} from the S. oneidensis outer-membrane c-type cytochrome MtrC, and EDTA increased the oxidation of MtrC by PuO{sub 2} {lg_bullet} xH{sub 2}O{sub (am)}. Our results suggest that PuO{sub 2} {lg_bullet} xH{sub 2}O{sub (am)} biotic and abiotic reduction and solubilization may be important in anoxic, reducing environments, especially where complexing ligands and electron shuttling compounds are present.

Plymale, Andrew E.; Bailey, Vanessa L.; Fredrickson, Jim K.; Heald, Steve M.; Buck, Edgar C.; Shi, Liang; Wang, Zheming; Resch, Charles T.; Moore, Dean A.; Bolton, Harvey

2012-01-24T23:59:59.000Z

63

Evaluation of neutron-induced reactions on sup 2 sup 3 sup 6 Pu for JENDL-3.3  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Cross sections and energy-angular distributions of emitted neutrons were evaluated for the neuron-incident reactions on sup 2 sup 3 sup 6 Pu in the incident energy range of 10 eV to 20 MeV by using a statistical model combined with a coupled channel optical model. The calculated results were compiled to the latest evaluated nuclear data library JENDL-3.3 in the ENDF-6 format. The unresolved resonance region is assumed to be from 10 eV to 30 keV, and the averaged resonance parameters were obtained to reproduce the calculated cross sections. Maxwell temperature for fission neutron spectra were estimated from a systematics with a correction for prefission neutrons.

Iwamoto, O

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

64

Adsorption of Atmospheric Gases on Pu Surfaces  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Surface adsorption represents a competition between collision and scattering processes that depend on surface energy, surface structure and temperature. The surface reactivity of the actinides can add additional complexity due to radiological dissociation of the gas and electronic structure. Here we elucidate the chemical bonding of gas molecules adsorbed on Pu metal and oxide surfaces. Atmospheric gas reactions were studied at 190 and 300 K using x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Evolution of the Pu 4f and O 1s core-level states were studied as a function of gas dose rates to generate a set of Langmuir isotherms. Results show that the initial gas dose forms Pu{sub 2}O{sub 3} on the Pu metal surface followed by the formation of PuO{sub 2} resulting in a layered oxide structure. This work represents the first steps in determining the activation energy for adsorption of various atmospheric gases on Pu.

Nelson, A J; Holliday, K S; Stanford, J A; Grant, W K; Erler, R G; Allen, P G; McLean, W; Roussel, P

2012-03-29T23:59:59.000Z

65

Pu electronic structure and photoelectron spectroscopy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The electronic structure of PuCoGa{sub 5}, Pu metal, and PuO{sub 2} is explored using photoelectron spectroscopy. Ground state electronic properties are inferred from temperature dependent photoemission near the Fermi energy for Pu metal. Angle-resolved photoemission details the energy vs. crystaJ momentum landscape near the Fermi energy for PuCoGa{sub 5} which shows significant dispersion in the quasiparticle peak near the Fermi energy. For the Mott insulators AnO{sub 2}(An = U, Pu) the photoemission results are compared against hybrid functional calculations and the model prediction of a cross over from ionic to covalent bonding is found to be reasonable.

Joyce, John J [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Durakiewicz, Tomasz [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Graham, Kevin S [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Bauer, Eric D [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Moore, David P [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Mitchell, Jeremy N [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Kennison, John A [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Martin, Richard L [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Roy, Lindsay E [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Scuseria, G. E. [RICE UNIV

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

66

Strong Lines of Plutonium ( Pu )  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Plutonium (Pu) Homepage - Introduction Finding list Select element by name. Select element by atomic number. ... Strong Lines of Plutonium ( Pu ). ...

67

Atomic Data for Plutonium (Pu)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Plutonium (Pu) Homepage - Introduction Finding list Select element by name. Select element by atomic number. ... Atomic Data for Plutonium (Pu). ...

68

Pilot-scale production of dicesium hexachloroplutonate (Cs/sub 2/PuCl/sub 6/) and filtrate recovery  

SciTech Connect

The Rocky Flats Plant is introducing the use of dicesium hexachloroplutonate (DCHP) into the Molten Salt Extraction Process (MSE). DCHP (Cs/sub 2/PuCl/sub 6/) extracts americium from molten plutonium metal into a molten calcium chloride matrix. The DCHP is produced by precipitating plutonium (IV) from hydrochloric acid with cesium chloride. Before production of the DCHP began, we performed a pilot-scale test to determine yields, track impurities, and test filtrate recovery for the proposed process. In the course of this study, we determined that impure plutonium oxide (0.80 g/g) dissolved in concentrated HCl is an acceptable source of plutonium for the DCHP. We also determined that dissolved oxide and chloride anion exchange eluate can be mixed for DCHP preparation. We found that DCHP yields average 92-95% at 8M total chloride and are independent of sparging rate and time. Furthermore, we found that drying at 150/degree/C for 5 hr gives <0.1% water in the DCHP only if it is preceeded by extensive air drying. Finally, we proved the efficiency of chloride anion exchange for the recovery of above-discard plutonium from the filtrate. 11 refs., 1 fig., 11 tabs.

Muscatello, A.C.; Stevens, J.R.; Killion, M.E.; Valdez, J.D.; Ames, R.L.

1989-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

69

Ambient-temperature Conditioning as a Probe of Double-C Transformation Mechanisms in Pu-2.0 at. % Ga  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The gallium-stabilized Pu-2.0 at. % Ga alloy undergoes a partial or incomplete low-temperature martensitic transformation from the metastable {delta} phase to the gallium-containing, monoclinic {alpha}{prime} phase near -100 C. This transformation has been shown to occur isothermally and it displays anomalous double-C kinetics in a time-temperature-transformation (TTT) diagram, where two nose temperatures anchoring an upper- and lower-C describe minima in the time for the initiation of transformation. The underlying mechanisms responsible for the double-C behavior are currently unresolved, although recent experiments suggest that a conditioning treatment--wherein, following an anneal at 375 C, the sample is held at a sub-anneal temperature for a period of time--significantly influences the upper-C of the TTT diagram. As such, elucidating the effects of the conditioning treatment upon the {delta} {yields} {alpha}{prime} transformation can provide valuable insights into the fundamental mechanisms governing the double-C kinetics of the transition. Following a high-temperature anneal, a differential scanning calorimeter (DSC) was used to establish an optimal conditioning curve that depicts the amount of {alpha}{prime} formed during the transformation as a function of conditioning temperature for a specified time. With the optimal conditioning curve as a baseline, the DSC was used to explore the circumstances under which the effects of the conditioning treatment were destroyed, resulting in little or no transformation.

Jeffries, J R; Blobaum, K M; Wall, M A; Schwartz, A J

2008-04-02T23:59:59.000Z

70

Experimental Limit to Interstellar 244Pu Abundance  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Short-lived nuclides, now extinct in the solar system, are expected to be present in the interstellar medium (ISM). Grains of ISM origin were recently discovered in the inner solar system and at Earth orbit and may accrete onto Earth after ablation in the atmosphere. A favorable matrix for detection of such extraterrestrial material is presented by deep open-sea sediments with very low sedimentation rates (0.8-3 mm/kyr). We report here on the measurement of Pu isotopic abundances in a 1-kg deep-sea dry sediment collected in 1992 in the North Pacific. Our measured value of (3+-3)x10^5 244Pu atoms in the Pu-separated fraction of the sample shows no excess over the expected stratospheric nuclear fallout content and under reasonable assumptions we derive a limit of 2x10^-11 g-244Pu/g-ISM for the abundance of 244Pu in ISM.

Paul, M; Ahmad, I; Berkovits, D; Bordeanu, C; Ghelberg, S; Hashimoto, Y; Hershcovitch, A I; Jiang, S; Nakanishi, T; Sakamoto, K

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

71

Experimental Limit to Interstellar 244Pu Abundance  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Short-lived nuclides, now extinct in the solar system, are expected to be present in the interstellar medium (ISM). Grains of ISM origin were recently discovered in the inner solar system and at Earth orbit and may accrete onto Earth after ablation in the atmosphere. A favorable matrix for detection of such extraterrestrial material is presented by deep open-sea sediments with very low sedimentation rates (0.8-3 mm/kyr). We report here on the measurement of Pu isotopic abundances in a 1-kg deep-sea dry sediment collected in 1992 in the North Pacific. Our measured value of (3+-3)x10^5 244Pu atoms in the Pu-separated fraction of the sample shows no excess over the expected stratospheric nuclear fallout content and under reasonable assumptions we derive a limit of 2x10^-11 g-244Pu/g-ISM for the abundance of 244Pu in ISM.

M. Paul; A. Valenta; I. Ahmad; D. Berkovits; C. Bordeanu; S. Ghelberg; Y. Hashimoto; A. Hershkowitz; S. Jiang; T. Nakanishi; K. Sakamoto

2001-06-12T23:59:59.000Z

72

Pu Workshop Letter  

SciTech Connect

In preparation for the upcoming Pu Workshop in Livermore, CA, USA, during July 14 and 15, 2006, we have begun to give some thought as to how the meeting will be structured and what will be discussed. Below, you will find our first proposal as to the agenda and contents of the meeting. From you, we need your feedback and suggestions concerning the desirability of each aspect of our proposal. Hopefully, we will be able to converge to a format that is acceptable to all parties. First, it now appears that we will be limited to three main sessions, Friday morning (July 14), Friday afternoon (July 14) and Saturday morning (July 15). The Pu Futures Meeting will conclude on Thursday, July 13. Following a social excursion, the Russian participants will be transported from Monterey Bay to their hotel in Livermore. We anticipate that the hotel will be the Residence Inn at 1000 Airway Blvd in Livermore. However, the hotel arrangements still need to be confirmed. We expect that many of our participants will begin their travels homeward in the afternoon of Saturday, July 15 and the morning of Sunday, July 16. Associated with the three main sessions, we propose that there be three main topics. Each session will have an individual focus. Because of the limited time available, we will need to make some judicious choices concerning the focus and the speakers for each session. We will also have a poster session associated with each session, to facilitate discussions, and a rotating set of Lab Tours, to maximize participation in the tour and minimize the disruption of the speaking schedule. Presently, we are planning a tour of the Dynamical Transmission Electron Microscope (DTEM) facilities, but this is still in a preliminary stage. We estimate that for each session and topic, there will be time for five (5) speakers. We propose that, typically, there be three (3) Russian and two (2) American speakers per session. We also propose that each session have a chair (or two chairs), who will be given a small amount of time to set the stage for the upcoming talks and pose previously prepared, crucial questions. While this imposes a significant burden upon the session chairs, it seems to us that such an arrangement will maximize the impact of each session. While some of the topics overlap with those at Pu Futures, we propose that there will be enough complementarity and amplification of specific topics that the overlap will be minimal.

Tobin, J G; Schwartz, A J; Fluss, M

2006-03-06T23:59:59.000Z

73

Pu speciation in actual and simulated aged wastes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

X-ray Absorption Fine Structure Spectroscopy (XAFS) at the Pu L{sub II/III} edge was used to determine the speciation of this element in (1) Hanford Z-9 Pu crib samples, (2) deteriorated waste resins from a chloride process ion-exchange purification line, and (3) the sediments from two Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Liter Scale simulant brine systems. The Pu speciation in all of these samples except one is within the range previously displayed by PuO{sub 2+x-2y}(OH){sub y}{center_dot}zH{sub 2}O compounds, which is expected based on the putative thermodynamic stability of this system for Pu equilibrated with excess H{sub 2}O and O{sub 2} under environmental conditions. The primary exception was a near neutral brine experiment that displayed evidence for partial substitution of the normal O-based ligands with Cl{sup -} and a concomitant expansion of the Pu-Pu distance relative to the much more highly ordered Pu near neighbor shell in PuO{sub 2}. However, although the Pu speciation was not necessarily unusual, the Pu chemistry identified via the history of these samples did exhibit unexpected patterns, the most significant of which may be that the presence of the Pu(V)-oxo species may decrease rather than increase the overall solubility of these compounds. Several additional aspects of the Pu speciation have also not been previously observed in laboratory-based samples. The molecular environmental chemistry of Pu is therefore likely to be more complicated than would be predicted based solely on the behavior of PuO{sub 2} under laboratory conditions.

Lezama-pacheco, Juan S [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Conradson, Steven D [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

74

Method of removing Pu(IV) polymer from nuclear fuel reclaiming liquid  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A Pu(IV) polymer not extractable from a nuclear fuel reclaiming solution by conventional processes is electrolytically converted to Pu.sup.3+ and PuO.sub.2.sup.2+ ions which are subsequently converted to Pu.sup.4+ ions extractable by the conventional processes.

Tallent, Othar K. (Oak Ridge, TN); Mailen, James C. (Oak Ridge, TN); Bell, Jimmy T. (Kingston, TN); Arwood, Phillip C. (Harriman, TN)

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

75

Distinguishing Pu Metal From Pu Oxide Using Fast Neutron Counting  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We describe a method for simultaneously determining the {alpha}-ratio and k{sub eff} for fissile materials using fast neutrons. Our method is a generalization of the Hage-Cifarrelli method for determining k{sub eff} for fissile assemblies which utilizes the shape of the fast neutron spectrum. In this talk we illustrate the method using Monte Carlo simulations of the fast neutrons generated in PuO{sub 2} to calculate the fast neutron spectrum and Feynman correlations.

Verbeke, J M; Chapline, G F; Nakae, L; Wurtz, R; Sheets, S

2012-05-29T23:59:59.000Z

76

Pu-Th (plutonium-thorium) system  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The phase behavior of the Pu-Th system has been studied by metallography, X-ray diffraction, thermal analysis, dilatometry, and density measurements, and by optical pyrometry. Results of studies of the system over the entire composition range are reported. The assessed phase diagram was constructed from the combined results of previous workers. Elemental Pu has six allotropic phases, whereas Th metal has two allotropes. The elemental transformation temperatures are based on a review of the actinides by Ward, et al. The diagram is dominated by the high solubility of Pu in Th, which is contrasted with the relatively small solubility of Th in Pu. The system has a single intermediate compound, zeta, formed by a peritectic reaction. The special points associated with the binary system are summarized. 10 references, 2 figures, 2 tables.

Peterson, D.E.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

77

Experimental Limit to Interstellar 244 Pu Abundance  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Short-lived nuclides, now extinct in the solar system, are expected to be present in interstellar matter (ISM). Grains of ISM origin were recently discovered in the inner solar system and at Earth orbit and may accrete onto Earth after ablation in the atmosphere. A favorable matrix for detection of such extraterrestrial material is presented by deep-sea sediments with very low sedimentation rates (0.83 mm/kyr). We report here on the measurement of Pu isotopic abundances in a 1-kg deep-sea dry sediment collected in 1992 in the North Pacific. Our estimate of (3 3) 105 244Pu atoms in the Pu-separated fraction of the sample shows no excess over the expected stratospheric nuclear fallout content and under reasonable assumptions sets a limit of 0.2 244 Pu atoms/cm 2 yr for extra-terrestrial deposition. Using available data on ISM steady-state flux on Earth, we derive a limit of 2 10?11 g-244Pu/g-ISM for the abundance of 244Pu in ISM. Subject headings: Nuclear reactions, nucleosynthesis, abundances ISM: abundancesinstrumentation: spectrographsmethods: laboratory

M. Paul; A. Valenta; I. Ahmad; D. Berkovits; C. Bordeanu; S. Ghelberg; A. Hershkowitz; S. Jiang; T. Nakanishi; K. Sakamoto

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

78

Radiolysis of Salts and Long-Term Storage Issues for Both Pure and Impure PuO{sub 2} Materials in Plutonium Storage Containers  

SciTech Connect

The Material Identification and Surveillance (MIS) project sponsored a literature search on the effects of radiation on salts, with focus on alkali chlorides. The goal of the survey was to provide a basis for estimating the magnitude of {alpha} radiation effects on alkali chlorides that can accompany plutonium oxide (PuO{sub 2}) into storage. Chloride radiolysis can yield potentially corrosive gases in plutonium storage containers that can adversely affect long-term stability. This literature search was primarily done to provide a tutorial on this topic, especially for personnel with nonradiation chemistry backgrounds.

Lav Tandon

2000-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

79

/sup 238/Pu surface contamination of MHW impact shell assembly  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

/sup 238/PuO/sub 2/ contamination of the grit blasted surface of the primary impact shell assembly (PISA) of the multi-hundred watt isotopic heat source was measured. The study determined the amount and distribution of the /sup 238/PuO/sub 2/ and characterization of its behavior during aging at 1350/sup 0/C. The results concluded that normal decontamination effectively removes the superficial /sup 238/PuO/sub 2/ but does not extract the /sup 238/PuO/sub 2/ which is deep within the grit blasted structure. Subsequent heating results in migration of microcurie amounts of plutonium out of the grit blasted structure.

Schaeffer, D.R.; Johnson, E.W.; Sheehan, W.E.; Fleming, D.L.; Egleston, E.E.

1976-11-22T23:59:59.000Z

80

Iron Corrosion Observations: Pu(VI)-Fe Reduction Studies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Iron and Pu Reduction: (1) Very different appearances in iron reaction products were noted depending on pH, brine and initial iron phase; (2) Plutonium was associated with the Fe phases; (3) Green rust was often noted at the higher pH; (4) XANES established the green rust to be an Fe2/3 phase with a bromide center; and (5) This green rust phase was linked to Pu as Pu(IV).

Reed, Donald T. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Swanson, Juliet S. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Richmann, Michael K. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Lucchini, Jean-Francois [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Borkowski, Marian [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2012-09-11T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "2 glenwood pu" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

High-silicon {sup 238}PuO{sub 2} fuel characterization study: Half module impact tests  

SciTech Connect

The General-Purpose Heat Source (GPHS) provides power for space missions by transmitting the heat of [sup 238]Pu decay to an array of thermoelectric elements. The modular GPHS design was developed to address both survivability during launch abort and return from orbit. Previous testing conducted in support of the Galileo and Ulysses missions documented the response of GPHSs to a variety of fragment- impact, aging, atmospheric reentry, and Earth-impact conditions. The evaluations documented in this report are part of an ongoing program to determine the effect of fuel impurities on the response of the heat source to conditions baselined during the Galileo/Ulysses test program. In the first two tests in this series, encapsulated GPHS fuel pellets containing high levels of silicon were aged, loaded into GPHS module halves, and impacted against steel plates. The results show no significant differences between the response of these capsules and the behavior of relatively low-silicon fuel pellets tested previously.

Reimus, M.A.H.

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

82

Program Pu Futures 2006  

SciTech Connect

The coordination chemistry of plutonium remains relatively unexplored. Thus, the fundamental coordination chemistry of plutonium is being studied using simple multi-dentate ligands with the intention that the information gleaned from these studies may be used in the future to develop plutonium-specific sequestering agents. Towards this goal, hard Lewis-base donors are used as model ligands. Maltol, an inexpensive natural product used in the commercial food industry, is an ideal ligand because it is an all-oxygen bidentate donor, has a rigid structure, and is of small enough size to impose little steric strain, allowing the coordination preferences of plutonium to be the deciding geometric factor. Additionally, maltol is the synthetic precursor of 3,4-HOPO, a siderophore-inspired bidentate moiety tested by us previously as a possible sequestering agent for plutonium under acidic conditions. As comparisons to the plutonium structure, Ce(IV) complexes of the same and related ligands were examined as well. Cerium(IV) complexes serve as good models for plutonium(IV) structures because Ce(IV) has the same ionic radius as Pu(IV) (0.94 {angstrom}). Plutonium(IV) maltol crystals were grown out of a methanol/water solution by slow evaporation to afford red crystals that were evaluated at the Advanced Light Source at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory using single crystal X-ray diffraction. Cerium(IV) complexes with maltol and bromomaltol were crystallized via slow evaporation of the mother liquor to afford tetragonal, black crystals. All three complexes crystallize in space group I4{sub 1}/a. The Ce(IV) complex is isostructural with the Pu(IV) complex, in which donating oxygens adopt a trigonal dodecahedral geometry around the metal with the maltol rings parallel to the crystallographic S{sub 4} axis and lying in a non-crystallographic mirror plane of D{sub 2d} molecular symmetry (Fig 1). The metal-oxygen bonds in both maltol complexes are equal to within 0.04 {angstrom} for each oxygen type. In contrast to the maltol structures, the cerium(IV) bromomaltol complex arranges the maltol rings in a drastically different manner while maintaining the S{sub 4} crystallographic symmetry (Fig 2). The coordination geometry around the cerium remains a trigonal dodecahedron, but the chelating ligands span a different set of edges as in the maltol structures; the two-fold related bromomaltol ligands twist away from planarity, breaking the D{sub 2d} molecular symmetry. It is unlikely that steric interaction with a bromine on the same molecule would have caused the observed rearrangement, as there would be sufficient separation between them to accommodate their bulk in the geometry of the plutonium and cerium maltol complexes. The extended packing in the unit cell of both the plutonium and cerium maltol crystals indicates that pi stacking occurs throughout the lattice via the maltol rings with close contacts between rings of approximately 3.6 {angstrom}. Introduction of the bromine to this structure would disrupt the packing that would allow these interactions, causing the molecule to adopt the geometry present in the bromomaltol structure. In this unexpected arrangement the complex is still able to maintain some pi stacking with the maltol rings of adjacent molecules with a close contact of approximately 3.3 {angstrom}. Additionally, the bromine on each ligand is arranged such that its next closest contact is with a bromine 3.64 {angstrom} away on another molecule. Despite the different ligand geometry, the bromomaltol structure exhibits metal-oxygen bond distances that are within 0.06 {angstrom} of those in the maltol complexes.

Fluss, M

2006-06-12T23:59:59.000Z

83

Pu-bearing materials - from fundamental science to storage standards.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The behavior of plutonium (Pu) oxides in the presence of water/moisture in a confined space and the associated issues of hydrogen and oxygen generation due to radiolysis have important implications for the storage and transportation of Pu-bearing materials. This paper reviews the results of recent studies of gas generation in the Pu-O-H system, including the determination of release rates via engineering-scale measurement. The observations of the significant differences in gas generation behavior between 'pure' Pu-bearing materials and those that contain salt impurities are addressed. In conjunction with the discussion of these empirical observations, the work also addresses recent scientific advances in the investigations of the Pu-O-H system using state-of-the-art ab initio electronic structure calculations, as well as advanced synchrotron techniques to determine the electronic structure of the various Pu-containing phases. The role of oxidizing species such as the hydroxyl radical from the radiolysis of water is examined. Discussed also is the challenge in the predictive ab-initio calculations of the electronic structure of the Pu-H-O system, due to the nature of the 5f valence electrons in Pu. Coupled with the continuing material surveillance program, it is anticipated that this work may help determine the electronic structure of the various Pu-containing phases and the role of impurity salts on gas generation and the long-term stability of oxygen/hydrogen-containing plutonium oxides beyond PuO{sub 2}.

Tam, S. W.; Liu, Y.; Decision and Information Sciences; Michigan Technical Univ.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

84

Chemical Speciation of Heterogeneously Reduced Pu in Synthetic Brines  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

X-ray absorption fine structure (XAFS) spectroscopy has been used to determine the speciation of Pu precipitates prepared by the heterogeneous reduction of Pu(VI) with Al and Fe in 5M NaCl and an ERDA-6 brine, a simulant from the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant in Carlsbad, New Mexico. NaOCl was added to some of these solutions to determine its effect on Pu speciation. Analysis of the Pu LIII spectra showed that all solids consisted of PuO2+x?y(OH)2y zH2O, compounds with characteristics identical to those prepared by hydrolysis and with Pu?O and Pu?Pu distances identical to those treated at elevated temperature. Additionally, reduction with Al gave compounds with different site distributions than reduction with Fe, and reduction with Al or the addition of NaOCl appeared to suppress the formation of oxo groups and their associated Pu(V) sites.

Ding, Mei; Conca, James L.; Den Auwer, Christophe J.; Gabitov, Rinat I.; Hess, Nancy J.; Paviet-Hartmann, Patricia; Palmer, Phillip D.; LoPresti, Vin; Conradson, Steven D.

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

85

Pu-238 Fact Sheet  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

and Determination for and Determination for Pu-238 Production Radioisotope power systems enable space exploration and national security missions. T he Department of Energy (DOE) and its predecessors have pro- vided radioisotope power systems that have safely enabled deep space exploration and national security missions for five decades. Radioisotope power systems (RPSs) convert the heat from the decay of the plutonium-238 (Pu-238) isotope into electricity. RPSs are capable of producing heat and electricity under the harsh conditions encountered in deep space for decades. They have proven safe, reliable, and maintenance-free in missions to study the moon and all of the planets in the solar system except Mer- cury. Recent missions include the Mars Science Laboratory rover,

86

Recovery of plutonium from HEPA filters by Ce(IV): promoted dissolution of PuO/sub 2/ and recycle of the cerium promoter  

SciTech Connect

Studies carried out in this investigation included (1) electrolytic production of Ce(IV) from Ce(III), (2) leaching of refractory PuO/sub 2/ from HEPA filters with maintenance of Ce(IV) by anodic oxidation during leaching, and (3) evaluation of methods for contacting the HEPA solids with the leaching solution and for separating the solid residue from the leaching liquor. Anodic oxidation of Ce(III) was accomplished with an electric current efficiency of about 85% at current densities of 0.04 to 0.4 A/dm/sup 2/ at Pt anode. Refractory PuO/sub 2/ was dissolved by a 4.0 M HNO/sub 3/ - 0.1 M Ce(IV) solution in 1.5 h at 100/sup 0/C using stirred-contact leaching of the solids or by recirculating the leachant through a packed column of the solids. Cerium(IV) concentrations were maintained continuously by anodic oxidation throughout leaching. Dissolution times up to 10 h were required unless the HEPA media were oxidized initially in air at 300/sup 0/C to destroy carbonaceous species which consumed Ce(IV) more rapidly than it could be regenerated be anodic oxidation. Leaching solids in packed columns avoided the relatively difficult liquid-solids separation by centrifugation which was required after stirred-contact leaching; however, the solids handling difficulties remain. A flowsheet is proposed for the recovery of actinides from HEPA filters. A 4 M HNO/sub 3/ - 0.1 M Ce(IV) nitrate solution is used as the leachant and the Ce(III) is recycled to the leaching operation using bidentate solvent extraction.

Scheitlin, F.M.; Bond, W.D.

1980-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

87

The fluorite related modulated structures of the Gd{sub 2}(Zr{sub 2-x}Ce{sub x})O{sub 7} solid solution: An analogue for Pu disposition  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We present an overview of the Gd{sub 2}(Zr{sub 2-x}Ce{sub x})O{sub 7} phase diagram, of interest as a model system for ceramic disposition of Pu (with Ce as a Pu surrogate). The fluorite related structures of this solid solution were determined using a modulated structure approach, to identify the underlying cation and vacancy ordering mechanisms from analysis of key satellite reflections in selected zone axis electron diffraction patterns. This revealed the formation of four structure types: pyrochlore for x1.50. X-ray absorption (XAS) and electron energy loss (EELS) spectra confirmed the presence of Ce{sup 4+} as the dominant species in compositions across this system, remaining analogous to Pu{sup 4+}. - Graphical abstract: Electron diffraction reveals the cation vacancy ordering mechanisms leading to fluorite related superstructures in the Gd{sub 2}(Zr{sub 2-x}Ce{sub x})O{sub 7} solid solution. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The fluorite related solid solution Gd{sub 2}(Zr{sub 1-x}Ce{sub x})O{sub 7} was prepared by solid state synthesis. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Ce L{sub 3} edge XAS and Ce M{sub 4,5} EELS measurements show Ce substitutes as Ce{sup 4+}. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Cation and oxygen vacancy ordering results in four fluorite related structures.

Reid, D.P. [Immobilisation Science Laboratory, Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Sheffield, Mappin Street, Sheffield S1 3JD (United Kingdom); Stennett, M.C., E-mail: m.c.stennett@sheffield.ac.uk [Immobilisation Science Laboratory, Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Sheffield, Mappin Street, Sheffield S1 3JD (United Kingdom); Hyatt, N.C., E-mail: n.c.hyatt@sheffield.ac.uk [Immobilisation Science Laboratory, Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Sheffield, Mappin Street, Sheffield S1 3JD (United Kingdom)

2012-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

88

Interaction of an iridium-clad RTG heat source unit with a simulated terrestrial environment. [/sup 238/PuO/sub 2/  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

An iridium-clad, 100-W /sup 238/PuO/sub 2/ sphere, a prototype for the multihundred-watt radioisotope thermoelectric generator, was exposed for 1 y to a simulated temperate humid climate in an environmental test chamber containing sandy soil. The hot sphere sank into the soil after the first rain, then gradually acquired a hard crust around it as a result of the rainwater reacting with the hot soil during successive rains. Time and temperature profiles of the sphere were recorded during the weekly rains, and the air and rainwater that percolated through the soil were monitored for plutonium. No plutonium was released from the sphere. Aside from the crust formation, very little reaction occurred between the hot iridium shell and the soil.

Patterson, J.H.; Herrera, B.; Nelson, G.B.; Matlack, G.M.; Waterbury, G.R.

1976-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

89

$sup 238$Pu fuel form activities  

SciTech Connect

This report for STYPu Fuel Form Activities has one main section: SRP-PuFF Facility. The SRL portion of this program has been completed. The program status, budget information, and milestone schedules are discussed. The SRP portion of this report summarizes production of STYPuO2 fuel forms for use in radioisotopic thermoelectric generators (RTG's) in the Plutonium Fuel Form (Puff) Facility at the Savannah River Plant. The PuFF Facility has been placed in a production readiness mode of operation pending funding of additional heat source programs.

1987-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

90

Elastic properties of Pu metal and Pu-Ga alloys  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We present elastic properties, theoretical and experimental, of Pu metal and Pu-Ga ({delta}) alloys together with ab initio equilibrium equation-of-state for these systems. For the theoretical treatment we employ density-functional theory in conjunction with spin-orbit coupling and orbital polarization for the metal and coherent-potential approximation for the alloys. Pu and Pu-Ga alloys are also investigated experimentally using resonant ultrasound spectroscopy. We show that orbital correlations become more important proceeding from {alpha} {yields} {beta} {yields} {gamma} plutonium, thus suggesting increasing f-electron correlation (localization). For the {delta}-Pu-Ga alloys we find a softening with larger Ga content, i.e., atomic volume, bulk modulus, and elastic constants, suggest a weakened chemical bonding with addition of Ga. Our measurements confirm qualitatively the theory but uncertainties remain when comparing the model with experiments.

Soderlind, P; Landa, A; Klepeis, J E; Suzuki, Y; Migliori, A

2010-01-05T23:59:59.000Z

91

Cs and 239,240 Pu concentration  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

;into 17 latitudinal boxes according to ocean circulation, global fallout patterns and the location,240 Pu were 21 G 2 years and 9 G 1 years, respectively. There is evidence that fallout removal rates to global fallout from nuclear weapons tests carried out in the 1950s and 1960s. The input function

Buesseler, Ken

92

XAFS and LIBD Investigation of the Formation and Structure of Pu(IV) Hydrolysis Products  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Pu(IV) oxyhydroxide colloid growth is investigated with XAFS and LIBD. From combined results a model of colloid formation is proposed, which leads to a face-centered cubic Pu sublattice having cation defects, as observed with EXAFS, and a linear dependency of log [Pu(IV)] on -log [H{sup +}] with slope -2, in accord with LIBD. The solubility for Pu(IV) measured with LIBD is close to the lower limit of the solubility curve from previously reported data.

Rothe, J.; Walther, C.; Denecke, M.A.; Fanghnel, Th. (Karlesruhe)

2010-11-16T23:59:59.000Z

93

NIST: International Comparison of Pu-241  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

International Comparison of Pu-241. Summary: ... In addition, 241 Pu is the most difficult of the plutonium isotopes to detect and measure. ...

2012-06-27T23:59:59.000Z

94

The Research of Rou Pu Tuan.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Speaking to the erotological fiction, people would often refer to Rou Pu Tuan. Besides Jin Ping Mei, Rou Pu Tuan is also frequently mentioned by (more)

Lin, Sin-ying

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

95

Experimental Benchmarking of Pu Electronic Structure  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The standard method to determine the band structure of a condensed phase material is to (1) obtain a single crystal with a well defined surface and (2) map the bands with angle resolved photoelectron spectroscopy (occupied or valence bands) and inverse photoelectron spectroscopy (unoccupied or conduction bands). Unfortunately, in the case of Pu, the single crystals of Pu are either nonexistent, very small and/or having poorly defined surfaces. Furthermore, effects such as electron correlation and a large spin-orbit splitting in the 5f states have further complicated the situation. Thus, we have embarked upon the utilization of unorthodox electron spectroscopies, to circumvent the problems caused by the absence of large single crystals of Pu with well-defined surfaces. Our approach includes the techniques of resonant photoelectron spectroscopy, x-ray absorption spectroscopy, electron energy loss spectroscopy, Fano Effect measurements, and Bremstrahlung Isochromat Spectroscopy, including the utilization of micro-focused beams to probe single-crystallite regions of polycrystalline Pu samples.

Tobin, J.G.; Moore, K.T.; Chung, B.W.; Wall, M.A.; Schwartz, A.J.; Ebbinghaus, B.B.; Butterfield, M.T.; Teslich, Jr., N.E.; Bliss, R.A.; Morton, S.A.; Yu, S.W.; Komesu, T.; Waddill, G.D.; van der Laan, G.; Kutepov, A.L. (UMR-MUST); (LLNL)

2008-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

96

Pu-Bearing Materials - From Fundamental Science to Storage Standards  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The behavior of plutonium (Pu) oxides in the presence of water/moisture in a confined space and the associated issues of hydrogen and oxygen generation due to radiolysis have important implications for the storage and transportation of Pu-bearing materials. This paper reviews the results of recent studies of gas generation in the Pu-O-H system, including the determination of release rates via engineering-scale measurement. The observations of the significant differences in gas generation behavior between 'pure' Pu-bearing materials and those that contain salt impurities are addressed. In conjunction with the discussion of these empirical observations, this work also addresses recent scientific advances in the investigations of the Pu-O-H system using state-of-the-art ab initio electronic structure calculations, as well as advanced synchrotron techniques to determine the electronic structure of the various Pu-containing phases. The role of oxidizing species such as the hydroxyl radical from the radiolysis of water is examined. Discussed also is the challenge in the predictive ab-initio calculations of the electronic structure of the Pu-H-O system, due to the nature of the 5f valence electrons in Pu. Coupled with the continuing material surveillance program, it is anticipated that this work may help determine the electronic structure of the various Pu-containing phases and the role of impurity salts on gas generation and the long-term stability of oxygen/hydrogen-containing plutonium oxides beyond PuO{sub 2}. (authors)

Shiu-Wing Tam; Yung Liu [Decision and Information Sciences Div., Argonne National Laboratory, 9700 S. Cass Avenue, Bldg. 900, MS-12, Argonne, IL, 60439 (United States)

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

97

Reaction of plutonium with water kinetic and equilibrium behavior of binary and ternary phases in the Pu + O + H system  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The kinetic and equilibrium behavior of the Pu + O + H system has been studied by measuring the production of hydrogen gas formed by a sequence of hydrolysis reactions. The kinetic dependence of the Pu + H/sub 2/O reaction on salt concentration and temperature has been defined. The metal is quantitatively converted to a fine black powder which has been identified as plutonium monoxide monohydride, PuOH. Other hydrolysis products formed in aqueous media include a second oxide hydride, Pu/sub 7/O/sub 9/H/sub 3/, and the oxides Pu/sub 2/O/sub 3/, Pu/sub 7/O/sub 12/, Pu/sub 9/O/sub 16/, Pu/sub 10/O/sub 18/, Pu/sub 12/O/sub 22/, and PuO/sub 2/. Thermal decomposition products of PuOH include Pu/sub 2/O/sub 2/H and PuO. A tentative phase diagram for Pu + O + H is presented and structural relationships of the oxide hydrides and oxides are discussed. 10 figures, 5 tables.

Haschke, J.M.; Hodges, A.E. III; Bixby, G.E.; Lucas, R.L.

1983-02-03T23:59:59.000Z

98

The Transcription Factor PU.1 Regulates cd T Cell  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Background: T cell development results in the generation of both mature ab and cd T cells. While ab T cells predominate in secondary lymphoid organs, cd T cells are more abundant in mucosal tissues. PU.1, an Ets family transcription factor, also identified as the spleen focus forming virus proviral integration site-1 (Sfpi1) is essential for early stages of T cell development, but is down regulated during the DN T-cell stage. Methodology/Principal Findings: In this study, we show that in mice specifically lacking PU.1 in T cells using an lck-Cre transgene with a conditional Sfpi1 allele (Sfpi1 lck2/2) there are increased numbers of cd T cells in spleen, thymus and in the intestine when compared to wild-type mice. The increase in cd T cell numbers in PU.1-deficient mice is consistent in cd T cell subsets identified by TCR variable regions. PU.1-deficient cd T cells demonstrate greater proliferation in vivo and in vitro. Conclusions/Significance: The increase of cd T cell numbers in Lck-Cre deleter strains, where deletion occurs after PU.1 expression is diminished, as well as the observation that PU.1-deficient cd T cells have greater proliferative responses than wild type cells, suggests that PU.1 effects are not developmental but rather at the level of homeostasis. Thus, our data

Rukhsana Jabeen; Hua-chen Chang; Ritobrata Goswami; Stephen L. Nutt; Mark H. Kaplan

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

Assessment of Plutonium-238 (Pu-238) Production Alternatives  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Plutonium-238 Plutonium-238 Production Alternatives Briefing for Nuclear Energy Advisory Committee April 21, 2008 Dennis Miotla Deputy Assistant Secretary for Nuclear Power Deployment Miotla - April 2008 NEAC Mtg - DM183874 (2) Statement of Work Desired end state: - Reliable, sustainable, affordable supply of Pu-238 suitable for NASA applications Assumptions: - NASA obtains funding for planned missions - Russia is out of material to sell to US - DOE maintains balance of radioisotope power source infrastructure during period of depleted supply Independently evaluate the Pu-238 heat source requirements for NASA's mission projections and assess Pu-238 production assumptions, strategy and alternatives for meeting those requirements Miotla - April 2008 NEAC Mtg - DM183874 (3)

100

Development of a detection method for {244}Pu by resonance ionization mass spectrometry.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The long-lived actinide {sup 244}Pu (t{sub 1/2} = 81 Myr) is expected to be present in the Interstellar Medium from fresh r-process nucleosynthesis or in direct ejecta from supernovae. Deposition onto Earth may result in traces of live {sup 244}Pu in suitable reservoirs. We are developing a method for {sup 244}Pu detection based on resonance ionization mass spectroscopy. Using Gd as a proxy, we determine an overall efficiency of 0.5% in conditions applicable to the detection of Pu, and present preliminary results on Pu detection.

Ofan, A.; Ahmad, I.; Greene, J. P.; Paul, M.; Savina, M. R. (Materials Science Division); ( PHY); (Hebrew Univ.)

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "2 glenwood pu" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Microsoft PowerPoint - NEAC Pu-238 Briefing.PPT [Compatibility Mode]  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Pu Pu 238 Supply Recent Pu-238 Supply Developments Briefing for N l E Ad i C itt Nuclear Energy Advisory Committee J 9 2009 June 9, 2009 Alice Caponiti Office of Radioisotope Power Systems Status Update on Pu-238 Supply ● DOE's FY 2010 Congressional budget request includes $30 million to reestablish a domestic Pu-238 production $30 million to reestablish a domestic Pu 238 production capability ▬ NE is making plans for FY2010 should the project get funded g p p j g ● Russian fuel shipment received in December 2008 ▬ NE is continuing negotiations for the remaining shipments ▬ NE is continuing negotiations for the remaining shipments ● National Research Council study concluded that need to reestablish Pu-238 production is urgent p g ▬ Specific findings and recommendations follow 2

102

PU.1 Is Required for Macrophage Polarization and the Development of Allergic Inflammation.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Rational: Alternatively activated macrophages (AAM) play a pivotal role in Th2 immune response. Although it was well proven that the transcription factor PU.1 has an (more)

Deng, Jing

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

103

Effect of 1-hydroxyethane-1,1-diphosphonic acid (HEDPA) on Partitioning of Np and Pu to Synthetic Boehmite  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Penrose, W. R. , Nelson, D. M. : Pu(V) as the stable form ofT. , and Serkiz, S. M. : Pu(V)O 2+ adsorption and reductionEffect of HEDPA on Np and Pu sorption to boehmite (?-AlOOH)

Powell, Brian A.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

104

Pu-erh Tea Inhibits Tumor Cell Growth by Down-Regulating Mutant p53  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abstract: Pu-erh tea is a kind of fermented tea with the incorporation of microorganisms metabolites. Unlike green tea, the chemical characteristics and bioactivities of Pu-erh tea are still not well understood. Using water extracts of Pu-erh tea, we analyzed the tumor cell growth inhibition activities on several genetically engineered mouse tumor cell lines. We found that at the concentration that did not affect wild type mouse embryo fibroblasts (MEFs) growth, Pu-erh tea extracts could inhibit tumor cell growth by down-regulated S phase and cause G1 or G2 arrest. Further study showed that Pu-erh tea extracts down-regulated the expression of mutant p53 in tumor cells at the protein level as well as mRNA level. The same concentration of Pu-erh tea solution did not cause p53 stabilization or activation of its downstream pathways in wild type cells. We also found that Pu-erh tea treatment could slightly down-regulate both HSP70 and HSP90 protein levels in tumor cells. These data revealed the action of Pu-erh tea on tumor cells and provided the possible mechanism for Pu-erh tea action, which explained its selectivity in inhibiting tumor cells without affecting wild type cells. Our data sheds light on the application of Pu-erh tea as an

Lanjun Zhao; Shuting Jia; Wenru Tang; Jun Sheng; Ying Luo

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

105

Local structure and vibrational properties of alpha'-Pu martensitein Ga-stabilized delta-Pu  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Extended x-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy (EXAFS) is used to investigate the local atomic environment and vibrational properties of plutonium and gallium atoms in the {alpha}{prime} and {delta} phases of a mixed phase Pu-Ga alloy. EXAFS results measured at low temperature compare the structure of the mixed phase sample with a single-phase {delta}-Pu sample. EXAFS spectral components attributed to both {alpha}{prime}-Pu and {delta}-Pu were observed in the mixed phase sample. Ga K-edge EXAFS spectra indicate local atomic environments similar to the Pu LIII-edge EXAFS results, which suggests that Ga is substitutional for Pu atoms in both the monoclinic {alpha}{prime}-Pu and the fcc {delta}-Pu structures. In {delta}-Pu, we measure a Ga-Pu bond length contraction of 0.11 Angstroms with respect to the Pu-Pu bond length. The corresponding bond-length contraction around Ga in {alpha}{prime}-Pu is only 0.03 Angstroms. Results from temperature-dependent Pu LIII-edge EXAFS measurements are fit to a correlated Debye model, and a large difference in the Pu-Pu bond Debye temperature is observed for the {alpha}{prime} and {delta} phases: {theta}{sub cD}({alpha}{prime})=159{+-}13 K versus {theta}{sub cD}({delta})=120{+-}3 K. The corresponding analysis for the Ga K EXAFS determines a Ga-Pu bond Debye temperature of {theta}{sub cD}({delta})=188{+-}12 K in the {delta}-Pu phase. These results are related to the observed solubility of Ga in {delta}-Pu, the ''stabilization'' of {delta}-Pu by Ga at room temperature, and the insolubility of Ga in {alpha}{prime}-Pu.

Nelson, E.J.; Blobaum, K.J.M.; Wall, M.A.; Allen, P.G.; Schwartz,A.J.; Booth, C.H.

2003-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

106

Economical Production of Pu-238  

SciTech Connect

All space exploration missions traveling beyond Jupiter must use radioisotopic power sources for electrical power. The best isotope to power these sources is plutonium-238. The US supply of Pu-238 is almost exhausted and will be gone within the next decade. The Department of Energy has initiated a production program with a $10M allocation from NASA but the cost is estimated at over $100 M to get to production levels. The Center for Space Nuclear Research has conceived of a potentially better process to produce Pu-238 earlier and for significantly less cost. The new process will also produce dramatically less waste. Potentially, the front end costs could be provided by private industry such that the government only had to pay for the product produced. Under a NASA Phase I NIAC grant, the CSNR has evaluated the feasibility of using a low power, commercially available nuclear reactor to produce at least 1.5 kg of Pu-238 per year. The impact on the neutronics of the reactor have been assessed, the amount of Neptunium target material estimated, and the production rates calculated. In addition, the size of the post-irradiation processing facility has been established. In addition, a new method for fabricating the Pu-238 product into the form used for power sources has been identified to reduce the cost of the final product. In short, the concept appears to be viable, can produce the amount of Pu-238 needed to support the NASA missions, can be available within a few years, and will cost significantly less than the current DOE program.

Steven D. Howe; Douglas Crawford; Jorge Navarro; Terry Ring

2013-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

107

Parity splitting and E1/E2 branching in the alternating parity band of {sup 240}Pu from two-center octupole wave functions using supersymmetric quantum mechanics  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An interpretation is suggested of the recently published experimental data on the alternating parity bands in {sup 240}Pu. The interpretation is based on the assumption that the main role in the description of the properties of the alternating parity bands plays the octupole mode which preserves the axial symmetry. The mathematical technique of the supersymmetric quantum mechanics is used for the realization of the model with the two-center octupole wave functions. A good description of the parity splitting and of the ratio of the dipole and quadrupole transitional moments is obtained for the first two bands.

Jolos, R. V. [Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, 141980 Dubna (Russian Federation); Institut fuer Kernphysik der Universitaet zu Koeln, D-50937 Koeln (Germany); Brentano, P. von [Institut fuer Kernphysik der Universitaet zu Koeln, D-50937 Koeln (Germany)

2011-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

108

Oxidation Potential of the Pu(III)-Pu(IV) Couple in Percloric Acid So lution. Heat Content and Entropy Change  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

on the heat of oxidation of Pu to PuO^ ". The entropies ofT ENINEi' T The cPu= Pu + e" has been reported by Hindman et al ' to be -0.945

Connick, Robert E.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

109

EnEnvironmental Mobility of Pu(IV) in the Presence of Ethylenediaminetetraacetic Acid: Myth or Reality  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Ethylenediaminetetracetic acid (EDTA), which was co-disposed with Pu at several U. S. Department of Energy sites, has been reported to enhance the solubility and transport of Pu. It is generally assumed that this enhanced transport of Pu in geologic environments is a result of complexation of Pu(IV) with EDTA. However, the fundamental bases for this assumption have never been fully explored. Whether EDTA can mobilize Pu(IV) in geologic environments is dependent on many factors, chief among them are not only the complexation constants of Pu with EDTA and dominant oxidation state and the nature of Pu solids, but also 1) the complexation constants of environmentally important metal ions (e.g. Fe, Al, Ca, Mg) that compete with Pu for EDTA and 2) EDTA interactions with geomedia (e.g., adsorption, biodegradation) that reduce effective EDTA concentrations available for complexation. Extensive studies over a large range of pH values (1 to 14) and EDTA concentrations (0.0001 to 0.01 M) as a function of time were conducted on the solubility of 2-line ferrihydrite (Fe(OH)3(s)), PuO2(am) in the presence of different concentrations of Ca ions, and mixtures of PuO2(am) and Fe(OH)3(s). The solubility data were interpreted using Pitzers ion-interaction approach to determine/validate the solubility product of Fe(OH)3(s), the complexation constants of Pu(IV)-EDTA and Fe(III)-EDTA, and to determine the affect of EDTA in solubilizing Pu(IV) from PuO2(am) in the presence of Fe(III) compounds and aqueous Ca concentrations. Predictions based on these extensive fundamental data show that environmental mobility of Pu as a result of Pu(IV)-EDTA complexation as reported/implied in the literature is a myth rather than the reality.

Rai, Dhanpat; Moore, Dean A.; Rosso, Kevin M.; Felmy, Andrew R.; Bolton, Harvey

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

110

Soft X-ray Studies of Pu Electronic Structure: Past Lessons and Future Directions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Photoelectron Spectroscopy (PES) and X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy (XAS, Figure 1) have contributed greatly to our improved understanding of Pu electronic structure. From these and related measurements, the following has been determined: (1) The Pu 5f spin-orbit splitting is large; (2) The number of Pu5f electrons is near 5; and (3) The Pu 5f spin-orbit splitting effect dominates 5f itineracy. Significant questions remain concerning the nature of Pu electronic structure. Perhaps the missing piece of the puzzle is the direct experimental determination of the unoccupied electronic structure using high energy inverse photoelectron spectroscopy or Bremstrahlung Isochromat Spectroscopy (BIS). Past BIS studies of Th and U indicate the feasibility and utility of Pu studies.

Tobin, J G; Yu, S W

2008-02-07T23:59:59.000Z

111

Pu WangReference  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

[1] O. Dousse and P. Thiran, Connectivity vs capacity in dense ad- hoc networks, Proc. INFOCOM 2004. [2] P. Gupta and P. R. Kumar, Critical power for asymptotic connectivity in

Pu Wang Reference; O. Dousse; P. Mannersalo; P. Thiran; O. Hggstrm; Y. Peres; J. Steif; Dynamic Percolation; Pu Wang

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

112

Statistical analysis of Pu in soil at NTS: some results (an outline)  

SciTech Connect

From NAEG plutonium environmental studies program meeting; Las Vegas, Nevada, USA (2 Oct 1973). The inventory of /sup 239/Pu and /sup 240/Pu at various depths in surface soil samples collected from various locations at the Nevada Test Site was determined. Isopleths were constructed for use in stratified random sampling to estimate surface inventory. Gamma scans for /sup 241/Am were made on all soil samples for comparison with the determinations of / sup 239/Pu and /sup 240/Pu made using wet chemistry techniques. (CH)

Gilbert, R.O.; Eberhardt, L.L.

1973-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

113

Overview of advanced technologies for stabilization of {sup 238}Pu-contaminated waste  

SciTech Connect

This paper presents an overview of potential technologies for stabilization of {sup 238}Pu-contaminated waste. Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) has processed {sup 238}PuO{sub 2} fuel into heat sources for space and terrestrial uses for the past several decades. The 88-year half-life of {sup 238}Pu and thermal power of approximately 0.6 watts/gram make this isotope ideal for missions requiring many years of dependable service in inaccessible locations. However, the same characteristic which makes {sup 238}Pu attractive for heat source applications, the high Curie content (17 Ci/gram versus 0.06 Ci/gram for 239{sup Pu}), makes disposal of {sup 238}Pu-contaminated waste difficult. Specifically, the thermal load limit on drums destined for transport to the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP), 0.23 gram per drum for combustible waste, is impossible to meet for nearly all {sup 238}Pu-contaminated glovebox waste. Use of advanced waste treatment technologies including Molten Salt Oxidation (MSO) and aqueous chemical separation will eliminate the combustible matrix from {sup 238}Pu-contaminated waste and recover kilogram quantities of {sup 238}PuO{sub 2} from the waste stream. A conceptual design of these advanced waste treatment technologies will be presented.

Ramsey, K.B.; Foltyn, E.M. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Heslop, J.M. [Naval Surface Warfare Center, Indian Head, MD (United States)

1998-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

114

DEVELOPMENT PROGRAM FOR PU-238 AQUEOUS RECOVERY PROCESS  

SciTech Connect

Aqueous processing is necessary for the removal of impurities from {sup 238}Pu dioxide ({sup 238}PuO{sub 2}) fuel due to unacceptable levels of {sup 234}U and other non-actinide impurities in the scrap fuel. Impurities at levels above General Purpose Heat Source (GPHS) fuel specifications may impair the performance.of the heat sources. Efforts at Los Alamos have focused on developing the bench scale methodology for the aqueous process steps which includes comminution, dissolution, ion exchange, precipitation, and calcination. Recently, work has been performed to qualify the bench scale methodology, to show that the developed process produces pure {sup 238}PuO{sub 2} meeting GPHS fuel specifications. In addition, this work has enabled us to determine how waste volumes may be minimized during full-scale processing. Results of process qualification for the bench scale aqueous recovery operation and waste minimization efforts are presented.

M. PANSOY-HJELVIK; M. REIMUS; ET AL

2000-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

115

Delayed neutron measurements for Th-232, Np-237, Pu-239, Pu-241 and depleted uranium  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The neutron emission rates from five very pure actinide samples (Th-232, Np-237, Pu-239, Pu-241 and depleted uranium) were measured following equilibrium irradiation in fast and thermal neutron fluxes. The relative abundances (alphas) for the first four groups were calculated from the delayed neutron emission (counts vs. time) data using Keepin's 6-group decay constants (lambdas) for Th-232, Pu-239 and depleted uranium (both fast and thermal neutron induced fissions). The relative abundances (alphas) for the first five groups were calculated for the fast neutron induced fission of Np-237 using the 7-group lambdas obtained by Charlton (1997). The relative abundances for the first five groups were also calculated using the 7-group lambdas proposed by Loaiza and Haskin (2000), the 8-group lambdas proposed by Campbell and Spriggs (1998) and the 8-group lambdas proposed by Piksaikin (2000) for all of the samples (fast neutron induced fission only for Th-232 and Np-237, fast and thermal neutron induced fission for the remainder). Fission product yield and delayed neutron emission probability data from the ENDF-349 and JEF 2.2 nuclear data libraries were also used to simulate neutron emission data from the samples. The calculated neutron yield curves were used to obtain group relative abundances for each of the five actinide samples (fast neutron induced fission only for Th-232 and Np-237, fast and thermal neutron induced fission for the remainder) based on each set of proposed lambdas. The relative abundances obtained from the experiments and calculations are compared and the differences are noted and discussed.

Stone, Joseph C.

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

116

Savannah River Site: Plutonium Preparation Project (PuPP) at...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Site: Plutonium Preparation Project (PuPP) at Savannah River Site Savannah River Site: Plutonium Preparation Project (PuPP) at Savannah River Site Full Document and Summary...

117

Plutonium Residue Recovery (PuRR) project quarterly progress report, April--June 1989  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A material-balance flowsheet for ash-heel processing has been prepared. The major process features are (1) reduction of Pu into a calcium-zinc alloy and selective electrolytic recovery of the Pu from the alloy, (2) removal of americium as a waste, (3) concentration of nontransuranic tramp elements in a zinc waste, (4) removal of oxygen and recovery of calcium by electrolysis of CaO, and (5) zinc recycle by evaporation. Based on this idealized flowsheet, the mass of solid waste is only 62% of that of the original residue. This is accomplished by recycling virtually all the reagents and discarding the oxygen as CO and CO{sub 2}. The pyrochemical recovery of Pu from incinerator ash heel from the Rocky Flats Plant was investigated. During this period, zinc-calcium alloys were used to reduce the PuC{sub 2} in the ash. Reduction of ash heel has been attempted with zinc-calcium alloys containing 2, 6, and 10 wt% calcium after the reduction. These resulted in extractions of 95%, 97%, and 99.5%, respectively, of the Pu from the salt. Following exposure of the reduction alloy to a ZnCl{sub 2}-bearing salt, the Pu was removed effectively from the alloy; however, the Pu recovered in the salt did not complete the material balance. Experiments were made to test a calcium-zinc reference electrode against a Zn-Ca-Mg-Al liquid alloy. The results agreed well with calculated potentials, and such electrodes are promising for application to process monitoring. Calculations were made that verify that most of the americium in the molten salt is present in the divalent state when distributed between liquid Pu and NaCl-KCl. The AmCl{sub 2} activity coefficient is about 10 times that of PuCl{sub 3} in the salt mixture.

Gregg, D.W.; Hickman, R.G.; Landrum, J.H. (Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (USA)); Johnson, G.K.; Johnson, I.; Mulcahey, T.P.; Pierce, R.D.; Poa, D.S. (Argonne National Lab., IL (USA))

1989-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

118

Criticality Safety Controls for 55-Gallon Drums with a Mass Limit of 200 grams Pu-239  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The following 200-gram Pu drum criticality safety controls are applicable to RHWM drum storage operations: (1) Mass (Fissile/Pu) - each 55-gallon drum or its equivalent shall be limited to 200 gram Pu or Pu equivalent; (2) Moderation - Hydrogen materials with a hydrogen density greater than that (0.133 g H/cc) of polyethylene and paraffin are not allowed and hydrogen materials with a hydrogen density no greater than that of polyethylene and paraffin are allowed with unlimited amounts; (3) Interaction - a spacing of 30-inches (76 cm) is required between arrays and 200-gram Pu drums shall be placed in arrays for 200-gram Pu drums only (no mingling of 200-gram Pu drums with other drums not meeting the drum controls associated with the 200-gram limit); (4) Reflection - no beryllium and carbon/graphite (other than the 50-gram waiver amount) is allowed, (note that Nat-U exceeding the waiver amount is allowed when its U-235 content is included in the fissile mass limit of 200 grams); and (5) Geometry - drum geometry, only 55-gallon drum or its equivalent shall be used and array geometry, 55-gallon drums are allowed for 2-high stacking. Steel waste boxes may be stacked 3-high if constraint.

Chou, P

2011-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

119

New limits on the ordered moments in ?-Pu and Ga-stabilized ?-Pu  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present the first SR measurements ever performed on elemental Pu, and set the most stringent upper limits to date on the magnitude of the ordered moment ord in ?-Pu and ?-stabilized Pu (alloyed with 4.3 at. % Ga). Assuming a nominal hyperfine coupling field of 1 kOe/B we find ord ? 10 ?3 B at T ? = 4 K. Key words: plutonium magnetism, f-electron, SR 1.

R. H. Heffner A; G. D. Morris A

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

120

PU IMMOBILIZATION - INDUCTION MELTING ND OFFGAS TESTING  

SciTech Connect

The Cylindrical Induction Melter (CIM) at the Aiken County Technology Laboratory (ACTL) has been operated by the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) to support the Pu Disposition Conceptual Design (CD-0) development effort. The primary purpose of this report is to summarize the offgas sampling tests conducted in the CIM to capture and analyze the particulate and vapors emitted from lanthanide borosilicate (LaBS) Frit X with HfO{sub 2} as a surrogate for PuO{sub 2} and added impurities. In addition, this report describes several initial tests of the CIM for the vitrification of LaBS Frit X with HfO{sub 2}. The activities required to produce Frit X from batch chemical oxides for subsequent milling to yield glass frit of nominally 20 micron particle size are also discussed. The tests with impurities added showed that alkali salts such as NaCl and KCl were substantially emitted into the offgas system as the salt particulate, HCl, or Cl{sub 2}. Retention of Na and K in the glass were about 80 and 55%, respectively. Chloride retention was about 35%; chloride remaining in the glass was 0.29-0.37 wt%. Based on a material balance, approximately 83% of F fed was retained in the glass at about 0.09 wt % (F could not be measured directly at this concentration). Transition metals (Ni, Cu, Fe, Mo, Cr) were also volatilized to varying extents. A very small amount (<0.1 g) of nickel compounds and KCl were found in crystals deposited on the melter offgas line. Overall, about 58-72% of the impurities added were volatilized. Virtually all of the particulate species were collected on the nominal 0.3 {micro}m filter. The particulate evolution rate ranged from 2-8 g/kg glass/h. The particulate was found to be as small as 0.2 {micro}m and have an approximate median size of 0.5 {micro}m. The particulate salt was also found to stick together by forming bridges between particles. Further runs without washable salts are recommended. Measurements of particle size distribution for use in offgas system design and tests of simple impingement devices for particle collection are also recommended for tests in the near future.

Marra, J

2006-11-28T23:59:59.000Z

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121

Determining site-specific drum loading criteria for storing combustible {sup 238}Pu waste  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Waste containing hydrogenous-combustible material contaminated with {sup 238}Pu can generate hydrogen gas at appreciable rates through alpha radiolysis. To ensure safe transportation of WIPP drums, the limit for {sup 238}Pu-combustible waste published in the WIPP TRUPACT-11 CONTENT (TRUCON) CODES is 21 milliwafts per 55 gallon drum. This corresponds to about 45 milligrams of {sup 238}PuO{sub 2} used for satellite heat source-electrical generators. The Los Alamos waste storage site adopted a {sup 238}Pu waste storage criteria based on these TRCUCON codes. However, reviews of the content in drums of combustible waste generated during heat source assembly at Los Alamos showed the amount of {sup 238}Pu is typically much greater than 45 milligrams. It is not feasible to appreciably reduce Los Alamos {sup 238}Pu waste drum loadings without significantly increasing waste volumes or introducing unsafe practices. To address this concern, a series of studies were implemented to evaluate the applicability of the TRUCON limits for storage of this specific waste. Addressed in these evaluations were determination of the hydrogen generation rate, hydrogen diffusion rates through confinement layers and vent filters, and packaging requirements specific to Los Alamos generated {sup 238}Pu contaminated combustible waste. These studies also showed that the multiple-layer packaging practices in use at Los Alamos could be relaxed without significantly increasing the risk of contamination. Based on a model developed to predict H{sub 2} concentrations in packages and drum headspace, the site specific effective hydrogen generation rate, and hydrogen-diffusion values, and revising the waste packaging practices, we were able to raise the safe loading limit for {sup 238}Pu waste drums for on site storage to the gram levels typical of currently generated {sup 238}Pu waste.

Marshall, R.S.; Callis, E.L.; Cappis, J.H.; Espinoza, J.M.; Foltyn, E.M.; Reich, B.T. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Smith, M.C. [Benchmark Environmental Corp., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

1994-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

122

Characterization of Pu-238 heat source granule containment  

SciTech Connect

The Milliwatt Radioisotopic Thermoelectric Generator (RTG) provides power for permissive-action links. These nuclear batteries convert thermal energy to electrical energy using a doped silicon-germanium thermopile. The thermal energy is provided by a heat source made of {sup 238}Pu, in the form of {sup 238}PuO{sub 2} granules. The granules are contained in 3 layers of encapsulation. A thin T-111 liner surrounds the {sup 238}PuO{sub 2} granules and protects the second layer (strength member) from exposure to the fuel granules. The T-111 strength member contains the fuel under impact condition. An outer clad of Hastelloy-C protects the T-111 from oxygen embrittlement. The T-111 strength member is considered the critical component in this {sup 238}PuO{sub 2} containment system. Any compromise in the strength member is something that needs to be characterized. Consequently, the T-111 strength member is characterized upon it's decommissioning through Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM), and Metallography. SEM is used in Secondary Electron mode to reveal possible grain boundary deformation and/or cracking in the region of the strength member weld. Deformation and cracking uncovered by SEM are further characterized by Metallography. Metallography sections are mounted and polished, observed using optical microscopy, then documented in the form of photomicrographs. SEM may further be used to examine polished Metallography mounts to characterize elements using the SEM mode of Energy Dispersive X-ray Spectroscopy (EDS). This paper describes the characterization of the metallurgical condition of decommissioned RTG heat sources.

Richardson Ii, P D [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Thronas, D L [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Romero, J P [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Sandoval, F E [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Neuman, A D [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Duncan, W S [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

123

Z dependence of the N=152 deformed shell gap: In-beam {gamma}-ray spectroscopy of neutron-rich {sup 245,246}Pu  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We have measured in-beam {gamma} rays in the neutron-rich {sup 246}Pu{sub 152} and {sup 245}Pu{sub 151} nuclei by means of {sup 244}Pu({sup 18}O, {sup 16}O){sup 246}Pu and {sup 244}Pu({sup 18}O, {sup 17}O){sup 245}Pu neutron transfer reactions, respectively. The {gamma} rays emitted from {sup 246}Pu ({sup 245}Pu) were identified by selecting the kinetic energy of scattered {sup 16}O ({sup 17}O) detected by Si {delta}E-E detectors. The ground-state band of {sup 246}Pu was established up to the 12{sup +} state. We have found that the shell gap of N=152 is reduced in energy with decreasing atomic number by extending the systematics of the one-quasiparticle energies in N=151 nuclei into those in {sup 245}Pu. This reduction of the shell gap clearly affects the 2{sup +} energy of the ground-state band of {sup 246}Pu.

Makii, H.; Ishii, T.; Asai, M.; Tsukada, K.; Toyoshima, A.; Ichikawa, S. [Advanced Science Research Center, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Tokai, Ibaraki 319-1195 (Japan); Matsuda, M. [Department of Research Reactor and Tandem Accelerator, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Tokai, Ibaraki 319-1195 (Japan); Makishima, A. [National Defense Medical College, Tokorozawa, Saitama 359-8513 (Japan); Kaneko, J. [Department of Radiological Sciences, Komazawa University, Setagaya, Tokyo 154-8525 (Japan); Toume, H. [Advanced Science Research Center, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Tokai, Ibaraki 319-1195 (Japan); College of Science, Ibaraki University, Mito, Ibaraki 310-8512 (Japan); Shigematsu, S.; Kohno, T. [Department of Energy Sciences, Tokyo Institute of Technology, Yokohama, Kanagawa 226-8502 (Japan); Ogawa, M. [Research Laboratory for Nuclear Reactors, Tokyo Institute of Technology, Meguro, Tokyo 152-8550 (Japan)

2007-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

124

Characterization of the nitrate complexes of Pu(IV) using absorption spectroscopy, {sup 15}N NMR, and EXAFS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Nitrate complexes of Pu(IV) are studied in solutions containing nitrate up to 13 molar (M). Three major nitrato complexes are observed and identified using absorption spectroscopy, {sup 15}N nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), and extended x-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) as Pu(NO{sub 3}){sub 2}{sup 2+}, Pu(NO{sub 3}){sub 4}, and Pu(NO{sub 3}){sub 6}{sup 2{minus}}. The possibility that Pu(NO{sub 3}){sub 1}{sup 3+}, Pu(NO{sub 3}){sub 3}{sup 1+} and Pu(NO{sub 3}){sub 5}{sup 1{minus}} are major species in solution is not consistent with these results and an upper limit of 0.10 can be set on the fraction for each of these three nitrate complexes in nitrate containing solutions. Fraction of the three major species in nitric acid over the 1--13 M range were calculated from absorption spectra data. The fraction of Pu(NO{sub 3}){sub 6}{sup 2{minus}} as a function of nitric acid concentration is in good agreement with the literature, whereas the fraction of Pu(NO{sub 3}){sub 2}{sup 2+} and Pu(NO{sub 3}){sub 4} species differ from previous studies. We have modeled the chemical equilibria up to moderate ionic strength ( < 6 molal) using the specific ion interaction theory (SM. Comparison of our experimental observations to literature stability constants that assume the presence of mononitrate species is poor. Stability constant at zero ionic strength for the dinitrato complex is determined to be log({beta}{sub 2}{sup 0})=3.77 {plus_minus} 0.14 (2{sigma}).

Veirs, D.K.; Smith, C.A.; Zwick, B.D.; Marsh, S.F.; Conradson, S.D.

1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

125

Neutron flux, spectrum, and dose equivalent measurements for a 4500-W(th) /sup 238/PuO/sub 2/ general purpose heat source  

SciTech Connect

The total emission rate is (4.5 +- 0.4) 10/sup 7/ n/s, and the average neutron energy is (1.64 +- 0.07) MeV. The factor for converting from neutron fluence to dose equivalent for this spectrum is (3.10 +- 0.24) 10/sup -5/ mRem/n-cm/sup -2/. The factor for converting from neutron fluence to tissue absorbed dose is (3.18 +- 0.26) 10/sup -6/ mRad/n-cm/sup -2/.

Anderson, M.E.

1985-05-09T23:59:59.000Z

126

Spectroscopy of Neutron-rich Pu Nuclei  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Spectroscopic studies of nuclei in the A{approx}250, Z{approx}100 region provide critical input to theoretical models that attempt to describe the structure and stability of the heaviest elements. We report here on new spectroscopic studies in the N = 150,151 nuclei {sup 244,245}Pu. (Z = 94). Excitations in these nuclei on the neutron-rich side of the valley of stability, accessed via inelastic and transfer reactions, complement fusion-evaporation studies of Z{>=}100 nuclei. States in {sup 244,245}Pu were populated using {sup 47}Ti and {sup 208}Pb beams incident on a {sup 244}Pu target, with delayed and prompt gamma rays detected by the Gammasphere array. The new results are discussed in the context of emerging systematics of one- and two-quasiparticle excitations in N{>=}150 nuclei.

Chowdhury, P.; Hota, S.; Lakshmi, S.; Tandel, S. K.; Harrington, T.; Jackson, E.; Moran, K.; Shirwadkar, U. [Department of Physics, University of Massachusetts Lowell, Lowell MA 01854 (United States); Ahmad, I.; Carpenter, M. P.; Greene, J.; Hoffman, C. R.; Janssens, R. V. F.; Khoo, T. L.; Kondev, F. G.; Lauritsen, T.; Lister, C. J.; McCutchan, E. A.; Seweryniak, D.; Stefanescu, I. [Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States)

2011-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

127

Summary of criticality data obtained at Battelle Pacific Northwest Laboratories on fixed and soluble poisons in U + Pu nitrate solutions  

SciTech Connect

Knowledge of the effects of neutron poisons on U +Pu systems is necessary to better establish criticality safety programs. These data are needed in setting of criticality safety specifications for storage, processing and shipping of fissile material where it is desired to handle larger quantities with safety and efficiency. These data are needed also for validating calculational techniques and cross sections sets. U + Pu solutions containing 30% Pu in the total U + Pu were used in these experiments to determine the effect of neutron poisons. Criticality of heterogeneous systems of UO/sub 2/-PuO/sub 2/ rods in a lattice were studied when the U + Pu solutions with various amounts of Gd and + B were added to the system. Criticality of homogeneous systems of the U + Pu nitrate were determined with varying amounts of Gd and Gd + B added to the solution. Measurements were made to determine also the effect of boron-glass raschig rings on the criticality of the U + Pu nitrate solution systems.

Lloyd, R.C.; Clayton, E.D.

1976-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

128

A Brief Review of Past INL Work Assessing Radionuclide Content in TMI-2 Melted Fuel Debris: The Use of 144Ce as a Surrogate for Pu Accountancy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report serves as a literature review of prior work performed at Idaho National Laboratory, and its predecessor organizations Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) and Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL), studying radionuclide partitioning within the melted fuel debris of the reactor of the Three Mile Island 2 (TMI-2) nuclear power plant. The purpose of this review is to document prior published work that provides supporting evidence of the utility of using 144Ce as a surrogate for plutonium within melted fuel debris. When the TMI-2 accident occurred no quantitative nondestructive analysis (NDA) techniques existed that could assay plutonium in the unconventional wastes from the reactor. However, unpublished work performed at INL by D. W. Akers in the late 1980s through the 1990s demonstrated that passive gamma-ray spectrometry of 144Ce could potentially be used to develop a semi-quantitative correlation for estimating plutonium content in these materials. The fate and transport of radioisotopes in fuel from different regions of the core, including uranium, fission products, and actinides, appear to be well characterized based on the maximum temperature reached by fuel in different parts of the core and the melting point, boiling point, and volatility of those radioisotopes. Also, the chemical interactions between fuel, fuel cladding, control elements, and core structural components appears to have played a large role in determining when and how fuel relocation occurred in the core; perhaps the most important of these reaction appears to be related to the formation of mixed-material alloys, eutectics, in the fuel cladding. Because of its high melting point, low volatility, and similar chemical behavior to plutonium, the element cerium appears to have behaved similarly to plutonium during the evolution of the TMI-2 accident. Anecdotal evidence extrapolated from open-source literature strengthens this logical feasibility for using cerium, which is rather easy to analyze using passive nondestructive analysis gamma-ray spectrometry, as a surrogate for plutonium in the final analysis of TMI-2 melted fuel debris. The generation of this report is motivated by the need to perform nuclear material accountancy measurements on the melted fuel debris that will be excavated from the damaged nuclear reactors at the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant in Japan, which were destroyed by the Tohoku earthquake and tsunami on March 11, 2011. Lessons may be taken from prior U.S. work related to the study of the TMI-2 core debris to support the development of new assay methods for use at Fukushima Daiichi. While significant differences exist between the two reactor systems (pressurized water reactor (TMI-2) versus boiling water reactor (FD), fresh water post-accident cooing (TMI-2) versus salt water (FD), maintained containment (TMI-2) versus loss of containment (FD)) there remain sufficient similarities to motivate these comparisons.

D. L. Chichester; S. J. Thompson

2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

129

Isochronal Annealing Studies in Pu and Pu Alloys Using Magnetic Susceptibility  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The isochronal annealing of the low temperature accumulated damage from the radioactive decay of plutonium in {alpha}-Pu, {delta}-Pu{sub 1-x}Ga{sub x} (x = 0.043) and {delta}-Pu{sub 1-x}Am{sub x} (x = 0.224) was characterized using magnetic susceptibility. In each specimen, thermal annealing, as tracked by magnetic susceptibility, only commenced when T > 33 K and the magnetic susceptibility changes due to defects were fully annealed at T not, vert, similar 300 K. The {alpha}-Pu magnetic susceptibility isochronal annealing data is similar to earlier measurements of resistivity characterized isochronal annealing. However, the {delta}-Pu{sub 1-x}Ga{sub x} (x = 0.043) magnetic susceptibility isochronal annealing data, when compared with similar resistivity data, indicates that for this alloy magnetic susceptibility studies are more sensitive to vacancies than to the interstitials accumulated at low temperatures. The Pu{sub 1-x}Am{sub x} (x = 0.224) alloy shows a remarkable change in properties, over a limited temperature range beginning where interstitial defects are first mobile, and characterized by an induced effective moment of order 1.1 {mu}{sub B}/Pu. This transient behavior may be evidence for a disorder driven low temperature phase transition, perhaps indicative of a compositional and structural proximity to a state possessing significant magnetic moments.

McCall, S. K. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL); Fluss, M. J. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL); Chung, B. W. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL); McElfresh, M. W. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL); Chapline, G.F. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL); Jackson, D. D. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL); Haire, Richard {Dick} G [ORNL

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

130

Soft X-ray Studies of Pu Electronic Structure: Past Lessons and Future Directions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Photoelectron Spectroscopy (PES) and X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy (XAS) have contributed greatly to our improved understanding of Pu electronic structure. From these and related measurements, the following has been determined. 1. The Pu 5f spin-orbit splitting is large. 2. The number of Pu 5f electrons is near 5. 3. The Pu 5f spin-orbit splitting effect dominates 5f itinerancy. Significant questions remain concerning the nature of Pu electronic structure. Perhaps the missing piece of the puzzle is the direct experimental determination of the unoccupied electronic structure using high energy inverse photoelectron spectroscopy or Bremsstrahlung Isochromat Spectroscopy (BIS). Past BIS studies of Th and U indicate the feasibility and utility of Pu studies. To this end, a new BIS capability has been developed in our laboratory. Electron stimulated emission of photons has been carried out using the XES-350 monochromator and detector system. Some of our preliminary results are shown, using an electron excitation beam energy of 3000 eV. (authors)

Tobin, J.G.; Yu, S.W. [LLNL, Livermore, CA, 94550 (United States)

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

131

PuLP: A Linear Programming Toolkit for Python  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Sep 5, 2011 ... This required that PuLP be affordable, easily licensed, and ... trast to Pyomo ( section 4), another Python-based modelling language, PuLP does.

132

Nitrate Anion Exchange in Pu-238 Aqueous Scrap Recovery Operations  

SciTech Connect

Strong base, nitrate anion exchange (IX) is crucial to the purification of {sup 238}Pu solution feedstocks with gross levels of impurities. This paper discusses the work involved in bench scale experiments to optimize the nitrate anion exchange process. In particular, results are presented of experiments conducted to (a) demonstrate that high levels of impurities can be separated from {sup 238}Pu solutions via nitrate anion exchange and, (b) work out chemical pretreatment methodology to adjust and maintain {sup 238}Pu in the IV oxidation state to optimize the Pu(IV)-hexanitrato anionic complex sorption to Reillex-HPQ resin. Additional experiments performed to determine the best chemical treatment methodology to enhance recovery of sorbed Pu from the resin, and VIS-NIR absorption studies to determine the steady state equilibrium of Pu(IV), Pu(III), and Pu(VI) in nitric acid are discussed.

Pansoy-Hjelvik, M.E.; Silver, G.L.; Reimus, M.A.H.; Ramsey, K.B.

1999-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

133

Pu-238 fuel form activities, June 1-30, 1980  

SciTech Connect

This monthly report for Pu-238 Fuel Form Activities has two main sections: SRP-PuFF Pu-238 Fuel Form Production Processes and SRL Pu-238 Fuel Form Research and Development. The program status, budget information, and milestone information are discussed in each main section. The Work Breakdown Structures (WBS) for this program is outlined. Only one monthly report per year is processed for EDB.

1980-07-18T23:59:59.000Z

134

PU/ZnO composites for biomedical applications; Compsitos PU/ZnO para aplicaes biomdicas.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The present work is focused on the preparation and characterization of biomedical devices able to elicit different biological responses. Polyurethane/zinc oxide composites (PU/ZnO) appear as (more)

Lus, Jorge Louro

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

135

Examining 239Pu and 240Pu Nuclear Resonance Fluorescence Measurements on Spent Fuel for Nuclear Safeguards  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Fluorescence for Spent Nuclear Fuel Assay, Inst. of Nucl.239 Pu content in spent nuclear fuel [4, 5]. Development ofin the context of spent nuclear fuel, summarizes the results

Quiter, Brian

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

136

Detection and Quantification of Pu(III, IV, V, and VI) Using a 1.0-meter Liquid Core Waveguide  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

absorption spectra of Pu ions in 1 M perchloric acidA. ) Pu III, B. )Pu IV, C. ) Pu V (0.001 M HClO 4 ), D. ) Pu VI. D

Wilson, Richard E.; Hu, Yung-Jin; Nitsche, Heino

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

137

Glenwood, Illinois: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

49°, -87.6022658° 49°, -87.6022658° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":41.5425349,"lon":-87.6022658,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

138

Glenwood, Iowa: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

9437°, -95.7425056° 9437°, -95.7425056° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":41.0469437,"lon":-95.7425056,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

139

Characterization of U/Pu Particles Originating From the Nuclear Weapon Accidents at Palomares, Spain, 1966 And Thule, Greenland, 1968  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Following the USAF B-52 bomber accidents at Palomares, Spain in 1966 and at Thule, Greenland in 1968, radioactive particles containing uranium (U) and plutonium (Pu) were dispersed into the environment. To improve long-term environmental impact assessments for the contaminated ecosystems, particles from the two sites have been isolated and characterized with respect to properties influencing particle weathering rates. Low [239]Pu/[235]U (0.62-0.78) and [240]Pu/[239]Pu (0.055-0.061) atom ratios in individual particles from both sites obtained by Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry (ICP-MS) show that the particles contain highly enriched U and weapon-grade Pu. Furthermore, results from electron microscopy with Energy Dispersive X-ray analysis (EDX) and synchrotron radiation (SR) based micrometer-scale X-ray fluorescence ({micro}-XRF) 2D mapping demonstrated that U and Pu coexist throughout the 1-50 {micro}m sized particles, while surface heterogeneities were observed in EDX line scans. SR-based micrometer-scale X-ray Absorption Near Edge Structure Spectroscopy ({micro}-XANES) showed that the particles consisted of an oxide mixture of U (predominately UO[2] with the presence ofU[3][8]) and Pu ((III)/(IV), (V)/(V) or (III), (IV) and (V)). Neither metallic U or Pu nor uranyl or Pu(VI) could be observed. Characteristics such as elemental distributions, morphology and oxidation states are remarkably similar for the Palomares and Thule particles, reflecting that they originate from similar source and release scenarios. Thus, these particle characteristics are more dependent on the original material from which the particles are derived (source) and the formation of particles (release scenario) than the environmental conditions to which the particles have been exposed since the late 1960s.

Lind, O.C.; Salbu, B.; Janssens, K.; Proost, K.; Garcia-Leon, M.; Garcia-Tenorio, R.

2007-07-10T23:59:59.000Z

140

$PU(N)$ monopoles, higher rank instantons, and the monopole invariants  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A famous conjecture in gauge theory mathematics, attributed to Witten, suggests that the polynomial invariants of Donaldson are expressible in terms of the Seiberg-Witten invariants if the underlying four-manifold is of simple type. Mathematicians have sought a proof of the conjecture by means of a `cobordism program' involving $PU(2)$ monopoles. A higher rank version of the Donaldson invariants was recently introduced by Kronheimer. Before being defined, the physicists Mari\\~no and Moore had already suggested that there should be a generalisation of Witten's conjecture to this type of invariants. We adopt a generalisation of the cobordism program to the higher rank situation by studying $PU(N)$ monopoles. We analyse the differences to the $PU(2)$ situation, yielding evidence that a generalisation of Witten's conjecture should hold.

Zentner, Raphael

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "2 glenwood pu" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Fission Parameters Measurements for Np, Pu, Am, and Cm Isotopes Inside a Salt Blanket Micromodel  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The MAKET zero-power heavy water reactor has been used at ITEP to measure the fission characteristics of the Np, Pu, Am, and Cm isotopes in the 0.52NaF+0.48ZrF_4 melt-filled salt blanket micromodel. The 237Np(n,f), 238Pu(n,f), 239Pu(n,f), 240Pu(n,f), 241Pu(n,f), 242m^Am(n,f), 243Cm(n,f), 245Cm(n,f), 247Cm(n,f), 238U(n,f), 238U(n,g), 235U(n,f) fission reaction rates have been measured. The neutron spectrum in the isotope irradiation locations was monitored by measuring the rates of the (235U(n,f), 238U(n,g), 55Mn(n,g), 63Cu(n,g), 176Lu(n,g), 197Au(n,g), 115In(n,n'), 27Al(n,4He), and 64Zn(n,p)) reactions whose cross sections have been commonly accepted. The measured functionals are compared with the respective results of MCNP code simulation obtained using the ENDF/B6 and JENDL3.2 neutron databases.

Yu. E. Titarenko; O. V. Shvedov; V. N. Konev; M. M. Igumnov; V. F. Batyaev; E. I. Karpikhin; V. M. Zhivun; A. B. Koldobsky; R. D. Mulambetov; D. V. Fischenko; S. V. Kvasova; E. F. Fomushkin; V. V. Gavrilov; G. F. Novoselov; A. V. Lopatkin; V. G. Muratov; A. F. Lositskiy; B. L. Kurushin; S. G. Mashnik; H. Yasuda

2002-09-06T23:59:59.000Z

142

Resolving the Pu Electronic Structure Enigma: Past Lessons and Future Directions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The nature of the 5f electronic structure of plutonium (Pu) remains unclear. [1] Despite many recent attempts to resolve the issue, a plethora of important unanswered questions remain. While many theoretical approaches to the problem have been promulgated, the real source of the difficulty is the absence of sufficient experimental benchmarking. This paucity of impact on the part of experimental results is driven in part by the difficulties of working with Pu: it is highly radioactive, biologically toxic, chemically reactive and restricted in its distribution and permitted access to user facilities. The results of these liabilities include the following: (1) it is very difficult, if not impossible, to get large single crystals of single phase samples and; (2) many state of the art experiments can not be done because general user facilities are not available for use with Pu samples. Additionally, there is the apparently bizarre nature of Pu, which seems to defeat the efforts to analyze it. A wonderful example of this is the absence of detailed and variant fine structure in many of the spectroscopic investigations of Pu.

Tobin, J G; Yu, S W; Chung, B W; Waddill, G D

2008-05-30T23:59:59.000Z

143

Adapting the polycarbonate dosimeter and electrochemical etching to the microdosimetry of /sup 239/Pu in bone  

SciTech Connect

The problem of setting the maximum permissible body burden, MPBB, for /sup 239/Pu is a complex one. Recent papers have been published which favor lowering the MPBB by varying factors depending on the assumptions used. /sup 239/Pu has been shown quite clearly, on detailed autoradiograph, to concentrate on the trabecular surfaces of the endosteal face of osseous tissue. This realization led the ICRP to propose the alteration of the MPBB for /sup 239/Pu in a manner based upon microdosimetry of /sup 239/Pu in bone, i.e., determine the dose out to 10..mu..m from the bone surfaces. Unfortunately, microdosimetry fulfilling this requirement has not been available. We are working toward this objective utilizing the Lexan polycarbonate detector and our optimized electrochemical etching procedure to amplify plutonium alpha tracks. As a prerequisite to this work, we are studying three problems inherently present in the Lexan detector. They involve achieving a very low background of tracks on the foils and a high degree of reproducibility between etching batches at this background level. Thirdly, we are determining the factor by which to multiply the number of induced tracks/cm/sup 2/ (..cap alpha.. and recoil) to obtain dose equivalent (rem). In this calibration we are using a standard /sup 239/Pu source and a surface barrier detection system. The plutonium bearing bones used in the microdosimetry phase of this research are rat, dog, and human.

Stillwagon, G.B.; Su, S.J.; Morgan, K.Z.

1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

144

Sintering of compacts of UN, (U,Pu)N, and PuN  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

>A method is provided for preparing a densified compact of a metal nitride selected from the group consisting of UN, (U,Pu)N, and PuN which comprises heating a green compact of at least one selected nitride in the mononitride single-phase region, as displayed by a phase diagram of the mononitride of said compact, in a nitrogen atmosphere at a pressure of nitrogen less than 760 torr. At a given temperature, this process produces a singlephase structure and a maximal sintered density as measured by mercury displacement. (Official Gazette)

Tennery, V.J.; Godfrey, T.G.; Bomar, E.S.

1973-10-16T23:59:59.000Z

145

PROPERTIES AND BEHAVIOR OF 238PU RELEVANT TO DECONTAMINATION OF BUILDING 235-F  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report was prepared to document the physical, chemical and radiological properties of plutonium oxide materials that were processed in the Plutonium Fuel Form Facility (PuFF) in building 235-F at the Savannah River Plant (now known as the Savannah River Site) in the late 1970s and early 1980s. An understanding of these properties is needed to support current project planning for the safe and effective decontamination and deactivation (D&D) of PuFF. The PuFF mission was production of heat sources to power Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generators (RTGs) used in space craft. The specification for the PuO{sub 2} used to fabricate the heat sources required that the isotopic content of the plutonium be 83 {+-} 1% Pu-238 due to its high decay heat of 0.57 W/g. The high specific activity of Pu-238 (17.1 Ci/g) due to alpha decay makes this material very difficult to manage. The production process produced micron-sized particles which proved difficult to contain during operations, creating personnel contamination concerns and resulting in the expenditure of significant resources to decontaminate spaces after loss of material containment. This report examines high {sup 238}Pu-content material properties relevant to the D&D of PuFF. These relevant properties are those that contribute to the mobility of the material. Physical properties which produce or maintain small particle size work to increase particle mobility. Early workers with {sup 238}PuO{sub 2} felt that, unlike most small particles, Pu-238 oxide particles would not naturally agglomerate to form larger, less mobile particles. It was thought that the heat generated by the particles would prevent water molecules from binding to the particle surface. Particles covered with bound water tend to agglomerate more easily. However, it is now understood that the self-heating effect is not sufficient to prevent adsorption of water on particle surfaces and thus would not prevent agglomeration of particles. Operational experience at PuFF indicates that the Pu-238 contamination was observed to move along surfaces and through High Efficiency Particulate Air (HEPA) filters over time. Recent research into the phenomenon known as alpha recoil offers a potential explanation for this observed behavior. Momentum is conserved when an alpha particle is ejected from a Pu-238 atom due to radioactive decay. Consequently, the entire particle of which that Pu-238 atom is a constituent experiences a movement similar to the recoil of a gun when a bullet is ejected. Furthermore, the particle often fractures in response to Pu-238 atom disintegration (yielding an alpha particle), with a small particle fragment also being ejected in order to conserve momentum. This process results in the continuous size reduction and transport of particles containing Pu-238 atoms, thus explaining movement of contamination along surfaces and through HEPA filters. A better understanding of the thermal behavior of {sup 238}PuO{sub 2} particles is needed to inform the planning process for the PuFF D&D project at the 235-F facility. There has been a concern that the surface temperature of individual particles may be high enough to cause problems with decontamination equipment and materials as a result of heat generation due to radioactive decay. A calculation under conservative assumptions shows that the surface temperature of particles less than about 100 {micro}m diameter is not appreciably above ambient. Since most particles in PuFF are on order of 1 {micro}m in diameter, the effect of particle surface temperature on decontamination equipment and materials is expected to be minimal. The result of this calculation also indicates that thermal imaging, which has been under consideration as a method to monitor the progress of system decontamination efforts would not likely be effective. The use of strippable coating was suggested as a possible alternative to other decontamination techniques. One particular system (i.e., Decon Gel 1101) may offer significant advantages over conventional liquid decontamination solut

Duncan, A.; Kane, M.

2009-11-24T23:59:59.000Z

146

The Importance of Maintaining PU.1 Expression Levels During Hematopoiesis.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The Ets family transcription factor PU.1 (encoded by Sfpi1) is essential for both myeloid and lymphoid development. Previous data has demonstrated that high concentrations of (more)

Houston, Isaac Benjamin

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

147

Atomistic Modeling of Thermodynamic Properties of Pu-Ga Alloys ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Atomistic Modeling of Thermodynamic Properties of Pu-Ga Alloys Based on the ... Resources for the Selection and Use of Interatomic Potentials in Atomistic...

148

Covolumes of nonuniform lattices in PU(n, 1)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper studies the covolumes of nonuniform arithmetic lattices in PU(n, 1). We determine the smallest covolume nonuniform arithmetic lattices for each n, the number of minimal covolume lattices for each n, and study the growth of the minimal covolume as n varies. In particular, there is a unique lattice (up to conjugacy) in PU(9, 1) of smallest Euler--Poincar\\'e characteristic amongst all nonuniform arithmetic lattices in PU(n, 1). We also show that for each even n, there are arbitrarily large families of nonisomorphic maximal nonuniform lattices in PU(n, 1) of equal covolume.

Emery, Vincent

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

149

Anaerobic Biotransformation and Mobility of Pu and of Pu-EDTA  

SciTech Connect

The enhanced mobility of radionuclides by co-disposed chelating agent, ethylenediaminetetraacetate (EDTA), is likely to occur only under anaerobic conditions. Our extensive effort to enrich and isolate anaerobic EDTA-degrading bacteria has failed. Others has tried and also failed. To explain the lack of anaerobic biodegradation of EDTA, we proposed that EDTA has to be transported into the cells for metabolism. A failure of uptake may contribute to the lack of EDTA degradation under anaerobic conditions. We demonstrated that an aerobic EDTA-degrading bacterium strain BNC1 uses an ABC-type transporter system to uptake EDTA. The system has a periplasmic binding protein that bind EDTA and then interacts with membrane proteins to transport EDTA into the cell at the expense of ATP. The bind protein EppA binds only free EDTA with a Kd of 25 nM. The low Kd value indicates high affinity. However, the Kd value of Ni-EDTA is 2.4 x 10^(-10) nM, indicating much stronger stability. Since Ni and other trace metals are essential for anaerobic respiration, we conclude that the added EDTA sequestrates all trace metals and making anaerobic respiration impossible. Thus, the data explain the lack of anaerobic enrichment cultures for EDTA degradation. Although we did not obtain an EDTA degrading culture under anaerobic conditions, our finding may promote the use of certain metals that forms more stable metal-EDTA complexes than Pu(III)-EDTA to prevent the enhanced mobility. Further, our data explain why EDTA is the most dominant organic pollutant in surface waters, due to the lack of degradation of certain metal-EDTA complexes.

Xun, Luying

2009-11-20T23:59:59.000Z

150

Cs and 239;240 Pu in East China Sea sediments  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

irradiation time, the remainder consists of approximately 1% plutonium (Pu), 2%­3% fission products, and other., Tait, C. D.: Neptunium and plutonium solubilities in Yucca Mountain groundwater. Environ. Sci. Technol): Chemical thermodynamics of neptu- nium and plutonium. Elsevier, North-Holland (2001). 36. Fanghänel, Th

Huh, Chih-An

151

Production of 239 Pu from a natural Uranium disk and "hot" rock using a neutron howitzer  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A neutron howitzer was used to produce 239Np from the targets of natural U and a hot rock. An intrinsic Germanium detector enabled the observations of the gamma rays in the decay of 239Np and a determination of its half life of 2.3 days. This shows that 239Pu had been produced in both targets

Steiner, Joseph; De Marco, Michael

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

152

Production of 239 Pu from a natural Uranium disk and "hot" rock using a neutron howitzer  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A neutron howitzer was used to produce 239Np from the targets of natural U and a hot rock. An intrinsic Germanium detector enabled the observations of the gamma rays in the decay of 239Np and a determination of its half life of 2.3 days. This shows that 239Pu had been produced in both targets

Joseph Steiner; Aaron Anderson; Michael De Marco

2008-05-23T23:59:59.000Z

153

Pu-238 fuel form activities, January 1-31, 1983  

SciTech Connect

This monthly report for /sup 238/Pu Fuel Form Activities has two main sections: SRP-PuFF facility and SRL Fuel Form Activities. The program status, budget information, and milestone schedules are discussed in each main section. The Work Breakdown Structure (WBS) for this program is shown. Only one monthly report per year is processed for EDB.

1983-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

154

Pu-238 fuel form activities, January 1-31, 1981  

SciTech Connect

This monthly report for /sup 238/Pu Fuel Form Activities has two main sections: SRP-PuFF facility and SRL Fuel Form Activities. The program status, budget information, and milestone schedules are discussed in each main section. The Work Breakdown Structure (WBS) for this program is shown. Only one monthly report per year is processed for EDB.

1981-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

155

Pu-238 fuel form activities, January 1-31, 1982  

SciTech Connect

This monthly report for /sup 238/Pu fuel form activities has two main sections: SRP-PuFF facility and SRL fuel form activities. The program status, budget information, and milestone schedules are discussed in each main section. The Work Breakdown Structure (WBS) for this program is shown. Only one monthly report per year is processed for EDB.

1982-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

156

New Superheavy Element Isotopes: 242Pu(48Ca,5n)285114  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

New Superheavy Element Isotopes: Pu( 48 Ca,5n) 285 114 P. A.48 Ca irradiations of 242 Pu targets at a center-of-targetelement shell e?ects. The 242 Pu( 48 Ca,5n) 285 114 cross

Ellison, Paul A

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

157

SYNTHESIS AND CHARACTERIZATION OF Pa(IV), Np(IV), AND Pu(IV) BOROHYDRIDES  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

a ( I V ) , N p ( I V ) , AND Pu(IV) BOROHYDRIDES Rodney H.borohydrides of Pa, Np, and Pu have been pre pared and someU(BH. ,)Pu(BHi<)ii are much more volatile

Banks, R.H.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

158

Rational Ligand Design for U(VI) and Pu(IV)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1.6 Ligand Design for Pu(IV) . ... ligands used in UO 22+ and Pu(IV) structural studies .. 23Raymond group ligands for Pu(IV) decorporation 208

Szigethy, Geza

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

159

Surprising Coordination Geometry Differences in Ce(IV)- and Pu(IV)-Maltol Complexes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Differences in Ce(IV)- and Pu(IV)-Maltol Complexes [1] Gzacoordination behavior of Pu(IV), single crystal X-rayhave been determined for Pu(IV) and Ce(IV) complexes with

Szigethy, Geza; Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

160

Sputtering yield of Pu bombarded by fission Fragments from Cf  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We present results on the yield of sputtering of Pu atoms from a Pu foil, bombarded by fission fragments from a {sup 252}Cf source in transmission geometry. We have found the number of Pu atoms/incoming fission fragments ejected to be 63 {+-} 1. In addition, we show measurements of the sputtering yield as a function of distance from the central axis, which can be understood as an angular distribution of the yield. The results are quite surprising in light of the fact that the Pu foil is several times the thickness of the range of fission fragment particles in Pu. This indicates that models like the binary collision model are not sufficient to explain this behavior.

Danagoulian, Areg [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Klein, Andreas [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Mcneil, Wendy V [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Yuan, Vincent W [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "2 glenwood pu" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Determination of the 242Pu Branching Ratio via Alpha-Gamma Coincidence  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

When the burn-up is high, the {sup 242}Pu isotopic content becomes more important. The traditional correlation method will fail. The {sup 242}Pu isotopic content in the sample plays an essential role if the neutron coincidence method is used to quantify the total amount of plutonium. In one of the earlier measurements we had a chance to measure an isotopic pure (> 99.95 %) {sup 242}Pu thick sample and realized that the difference in the branching ratio (BR) value among current nuclear data3) for the two important gamma-rays at 103.5-keV and 158.8-keV. In this study, the thick sample was counted on a 15% ORTEC safeguards type HPGe to further improve BR determination of the 159-keV gamma-ray. Furthermore, we have made a thin {sup 242}Pu sample from the thick sample and performed alpha-gamma coincidence measurements. Our preliminary gamma-ray BR results are 4.37(6) E-4, 2.79(8) E-5, and 2.25(8) E-6 for 44.9-keV, 103.5-keV, and 158.9-keV, respectively.

Wang, T F

2012-05-24T23:59:59.000Z

162

Consistent Data Assimilation of Isotopes: 242Pu and 105Pd  

SciTech Connect

In this annual report we illustrate the methodology of the consistent data assimilation that allows to use the information coming from integral experiments for improving the basic nuclear parameters used in cross section evaluation. A series of integral experiments are analyzed using the EMPIRE evaluated files for 242Pu and 105Pd. In particular irradiation experiments (PROFIL-1 and -2, TRAPU-1, -2 and -3) provide information about capture cross sections, and a critical configuration, COSMO, where fission spectral indexes were measured, provides information about fission cross section. The observed discrepancies between calculated and experimental results are used in conjunction with the computed sensitivity coefficients and covariance matrix for nuclear parameters in a consistent data assimilation. The results obtained by the consistent data assimilation indicate that not so large modifications on some key identified nuclear parameters allow to obtain reasonable C/E. However, for some parameters such variations are outside the range of 1 s of their initial standard deviation. This can indicate a possible conflict between differential measurements (used to calculate the initial standard deviations) and the integral measurements used in the statistical data adjustment. Moreover, an inconsistency between the C/E of two sets of irradiation experiments (PROFIL and TRAPU) is observed for 242Pu. This is the end of this project funded by the Nuclear Physics Program of the DOE Office of Science. We can indicate that a proof of principle has been demonstrated for a few isotopes for this innovative methodology. However, we are still far from having explored all the possibilities and made this methodology to be considered proved and robust. In particular many issues are worth further investigation: Non-linear effects Flexibility of nuclear parameters in describing cross sections Multi-isotope consistent assimilation Consistency between differential and integral experiments

G. Palmiotti; H. Hiruta; M. Salvatores

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

163

Unusually high (oxidizer/Pu) ratios in the macro-residues from plutonium-droplet combustion  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Individual submillimeter-diameter droplets of /sup 239/Pu-0.6w/o Ga alloy were laser ignited and burned during free fall through air. As with a number of other active metals, plutonium droplets burn as coherent, intensely incandescent bodies that explode near the end of combustion. Compared to many other metals, however, the explosive event with plutonium droplets is relatively mild, and, in most experiments, an essentially intact spherule of oxidized material can be retrieved afterward from the combustion chamber. The oxidizer-to-plutonium atomic ratios (O/Pu) of the exploded spherules retrieved in the experiments seem unusually high - from 3- to 5-fold greater than the pre-explosion ratios. Some possible explanations of the high apparent O/Pu ratios are: (1) the particles may have become contaminated after the explosion but before the microweighing; (2) the analyses may have been performed with only partially dissolved specimens; (3) one or more elements heavier than the oxidizer elements (i.e. Ga) may have concentrated in the post explosion residue, giving a false indication of the O/Pu ratio; (4) the specimens may be supersaturated or otherwise metastable solutions of oxygen or other oxidizers quenched in at combustion temperatures; or (5) there might be hitherto unknown hyperstoichiometric oxygen and/or nitrogen compounds of plutonium which form at high temperatures. (JMT)

Nelson, L.S.

1980-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

164

Electronic Structure, Localization and 5f Occupancy in Pu Materials  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The electronic structure of delta plutonium ({delta}-Pu) and plutonium compounds is investigated using photoelectron spectroscopy (PES). Results for {delta}-Pu show a small component of the valence electronic structure which might reasonably be associated with a 5f{sup 6} configuration. PES results for PuTe are used as an indication for the 5f{sup 6} configuration due to the presence of atomic multiplet structure. Temperature dependent PES data on {delta}-Pu indicate a narrow peak centered 20 meV below the Fermi energy and 100 meV wide. The first PES data for PuCoIn5 indicate a 5f electronic structure more localized than the 5fs in the closely related PuCoGa{sub 5}. There is support from the PES data for a description of Pu materials with an electronic configuration of 5f{sup 5} with some admixture of 5f{sup 6} as well as a localized/delocalized 5f{sup 5} description.

Joyce, John J. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Beaux, Miles F. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Durakiewicz, Tomasz [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Graham, Kevin S. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Bauer, Eric D. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Mitchell, Jeremy N. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Tobash, Paul H. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Richmond, Scott [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2012-05-03T23:59:59.000Z

165

An Alternative Model for Electron Correlation in Pu  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Using a density functional theory based approach that treats the 5f electrons relativistically, a Pu electronic structure with zero net magnetic moment is obtained, where the 5f orbital and 5f spin moments cancel each other. By combining the spin and orbital specific densities of states with state, spin and polarization specific transition moments, it is possible to reconstruct the experimentally observed photoemission spectra from Pu. Extrapolating to a spin-resolving Fano configuration, it is shown how this would resolve the extant controversy over Pu electronic structure.

Yu, S; Tobin, J; Soderlind, P

2007-10-23T23:59:59.000Z

166

Elastic properties of gamma-Pu by resonant ultrasound spectroscopy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Despite intense experimental and theoretical work on Pu, there is still little understanding of the strange properties of this metal. We used resonant ultrasound spectroscopy method to investigate the elastic properties of pure polycrystalline Pu at high temperatures. Shear and longitudinal elastic moduli of the {gamma}-phase of Pu were determined simultaneously and the bulk modulus was computed from them. A smooth linear and large decrease of all elastic moduli with increasing temperature was observed. We calculated the Poisson ratio and found that it increases from 0.242 at 519K to 0.252 at 571K.

Migliori, Albert [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Betts, J [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Trugman, A [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Mielke, C H [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Mitchell, J N [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Ramos, M [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Stroe, I [WORXESTER, MA

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

167

Nuclear magnetic resonance offers new insights into Pu 239  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Nuclear magnetic resonance offers new insights into Pu 239 Nuclear magnetic resonance offers new insights into Pu 239 Nuclear magnetic resonance offers new insights into Pu 239 Fingerprint of element found by LANL/Japanese team. May 29, 2012 How would the detonation of a nuclear energy source afffect an incoming asteroid? Georgios Koutroulakis and H. Yasuoka in the condensed-matter NMR lab at Los Alamos National Laboratory after having observed the magnetic resonance signal of Pu 239 for the first time. Get Expertise Scientist Eric Bauer Condensed Matter & Magnet Science Email Professor Hiroshi Yasuoka Japan Atomic Energy Agency "This discovery of the plutonium 239 magnetic resonance promises to revolutionize our understanding of plutonium solid state physics, chemistry, biology and materials science."

168

Experimental Bench-marking of Pu Electronic Structure  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Our plan is to do Ce (as a Pu surrogate) this year and be ready to do Pu next year. The Fano (Spin-resolved Photoelectron Spectroscopy) measurements are essential to testing electron correlation in the occupied 5f states. BIS (Bremstrahlung Isochromat Spectroscopy or high energy Inverse Photoelectron Spectroscopy) experiments are crucial to a quantitative determination of the 5f unoccupied density of states (5f-UDOS). The 5f UDOS is the key to differentiation between a myriad of models of 5f electronic structure. During this time, we will work to converge to a solution for the Pu safety issues, with the plan to implement these in the next FY. Acceleration of this schedule and implementation of the safety plan in this FY will require a very significant increase in funding. Ultimately, results from the Pu experiments will be fed into calculations performed by P. Soderlind, A. Landa, and others.

Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

2007-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

169

LOW-TEMPERATURE REFLUORINATION OF PuF$sub 6$ DECOMPOSITION PRODUCTS  

SciTech Connect

The use of direct refluorinntion to recover plutonium deposited in equipment by consumption and decomposition of PuF/sub 6/ gas was the subject of a brief experimental program Measurable rates of refluorination were obtained at temperatures as low as 170 C and by means of a statistically dcsigned experiment; the approximate signficance of the three variables, temperature, fluorine pressure, and fluorine flow rate, was determined. Temperature was found to be the most significant variable, and the heat of reaction based on removal rates measured from 170 to 350 C compared favorably with reported values obtained by equilibrating PuF/sub 6/ and F2 gas mixtures. At plutonium surface concentrntions below -3 mu g/cm, the rate of refluorination was found to be proportional to the plutonium surface concentration. In no case was the surface concentration decreased below 0.08 mu g/cm2. (auth)

Robb, W.L.; Brandon, R.J.; Myers, R.L.; Galpern, H.N.

1957-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

170

Effect of storage temperature on self-irradiation damage of /sup 238/Pu-substituted zirconolite  

SciTech Connect

/sup 238/Pu-substituted cubic zirconolite (CaPuTi/sub 2/O/sub 7/) was stored at ambient temperature, 575/sup 0/ K, and 875/sup 0/ K until alpha decay doses of 2.4 to 3.6 x 10/sup 25//m/sup 3/ had been accumulated. The ambient temperature material swelled to a saturation value of 5.5 vol %, and the originally crystalline structure was transformed to one with an amorphous matrix and small domains that had retained their crystallinity. At 575/sup 0/ K, lesser amounts of swelling (4.1 vol %) and transformation were observed, reflecting concurrent partial recovery. The material held at 875/sup 0/ K remained crystalline, swelled only 0.4 vol %, and exhibited formation of isolated defect clusters. 5 figures.

Clinard, F.W.; Peterson, D.E.; Rohr, D.L.; Roof, R.B.; Hobbs, L.W.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

171

Prevention of Pu(IV) polymerization in a PUREX-based process  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The US Mixed Oxide (MOX) Fuel Fabrication Facility (MFFF) is being designed to produce MOX fuel assemblies for use in domestic, commercial nuclear power reactors, as part of the U.S. DOE efforts to dispose of surplus weapon-grade plutonium. The feed material is plutonium dioxide from surplus weapon grade plutonium. PuO{sub 2}, issued from a pit disassembly and conversion facility (PDCF), will be processed using a flowsheet derived from the La Hague reprocessing plant to remove impurities. The purified PuO{sub 2} will be blended with UO{sub 2} to form mixed oxide pellets, and loaded into fuel rods, to create MOX fuel assemblies based on the process and technology of the MELOX plant in France,. Safety studies are necessary to support the development of the design basis per regulation 10 CFR Part 70 to complete an integrated safety analysis for the MFFF facility. The formation of tetravalent plutonium polymers in certain process vessels of the aqueous polishing (AP) process has been identified as a potential hazard. Based on scientific literature, the following paper demonstrates that within the AP process units, the polymerization of Pu(IV) will not occur and/or will not create a criticality issue even where the acidity may drop below 0.5 N HNO{sub 3}. We will identify and control the conditions under which plutonium (IV) will not polymerize. (authors)

Paviet-Hartmann, Patricia [Idaho State University, 1776 Science Center Drive, Idaho Falls, ID 83402 (United States); Senentz, Gerald [AREVA NC, 1 rue des Herons, 78182 St Quentin en Yvelines (France)

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

172

Neutron Capture Cross Section Measurement on $^{238}$Pu at DANCE  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The proposed neutron capture measurement for {sup 238}Pu was carried out in Nov-Dec, 2010, using the DANCE array at LANSCE, LANL. The total beam-on-target time is about 14 days plus additional 5 days for the background measurement. The target was prepared at LLNL with the new electrplating cell capable of plating the {sup 238}Pu isotope simultaneously on both sides of the 3-{micro}m thick Ti backing foil. A total mass of 395 {micro}g with an activity of 6.8 mCi was deposited onto the area of 7 mm in diameter. The {sup 238}Pu sample was enriched to 99.35%. The target was covered by 1.4 {micro}m double-side aluminized mylar and then inserted into a specially designed vacuum-tight container, shown in Fig. 1, for the {sup 238}Pu containment. The container was tested for leaks in the vacuum chamber at LLNL. An identical container without {sup 238}Pu was made as well and used as a blank for the background measurement.

Chyzh, A; Wu, C Y

2011-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

173

As-cast microstructures in U-Pu-Zr alloy fuel pins with 5-8 wt% minor actinides and 0-1.5 wt% rare-earth elements  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Idaho National Laboratory (INL) is investigating UPuZr alloys with low concentrations of minor actinides (Np and Am) and rare-earth elements (La, Ce, Pr, and Nd) as possible nuclear fuels to be used to transmute minor actinides. Alloys with compositions 60U20Pu 3Am2Np15Zr, 42U30Pu5Am3Np20Zr, 59U20Pu3Am2Np1RE15Zr, 58.5U20Pu 3Am2Np1.5RE15Zr, 41U30Pu5Am3Np1RE20Zr, and 40.5U30Pu5Am3Np1.5RE 20Zr (where numbers represent weight percents of each element and RE is a rare-earth alloy consisting of 6% La, 16% Pr, 25% Ce, and 53% Nd by weight) were arc-melted and vacuum cast as fuel pins approximately 4 mmin diameter. The as-cast pins were sectioned, polished, and examined by scanning electron microscopy. Each alloy contains high-Zr inclusions surrounded by a high-actinide matrix. Alloys with rare-earth elements also contain inclusions that are high in these elements. Within the matrix, concentrations of U and Zr vary inversely, while concentrations of Np and Pu appear approximately constant. Am occurs in the matrix and with some high-rare-earth inclusions, and occasionally as high-Am inclusions in samples without rare-earth elements.

Dawn E. Janney; J. Rory Kennedy

2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

174

As-cast microstructures in U-Pu-Zr alloy fuel pins with 5-8 wt.% minor actinides and 0- 1.5 wt% rare-earth elements  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Idaho National Laboratory (INL) is investigating U-Pu-Zr alloys with low concentrations of minor actinides (Np, Am) and rare-earth elements (La, Ce, Pr, Nd) as possible nuclear fuels to be used to transmute minor actinides. Alloys with compositions 60U-20Pu-3Am-2Np-15Zr, 42U-30Pu-5Am-3Np-20Zr, 59U-20Pu-3Am-2Np-1RE-15Zr, 58.5U-20Pu-3Am-2Np-1.5RE-15Zr, 41U-30Pu-5Am-3Np-1RE-20Zr, and 40.5U-30Pu-5Am-3Np-1.5RE-20Zr (where numbers represent weight percents of each element and RE is a rare-earth alloy consisting of 6% La, 16% Pr, 25% Ce, and 53% Nd by weight) were arc-melted and vacuum cast as fuel pins approximately 4 mm in diameter. The pins were sectioned, polished, and examined by scanning electron microscopy. Each alloy contains high-Zr inclusions surrounded by a high-actinide matrix. Alloys with lanthanides also contain high-RE inclusions. Within the matrix, concentrations of U and Zr vary inversely, while concentrations of Np and Pu appear approximately constant. Am occurs in the matrix and with some high-RE inclusions, and occasionally as high-Am inclusions in samples without REs.

Dawn E. Janney; J. Rory Kennedy

2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

175

Differential scanning calorimetry of metamict Pu-substituted zirconolite  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Samples of CaPuTi/sub 2/O/sub 7/ were prepared by cold pressing and sintering. Plutonium was substituted for zirconium in order to characterize radiation damage effects. The energy stored in a sample which had reached saturation in swelling after storage at ambient temperature was measured with a differential scanning calorimeter. The total energy of 6.6 +- 0.1 cal/g is released over the range 485 to 715/sup 0/C. The activation energy of annealing of the damage is 1.22 +- 0.05 eV. The temperature dependence of the rate constant is described by k/sub T/ = 5.96E4 exp(-1.22/k/sub B/T) s/sup -1/ where kB and T are the Boltzmann's constant and temperature (K) respectively. A sample stored at 600/sup 0/C was similarly evaluated and showed no release of stored energy to the precision of the apparatus (+- 0.1 cal/g). These results are applied to analysis of waste incorporation in SYNROC and are correlated with analogous parameters for other materials.

Peterson, D.E.; Clinard, F.W. Jr.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

176

Determination of Plutonium Activity Concentrations and 240Pu/239Pu Atom Ratios in Brown Algae (Fucus distichus) Collected from Amchitka Island, Alaska.  

SciTech Connect

Plutonium-239 ({sup 239}Pu) and plutonium-240 ({sup 240}Pu) activity concentrations and {sup 240}Pu/{sup 239}Pu atom ratios are reported for Brown Algae (Fucus distichus) collected from the littoral zone of Amchitka Island (Alaska) and at a control site on the Alaskan peninsula. Plutonium isotope measurements were performed in replicate using Accelerator Mass Spectrometry (AMS). The average {sup 240}Pu/{sup 239}Pu atom ratio observed in dried Fucus d. collected from Amchitka Island was 0.227 {+-} 0.007 (n=5) and compares with the expected {sup 240}Pu/{sup 239}Pu atom ratio in integrated worldwide fallout deposition in the Northern Hemisphere of 0.1805 {+-} 0.0057 (Cooper et al., 2000). In general, the characteristically high {sup 240}Pu/{sup 239}Pu content of Fucus d. analyzed in this study appear to indicate the presence of a discernible basin-wide secondary source of plutonium entering the marine environment. Of interest to the study of plutonium source terms within the Pacific basin are reports of elevated {sup 240}Pu/{sup 239}Pu atom ratios in fallout debris from high-yield atmospheric nuclear tests conducted in the Marshall Islands during the 1950s (Diamond et al., 1960), the wide range of {sup 240}Pu/{sup 239}Pu atom ratio values (0.19 to 0.34) observed in sea water, sediments, coral and other environmental media from the North Pacific Ocean (Hirose et al., 1992; Buesseler, 1997) and updated estimates of the relative contributions of close-in and intermediate fallout deposition on oceanic inventories of radionuclidies, especially in the Northern Pacific Ocean (Hamilton, 2004).

Hamilton, T F; Brown, T A; Marchetti, A A; Martinelli, R E; Kehl, S R

2005-05-02T23:59:59.000Z

177

Reductive Disslocation of Pu(IV) by Clostridium sp. Under Anaerobic Conditions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An anaerobic, gram positive, spore-forming bacterium Clostridium sp., common in soils and wastes, capable of reduction of Fe(III) to Fe(II), Mn(IV) to Mn(II), Tc(VII) to Tc(IV), and U(VI) to U(IV), reduced Pu(IV) to Pu(III). Addition of 242Pu (IV)-nitrate to the bacterial growth medium at pH 6.4 resulted in the precipitation of Pu as amorphous Pu(OH)4 due to hydrolysis and polymerization reactions. The Pu (1 x 10-5 M) had no effect upon growth of the bacterium as evidenced by glucose consumption; carbon dioxide and hydrogen production; a decrease in pH of the medium from 6.4 to 3.0 due to production of acetic and butyric acids from glucose fermentation; and a change in the Eh of the culture medium from +50 to -180 mV. Commensurate with bacterial growth, Pu was rapidly solubilized as evidenced by an increase in Pu concentration in solution which passed through a 0.03 {mu}m filtration. Selective solvent extraction of the culture by thenoyltrifluoroacetone (TTA) indicated the presence of a reduced Pu species in the soluble fraction. X-ray absorption near edge spectroscopic (XANES) analysis of Pu in the culture sample at the Pu LIII absorption edge (18.054 keV) showed a shift of -3 eV compared to a Pu(IV) standard indicating reduction of Pu(IV) to Pu(III). These results suggest that, although Pu generally exists as insoluble Pu(IV) in the environment, under appropriate conditions, anaerobic microbial activity could affect the long-term stability and mobility of Pu by its reductive dissolution.

Francis,A.; Dodge, C.; Gillow, J.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

178

Local structure and vibrational properties of alpha-Pu, alpha-U and the alpha-U charge density wave  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 (1994). Erik Nelson, ?-Pu / ?-U EXAFS paper, 8/10/2004,1078 (2003). Erik Nelson, ?-Pu / ?-U EXAFS paper, 8/10/2004,2003). Erik Nelson, ?-Pu / ?-U EXAFS paper, 8/10/2004, page

Nelson, E.J.; Allen, P.G.; Blobaum, K.J.M.; Wall, W.A.; Booth, C.H.

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

179

The Utilization of Spin Polarized Photoelectron Spectroscopy as a Probe of Electron Correlation with an Ultimate Goal of Pu  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

with an Ultimate Goal of Pu J.G. Tobin 1 , S.W. Yu 1 , B.W.goal of resolving the Pu electronic structure controversy.question of the nature of the Pu electronic structure. [

Tobin, James

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

180

Unterschiedliche Autoregulation am PU.1 Lokus in B -Zellen und myeloischen Zellen.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Als Schlsselfaktor des hmatopoietischen Systems spielt PU.1 eine ent-scheidende Rolle in der Entwicklung der meisten hmatopoietischen Li-nien. Das PU.1 Expressionslevel bestimmt das Differenzierungspotential hmatopoietischer Stammzellen (more)

Leddin, Mathias

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "2 glenwood pu" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Biogeochemical Cycling and Environmental Stability of Pu Relevant to Long-Term Stewardship of DOE Sites  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The overall objective of this proposed research is to understand the biogeochemical cycling of Pu in environments of interest to long-term DOE stewardship issues. Central to Pu cycling (transport initiation to immobilization) is the role of microorganisms. The hypothesis underlying this proposal is that microbial activity is the causative agent in initiating the mobilization of Pu in near-surface environments: through the transformation of Pu associated with solid phases, production of extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) carrier phases, and the creation of microenvironments. Also, microbial processes are central to the immobilization of Pu species, through the metabolism of organically complexed Pu species and Pu associated with extracellular carrier phases and the creation of environments favorable for Pu transport retardation.

Honeyman, Bruce D.

2006-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

182

Biogeochemical Cycling and Environmental Stability of Pu Relevant to Long-Term Stewardship of DOE Sites  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The overall objective of this proposed research is to understand the biogeochemical cycling of Pu in environments of interest to long-term DOE stewardship issues. Central to Pu cycling (transport initiation to immobilization) is the role of microorganisms. The hypothesis underlying this proposal is that microbial activity is the causative agent in initiating the mobilization of Pu in near-surface environments: through the transformation of Pu associated with solid phases, production of extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) carrier phases, and the creation of microenvironments. Also, microbial processes are central to the immobilization of Pu species, through the metabolism of organically complexed Pu species and Pu associated with extracellular carrier phases and the creation of environments favorable for Pu transport retardation.

Francis, Arokiasamy J.; Santschi, Peter H.; Honeyman, Bruce D.

2005-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

183

Enthalpy of gamma-delta Transition in Ternary U-Pu-Zr Fuel Alloys  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Presentation Title, Enthalpy of gamma-delta Transition in Ternary U-Pu-Zr Fuel ... that the activities of Pu and Zr in the delta phase may be self-compensating.

184

Biogeochemical Cycling and Environmental Stability of Pu Relevant to Long-Term Stewardship of DOE Sites  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The overall objective of this research is to understand the biogeochemical cycling of Pu in environments of interest to long-term DOE stewardship issues. Central to Pu cycling (transport initiation and immobilization) is the role of microorganisms. The hypothesis underlying this work is that microbial activity is the causative agent in initiating the mobilization of Pu in near-surface environments: through the transformation of Pu associated with solid phases, production of extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) carrier phases and the creation of microenvironments. Also, microbial processes are central to the immobilization of Pu species, through the metabolism of organically complexed Pu species and Pu associated with extracellular carrier phases and the creation of environments favorable for Pu transport retardation.

Honeyman, Bruce D.; Francis, A.J.; Gillow, Jeffrey B.; Dodge, Cleveland J.; Santschi, Peter H.; Chin-Chang Hung; Diaz, Angelique; Tinnacher, Ruth; Roberts, Kimberly; Schwehr, Kathy

2006-04-05T23:59:59.000Z

185

Electronic Structure Theory of the Ground State and Photoemission Spectra of Non-Magnetic {delta}-Pu, fcc-Am, and Pu-Am Alloys  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The around-the-mean-field version of the LDA+U correlated band theory is applied to investigate the electronic and magnetic structure of d-Pu, Am, their alloys and compounds. It gives correct non-magnetic ground state for Pu and Am, and provides a good agreement with experimental equilibrium volumes and bulk moduli. For Pu-Am alloys, despite a lattice expansion caused by the Am atoms, neither tendency to 5f localization nor formation of local magnetic moments on Pu atoms in Pu-Am alloys are found. In order to access the experimental photoelectron spectra, we developed a straightforward and efficient procedure to perform dynamical mean-field (DMFT) calculations on the top of the static mean-field LDA+U approximation. Starting from self-consistent LDA+U ground state we included multiplet transitions using the Hubbard-I approximation. We obtained fairly good agreement with experimental photoelectron spectra of {delta}-Pu, Am, Pu0.25Am0.75 alloy, PuTe, and AmX (X=N,Sb). Our calculations show the importance of electron correlations beyond those which are included in conventional (LDA/GGA) band theory for Pu and Am based systems. Furthermore, we have shown that the three narrow features observed in the valence band spectra of Pu and majority of Pu compounds can be identified with the most intense atomic excitations (multiplets). The calculations explain that the atomic-like excitations can be observed even if the 5f states are not fully localized as in {delta}-Pu, and the atomic character fixes the characteristic energies such that similar features are found in spectra of diverse Pu systems. (authors)

Shick, Alexander; Drchal, Vaclav [Condensed Matter Theory, Institute of Physics, Academy of Sciences of Czech Republic, Prague (Czech Republic); Havela, Ladislav [Charles University, CS-121 16 Prague (Czech Republic); Kolorenc, Jindrich [Condensed Matter Theory, Institute of Physics, Academy of Sciences of Czech Republic, Prague (Czech Republic)]|[Department of Physics, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, North Carolina (United States)

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

186

Selection and Evaluation of a new Pu Density Measurement Fluid  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper summarizes efforts leading to selection of a new fluid for the determination of the density of large Pu parts. Based on an extended literature search, perfluorotributylamine (FC-43) was chosen for an experimental study. Plutonium coupon corrosion studies were performed by exposing Pu to deaerated and aerated solutions and measuring corrosion gravimetrically. Corrosion rates were determined. Samples of deaerated and aerated perfuluorotributylamine (FC-43) were also irradiated with {sup 60}Co gamma rays (96 Gy/min) to various doses. The samples were extracted with NaOH and analyzed by IC and showed the presence of F and Cl{sup -}. The G-values were established. In surface study experiments Pu coupons were exposed to deaerated and aerated solutions of FC-43 and analyzed by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The XPS data indicate that there is no detectable surface effect caused by the new fluid. In conclusion the FC-43 was determined to be a very effective and practical fluid for Pu density measurements.

Dziewinska, Krystyna [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Peters, Michael A [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Martinez, Patrick P [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Dziewinski, Jacek J [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Pugmire, David L [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Trujillo, Stephen M [Los Alamos National Laboratory; La Verne, Jake A [UNIV OF NOTRE DAME; Rajesh, P [UNIV OF NOTRE DAME

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

187

Possible experimental evidence for the presence of double octupole states in {sup 240}Pu  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Excited states in the {sup 240}Pu nucleus have been studied by means of the (p,t) reaction using the Q3D spectrometer and the focal plane detector from Munich. The comparison between experimental angular distributions and the DWBA calculations allowed the extraction of relative two-neutron transfer strengths. These observables may reveal important information about the structure of different states. The experimental two neutron strength for the 0{sup +}{sub 2} and 0{sup +}{sub 3} states is found in good agreement with the predictions of the IBA model, confirming the double octupole nature for the 0{sup +}{sub 2} state proposed in the previous studies.

Pascu, S.; Spieker, M.; Bucurescu, D.; Faestermann, T.; Hertenberger, R.; Skalacki, S.; Weber, S.; Wirth, H. F.; Zamfir, N. V.; Zilges, A. [Institut fuer Kernphysik, Universitaet zu Koeln, D-50937 Koeln, Germany and National Institute for Physics and Nuclear Engineering, R-77125, Bucharest-Magurele (Romania); Institut fuer Kernphysik, Universitaet zu Koeln, D-50937 Koeln (Germany); National Institute for Physics and Nuclear Engineering, R-77125, Bucharest-Magurele (Romania); Physik Department E12, Technische Universitaet Muenchen, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Sektion Physik, Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet Muenchen, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Institut fuer Kernphysik, Universitaet zu Koeln, D-50937 Koeln (Germany); Sektion Physik, Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet Muenchen, D-85748 Garching (Germany); National Institute for Physics and Nuclear Engineering, R-77125, Bucharest-Magurele (Romania); Institut fuer Kernphysik, Universitaet zu Koeln, D-50937 Koeln (Germany)

2012-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

188

NR Pu SEIS Advisory 07272012_Clean  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Savannah R iver O perations O ffice P.O. B ox A Aiken, S C 2 9802 http:sro.srs.govindex.html SAVANNAH R IVER O PERATIONS O FFICE AIKEN, S C 2 9802 NEWS M EDIA C ONTACTS: FOR I...

189

Determination of the photon-contribution of a $^(238)$Pu-Be source  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Gamma radiation of a $^(238)$Pu-Be source at CERN was measured with two neutron insensitive ionisation chambers, i.e. a graphite chamber filled with CO//2 and a steel chamber filled with argon, in order to determine the photon-contribution to ambient dose equivalent. These straightforward measurements were confronted with a novel method using a recombination chamber, with which a coarse spectrum in LET of the mixed radiation field can be obtained. The lowest LET part of the spectrum corresponds to the photon-contribution to the absorbed dose of mixed radiation. The comparison of the different methods showed very good agreement within the measurement uncertainties.

Mayer, S; Golnik, N

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

190

Characterization of Pu-contaminated soils from Nuclear Site 201 at the Nevada Test Site  

SciTech Connect

Distribution and characteristics of Pu-bearing radioactive particles throughout five soil profiles from Nuclear Site (NS) 201 were investigated. Concentrations of /sup 239/ /sup 240/Pu and /sup 241/Am decreased with depth and most of the contamination was contained in the top 5 cm except in profile 4 where it extended to 10 cm. The mean activity ratio of /sup 239/ /sup 240/Pu to /sup 241/Am and its standard error were 5.8 +- 0.3 (N=42). Most of the total radioactivity of the soils was contributed by 0.25 to 2 mm sand size fraction which comprised 20 to 50% by weight of the soils. The radioactive particles in the 0.25 to 2 mm size fraction occurred as spherical glass particles or as glass coatings on sand particles. The glass coatings had gas voids in the matrix but were not as porous as the radioactive particles from NS 219. After impact grinding the >0.25-mm size fractions for one hour, 85% of the initial activity in a NS 201 sample remained with the particles on the 0.25 mm sieve, whereas in the NS 219 sample only 10% remained. The results show that the radioactive particles from NS 201 were much more stable against the impact grinding force than those from NS 219. Therefore, the NS 201 soils would be expected to have a lower probability of producing respirable-size radioactive particles by saltation during wind erosion. 19 references, 3 figures, 3 tables.

Lee, S.Y.; Tamura, T.; Larsen, I.L.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

191

Delayed neutron emission measurements for U-235 and Pu-239  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The delayed neutron emission rates of U-235 and Pu-239 samples were measured accurately from a thermal fission reaction. A Monte Carlo calculation using the Geant4 code was used to demonstrate the neutron energy independence of the detector used in the counting station. A set of highly purified actinide samples (U-235 and Pu-239) was irradiated in these experiments by using the Texas A&M University Nuclear Science Center Reactor. A fast pneumatic transfer system, an integrated computer control system, and a graphite-moderated counting system were constructed to perform all these experiments. The calculated values for the five-group U-235 delayed neutron parameters and the six-group Pu-239 delayed neutron parameters were compared with the values recommended by Keepin et al. (1957) and Waldo et al. (1981). These new values differ slightly from literature values. The graphite-moderated counting station and the computerized pneumatic system are now operational for further delayed neutron measurement.

Chen, Yong

2006-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

192

Plutonium Residue Recovery (PuRR) project: Quarterly progress report, April-June 1988  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A major activity during this period was the conduct of a technical review of the PuRR process before a panel of persons having expertise in residue recovery. The results of the review were favorable as to the assessment of the feasibility of the project, and the reviewers also made valuable suggestions regarding the direction of specific activities in its support. In the area of process development, several variations on initial reduction processes have been conceived and are being explored. Laboratory-scale demonstration-of-feasibility experiments continue at ANL, with further investigation of reductions from ash and from LECO crucibles. ANL is also investigating reduction over a Cu--Mg alloy, and the effects of Si and Al on the solubility of Pu in this alloy, which is proposed as the donor alloy for a subsequent salt-transport step. Some preliminary work on chlorination as a head-end step, either to form volatile chlorides of Al and Si, or selectively to chlorinate Pu, was also initiated. At LLNL, progress was made toward reactivating the Bldg. 332 (Plutonium Facility) laboratory for experiments, and with writing and issuing procedures and emergency procedures for the gloveboxes and gas purification system. In the area of engineering support for laboratory feasibility demonstrations, a Preliminary Design Review for the initial laboratory-scale hardware was held, and several tasks necessary for reactivating the gloveboxes were completed. Preliminary material balances, as recommended by the technical reviewers, have been prepared as part of the project's process engineering effort. 2 refs., 4 figs.

Pittenger, L.C.; Alire, R.M.; Coops, M.S.; Landrum, J.H.; Priest, R.E.; Thompson, D.S.; Gregg, D.W.; Burris, L.; Pierce, R.D.; Morrissey, L.J.

1988-10-24T23:59:59.000Z

193

QUALIFICATION OF THE SAVANNAH RIVER SITE 252CF SHUFFLER FOR RECEIPT VERIFICATION MEASUREMENTS OF MIXED U-PU OXIDES STORED IN 9975 SHIPPING CONTAINERS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

To extend their ability to perform accountability and verification measurements of {sup 235}U in a U-Pu oxide matrix, the K-Area Material Storage facility commissioned the development and construction of a Passive/Active {sup 252}Cf Shuffler. A series of {sup 252}Cf, PuO{sub 2}, and U-Pu oxide standards, in addition to a single U{sub 3}O{sub 8} standard, were measured to characterize and calibrate the shuffler. Accompanying these measurements were simulations using MCNP5/MCNPX, aimed at isolating the neutron countrate contributions for each of the isotopes present. Two calibration methods for determining the {sup 235}U content in mixed UPu oxide were then developed, yielding comparable results. The first determines the {sup 235}U mass by estimating the {sup 239}Pu/{sup 235}U ratio-dependent contributions from the primary delayed neutron contributors. The second defines an average linear response based on the {sup 235}U and {sup 239}Pu mass contents. In each case, it was observed that self-shielding due to {sup 235}U mass has a large influence on the observed rates, requiring bounds on the applicable limits of each calibration method.

Dubose, F.

2011-05-26T23:59:59.000Z

194

Summary of Pu u O o - Kupaianaha Eruption, Kilauea Volcano, Hawaii | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Summary of Pu u O o - Kupaianaha Eruption, Kilauea Volcano, Hawaii Summary of Pu u O o - Kupaianaha Eruption, Kilauea Volcano, Hawaii Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Web Site: Summary of Pu_u _O_o - Kupaianaha Eruption, Kilauea Volcano, Hawaii Published USGS, Date Not Provided DOI Not Provided Check for DOI availability: http://crossref.org Online Internet link for Summary of Pu_u _O_o - Kupaianaha Eruption, Kilauea Volcano, Hawaii Citation Summary of Pu_u _O_o - Kupaianaha Eruption, Kilauea Volcano, Hawaii [Internet]. 2012. USGS. [cited 06/26/2013]. Available from: http://hvo.wr.usgs.gov/kilauea/summary/ Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Summary_of_Pu_u_O_o_-_Kupaianaha_Eruption,_Kilauea_Volcano,_Hawaii&oldid=682513" Categories: References Uncited References

195

Structure of $^{240}$Pu: Evidence for Octupole Phonon Condensation?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The expanded level structure of $^{240}$Pu available from the present study highlights the role of strong octupole correlations in this nucleus. Besides a delayed alignment in the yrast band, the observations include the presence of both $I^{+}{\\to}(I-1)^{-}$ and $I^{-}{\\to}(I-1)^{+}$ E1 transitions linking states of the yrast and negative-parity bands at high spin and the presence of an additional even-spin, positive-parity band deexciting exclusively to the negative parity sequence. The observations appear to be consistent with expectations based on the recently proposed concept of octupole phonon condensation.

X. Wang; R. V. F. Janssens; M. P. Carpenter; S. Zhu; I. Wiedenhver; U. Garg; S. Frauendorf; T. Nakatsukasa; I. Ahmad; A. Bernstein; E. Diffenderfer; S. J. Freeman; J. P. Greene; T. L. Khoo; F. G. Kondev; A. Larabee; T. Lauritsen; C. J. Lister; B. Meredith; D. Seweryniak; C. Teal; P. Wilson

2009-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

196

First-principles elastic properties of (alpha)-Pu  

SciTech Connect

Density-functional electronic structure calculations have been used to investigate the ambient pressure and low temperature elastic properties of the ground-state {alpha} phase of plutonium metal. The electronic structure and correlation effects are modeled within a fully relativistic anti-ferromagnetic treatment with a generalized gradient approximation for the electron exchange and correlation functionals. The 13 independent elastic constants, for the monoclinic {alpha}-Pu system, are calculated for the observed geometry. A comparison of the results with measured data from resonant ultrasound spectroscopy for a cast sample is made.

Soderlind, P; Klepeis, J E

2008-11-04T23:59:59.000Z

197

Structure of $^{240}$Pu: Evidence for Octupole Phonon Condensation?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The expanded level structure of $^{240}$Pu available from the present study highlights the role of strong octupole correlations in this nucleus. Besides a delayed alignment in the yrast band, the observations include the presence of both $I^{+}{\\to}(I-1)^{-}$ and $I^{-}{\\to}(I-1)^{+}$ E1 transitions linking states of the yrast and negative-parity bands at high spin and the presence of an additional even-spin, positive-parity band deexciting exclusively to the negative parity sequence. The observations appear to be consistent with expectations based on the recently proposed concept of octupole phonon condensation.

Wang, X; Carpenter, M P; Zhu, S; Wiedenhver, I; Garg, U; Frauendorf, S; Nakatsukasa, T; Ahmad, I; Bernstein, A; Diffenderfer, E; Freeman, S J; Greene, J P; Khoo, T L; Kondev, F G; Larabee, A; Lauritsen, T; Lister, C J; Meredith, B; Seweryniak, D; Teal, C; Wilson, P

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

198

Contract B590089: Technical Evaluation of the Pu Cluster Calculations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Using Synchrotron-Radiation-based Photoelectron Spectroscopy and X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy, the theoretical results within recent progress reports supplied under Contract B590089 have been evaluated. Three appendices are included: A is from Progress Report I; B is from Progress Report II; and C is from an earlier calculation by M. Ryzhkov. The comparisons between the LLNL experimental data and the Russian calculations are quite favorable. The Cluster calculations may represent a new and useful avenue to address unresolved questions within the field of actinide electron structure, particularly that of Pu.

Tobin, J G; Ryzhkov, M; Mirmelstein, A

2011-11-18T23:59:59.000Z

199

Microsoft Word - Template_SLAC Proprietary Use Agreement_PU 11...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

PU 11142013 1 The Department of Energy has opted to utilize the following agreement for Designated Proprietary User Facilities transactions. Because these transactions are...

200

Gene Repression and Cell Cycle Regulation by PU.1 in Acute Myeloid Leukemia.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is associated with mutations or chromosomal translocations in genes encoding transcription factors. PU.1 is a transcription factor that is required for (more)

Ziliotto, Rachel GH

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "2 glenwood pu" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

The transcription factor PU.1 does not regulate lineage commitment but has lineagespecific effects  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abstract: PU.1 is a transcription factor shown to regulate the expression of many important genes in myeloid and B cells. At birth, mice homozygous for the disruption of the PU.1 gene have erythrocytes, megakaryocytes, and T cells, but no mature myeloid or B cells. Cells with an inability to develop to maturity were found in this mouse for B cells, neutrophils, eosinophils, mast cells, and monocytes. Rescue of early monocytic cells by transfection with the PU.1 gene results in renewed development to macrophages. These results demonstrate that PU.1 is an important regulator in the development of cells in the hematopoietic system. J. Leukoc.

Scott R. Mckercher; Gregory W. Henkel; Richard A. Maki

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

202

Glenwood Springs, Colorado: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

5505376°, -107.3247762° 5505376°, -107.3247762° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":39.5505376,"lon":-107.3247762,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

203

Space heating for office building at Glenwood Springs, Colorado  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Technical assistance in a preliminary design and economic evaluation of a geothermal heating system was provided. The use of a downhole heat exchanger was evaluated, with the objective of reducing costs in this first stage of the project, but was abandoned. The low resource temperature and lack of sufficient aquifer data were the reasons for abandonment of the downhole heat exchanger concept. The use of surface plate heat exchangers was selected as the preferred approach for utilizing the geothermal resource. Brine will be passed through three plate heat exchangers in the building basement. Separate loops of clean circulating fluid will be used to extract heat from the brine in three heat exchangers, with the loops providing heat to the building, a hot tub, and a deicing system. The cooled geothermal fluid from the heat exchangers will be injected to an isolated injection zone at the bottom of the production well. Aquifer tests are required to develop final pump sizes and process flows. The information developed from the work tasks of this project is presented.

Garing, K.L.; Coury, G.E.

1982-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

204

Calibration of the ERL cavity FPC and PU couplers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The performance parameters of a superconducting cavity, notably accelerating field and quality factor, are first obtained in a cryogenic vertical test Dewar, and again after the final assembly in its cryostat. The tests involve Network Analyzer (NA) measurements in which the cavity is excited through an input coupler and the properties are obtained from the reflected signal at the input and the transmitted signal from the output coupler. The interpretation of the scattering coefficients in terms of field strength requires the knowledge of the Fundamental Power Coupler (FPC) and Pick-Up (PU) coupler strength, as expressed by their 'external' and Q{sub FPC} Q{sub PU}. The coupler strength is independent of the field level or cavity losses and thus can be determined at low levels with the scattering coefficients S{sub 11} and S{sub 21}, assuming standard 50 {Omega} terminations in the network analyzer. Also needed is the intrinsic cavity parameter, R{sub a} /Q{sub 0} {triple_bond} {l_brace}R/Q{r_brace}, a quantity independent of field or losses which must be obtained from simulation programs, such as the Microwave Studio.

Hahn, H.; Johnson, E.; Kayran, D.

2010-04-05T23:59:59.000Z

205

ZPR-6 assembly 7 high {sup 240}Pu core experiments : a fast reactor core with mixed (Pu,U)-oxide fuel and a centeral high{sup 240}Pu zone.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

ZPR-6 Assembly 7 (ZPR-6/7) encompasses a series of experiments performed at the ZPR-6 facility at Argonne National Laboratory in 1970 and 1971 as part of the Demonstration Reactor Benchmark Program (Reference 1). Assembly 7 simulated a large sodium-cooled LMFBR with mixed oxide fuel, depleted uranium radial and axial blankets, and a core H/D near unity. ZPR-6/7 was designed to test fast reactor physics data and methods, so configurations in the Assembly 7 program were as simple as possible in terms of geometry and composition. ZPR-6/7 had a very uniform core assembled from small plates of depleted uranium, sodium, iron oxide, U{sub 3}O{sub 8} and Pu-U-Mo alloy loaded into stainless steel drawers. The steel drawers were placed in square stainless steel tubes in the two halves of a split table machine. ZPR-6/7 had a simple, symmetric core unit cell whose neutronic characteristics were dominated by plutonium and {sup 238}U. The core was surrounded by thick radial and axial regions of depleted uranium to simulate radial and axial blankets and to isolate the core from the surrounding room. The ZPR-6/7 program encompassed 139 separate core loadings which include the initial approach to critical and all subsequent core loading changes required to perform specific experiments and measurements. In this context a loading refers to a particular configuration of fueled drawers, radial blanket drawers and experimental equipment (if present) in the matrix of steel tubes. Two principal core configurations were established. The uniform core (Loadings 1-84) had a relatively uniform core composition. The high {sup 240}Pu core (Loadings 85-139) was a variant on the uniform core. The plutonium in the Pu-U-Mo fuel plates in the uniform core contains 11% {sup 240}Pu. In the high {sup 240}Pu core, all Pu-U-Mo plates in the inner core region (central 61 matrix locations per half of the split table machine) were replaced by Pu-U-Mo plates containing 27% {sup 240}Pu in the plutonium component to construct a central core zone with a composition closer to that in an LMFBR core with high burnup. The high {sup 240}Pu configuration was constructed for two reasons. First, the composition of the high {sup 240}Pu zone more closely matched the composition of LMFBR cores anticipated in design work in 1970. Second, comparison of measurements in the ZPR-6/7 uniform core with corresponding measurements in the high {sup 240}Pu zone provided an assessment of some of the effects of long-term {sup 240}Pu buildup in LMFBR cores. The uniform core version of ZPR-6/7 is evaluated in ZPR-LMFR-EXP-001. This document only addresses measurements in the high {sup 240}Pu core version of ZPR-6/7. Many types of measurements were performed as part of the ZPR-6/7 program. Measurements of criticality, sodium void worth, control rod worth and reaction rate distributions in the high {sup 240}Pu core configuration are evaluated here. For each category of measurements, the uncertainties are evaluated, and benchmark model data are provided.

Lell, R. M.; Morman, J. A.; Schaefer, R.W.; McKnight, R.D.; Nuclear Engineering Division

2009-02-23T23:59:59.000Z

206

I. Nuclear Production Reaction and Chemical Isolation Procedure for 240Am II. New Superheavy Element Isotopes: 242Pu(48Ca,5n)285-114  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

6.1.1 Predicted 242 Pu( 48 Ca, 5n) 285 114 nuclear reactionthe irradiation apparatus for the 242 Pu(p, 3n) 240 Am re-Alpha spectrum of the 242 Pu solution after chemical

Ellison, Paul Andrew

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

207

V-213: PuTTY SSH Handshake Integer Overflow Vulnerabilities | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

3: PuTTY SSH Handshake Integer Overflow Vulnerabilities 3: PuTTY SSH Handshake Integer Overflow Vulnerabilities V-213: PuTTY SSH Handshake Integer Overflow Vulnerabilities August 7, 2013 - 6:00am Addthis PROBLEM: SEARCH-LAB has reported some vulnerabilities in PuTTY PLATFORM: PuTTY 0.x ABSTRACT: The vulnerabilities can be exploited by malicious people to potentially compromise a user's system. REFERENCE LINKS: Secunia Advisory SA54354 http://cve.mitre.org/cgi-bin/cvename.cgi?name=CVE-2013-3520 CVE-2013-4206 CVE-2013-4207 CVE-2013-4208 CVE-2013-4852 IMPACT ASSESSMENT: Medium DISCUSSION: The vulnerabilities are caused due to some integer overflow errors when handling the SSH handshake and can be exploited to cause heap-based buffer overflows via a negative handshake message length. IMPACT: Successful exploitation of may allow execution of arbitrary code

208

U.S.-Russian experts NATO collaborative research grant exchange visit meeting on excess Pu ceramics formulations and characterizations  

SciTech Connect

This document contains the agenda and meeting notes. Topics of discussion included US Pu disposition ceramics activities, Russian experience and proposals in Pu ceramics, and development of possible Russian ceramic proposals or collaborations.

Jardine, L.J., LLNL

1998-11-24T23:59:59.000Z

209

Photometric study of new southern SU UMa-type dwarf novae and candidates: V877 Ara, KK Tel and PU CMa  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We photometrically observed three dwarf novae V877 Ara, KK Tel and PU CMa. We discovered undisputed presence of superhumps in V877 Ara and KK Tel, with mean periods of 0.08411(2) d and 0.08808(3) d, respectively. Both V877 Ara and KK Tel are confirmed to belong to long-period SU UMa-type dwarf novae. In V877 Ara, we found a large decrease of the superhump period (dot(P)/P = -14.5 +/- 2.1 x 10^(-5)). There is evidence that the period of KK Tel decreased at a similar or a more exceptional rate. Coupled with the past studies of superhump period changes, these findings suggest that a previously neglected diversity of phenomena is present in long-period SU UMa-type dwarf novae. The present discovery of a diversity in long-period SU UMa-type systems would become an additional step toward a full understanding the dwarf nova phenomenon. PU CMa is shown to be an excellent candidate for an SU UMa-type dwarf nova. We examined the outburst properties of these dwarf novae, and derived characteristic outburst recurrence times. Combined with the recently published measurement of the orbital period of PU CMa, we propose that PU CMa is the first object filling the gap between the extreme WZ Sge-type and ER UMa-type stars.

T. Kato; R. Santallo; G. Bolt; T. Richards; P. Nelson; B. Monard; M. Uemura; S. Kiyota; R. Stubbings; A. Pearce; T. Watanabe; P. Schmeer; H. Yamaoka

2002-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

210

DOE Plutonium Disposition Study: Pu consumption in ALWRs. Volume 1, Final report  

SciTech Connect

The Department of Energy (DOE) has contracted with Asea Brown Boveri-Combustion Engineering (ABB-CE) to provide information on the capability of ABB-CE`s System 80 + Advanced Light Water Reactor (ALWR) to transform, through reactor burnup, 100 metric tonnes (MT) of weapons grade plutonium (Pu) into a form which is not readily useable in weapons. This information is being developed as part of DOE`s Plutonium Disposition Study, initiated by DOE in response to Congressional action. This document, Volume 1, presents a technical description of the various elements of the System 80 + Standard Plant Design upon which the Plutonium Disposition Study was based. The System 80 + Standard Design is fully developed and directly suited to meeting the mission objectives for plutonium disposal. The bass U0{sub 2} plant design is discussed here.

Not Available

1993-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

211

Analysis of Density Changes in Plutonium Observed from Accelerated Aging Using Pu-238 Enrichment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We present dimensional and density changes in an aging plutonium alloy enriched with 7.3 at.% of {sup 238}Pu and reference alloys of various ages. After 45 equivalent years of aging, the enriched alloys at 35 C have swelled in volume by 0.14 to 0.16% and now exhibit a near linear volume increase, without void swelling. Based on X-ray diffraction measurements, the lattice expansion by self-irradiation appears to be the primary cause for dimensional changes during the initial 2-3 years of aging. Following the initial transient, the density change is primarily cause by a constant helium in-growth rate as a result of {alpha}-particle decay.

Chung, B W; Saw, C K; Thompson, S R; Quick, T M; Woods, C H; Hopkins, D J; Ebbinghaus, B B

2006-07-11T23:59:59.000Z

212

Exploring simultaneous single and coincident gamma-ray measurements for U/Pu assay in safeguards  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Using a broad range of gamma-ray uranium standards and two plutonium samples of known isotopic content, list mode gamma ray information from two Compton suppressed and one planar HPGe detectors were analyzed according to the time information of the signals. Interferences from Cs-137 were introduced. In this study, we extended singles measurements by exploring the potential of simultaneously using both singles and coincidence data for U/Pu assay. The main goals of this exploratory study are: 1) whether one will be able to use coincidence information in addition to the complicated 100-keV unfolding to obtain extra information of uranium and plutonium isotopic ratios, and 2) with higher energy interference gamma-rays from isotopes such as Cs-137, can the coincidence information help to provide the isotopic information. (authors)

Wang, T. F. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, CA 94550 (United States); Horne, S. M. [Nuclear and Radiation Engineering Program, Mechanical Engineering Dept., Univ. of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX 78712 (United States); Henderson, R. A.; Roberts, K. E.; Vogt, D. K. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, CA 94550 (United States)

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

213

Plutonium Residue Recovery (PuRR) Project: Quarterly progress report, July-September 1988  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

During this quarter, process development activities were concentrated on methods for recycling the salt and alloy reagents used by PuRR. Promising techniques were identified for further investigation, development and refinement. Processes for the recycling of salts, in particular, were also shown to be of potential benefit in reducing waste streams in the current plutonium metal production cycle. At Argonne National Laboratory (ANL), the first attempt at reduction of ash heels was made. The recovery of plutonium from this most intractable of residues was gratifyingly high. Magnesium was used for reduction of ash heel into a zinc alloy, and calcium was used for reduction into a copper-magnesium alloy. For the zinc-magnesium run 99.9% reduction was achieved in two reduction stages. For the copper-magnesium-calcium run, 99.8% reduction was obtained in a single stage. The reduction alloy from the copper-magnesium-calcium system was subjected to salt extraction by reaction with CdCl/sub 2/. Only 96.5% of the reduced plutonium was extracted. Quantitative extraction was expected; the cause for the incomplete extraction will be investigated. A similar salt extraction will be performed with the reduction ingot from the zinc-magnesium system. At Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), further progress was made toward readying the gloveboxes in the Plutonium Facility for use. Preliminary steps were taken to prepare ash-heel residues for experiments to attempt gross mechanical separation as a head-end stage for PuRR. 3 refs., 3 figs.

Pittenger, L.C.; Alire, R.M.; Coops, M.S.; Landrum, J.H.; Priest, R.E.; Thompson, D.S.; Gregg, D.W.; Pierce, R.D.; Johnson, G.K.; Mulcahey, T.P.

1988-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

214

Isochronal annealing of radiation damage in (alpha)- and (delta)-Pu alloys  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Magnetic isochronal annealing curves were measured on specimens of self damaged {alpha}-Pu and several {delta}-Pu alloys stabilized by Ga and Am. These results are compared to one another and to isochronal resistivity annealing curves, where distinct differences are observed between the magnetic and resistive annealing for the case of {delta}-Pu. The first stage of annealing observed in the resistivity measurements is largely missing from the magnetic measurements, indicating that interstitials contribute little if any signal to the magnetization, while the onset of vacancy migration is strongly reflected in the magnetization signal.

McCall, S K; Fluss, M J; Chung, B W; Haire, R G

2009-06-22T23:59:59.000Z

215

Spent Nuclear Fuel Self-Induced XRF to Predict Pu to U Content  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The quantification of plutonium (Pu) in spent nuclear fuel is an increasingly important safeguards issue. There exists an estimated worldwide 980 metric tons of Pu in the nuclear fuel cycle and the majority is in spent nuclear fuel waiting for long term storage or fuel reprocessing. This study investigates utilizing the measurement of x-ray fluorescence (XRF) from the spent fuel for the quantification of its uranium (U) to Pu ratio. Pu quantification measurements at the front end of the reprocessing plant, the fuel cycle area of interest, would improve input accountability and shipper/receiver differences. XRF measurements were made on individual PWR fuel rods with varying fuel ages and final burn-ups at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) in July 2008 and January 2009. These measurements successfully showed that it is possible to measure the Pu x-ray peak at 103.7 keV in PWR spent fuel (~1 percent Pu) using a planar HPGe detector. Prior to these measurement campaigns, the Pu peak has only been measured for fast breeder reactor fuel (~40 percent Pu). To understand the physics of the measurements, several modern physics simulations were conducted to determine the fuel isotopics, the sources of XRF in the spent fuel, and the sources of Compton continuum. Fuel transformation and decay simulations demonstrated the Pu/U measured peak ratio is directly proportional to the Pu/U content and increases linearly as burn-up increases. Spent fuel source simulations showed for 4 to 13 year old PWR fuel with burn-up ranges from 50 to 67 GWd/MTU, initial photon sources and resulting Compton and XRF interactions adequately model the spent fuel measured spectrum and background. The detector simulations also showed the contributions to the Compton continuum from strongest to weakest are as follows: the fuel, the shipping tube, the cladding, the detector can, the detector crystal and the collimator end. The detector simulations showed the relationship between the Pu/U peak ratio and fuel burn-up over predict the measured Pu/U peak but the trend is the same. In conclusion, the spent fuel simulations using modern radiation transport physics codes can model the actual spent fuel measurements but need to be benchmarked.

Stafford, Alissa Sarah

2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

216

doi:10.1155/2011/808524 Review Article PU.1 and Haematopoietic Cell Fate: Dosage Matters  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. The ETS family transcription factor PU.1 is a key regulator of haematopoietic differentiation. Its expression is dynamically controlled throughout haematopoiesis in order to direct appropriate lineage specification. Elucidating the biological role of PU.1 has proved challenging. This paper will discuss how a range of experiments in cell lines and mutant and transgenic mouse models have enhanced our knowledge of the mechanisms by which PU.1 drives lineage-specific differentiation during haematopoiesis. 1.

Ka Sin Mak; Alister P. W. Funnell; Richard C. M. Pearson; Merlin Crossley

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

217

ZPR-6 assembly 7 high {sup 240} PU core : a cylindrical assemby with mixed (PU, U)-oxide fuel and a central high {sup 240} PU zone.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Over a period of 30 years more than a hundred Zero Power Reactor (ZPR) critical assemblies were constructed at Argonne National Laboratory. The ZPR facilities, ZPR-3, ZPR-6, ZPR-9 and ZPPR, were all fast critical assembly facilities. The ZPR critical assemblies were constructed to support fast reactor development, but data from some of these assemblies are also well suited to form the basis for criticality safety benchmarks. Of the three classes of ZPR assemblies, engineering mockups, engineering benchmarks and physics benchmarks, the last group tends to be most useful for criticality safety. Because physics benchmarks were designed to test fast reactor physics data and methods, they were as simple as possible in geometry and composition. The principal fissile species was {sup 235}U or {sup 239}Pu. Fuel enrichments ranged from 9% to 95%. Often there were only one or two main core diluent materials, such as aluminum, graphite, iron, sodium or stainless steel. The cores were reflected (and insulated from room return effects) by one or two layers of materials such as depleted uranium, lead or stainless steel. Despite their more complex nature, a small number of assemblies from the other two classes would make useful criticality safety benchmarks because they have features related to criticality safety issues, such as reflection by soil-like material. The term 'benchmark' in a ZPR program connotes a particularly simple loading aimed at gaining basic reactor physics insight, as opposed to studying a reactor design. In fact, the ZPR-6/7 Benchmark Assembly (Reference 1) had a very simple core unit cell assembled from plates of depleted uranium, sodium, iron oxide, U3O8, and plutonium. The ZPR-6/7 core cell-average composition is typical of the interior region of liquid-metal fast breeder reactors (LMFBRs) of the era. It was one part of the Demonstration Reactor Benchmark Program,a which provided integral experiments characterizing the important features of demonstration-size LMFBRs. As a benchmark, ZPR-6/7 was devoid of many 'real' reactor features, such as simulated control rods and multiple enrichment zones, in its reference form. Those kinds of features were investigated experimentally in variants of the reference ZPR-6/7 or in other critical assemblies in the Demonstration Reactor Benchmark Program.

Lell, R. M.; Schaefer, R. W.; McKnight, R. D.; Tsiboulia, A.; Rozhikhin, Y.; Nuclear Engineering Division; Inst. of Physics and Power Engineering

2007-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

218

RAPID DETERMINATION OF 237 NP AND PU ISOTOPES IN WATER BY INDUCTIVELY COUPLED PLASMA MASS SPECTROMETRY AND ALPHA SPECTROMETRY  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A new method that allows rapid preconcentration and separation of plutonium and neptunium in water samples was developed for the measurement of {sup 237}Np and Pu isotopes by inductively-coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) and alpha spectrometry; a hybrid approach. {sup 238}U can interfere with {sup 239}Pu measurement by ICP-MS as {sup 238}UH{sup +} mass overlap and {sup 237}Np via peak tailing. The method provide enhanced removal of uranium by separating Pu and Np initially on TEVA Resin, then moving Pu to DGA resin for additional removal of uranium. The decontamination factor for uranium from Pu is almost 100,000 and the decontamination factor for U from Np is greater than 10,000. This method uses stacked extraction chromatography cartridges and vacuum box technology to facilitate rapid separations. Preconcentration is performed using a streamlined calcium phosphate precipitation method. Purified solutions are split between ICP-MS and alpha spectrometry so that long and short-lived Pu isotopes can be measured successfully. The method allows for simultaneous extraction of 20 samples (including QC samples) in 4 to 6 hours, and can also be used for emergency response. {sup 239}Pu, {sup 242}Pu and {sup 237}Np were measured by ICP-MS, while {sup 236}Pu, {sup 238}Pu, and {sup 239}Pu were measured by alpha spectrometry.

Maxwell, S.; Jones, V.; Culligan, B.; Nichols, S.; Noyes, G.

2010-06-23T23:59:59.000Z

219

Rational Ligand Design for U(VI) and Pu(IV)  

SciTech Connect

Nuclear power is an attractive alternative to hydrocarbon-based energy production at a time when moving away from carbon-producing processes is widely accepted as a significant developmental need. Hence, the radioactive actinide power sources for this industry are necessarily becoming more widespread, which is accompanied by the increased risk of exposure to both biological and environmental systems. This, in turn, requires the development of technology designed to remove such radioactive threats efficiently and selectively from contaminated material, whether that be contained nuclear waste streams or the human body. Raymond and coworkers (University of California, Berkeley) have for decades investigated the interaction of biologically-inspired, hard Lewis-base ligands with high-valent, early-actinide cations. It has been established that such ligands bind strongly to the hard Lewis-acidic early actinides, and many poly-bidentate ligands have been developed and shown to be effective chelators of actinide contaminants in vivo. Work reported herein explores the effect of ligand geometry on the linear U(IV) dioxo dication (uranyl, UO{sub 2}{sup 2+}). The goal is to utilize rational ligand design to develop ligands that exhibit shape selectivity towards linear dioxo cations and provides thermodynamically favorable binding interactions. The uranyl complexes with a series of tetradentate 3-hydroxy-pyridin-2-one (3,2-HOPO) ligands were studied in both the crystalline state as well as in solution. Despite significant geometric differences, the uranyl affinities of these ligands vary only slightly but are better than DTPA, the only FDA-approved chelation therapy for actinide contamination. The terepthalamide (TAM) moiety was combined into tris-beidentate ligands with 1,2- and 3,2-HOPO moieties were combined into hexadentate ligands whose structural preferences and solution thermodynamics were measured with the uranyl cation. In addition to achieving coordinative saturation, these ligands exhibited increased uranyl affinity compared to bis-Me-3,2-HOPO ligands. This result is due in part to their increased denticity, but is primarily the result of the presence of the TAM moiety. In an effort to explore the relatively unexplored coordination chemistry of Pu(IV) with bidentate moieties, a series of Pu(IV) complexes were also crystallized using bidentate hydroxypyridinone and hydroxypyrone ligands. The geometries of these complexes are compared to that of the analogous Ce(IV) complexes. While in some cases these showed the expected structural similarities, some ligand systems led to significant coordination changes. A series of crystal structure analyses with Ce(IV) indicated that these differences are most likely the result of crystallization condition differences and solvent inclusion effects.

Szigethy, Geza

2009-08-12T23:59:59.000Z

220

133Ba as a gamma-ray surrogate source for 1kg HEU and 10g 239Pu and 252Cf as a Neutron Surrogate for Pu  

SciTech Connect

Monte Carlo was performed for the purpose of relating gamma-ray signal strength from 1kg of HEU and 10g of {sup 239}Pu (as described in the ASTM standards) to the radiation emitted from an amount of {sup 133}Ba. A determination was made on the amount of {sup 133}Ba that could act as a surrogate for the specified amounts of HEU and Pu. {sup 133}Ba is not the ideal source to use as a surrogate for HEU because of its higher energies. {sup 133}Ba was chosen as the surrogate since it has a half-life of 10.54 years, rather then the more ideal surrogate of {sup 57}Co which has a half-life of 271 days. A similar Monte Carlo was performed for the purpose of relating neutron signal strength from 200g of Pu (as described in the ASTM standards) to the radiation emitted from an amount of shielded {sup 252}Cf. A determination was made on the amount of {sup 252}Cf necessary to act as a surrogate for the 200g of Pu. An ASTM standard source is a metallic sphere, cube, or right cylinder of SNM having maximum self-attenuation of its emitted radiation. For plutonium, the source should be at least 93% {sup 239}Pu, less than 6.5% {sup 240}Pu, and less than 0.5% impurities. A cadmium filter of at least 0.08cm thick should be used to reduce the impact of {sup 241}Am. For uranium, the source should contain at least 95% {sup 235}U and less than 0.25% impurities. For neutron detector testing, the neutron source shall be placed in a lead shielding container that reduces the gamma radiation from the source to 1% of its unshielded value.

Pohl, B A; Archer, D E

2004-03-11T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "2 glenwood pu" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Purex Process Improvements for Pu and NP Control in Total Actinide Recycle Flowsheets  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Significant improvements are required in the Purex process to optimise it for Advanced Fuel Cycles. Two key challenges we have identified are, firstly, developing more efficient methods for U/Pu separations especially at elevated Pu concentrations and, secondly, improving recovery, control and routing of Np in a modified Purex process. A series of Purex-like flowsheets for improved Pu separations based on hydroxamic acids and are reported. Purex-like flowsheets have been tested on a glovebox-housed 30-stage miniature centrifugal contactor train. A series of trials have been performed to demonstrate the processing of feeds with varying Pu contents ranging from 7 - 40% by weight. These flowsheets have demonstrated hydroxamic acids are excellent reagents for complexant stripping of Pu being able to achieve high decontamination factors (DF) on both the U and Pu product streams and co - recover Np with Pu. The advantages of a complexant-based approach are shown to be especially relevant when AFC scenarios are considered, where the Pu content of the fuel is expected to b e significantly higher. Recent results towards modifying the Purex process to improve recovery and control of Np in short residence time contactors are reported. Work on the development of chemical and process models to describe the complicated behaviour of Np under primary separation conditions (i.e. the HA extraction contactor) is described. To test the performance of the model a series of experiments were performed including testing of flowsheets on a fume-hood housed miniature centrifugal contactor train. The flowsheet was designed to emulate the conditions of a primar y separations contactor with the Np split between the U-solvent product and aqueous raffinate. In terms of Np routing the process model showed good agreement with flowsheet trial however much further work is required to fully understand this complex system. (authors)

Birkett, J.E.; Carrott, M.J.; Crooks, G.; Fox, O.D.; Maher, C.J.; Taylor, R.J.; Woodhead, D.A. [Nexia Solutions Ltd., BNFL, Sellafield, Seascale, CA20 1PG (United Kingdom)

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

222

PU/SS EUTECTIC ASSESSMENT IN 9975 PACKAGINGS IN A STORAGE FACILITY DURING EXTENDED FIRE  

SciTech Connect

In a radioactive material (RAM) packaging, the formation of eutectic at the Pu/SS (plutonium/stainless steel) interface is a serious concern and must be avoided to prevent of leakage of fissile material to the environment. The eutectic temperature for the Pu/SS is rather low (410 C) and could seriously impact the structural integrity of the containment vessel under accident conditions involving fire. The 9975 packaging is used for long term storage of Pu bearing materials in the DOE complex where the Pu comes in contact with the stainless steel containment vessel. Due to the serious consequences of the containment breach at the eutectic site, the Pu/SS interface temperature is kept well below the eutectic formation temperature of 410 C. This paper discusses the thermal models and the results for the extended fire conditions (1500 F for 86 minutes) that exist in a long term storage facility and concludes that the 9975 packaging Pu/SS interface temperature is well below the eutectic temperature.

Gupta, N.

2012-03-26T23:59:59.000Z

223

DETERMINATION OF 237NP AND PU ISOTOPES IN LARGE SOIL SAMPLES BY INDUCTIVELY COUPLED PLASMA MASS SPECTROMETRY  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A new method for the determination of {sup 237}Np and Pu isotopes in large soil samples has been developed that provides enhanced uranium removal to facilitate assay by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). This method allows rapid preconcentration and separation of plutonium and neptunium in large soil samples for the measurement of {sup 237}Np and Pu isotopes by ICP-MS. {sup 238}U can interfere with {sup 239}Pu measurement by ICP-MS as {sup 238}UH{sup +} mass overlap and {sup 237}Np via {sup 238}U peak tailing. The method provides enhanced removal of uranium by separating Pu and Np initially on TEVA Resin, then transferring Pu to DGA resin for additional purification. The decontamination factor for removal of uranium from plutonium for this method is greater than 1 x 10{sup 6}. Alpha spectrometry can also be applied so that the shorter-lived {sup 238}Pu isotope can be measured successfully. {sup 239}Pu, {sup 242}Pu and {sup 237}Np were measured by ICP-MS, while {sup 236}Pu and {sup 238}Pu were measured by alpha spectrometry.

Maxwell, S.

2010-07-26T23:59:59.000Z

224

Nuclear data evaluation for sup 2 sup 3 sup 8 Pu, sup 2 sup 3 sup 9 Pu, sup 2 sup 4 sup 0 Pu, sup 2 sup 4 sup 1 Pu and sup 2 sup 4 sup 2 Pu irradiated by neutrons and protons at the energies up to 250 MeV  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The evaluation of nuclear data for plutonium isotopes with atomic mass number from 238 to 242 has been performed. Neutron data were obtained at the energies from 20 to 250 MeV and combined with JENDL-3.3 data at 20 MeV. Evaluation of the proton data has been done from 1 to 250 MeV. The coupled channel optical model was used to obtain angular distributions for elastic and inelastic scattering and transmission coefficients. Pre-equilibrium exciton model and Hauser-Feshbach statistical model were used to describe neutron and charged particles emission from the excited nuclei. These evaluation is the first work for producing the full set of evaluated file up to 250 MeV for plutonium isotopes.

Konobeyev, A Y; Iwamoto, O

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

225

Study of Pu consumption in light water reactors: Evaluation of GE advanced boiling water reactor plants, compilation of Phase 1C task reports  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report summarizes the evaluations conducted during Phase 1C of the Pu Disposition Study have provided further results which reinforce the conclusions reached during Phase 1A & 1B: These conclusions clearly establish the benefits of the fission option and the use of the ABWR as a reliable, proven, well-defined and cost-effective means available to disposition the weapons Pu. This project could be implemented in the near-term at a cost and on a schedule being validated by reactor plants currently under construction in Japan and by cost and schedule history and validated plans for MOX plants in Europe. Evaluations conducted during this phase have established that (1) the MOX fuel is licensable based on existing criteria for new fuel with limited lead fuel rod testing, (2) that the applicable requirements for transport, handling and repository storage can be met, and (3) that all the applicable safeguards criteria can be met.

Not Available

1994-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

226

Electric dipole moments of Hg, Xe, Rn, Ra, Pu, and TlF induced by the nuclear Schiff moment and limits on time-reversal violating interactions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We have calculated the atomic electric dipole moments (EDMs) induced in ^{199}Hg, ^{129}Xe, ^{223}Rn, ^{225}Ra, and ^{239}Pu by their respective nuclear Schiff moments S. The results are (in units 10^{-17}S(e {fm}^{3})^{-1}e cm): d(^{199}Hg)=-2.8, d(^{129}Xe)=0.38, d(^{223}Rn)=3.3, d(^{225}Ra)=-8.5, d(^{239}Pu)=-11. We have also calculated corrections to the parity- and time-invariance-violating (P,T-odd) spin-axis interaction constant in TlF. These results are important for the interpretation of atomic and molecular experiments on EDMs in terms of fundamental P,T-odd parameters.

V. A. Dzuba; V. V. Flambaum; J. S. M. Ginges; M. G. Kozlov

2002-03-21T23:59:59.000Z

227

Design of BPM PU for Low-Beta Proton Beam Using Magic Code  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We have designed the BPM PU based on capacitive buttons for use in the KOMAC (Korea Multi-purpose Accelerator Complex), the high-intensity proton linac that are under development at the KAERI (Korea Atomic Research Institute), Korea. The KOMAC is aiming to produce CW 20 mA beam current at the 100 MeV energy. We have chosen the button-type PU since it is easier to fabricate than other type PUs including the stripline, and it could provide enough signal power because of the high beam current. The PU sensitivity was calculated by the MAGIC that is a kind of the Particle-In-Cell code that originates from the plasma science community. The utilization of the MAGIC code is especially useful for BPM PUs in the low-beta sections of the accelerator, because it is difficult to obtain the PU sensitivity experimentally due to the difficulties in simulating the low-beta beams by the electromagnetic waves in a test bench. In this presentation, we report on the design of the BPM PU based on the MAGIC calculation.

Park, S J; Bae, Y S; Hwang, W H; Huang, J Y; Nam, S H

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

228

Density Changes in Plutonium Observed from Accelerated Aging Using Pu-238 Enrichment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In support of Stockpile Stewardship activities, accelerated aging tests on a plutonium alloy enriched with 7.3 atomic percentage of {sup 238}Pu is underway using dilatometry at 35, 50, and 65 C and immersion density measurements of material stored at 50 C. Changes in density are expected from radiation damage in the lattice and helium in-growth. After twenty-five equivalent years of aging, the dilatometry data shows that the alloys at 35 C have expanded in volume by 0.11% to 0.12% and have started to exhibit a near linear expansion behavior primarily caused by the helium accumulation. The average He-to-vacancy ratio from tested specimens was determined to be around 2.3. The model for the lattice damage and helium in-growth accurately represents the volume swelling at 35 C. The density converted from the dilatometry corresponds well to the decreasing density trend of reference plutonium alloys as a function of time.

Chung, B W; Thompson, S R; Woods, C H; Hopkins, D J; Gourdin, W H; Ebbinghaus, B B

2005-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

229

Isotopic yield measurement in the heavy mass region for {sup 239}Pu thermal neutron induced fission  

SciTech Connect

Despite the huge number of fission yield data available in the different evaluated nuclear data libraries, such as JEFF-3.1.1, ENDF/B-VII.0, and JENDL-4.0, more accurate data are still needed both for nuclear energy applications and for our understanding of the fission process itself. It is within the framework of this that measurements on the recoil mass spectrometer Lohengrin (at the Institut Laue-Langevin, Grenoble, France) was undertaken, to determine isotopic yields for the heavy fission products from the {sup 239}Pu(n{sub th},f) reaction. In order to do this, a new experimental method based on {gamma}-ray spectrometry was developed and validated by comparing our results with those performed in the light mass region with completely different setups. Hence, about 65 fission product yields were measured with an uncertainty that has been reduced on average by a factor of 2 compared to that previously available in the nuclear data libraries. In addition, for some fission products, a strongly deformed ionic charge distribution compared to a normal Gaussian shape was found, which was interpreted as being caused by the presence of a nanosecond isomeric state. Finally, a nuclear charge polarization has been observed in agreement, with the one described on other close fissioning systems.

Bail, A.; Serot, O.; Mathieu, L.; Litaize, O.; Materna, T.; Koester, U.; Faust, H.; Letourneau, A.; Panebianco, S. [CEA, DEN-Cadarache, F-13108 Saint-Paul-lez-Durance (France); Institut Laue Langevin, 6 rue Jules Horowitz, B.P. 156, F-38042, Grenoble (France); CEA, DSM-Saclay, IRFU/SPhN, F-91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France)

2011-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

230

Event-by-event study of prompt neutrons from 239Pu(n,f)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Employing a recently developed Monte Carlo model, we study the fission of 240Pu induced by neutrons with energies from thermal to just below the threshold for second chance fission. Current measurements of the mean number of prompt neutrons emitted in fission, together with less accurate measurements of the neutron energy spectra, place remarkably fine constraints on predictions of microscopic calculations. In particular, the total excitation energy of the nascent fragments must be specified to within 1 MeV to avoid disagreement with measurements of the mean neutron multiplicity. The combination of the Monte Carlo fission model with a statistical likelihood analysis also presents a powerful tool for the evaluation of fission neutron data. Of particular importance is the fission spectrum, which plays a key role in determining reactor criticality. We show that our approach can be used to develop an estimate of the fission spectrum with uncertainties several times smaller than current experimental uncertainties for outgoing neutron energies up to 2 MeV.

R. Vogt; J. Randrup; J. Pruet; W. Younes

2009-07-29T23:59:59.000Z

231

K2: Microstructural Development of Plutonium Alloys via Cooling ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Presentation Title, K2: Microstructural Development of Plutonium Alloys via Cooling Curve ... to gain a better understanding of Pu microstructural development.

232

6th US-Russian Pu Science Workshop Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

US-Russian Pu Science Workshop US-Russian Pu Science Workshop Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory University of California, Livermore, California July 14 and 15, 2006 Local Chairs: Michael Fluss, James Tobin, Adam Schwartz LLNL, Livermore, USA Alexander V. Petrovtsev, RFNC * VNIITF, Snezhinsk, Russia Boris A. Nadykto, RFNC * VNIIEF, Sarov, Russia Lidia F. Timofeeva, VNIINM, Moscow, Russia Siegfried S. Hecker, (Luis Morales POC) LANL, Los Alamos, USA Valentin E. Arkhipov, IMP, Ural Branch of RAS, Yekaterinburg, Russia This is a satellite meeting of the "Pu Futures-The Science 2006 International Conference", 9-13 July 2006, Asilomar Conference, Grounds, Pacific Grove Ca. The workshop is hosted by LLNL, under the aegis of the United States/Russian Federation Scientific and Technical Collaboration pursuant

233

Surrogate measurement of the {sup 238}Pu(n,f) cross section  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The neutron-induced fission cross section of {sup 238}Pu was determined using the surrogate ratio method. The (n,f) cross section over an equivalent neutron energy range 5-20 MeV was deduced from inelastic {alpha}-induced fission reactions on {sup 239}Pu, with {sup 235}U({alpha},{alpha}{sup '}f) and {sup 236}U({alpha},{alpha}{sup '}f) used as references. These reference reactions reflect {sup 234}U(n,f) and {sup 235}U(n,f) yields, respectively. The deduced {sup 238}Pu(n,f) cross section agrees well with standard data libraries up to {approx}10 MeV, although larger values are seen at higher energies. The difference at higher energies is less than 20%.

Ressler, J. J.; Burke, J. T.; Escher, J. E.; Bernstein, L. A.; Bleuel, D. L.; Casperson, R. J.; Gostic, J.; Henderson, R.; Scielzo, N. D.; Thompson, I. J.; Wiedeking, M. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94551 (United States); Angell, C. T.; Goldblum, B. L.; Munson, J. [Department of Nuclear Engineering, University of California, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Basunia, M. S.; Phair, L. W. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Beausang, C. W.; Hughes, R. O. [Department of Physics, University of Richmond, Richmond, Virginia 23173 (United States); Hatarik, R. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94551 (United States); Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Ross, T. J. [Department of Physics, University of Richmond, Richmond, Virginia 23173 (United States); Department of Physics, University of Surrey, Guildford GU2 7XH (United Kingdom)

2011-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

234

Correlation-induced anomalies and extreme sensitivity in fcc-Pu  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We have used GGA + U density functional theory to study the effects of correlation on the properties of fcc Pu. We found that the structural and elastic properties of fcc-Pu are highly sensitive to the Hubbard U parameter. Within an interval of 0.05 eV of the U parameter, the equilibrium lattice constants of fcc-Pu can change from 0.42 to 0.47 nm. While the bulk modulus can drop by a factor of 5 to 10. The pressure derivative, dB/dp, of the bulk modulus can rise dramatically from 5 to 15 and then drop to the negative values before recovering to the more normal values. These observations are partially supported by existing experiments and the prediction of a negative dB/dp need to be tested in future experiments.

Chen, Shao-ping [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

235

Appendix: Selected Answers Section 1.2  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Appendix: Selected Answers Chapter 1 Section 1.2 1.2.1 (a) 5/6. (b) 1. (c) 1/2. 1.2.4 No. 1.2.8 No/4. 1.6.3 limn P(An) = P(A) = P(S) = 1. 1 #12;2 APPENDIX: SELECTED ANSWERS Chapter 2 Section 2.1 2.1.1(a Negative Binomial(r + s, ) . Section 2.4 2.4.1 (a) P(U 0) = 0. (b) P(U = 1/2) = 0. (c) P(U

Rosenthal, Jeffrey S.

236

Verification of the content, isotopic composition and age of plutonium in Pu-Be neutron sources by gamma-spectrometry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A non-destructive, gamma-spectrometric method for verifying the plutonium content of Pu-Be neutron sources has been developed. It is also shown that the isotopic composition and the age of plutonium (Pu) can be determined in the intensive neutron field of these sources by the ``Multi-Group Analysis'' method. Gamma spectra were taken in the far-field of the sample, which was assumed to be cylindrical. The isotopic composition and the age of Pu were determined using a commercial implementation of the Multi-Group Analysis algorithm. The Pu content of the sources was evaluated from the count rates of the gamma-peaks of 239Pu, relying on the assumption that the gamma-rays are coming to the detector parallel to each other. The determination of the specific neutron yields and the problem of neutron damage to the detector are also discussed.

Nguyen, C T

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

237

Verification of the content, isotopic composition and age of plutonium in Pu-Be neutron sources by gamma-spectrometry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A non-destructive, gamma-spectrometric method for verifying the plutonium content of Pu-Be neutron sources has been developed. It is also shown that the isotopic composition and the age of plutonium (Pu) can be determined in the intensive neutron field of these sources by the ``Multi-Group Analysis'' method. Gamma spectra were taken in the far-field of the sample, which was assumed to be cylindrical. The isotopic composition and the age of Pu were determined using a commercial implementation of the Multi-Group Analysis algorithm. The Pu content of the sources was evaluated from the count rates of the gamma-peaks of 239Pu, relying on the assumption that the gamma-rays are coming to the detector parallel to each other. The determination of the specific neutron yields and the problem of neutron damage to the detector are also discussed.

Cong Tam Nguyen

2005-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

238

Estimation procedures and error analysis for inferring the total plutonium (Pu) produced by a graphite-moderated reactor  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Graphite isotope ratio method (GIRM) is a technique that uses measurements and computer models to estimate total plutonium (Pu) production in a graphite-moderated reactor. First, isotopic ratios of trace elements in extracted graphite samples from the target reactor are measured. Then, computer models of the reactor relate those ratios to Pu production. Because Pu is controlled under nonproliferation agreements, an estimate of total Pu production is often required, and a declaration of total Pu might need to be verified through GIRM. In some cases, reactor information (such as core dimensions, coolant details, and operating history) are so well documented that computer models can predict total Pu production without the need for measurements. However, in most cases, reactor information is imperfectly known, so a measurement and model-based method such as GIRM is essential. Here, we focus on GIRMs estimation procedure and its associated uncertainty. We illustrate a simulation strategy for a specific reactor that estimates GIRMs uncertainty and determines which inputs contribute most to GIRMs uncertainty, including inputs to the computer models. These models include a local code that relates isotopic ratios to the local Pu production, and a global code that predicts the Pu production shape over the entire reactor. This predicted shape is included with other 3D basis functions to provide a hybrid basis set that is used to fit the local Pu production estimates. The fitted shape can then be integrated over the entire reactor to estimate total Pu production. This GIRM evaluation provides a good example of several techniques of uncertainty analysis and introduces new reasons to fit a function using basis functions in the evaluation of the impact of uncertainty in the true 3D shape.

Heasler, Patrick G.; Burr, Tom; Reid, Bruce D.; Gesh, Christopher J.; Bayne, Charles K.

2006-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

239

EXPERIMENTAL AND CALCULATED RESEARCHES OF NUCLEAR-PHYSICS CHARACTERISTICS OF ASSEMBLIES CONTAINING [237Np + 239Pu(98%)] IN TH  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

And Calculated Researches of Nuclear-Physics Characteristics And Calculated Researches of Nuclear-Physics Characteristics Of Assemblies Containing [ 237 Np + 239 Pu(98%)] in The Core and Reflector of Natural Uranium V.I.Gavrilov, I.Yu.Drozdov, N.V.Zavialov, V.I.Il'in, A.A.Kajgorodov, M.I.Kuvshinov, A.V.Panin Russian Federal Nuclear Center All-Russia Scientific Research Institute of Experimental Physics Neptunium 237 seems to be a promising material as a core component of such systems as pulsed reactors [2] and cascade blankets for electronuclear facilities [1]. To realize calculated simulation of such facilities it is required to know neutron-physics data for the materials included. In this respect 237 Np is a little-studied material. Thus, the rated values of critical mass for a "bare" sphere of

240

Production of new superheavy Z=108-114 nuclei with $^{238}$U, $^{244}$Pu and $^{248,250}$Cm targets  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Within the framework of the dinuclear system (DNS) model, production cross sections of new superheavy nuclei with charged numbers Z=108-114 are analyzed systematically. Possible combinations based on the actinide nuclides $^{238}$U, $^{244}$Pu and $^{248,250}$Cm with the optimal excitation energies and evaporation channels are pointed out to synthesize new isotopes which lie between the nuclides produced in the cold fusion and the $^{48}$Ca induced fusion reactions experimentally, which are feasible to be constructed experimentally. It is found that the production cross sections of superheavy nuclei decrease drastically with the charged numbers of compound nuclei. Larger mass asymmetries of the entrance channels enhance the cross sections in 2n-5n channels.

Feng, Zhao-Qing; Li, Jun-Qing

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

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241

Production of new superheavy Z=108-114 nuclei with $^{238}$U, $^{244}$Pu and $^{248,250}$Cm targets  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Within the framework of the dinuclear system (DNS) model, production cross sections of new superheavy nuclei with charged numbers Z=108-114 are analyzed systematically. Possible combinations based on the actinide nuclides $^{238}$U, $^{244}$Pu and $^{248,250}$Cm with the optimal excitation energies and evaporation channels are pointed out to synthesize new isotopes which lie between the nuclides produced in the cold fusion and the $^{48}$Ca induced fusion reactions experimentally, which are feasible to be constructed experimentally. It is found that the production cross sections of superheavy nuclei decrease drastically with the charged numbers of compound nuclei. Larger mass asymmetries of the entrance channels enhance the cross sections in 2n-5n channels.

Zhao-Qing Feng; Gen-Ming Jin; Jun-Qing Li

2009-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

242

Exploiting Channel Correlation and PU Traffic Memory for Opportunistic Spectrum Scheduling  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We consider a cognitive radio network with multiple primary users (PUs) and one secondary user (SU), where a spectrum server is utilized for spectrum sensing and scheduling the SU to transmit over one of the PU channels opportunistically. One practical yet challenging scenario is when \\textit{both} the PU occupancy and the channel fading vary over time and exhibit temporal correlations. Little work has been done for exploiting such temporal memory in the channel fading and the PU occupancy simultaneously for opportunistic spectrum scheduling. A main goal of this work is to understand the intricate tradeoffs resulting from the interactions of the two sets of system states - the channel fading and the PU occupancy, by casting the problem as a partially observable Markov decision process. We first show that a simple greedy policy is optimal in some special cases. To build a clear understanding of the tradeoffs, we then introduce a full-observation genie-aided system, where the spectrum server collects channel fa...

Wang, Shanshan; Zhang, Junshan

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

243

Europhysics Letters PREPRINT Coulomb-U and magnetic moment collapse in ?-Pu  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

PACS. 71.20.Gj Electronic structure of other crystalline metals and alloys. PACS. 71.27.+a Strongly correlated electron systems; heavy fermions. PACS. 79.60.-i Photoemission and photoelectron spectra. Abstract. The around-the-mean-field version of the LDA+U method is applied to investigate electron correlation effects in ?-Pu. It yields a non-magnetic ground state of ??Pu, and provides a good agreement with experimental equilibrium volume, bulk modulus and explains important features of the photoelectron spectra. Plutonium is probably the most intricate element from the point of view of condensed matter physics. It exhibits six allotropic modifications at ambient pressure, some of them of very low symmetry (monoclinic), and there is little doubt that the anomalous behaviour is related to the 5f electronic states, being at the borderline between the localized, nonbonding, behaviour and the bonding situation of electronic bands. One can preconceive that at the cross-over regime, several states with very different degree of 5f delocalization can be nearly degenerated in energy. The most thoroughly studied phases are ??Pu (monoclinic) and ??Pu (fcc). The latter

A. B. Shick; V. Drchal; L. Havela

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

244

Optimal power flow in microgrids using event-triggered optimization Pu Wan and Michael D. Lemmon  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Optimal power flow in microgrids using event-triggered optimization Pu Wan and Michael D. Lemmon Abstract-- Microgrids are power generation and distribution systems in which users and generators-triggered distributed optimization algorithm to solve the optimal power flow (OPF) problem in microgrids. Under event

Lemmon, Michael

245

Progress on High Energy Delayed Gamma Spectroscopy for Direct Assay of Pu in Spent Fuel  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The direct, nondestructive measurement of fissile and fissionable isotopes in spent fuel is not yet possible. Current methods which infer plutonium content through proxy measurements and confirmatory burnup calculations have relatively large uncertainty and do not satisfy the desire for a measurement that is independent of operator declarations. We are currently exploring the High Energy Delayed Gamma Spectroscopy (HEDGS) technique for direct, independent Pu measurement in light-water reactor fuels. HEDGS exploits the unique distribution of fission-product nuclei from each of the fissile isotopes. Fission is stimulated in the sample with a source of interrogating neutrons, and delayed gamma rays from the decay of the short-lived fission-product nuclei are measured. The measured gamma spectrum from the unknown sample is then fit with a linear combination of gamma spectra from pure U-235, Pu-239, and Pu-241, as deduced from the known fission-product yield curves and decay properties of the fission-product nuclei, to determine the original proportions of these fissile isotopes. In previous work, we performed preliminary modeling studies of HEDGS on idealized single fuel pins of various burnups. Here, we report progress on extending our GEANT-based modeling tools to efficiently model full pressurized water reactor (PWR) fuel assemblies using variance reduction techniques specific to the background emissions and induced signal, as appropriate. Predicted performance for a nominal HEDGS instrument design, is reported for the assay of U-235, Pu-239 and Pu-241 in spent fuel assemblies ranging from fresh to 60 GWd/MTU in burnup.

Campbell, Luke W.; Smith, Leon E.

2010-08-11T23:59:59.000Z

246

PREPARATION AND PROPERTIES OF THE ACTINIDE BOROHYDRIDES: Pa(BH4)4, Np(BH4)4, AND Pu(BH4)4  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Pa (BH4 ) 4' Np (BH ) 4' AND Pu (BH ) 4 R. H. Banks, N. M.Pa(BH4 )4' Np(BH 4 )4' and Pu(BH4)4t R. H. Banks, N. M.Pa(BH )4' Np(BH )4' and Pu(BH )4 have been synthesized. U(

Banks, R.H

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

247

Signatures of Non-integer 5f Occupancy in Pu Systems: Magnetic Properties and Photoelectron Spectroscopy Studies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Very diverse Pu compounds exhibit strikingly universal features in their valence-band photoemission (PES) spectra. The conjecture that such features represent the 5f{sup 5} final state multiplet has been corroborated by LDA+Hubbard calculations, meaning that the ground state has a mixed 5f{sup 5}-5f{sup 6} character. Later on, more elaborated DMFT techniques (one crossing approximation, QMC) led to similar conclusions, providing quantitative explanation of such intermediate-valent situation in more details. Analogies in PES spectra of {delta}-Pu and other Pu systems suggest that the situation envisaged for {delta}-Pu is relevant for a large group of Pu compounds. Here we show that the around mean field LDA+U in conjunction with the Hubbard I approximation, which describes well the non-magnetic ground state for {delta}-Pu, captures in reality properties of a large group of Pu (as well as e.g. Am) compounds, reproducing correctly the onset of magnetism and size of magnetic moments. (authors)

Havela, Ladislav [Department of Electronic Structures, Charles University, Ke Karlovu 5, Prague 2, CZ-12116 (Czech Republic); Shick, Alexander [Institute of Physics, Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic, Prague 8, CZ-18221 (Czech Republic); Gouder, Thomas; Wastin, Franck; Rebizant, Jean [European Commission, Joint Research Centre, Institute for Transuranium Elements, Postfach 2340, Karlsruhe 1, D-76125 (Germany)

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

248

P2-03: 3D Characterization of High Burn-up MOX Fuel  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Currently fast reactor performance is largely defined by the limitations of the materials involved in reactors, especially the metallic or mixed oxide ((U, Pu)O2) fuel...

249

Table CE2-7c. Space-Heating Energy Consumption in U.S. Households ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Physical Units (PU) per Household3,a Physical Units of Space-Heating Consumption per Household,2 Where the Main Space-Heating Fuel Is:

250

Table CE2-12c. Space-Heating Energy Consumption in U.S. Households ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Physical Units (PU) per Household3,a Physical Units of Space-Heating Consumption per Household,2 Where the Main Space-Heating Fuel Is:

251

Table CE2-4c. Space-Heating Energy Consumption in U.S. Households ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Physical Units (PU) per Household3,a Physical Units of Space-Heating Consumption per Household,2 Where the Main Space-Heating Fuel Is:

252

Table CE2-7c. Space-Heating Energy Consumption in U.S. Households ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Physical Units (PU) per Household3 Physical Units of Space-Heating Consumption per Household,2 Where the Main Space-Heating Fuel Is:

253

Search for possible way of producing super-heavy elements-Dynamic study on damped reactions of 244Pu+244Pu,238$U+238$U and 197Au+197Au  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

By using the improved Quantum Molecular Dynamics model, the $^{244}$Pu+$^{244}$Pu, $^{238}$U+$^{238}$U and $^{197}$Au+$^{197}$Au reactions at the energy range of $E_{c.m.}$=800 $MeV$ to 2000 $MeV$ are studied. We find that the production probability of superheavy fragments(SHF) with $Z \\geq$ 114 is much higher for $^{244}$Pu+$^{244}$Pu reaction compared with that of $^{238}$U+$^{238}$U reaction and no product of SHF is found for $^{197}$Au+$^{197}$Au. The production probability of SHF is narrowly peaked in incident energy dependence. The decay mechanism of the composite system of projectile and target and the time scale of decay process are explored. The binding energies of superheavy fragments are found to be broadly distributed and their shapes turn out to be exotic form.

Ning Wang; Zhuxia Li; Xizhen Wu

2005-02-02T23:59:59.000Z

254

Evaluation of the thermal-neutron constants for /sup 233/U, /sup 235/U, /sup 239/Pu and /sup 241/Pu  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A consistent set of best values of the 2200 meter/second neutron cross sections, Westcott g-factors, and fission neutron yields for /sup 233/U, /sup 235/U, /sup 239/Pu and /sup 241/Pu are presented. A least squares fitting program, LSF, is used to obtain the best fit and to estimate the sensitivity of these fissile parameters to the quoted uncertainties in experimental data. The half-lives of the uranium and plutonium nuclides have been evaluated and these have been used to reassess the significant experimental data. The latest revision of the spontaneous fission neutron yield anti nu, of /sup 252/Cf and the foil thickness corrections to the fission neutron yield ratios of fissile nuclei to /sup 252/Cf are included. These lead to greater consistency in the data used for anti nu (/sup 252/Cf). Similarly, the /sup 234/U half-life as revised leads to improved consistency in the /sup 235/U fission cross section. Comparison is made with the values from ENDF/B-V and other evaluations.

Stehn, J.R.; Divadeenam, M.; Holden, N.E.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

255

Microscopic Calculation of Fission Fragment Energies for the 239Pu(nth,f) Reaction  

SciTech Connect

We calculate the total kinetic and excitation energies of fragments produced in the thermal-induced fission of {sup 239}Pu. This result is a proof-of-principle demonstration for a microscopic approach to the calculation of fission-fragment observables for applied data needs. In addition, the calculations highlight the application of a fully quantum mechanical description of scission, and the importance of exploring scission configurations as a function of the moments of the fragments, rather than through global constraints on the moments of the fissioning nucleus. Using a static microscopic calculation of configurations at and near scission, we have identified fission fragments for the {sup 239}Pu (n{sub th}, f) reaction and extracted their total kinetic and excitation energies. Comparison with data shows very good overall agreement between theory and experiment. Beyond their success as a proof of principle, these calculations also highlight the importance of local constraints on the fragments themselves in microscopic calculations.

Younes, W; Gogny, D

2011-10-03T23:59:59.000Z

256

Llr. Norgnn of the St. Louis office tolepbonod Dr. ;PuAuff mcently  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Llr. Norgnn of the St. Louis office tolepbonod Dr. ;PuAuff mcently Llr. Norgnn of the St. Louis office tolepbonod Dr. ;PuAuff mcently rtxpeetlng pemlasion to !wu mpmaentatfoee of Uallinckrodt visit 03% to review rare earth smparatlon tmkniquas. Their lntsmst In purev binstrIal In that they hop to indsti- preilnotlon '- emparntlon of thssae elwnts., Dr. %odnUf oheckad ritli Paul -1. : '/I .._ ,,,. . . w!w was will- to ao"rrlon~vit~~'thoir,Pisiffirg.~e Laboratory sliax he did not feel that it lzpliad 8.pmferentia.l tmabmnt of KalllncJwodt. Subsquently, Dr. %odmfP check~wlth Dr. Davidmnof the Office of Industrial Developmemtuho aleodid Mt objsctbutpointed Out that the Vick Chezdcal Company of 122 East l&xi Btmot, f&w PO* 17, N. ,P., had also expressed an intereat ir.having their mbsidi.arg, the J. T. Baker Chemical Coqany, get into the field. BU aeked

257

New Superheavy Element Isotopes: 242Pu(48Ca,5n)285114  

SciTech Connect

The new, neutron-deficient, superheavy element isotope {sup 285}114 was produced in {sup 48}Ca irradiations of {sup 242}Pu targets at a center-of-target beam energy of 256 MeV (E* = 50 MeV). The {alpha} decay of {sup 285}114 was followed by the sequential {alpha} decay of four daughter nuclides, {sup 281}Cn, {sup 277}Ds, {sup 273}Hs, and {sup 269}Sg. {sup 265}Rf was observed to decay by spontaneous fission. The measured {alpha}-decay Q values were compared with those from a macroscopic-microscopic nuclear mass model to give insight into superheavy element shell effects. The {sup 242}Pu({sup 48}Ca,5n){sup 285}114 cross section was 0.6{sub -0.5}{sup +0.9} pb.

Ellison, Paul A; Gregorich, Kenneth E.; Berryman, Jill S.; Bleuel, Darren L.; Clark, Roderick M.; Dragojevic, Irena; Dvorak, Jan; Fallon, Paul; Fineman-Sotomayor, Carolina; Gates, Jacklyn M.; Gothe, Oliver R.; Lee, I-Yang; Loveland, Walter D.; McLaughlin, Joseph P.; Paschalis, Stefanos; Petri, Marina-Kalliopi; Qian, Jing; Stavsetra, Liv; Wiedeking, Mathis; Nitsche, Heino

2010-10-22T23:59:59.000Z

258

Multiwavelength modeling the SED of very slow novae PU Vul and V723 Cas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Evolution in the spectrum of very slow novae PU Vul and V723 Cas during their transition from the optical maximum to the nebular phase is investigated using the method of disentangling the composite UV/optical spectra. Model SEDs suggested that a transient decrease in the WD luminosity, during the decline from the maximum, was caused by a negative beaming effect, when a neutral disk around the WD was formed. When the disk disappeared, the luminosity increased again to values from the beginning of the outburst (in the case of V723 Cas, at/above the Eddington limit). This suggests the presence of a mechanism maintaining a high energy output for a much longer time than it is predicted by the current theories. Similarity of light curves, but enormous difference of the separation between the components of PU Vul and V723 Cas binaries suggest that the mechanism is basically powered by the accretor.

Skopal, Augustin

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

259

Separate effects identification via casting process modeling for experimental measurement of UPuZr alloys  

SciTech Connect

Computational simulations of gravity casting processes for metallic UPuZr nuclear fuel rods have been performed using a design-of-experiments technique to determine the fluid flow, liquid heat transfer, and solid heat transfer parameters which most strongly influence the process solidification speed and fuel rod porosity. The results are used to make recommendations for the best investment of experimental time and effort to measure process parameters.

J. Crapps; D. S. DeCroix; J. D. Galloway; D. A. Korzekwa; R. Aikin; R. Fielding; R. Kennedy; C. Unal

2013-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

260

Test Map and Discreteness Criteria for Subgroups in PU(1,n;C)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We study the discreteness for non-elementary subgroup G in PU(1, n;C), under the assumption that G satisfies Condition A. Mainly, we present that one can use a test map, which need not to be in G, to examine the discreteness of G, and also show that G is discrete, if every two-loxodromic-generator subgroup of G is discrete.

Li, ChangJun

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "2 glenwood pu" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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261

Shenzhen Prosunpro PengSangPu Solar Industrial Products Corporation | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Prosunpro PengSangPu Solar Industrial Products Corporation Prosunpro PengSangPu Solar Industrial Products Corporation Jump to: navigation, search Name Shenzhen Prosunpro/ PengSangPu Solar Industrial Products Corporation Place Shenzhen, Guangdong Province, China Zip 518055 Sector Solar Product Shenzhen Prosunpro makes and installs flat panel solar passive energy collectors and engineers central solar hot water systems. Coordinates 22.546789°, 114.112556° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":22.546789,"lon":114.112556,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

262

Plutonium Immobilization Task 5.6 Metal Conversion: Milestone Report - Perform Feasibility Demonstrations on Pu-Al Alloys  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Plutonium Conversion Task within the Plutonium Immobilization Program (PIP) transforms incoming plutonium (Pu) feed materials into an oxide acceptable for blending with ceramic precursors. One of the feed materials originally planned for PIP was unirradiated fuel, which consisted mainly of the Zero Power Plutonium Reactor (ZPPR) fuel. Approximately 3.5 metric tons of Pu is in ZPPR fuel. The ZPPR fuel is currently stored at the Argonne National Laboratory-West as stainless steel clad metal plates and oxide pellets, with the vast majority of the Pu in the metal plates. The metal plates consist of a Pu-U-Mo alloy (containing 90% of the ZPPR plutonium metal) and a Pu-Al alloy (containing 10% of the ZPPR plutonium metal). The Department of Energy (DOE) decided that ZPPR fuel is a national asset and, therefore, not subject to disposition. This report documents work done prior to that decision. The Hydnde-Oxidation (HYDOX) Process was selected as the method for Metal Conversion in PIP because it provides a universal means for preparing oxide from all feed materials. HYDOX incorporates both the hydride process, originally developed to separate Pu from other pit materials, as well as the oxide formation step. Plutonium hydride is very reactive and is readily converted to either the nitride or the oxide. A previous feasibility study demonstrated that the Pu-U-Mo alloy could be successfully converted to oxide via the HYDOX Process. Another Metal Conversion milestone was to demonstrate the feasibility of the HYDOX Process for converting plutonium-aluminum (Pu-Al) alloy in ZPPR fuel plates to an acceptable oxide. This report documents the results of the latter feasibility study which was performed before the DOE decision to retain ZPPR fuel rather than immobilize it.

Zundelevich, Y; Kerns, J; Bannochie, C

2001-04-12T23:59:59.000Z

263

Nano-focused Bremstrahlung Isochromat Spectroscopy (nBIS) Determination of the Unoccupied Electronic Structure of Pu  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

While chemically toxic and highly radioactive, Pu may be the most scientifically interesting element in the periodic table. It's properties include the following: six different phases, close to each other in energy and sensitive to variations of temperature, pressure and chemistry; the face-centered-cubic phase (delta) is the least dense; Pu expands when it solidifies from the melt; and it is clearly the nexus of the actinide binary phase diagrams of the actinides. In a sense, it is the boundary between the light (ostensibly delocalized 5f electrons) and heavy (ostensibly localized or correlated 5f electrons) actinide elements, but this is an over-simplification. The localized atomic 5f states are naturally correlated, but important regimes of correlated electron states are conceivable as extended states on the delocalized side of the possible Mott transition between conductive and insulating behavior. The proximity to this crossover may be the driving force behind all these exotic properties. Pu remains of immense scientific and technological importance and the advancement to a firm, scientific understanding of the electronic structure of Pu and its compounds, mixtures, alloys and solutions is a crucial issue. Moreover, while there are a number of ongoing experimental efforts directed at determining the occupied (valence band, below the Fermi Energy) electronic structure of Pu, there is essential no experimental data on the unoccupied (conduction band, above the Fermi Energy) electronic structure of Pu. Our objective is to determine the conduction band (unoccupied) electronic structure of Pu and other actinides (and possibly rare earths as well), in a phase specific fashion and emphasizing bulk contributions. This is world-class science directed at issue that is central to LLNL and DOE: Pu structure property relationships.

Tobin, J G; Butterfield, M; Teslich, N; Bliss, A; Chung, B; Gross, J; McMahan, A; Schwartz, A

2006-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

264

Ceramicrete stabilization of U-and Pu-bearing materials  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method of stabilizing nuclear material is disclosed. Oxides or halides of actinides and/or transuranics (TRUs) and/or hydrocarbons and/or acids contaminated with actinides and/or TRUs are treated by adjusting the pH of the nuclear material to not less than about 5 and adding sufficient MgO to convert fluorides present to MgF.sub.2; alumina is added in an amount sufficient to absorb substantially all hydrocarbon liquid present, after which a binder including MgO and KH.sub.2PO.sub.4 is added to the treated nuclear material to form a slurry. Additional MgO may be added. A crystalline radioactive material is also disclosed having a binder of the reaction product of calcined MgO and KH.sub.2PO.sub.4 and a radioactive material of the oxides and/or halides of actinides and/or transuranics (TRUs). Acids contaminated with actinides and/or TRUs, and/or actinides and/or TRUs with or without oils and/or greases may be encapsulated and stabilized by the binder.

Wagh, Arun S. (Naperville, IL); Maloney, M. David (Evergreen, CO); Thompson, Gary H. (Thornton, CO)

2007-11-13T23:59:59.000Z

265

CALORIMETER-BASED ADJUSTMENT OF MULTIPLICITY DETERMINED 240PU EFF KNOWN-A ANALYSIS FOR THE ASSAY OF PLUTONIUM  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In nuclear material processing facilities, it is often necessary to balance the competing demands of accuracy and throughput. While passive neutron multiplicity counting is the preferred method for relatively fast assays of plutonium, the presence of low-Z impurities (fluorine, beryllium, etc.) rapidly erodes the assay precision of passive neutron counting techniques, frequently resulting in unacceptably large total measurement uncertainties. Conversely, while calorimeters are immune to these impurity effects, the long count times required for high accuracy can be a hindrance to efficiency. The higher uncertainties in passive neutron measurements of impure material are driven by the resulting large (>>2) {alpha}-values, defined as the ({alpha},n):spontaneous fission neutron emission ratio. To counter impurity impacts for high-{alpha} materials, a known-{alpha} approach may be adopted. In this method, {alpha} is determined for a single item using a combination of gamma-ray and calorimetric measurements. Because calorimetry is based on heat output, rather than a statistical distribution of emitted neutrons, an {alpha}-value determined in this way is far more accurate than one determined from passive neutron counts. This fixed {alpha} value can be used in conventional multiplicity analysis for any plutonium-bearing item having the same chemical composition and isotopic distribution as the original. With the results of single calorimeter/passive neutron/gamma-ray measurement, these subsequent items can then be assayed with high precision and accuracy in a relatively short time, despite the presence of impurities. A calorimeter-based known-{alpha} multiplicity analysis technique is especially useful when requiring rapid, high accuracy, high precision measurements of multiple plutonium bearing items having a common source. The technique has therefore found numerous applications at the Savannah River Site. In each case, a plutonium (or mixed U/Pu) bearing item is divided into multiple containers. A single item from that batch is then selected for both neutron and calorimetric measurements; all remaining items undergo a neutron measurement only. Using the technique mentioned above, the 'true' {alpha} value determined from the first (calorimeter and passive neutron measured) item is used in multiplicity analysis for all other items in the batch. The justification for using this {alpha} value in subsequent calculations is the assumption that the chemical composition and isotopic distribution of all batch items are the same, giving a constant ({alpha},n):spontaneous fission ratio. This analysis method has been successfully applied to the KIS Facility, significantly improving measurement uncertainties and reducing processing times for numerous items. Comprehensive plans were later developed to extend the use of this method to other applications, including the K-Area Shuffler and the H-Area Pu-Blending Project. While only the feasibility study for the Shuffler has been completed, implementation of the method in the H-Area Pu-Blending Project is currently in progress and has been successfully applied to multiple items. This report serves to document the details of this method in order to serve as a reference for future applications. Also contained herein are specific examples of the application of known-{alpha} multiplicity analysis.

Dubose, F.

2012-02-21T23:59:59.000Z

266

PLUTONIUM LOADING CAPACITY OF REILLEX HPQ ANION EXCHANGE COLUMN - AFS-2 PLUTONIUM FLOWSHEET FOR MOX  

SciTech Connect

Radioactive plutonium (Pu) anion exchange column experiments using scaled HB-Line designs were performed to investigate the dependence of column loading performance on the feed composition in the H-Canyon dissolution process for plutonium oxide (PuO{sub 2}) product shipped to the Mixed Oxide (MOX) Fuel Fabrication Facility (MFFF). These loading experiments show that a representative feed solution containing {approx}5 g Pu/L can be loaded onto Reillex{trademark} HPQ resin from solutions containing 8 M total nitrate and 0.1 M KF provided that the F is complexed with Al to an [Al]/[F] molar ratio range of 1.5-2.0. Lower concentrations of total nitrate and [Al]/[F] molar ratios may still have acceptable performance but were not tested in this study. Loading and washing Pu losses should be relatively low (<1%) for resin loading of up to 60 g Pu/L. Loading above 60 g Pu/L resin is possible, but Pu wash losses will increase such that 10-20% of the additional Pu fed may not be retained by the resin as the resin loading approaches 80 g Pu/L resin.

Kyser, E.; King, W.; O'Rourke, P.

2012-07-26T23:59:59.000Z

267

Electrodeposition of U and Pu on Thin C and Ti Substrates  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Physics experiments aimed at deducing key parameters for use in a variety of programs critical to the mission of the National Laboratories require actinide targets placed onto various substrates. The target material quantity and the substrate desired depend upon the type of experiment being designed. The physicist(s) responsible for the experimental campaign will consult with the radiochemistry staff as to the feasibility of producing a desired target/substrate combination. In this report they discuss the production of U and Pu targets on very thin C and Ti substrates. The techniques used, plating cells designed for, tips, and limits is discussed.

Henderson, R A; Gostic, J M

2010-05-19T23:59:59.000Z

268

Microsoft Word - 2Q09Web1, 10-28-09.docm  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

<3.11E+03 Eu-154 2.13E+02 2.13E+02 Np-237 () (t 12 ) > 5 yr 1.09E+01 1.09E+01 Pu-238 () (t 12 ) > 5 yr 1.67E+04 1.67E+04 Pu-239 () (t 12 ) > 5 yr 5.77E+02...

269

Microsoft Word - 2Q10Web Rev 1, 10-25-10.docm  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

<3.72E+02 Eu-154 4.46E+02 4.46E+02 Np-237 () (t 12 ) > 5 yr 1.36E+01 <1.36E+01 Pu-238 () (t 12 ) > 5 yr 2.19E+04 2.19E+04 Pu-239 () (t 12 ) > 5 yr 5.33E+02...

270

Criticality Safety Evaluations on the Use of 200-gram Pu Mass Limit for RHWM Waste Storage Operations  

SciTech Connect

This work establishes the criticality safety technical basis to increase the fissile mass limit from 120 grams to 200 grams for Type A 55-gallon drums and their equivalents. Current RHWM fissile mass limit is 120 grams Pu for Type A 55-gallon containers and their equivalent. In order to increase the Type A 55-gallon drum limit to 200 grams, a few additional criticality safety control requirements are needed on moderators, reflectors, and array controls to ensure that the 200-gram Pu drums remain criticality safe with inadvertent criticality remains incredible. The purpose of this work is to analyze the use of 200-gram Pu drum mass limit for waste storage operations in Radioactive and Hazardous Waste Management (RHWM) Facilities. In this evaluation, the criticality safety controls associated with the 200-gram Pu drums are established for the RHWM waste storage operations. With the implementation of these criticality safety controls, the 200-gram Pu waste drum storage operations are demonstrated to be criticality safe and meet the double-contingency-principle requirement per DOE O 420.1.

Chou, P

2011-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

271

Nuclear Materials Identification System (NMIS) with Gamma Spectrometry for Attributes of Pu, HEU, and Detection of HE and Chemical Agents  

SciTech Connect

A combined Nuclear Materials Identification System (NMIS)-gamma ray spectrometry system can be used passively to obtain the following attributes of Pu: presence, fissile mass, 240/239 ratio, and metal vs. oxide. This system can also be used with a small, portable, DT neutron generator to measure the attributes of highly enriched uranium (HEU): presence, fissile mass, enrichment, metal vs. oxide; and detect the presence of high explosives (HE). For the passive system, time-dependent coincidence distributions can be used for the presence, fissile mass, metal vs. oxide for Pu, and gamma-ray spectrometry can be used for 239/240 ratio and presence. So presence can be confirmed by two methods. For the active system with a DT neutron generator, all four attributes for both Pu and HEU can be determined from various features of the time-dependent coincidence distribution measurements for both Pu and HEU. Active gamma ray spectrometry would also give presence and 240/239 ratio for Pu, enrichment for HEU, and metal vs. oxide for both. Active gamma ray spectrometry would determine the presence of HE. The various features of time-dependent coincidence distributions and gamma ray spectrometry that determine these attributes are discussed with some examples from previous determinations.

Mihalczo, J. T.; Mattingly, J. K.; Mullens, J. A.; Neal, J. S.

2002-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

272

Influence of radiation damage and isochronal annealing on the magnetic susceptibility of Pu(1-x)Am(x) alloys  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Results of radiation damage in Pu and Pu{sub 1-x}Am{sub x} alloys studied with magnetic susceptibility, {chi}(T), and resistivity are presented. Damage accumulated at low temperatures increases {chi}(T) for all measured alloys, with the trend generally enhanced as the lattice expands. There is a trend towards saturation observable in the damage induced magnetic susceptibility data, that is not evident in similar damage induced resistivity data taken on the same specimen. A comparison of isochronal annealing curves measured by both resistivity and magnetic susceptibility on a 4.3at% Ga stabilized {delta}-Pu specimen show that Stage I annealing, where interstitials begin to move, is largely transparent to the magnetic measurement. This indicates that interstitials have little impact on the damage induced increase in the magnetic susceptibility. The isochronal annealing curves of the Pu{sub 1-x}Am{sub x} alloys do not show distinct annealing stages as expected for alloys. However, samples near 20% Am concentration show an unexpected increase in magnetization beginning when specimens are annealed to 35K. This behavior is also reflected in a time dependent increase in the magnetic susceptibility of damaged specimens indicative of first order kinetics. These results suggest there may be a metastable phase induced by radiation damage and annealing in Pu{sub 1-x}Am{sub x} alloys.

McCall, S; Fluss, M; Chung, B; Haire, R

2008-05-02T23:59:59.000Z

273

LITERATURE REVIEW OF PUO2 CALCINATION TIME AND TEMPERATURE DATA FOR SPECIFIC SURFACE AREA  

SciTech Connect

The literature has been reviewed in December 2011 for calcination data of plutonium oxide (PuO{sub 2}) from plutonium oxalate Pu(C{sub 2}O{sub 4}){sub 2} precipitation with respect to the PuO{sub 2} specific surface area (SSA). A summary of the literature is presented for what are believed to be the dominant factors influencing SSA, the calcination temperature and time. The PuO{sub 2} from Pu(C{sub 2}O{sub 4}){sub 2} calcination data from this review has been regressed to better understand the influence of calcination temperature and time on SSA. Based on this literature review data set, calcination temperature has a bigger impact on SSA versus time. However, there is still some variance in this data set that may be reflecting differences in the plutonium oxalate preparation or different calcination techniques. It is evident from this review that additional calcination temperature and time data for PuO{sub 2} from Pu(C{sub 2}O{sub 4}){sub 2} needs to be collected and evaluated to better define the relationship. The existing data set has a lot of calcination times that are about 2 hours and therefore may be underestimating the impact of heating time on SSA. SRNL recommends that more calcination temperature and time data for PuO{sub 2} from Pu(C{sub 2}O{sub 4}){sub 2} be collected and this literature review data set be augmented to better refine the relationship between PuO{sub 2} SSA and its calcination parameters.

Daniel, G.

2012-03-06T23:59:59.000Z

274

Density Changes in Plutonium Observed from Accelerated Aging using Pu-238 Enrichment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Plutonium, because of its radioactive nature, ages from the ''inside out'' by means of self-irradiation damage and thus produces Frankel-type defects (vacancies and self-interstitial atoms) and defect clusters. The self-irradiation damage in Plutonium-239 occurs mainly by {alpha}-particle decay, where most of the damage comes from the U-235 recoil nucleus. The defects resulting from the residual lattice damage and helium in-growth could result in microstructural and physical property changes. Because these self-irradiation effects would normally require decades to measure, with a fraction (7.5 wt%) of Pu-238 is added to the reference plutonium alloy thus accelerating the aging process by approximately 18 times the normal rate. By monitoring the properties of the Pu-238 spiked alloy over a period of about 3.5 years, the properties of plutonium in storage can be projected for periods up to about 60 years. This paper presents density and volume changes observed from the immersion density and dilatometry measurements equivalent to aging the reference plutonium alloys to nine years.

Chung, B W; Thompson, S R; Woods, C H; Hopkins, D J; Gourdin, W H; Ebbinghaus, B B

2003-12-19T23:59:59.000Z

275

Evolution of the Symbiotic Nova PU Vul -- Outbursting White Dwarf, Nebulae, and Pulsating Red Giant Companion  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present a composite light-curve model of the symbiotic nova PU Vul (Nova Vulpeculae 1979) that shows a long-lasted flat optical peak followed by a slow decline. Our model light-curve consists of three components of emission, i.e., an outbursting white dwarf (WD), its M-giant companion, and nebulae. The WD component dominates in the flat peak while the nebulae dominate after the photospheric temperature of the WD rises to log T (K) >~ 4.5, suggesting its WD origin. We analyze the 1980 and 1994 eclipses to be total eclipses of the WD occulted by the pulsating M-giant companion with two sources of the nebular emission; one is an unocculted nebula of the M-giant's cool-wind origin and the other is a partially occulted nebula associated to the WD. We confirmed our theoretical outburst model of PU Vul by new observational estimates, that spanned 32 yr, of the temperature and radius. Also our eclipse analysis confirmed that the WD photosphere decreased by two orders of magnitude between the 1980 and 1994 eclipses...

Kato, Mariko; Hachisu, Izumi

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

276

IMPORTANCE OF FULL COULOMB INTERACTIONS FOR UNDERSTANDING THE ELECTRONIC STRUCTURE OF DELTA-Pu  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The solid-state properties of most elements are now well understood on the basis of quantum physics - with few exceptions, notably the element number 94, plutonium. Plutonium has six crystalline phases at ambient pressure, some of which are separated by unusual phase transitions with large discontinuities in volume, exhibit negative thermal expansion coefficients, or form exotic low-symmetry structures. The main challenge to explain these anomalous properties is that the characteristic ingredient of actinides, the 5f electronic states, are in the cross-over regime between the localized and delocalized (itinerant) behaviour in Pu. The early part of the actinide series with the 5f states being itinerant, i.e. part of the metallic bond, culminates with Pu; starting with Am (Z = 95), the 5f states are localized, nonbonding, and resemble the 4f states in lanthanides. Both itinerant and localized regimes are well covered by existing theories, but they cannot be simply interpolated due to the importance of dynamical electron-electron correlations. Here we present accurate quantum Monte Carlo calculations achieving previously inaccessible resolution. Obtained results demonstrate that interplay of the full Coulomb interaction vertex with spin-orbital coupling is crucial for understanding the experimentally observed spectral properties of plutonium near the Fermi level.

Gorelov, E; Kolorenc, J; Wehling, T; Hafermann, H; Lichtenstein, A I; Shick, A B; Rubtsov, A N; Katsnelson, M I; Landa, A; McMahan, A K

2010-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

277

PLANTS AS BIO-MONITORS FOR 137CS, 238PU, 239, 240PU AND 40K AT THE SAVANNAH RIVER SITE  

SciTech Connect

The nuclear fuel cycle generates a considerable amount of radioactive waste, which often includes nuclear fission products, such as strontium-90 ({sup 90}Sr) and cesium-137 ({sup 137}Cs), and actinides such as uranium (U) and plutonium (Pu). When released into the environment, large quantities of these radionuclides can present considerable problems to man and biota due to their radioactive nature and, in some cases as with the actinides, their chemical toxicity. Radionuclides are expected to decay at a known rate. Yet, research has shown the rate of elimination from an ecosystem to differ from the decay rate due to physical, chemical and biological processes that remove the contaminant or reduce its biological availability. Knowledge regarding the rate by which a contaminant is eliminated from an ecosystem (ecological half-life) is important for evaluating the duration and potential severity of risk. To better understand a contaminants impact on an environment, consideration should be given to plants. As primary producers, they represent an important mode of contamination transfer from sediments and soils into the food chain. Contaminants that are chemically and/or physically sequestered in a media are less likely to be bio-available to plants and therefore an ecosystem.

Caldwell, E.; Duff, M.; Ferguson, C.

2010-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

278

Fusion Probability in the Reactions {sup 58}Fe+{sup 244}Pu and {sup 64}Ni+{sup 238}U  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Mass-energy distributions, as well as capture cross-section of fission-like fragments for the reactions {sup 64}Ni+{sup 238}U and {sup 58}Fe+{sup 244}Pu leading to the formation of superheavy compound system with Z = 120 and N 182 at energies near the Coulomb barrier have been measured. Fusion-fission cross sections were estimated from the analysis of mass and total kinetic energy distributions. It was found that the fusion probability is about one order of magnitude higher for the reaction {sup 58}Fe+{sup 244}Pu than that for the reaction with {sup 64}Ni-ions.

Knyazheva, G. N.; Bogachev, A. A.; Itkis, I. M.; Itkis, M. G.; Kozulin, E. M. [Flerov Laboratory of Nuclear Reactions, Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, RU-141980 Dubna, Moscow region (Russian Federation)

2010-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

279

Correlation of /sup 239/Pu thermal and fast reactor fission yields with neutron energy  

SciTech Connect

The relative isotopic abundances and the fisson yields for over 40 stable and long-lived fission products from /sup 239/Pu fast fission were evaluated to determine if the data could be correlated with neutron energy. Only mass spectrometric data were used in this study. For some nuclides changes of only a few percent in the relative isotopic abundance or the fission yields over the energy range of thermal to 1 MeV are easily discernable and significant; for others the data are too sparse and scattered to obtain a good correlation. The neutron energy index usedin this study is the /sup 150/Nd//sup 143/Nd isotopic ratio. The results of this correlation study compared to the US Evaluated Nuclear Data File (ENDF) fast fission yield compilation. Several discrepancies are noted and suggestions for future work are presented.

Maeck, W.J.

1981-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

280

The orbital and superhump periods of the deeply eclipsing dwarf nova PU UMa  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We report unfiltered photometry during superoutbursts of PU UMa in 2009 and 2012. The amplitude was 4.5 magnitudes above mean quiescence and lasted at least 9 to 10 days. Superhumps were present with a peak-to-peak amplitude of up to ~0.3 mag, thereby confirming it to be a member of the SU UMa family of dwarf novae. The mean superhump period during the later part of the 2012 outburst was Psh = 0.08076(40) d. Analysis of the eclipse times of minimum, supplemented with data from other researchers, revealed an orbital period of Porb = 0.077880551(17) d. The superhump period excess was epsilon = 0.037(5). During the 2012 outburst, which was the better observed of the two, the FWHM eclipse duration gradually declined from 9.5 to 5 min. The eclipse depth was up to 1.7 magnitudes.

Shears, Jeremy; Littlefield, Colin; Miller, Ian; Morelle, Etienne; Pickard, Roger; Pietz, Jochen; Sabo, Richard

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "2 glenwood pu" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

On the Equicontinuity Region of Discrete Subgroups of PU(1,n)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Let $ G $ be a discrete subgroup of PU(1,n). Then $ G $ acts on $\\mathbb {P}^n_\\mathbb C$ preserving the unit ball $\\mathbb {H}^n_\\mathbb {C}$, where it acts by isometries with respect to the Bergman metric. In this work we determine the equicontinuty region $Eq(G)$ of $G$ in $\\mathbb P^n_{\\mathbb C}$: It is the complement of the union of all complex projective hyperplanes in $\\mathbb {P}^n_{\\mathbb C}$ which are tangent to $\\partial \\mathbb {H}^n_\\mathbb {C}$ at points in the Chen-Greenberg limit set $\\Lambda_{CG}(G )$, a closed $G$-invariant subset of $\\partial \\mathbb {H}^n_\\mathbb {C}$, which is minimal for non-elementary groups. We also prove that the action on $Eq(G)$ is discontinuous.

Seade, Jos

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

282

Microscopic calculation of 240Pu scission with a finite-range effective force  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Hartree-Fock-Bogoliubov calculations of hot fission in $^{240}\\textrm{Pu}$ have been performed with a newly-implemented code that uses the D1S finite-range effective interaction. The hot-scission line is identified in the quadrupole-octupole-moment coordinate space. Fission-fragment shapes are extracted from the calculations. A benchmark calculation for $^{226}\\textrm{Th}$ is obtained and compared to results in the literature. In addition, technical aspects of the use of HFB calculations for fission studies are examined in detail. In particular, the identification of scission configurations, the sensitivity of near-scission calculations to the choice of collective coordinates in the HFB iterations, and the formalism for the adjustment of collective-variable constraints are discussed. The power of the constraint-adjustment algorithm is illustrated with calculations near the critical scission configurations with up to seven simultaneous constraints.

W. Younes; D. Gogny

2009-10-07T23:59:59.000Z

283

An evaluation of alternate production methods for Pu-238 general purpose heat source pellets  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

For the past half century, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) has used Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generators (RTG) to power deep space satellites. Fabricating heat sources for RTGs, specifically General Purpose Heat Sources (GPHSs), has remained essentially unchanged since their development in the 1970s. Meanwhile, 30 years of technological advancements have been made in the applicable fields of chemistry, manufacturing and control systems. This paper evaluates alternative processes that could be used to produce Pu 238 fueled heat sources. Specifically, this paper discusses the production of the plutonium-oxide granules, which are the input stream to the ceramic pressing and sintering processes. Alternate chemical processes are compared to current methods to determine if alternative fabrication processes could reduce the hazards, especially the production of respirable fines, while producing an equivalent GPHS product.

Mark Borland; Steve Frank

2009-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

284

Stocks and Flows of U and Pu in a World with 3.6 TWe of Nuclear Power  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Integrated energy, environment, and economics models project that worldwide electrical energy use will increase to ?12 TWe in 2100 and nuclear power may be required to provide 3.6 TWe at this time. If pulverized coal without carbon sequestration were employed instead, the resulting incremental long-term global temperature rise would be about 2/3 deg C. Calculations are presented of the stocks and flows of uranium and plutonium associated with the scenario where this energy is provided by nuclear power. If only light-water reactors (LWRs) are used, the scenario consumes about 33.4 Mt of mined uranium. Continuing to operate the reactors in place in 2100 through the end of their assumed 60 year lifetime raises this to 59 Mt, 4.7x the NEA/ IAEA Redbook estimate for total discovered + undiscovered uranium. The waste corresponds to about 86x the legally defined capacity of Yucca Mtn. A case is also considered where a transition is begun to fast-spectrum reactors in 2040, both for a balanced system of LWRs and transuranic (TRU) burners with conversion ration (CR) = 0.5, and for a system of breeders. In the latter case we find that CR = 1.21 is adequate to replace all LWRs with breeders by 2100, using solely TRU from LWRs to start up the reactors assuming reprocessed fuel is available for use two years after its removal from the reactor. The stock of plutonium circulating in the fast reactor system in 2100 is comparable to that which would have been buried in the LWR-only case. One year of fueling corresponds to 2,000 6,000t of Pu. Fusion energy, if first brought on line in mid-century, could in principle replace fast reactors in this scenario.

Robert J. Goldston

2012-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

285

Hidden disorder in the [alpha];#8242;;#8594;[sigma] transformation of Pu-1.9 at. % Ga  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Enthalpy and entropy are thermodynamic quantities critical to determining how and at what temperature a phase transition occurs. At a phase transition, the enthalpy and temperature-weighted entropy differences between two phases are equal ({Delta}H=T{Delta}S), but there are materials where this balance has not been experimentally or theoretically realized, leading to the idea of hidden order and disorder. In a Pu-1.9 at. % Ga alloy, the {delta} phase is retained as a metastable state at room temperature, but at low temperatures, the {delta} phase yields to a mixed-phase microstructure of {delta}- and {alpha}{prime}-Pu. The previously measured sources of entropy associated with the {alpha}{prime} {yields} {delta} transformation fail to sum to the entropy predicted theoretically. We report an experimental measurement of the entropy of the {alpha}{prime} {yields} {delta} transformation that corroborates the theoretical prediction, and implies that only about 65% of the entropy stabilizing the {delta} phase is accounted for, leaving a missing entropy of about 0.5 k{sub B}/atom. Some previously proposed mechanisms for generating entropy are discussed, but none seem capable of providing the necessary disorder to stabilize the {delta} phase. This hidden disorder represents multiple accessible states per atom within the {delta} phase of Pu that may not be included in our current understanding of the properties and phase stability of {delta}-Pu.

Jeffries, J.R.; Manley, M.E.; Wall, M.A.; Blobaum, K.J.M.; Schwartz, A.J. (LLNL)

2012-10-24T23:59:59.000Z

286

Glenwood Springs technical conference proceedings. Volume II. Bibliography of publications, state coupled geothermal resource assessment program  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The bibliography of publications is divided by state as follows: Alaska, California, Colorado, Hawaii, Montana, Nebraska, New Mexico, New York, North Dakota, Oregon, Texas and Washington. (MHR)

Ruscetta, C.A.; Foley, D. (eds.)

1981-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

287

Determination of Pu content in a Spent Fuel Assembly by Measuring Passive Total Neutron count rate and Multiplication with the Differential Die-Away Instrument  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Inspired by approach of Bignan and Martin-Didier (ESARDA 1991) we introduce novel (instrument independent) approach based on multiplication and passive neutron. Based on simulations of SFL-1 the accuracy of determination of {sup tot}Pu content with new approach is {approx}1.3-1.5%. Method applicable for DDA instrument, since it can measure both multiplication and passive neutron count rate. Comparison of pro's & con's of measuring/determining of {sup 239}Pu{sub eff} and {sup tot}Pu suggests a potential for enhanced diversion detection sensitivity.

Henzl, Vladimir [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Croft, Stephen [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Swinhoe, Martyn T. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Tobin, Stephen J. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2012-07-13T23:59:59.000Z

288

Evaluation of Aqueous and Powder Processing Techniques for Production of Pu-238-Fueled General Purpose Heat Sources  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report evaluates alternative processes that could be used to produce Pu-238 fueled General Purpose Heat Sources (GPHS) for radioisotope thermoelectric generators (RTG). Fabricating GPHSs with the current process has remained essentially unchanged since its development in the 1970s. Meanwhile, 30 years of technological advancements have been made in the fields of chemistry, manufacturing, ceramics, and control systems. At the Department of Energys request, alternate manufacturing methods were compared to current methods to determine if alternative fabrication processes could reduce the hazards, especially the production of respirable fines, while producing an equivalent GPHS product. An expert committee performed the evaluation with input from four national laboratories experienced in Pu-238 handling.

Not Available

2008-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

289

Low-energy electron spectrum of a copper target bombarded by {alpha}-particles of {sup 238}Pu  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The ({alpha}e) time coincidence method is applied to study the low-energy electron spectrum of a copper target bombarded by {alpha}-particles of {sup 238}Pu. Ionization of atoms bombarded by charged particles is considered as the shaking of electrons into the continuous spectrum due to a sudden perturbation by a flying particle. A comparison of experimental and calculated distributions showed good agreement, which confirms the accuracy of the ionization description as a result of the shaking effect.

Kupryashkin, V. T., E-mail: kupryashkinvt@yahoo.com; Sidorenko, L. P.; Feoktistov, A. I.; Rovenskykh, E. P. [National Academy of Sciences, Institute for Nuclear Research (Ukraine)

2011-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

290

Mise en vidence de gnes cibles directs communs FLI-1 et SPI-1/PU.1 dans les rythroleucmies de Friend.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Les facteurs de transcription FLI-1 et SPI-1/PU.1 appartiennent la famille ETS et reconnaissent le mme motif sur l'ADN GGAA. Leur activation est observe de (more)

Giraud, Guillaume

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

291

Quantifying the importance of orbital over spin correlations in delta-Pu within density-functional theory  

SciTech Connect

Spin and orbital and electron correlations are known to be important when treating the high-temperature {delta} phase of plutonium within the framework of density-functional theory (DFT). One of the more successful attempts to model {delta}-Pu within this approach has included condensed-matter generalizations of Hund's three rules for atoms, i.e., spin polarization, orbital polarization, and spin-orbit coupling. Here they perform a quantitative analysis of these interactions relative rank for the bonding and electronic structure in {delta}-Pu within the DFT model. The result is somewhat surprising in that spin-orbit coupling and orbital polarization are far more important than spin polarization for a realistic description of {delta}-Pu. They show that these orbital correlations on their own, without any formation of magnetic spin moments, can account for the low atomic density of the {delta} phase with a reasonable equation-of-state. In addition, this unambiguously non-magnetic (NM) treatment produces a one-electron spectra with resonances close to the Fermi level consistent with experimental valence band photoemission spectra.

Soderlind, P; Wolfer, W

2007-07-27T23:59:59.000Z

292

EVOLUTION OF THE SYMBIOTIC NOVA PU VUL-OUTBURSTING WHITE DWARF, NEBULAE, AND PULSATING RED GIANT COMPANION  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We present a composite light-curve model of the symbiotic nova PU Vul (Nova Vulpeculae 1979) that shows a long-lasting flat optical peak followed by a slow decline. Our model light curve consists of three components of emission, i.e., an outbursting white dwarf (WD), its M-giant companion, and the nebulae. The WD component dominates in the flat peak while the nebulae dominate after the photospheric temperature of the WD rises to log T (K) {approx}> 4.5, suggesting its WD origin. We analyze the 1980 and 1994 eclipses to be total eclipses of the WD occulted by the pulsating M-giant companion with two sources of the nebular emission; one is an unocculted nebula of the M-giant's cool-wind origin and the other is a partially occulted nebula associated to the WD. We confirmed our theoretical outburst model of PU Vul by new observational estimates, which spanned 32 yr, of the temperature and radius. Also our eclipse analysis confirmed that the WD photosphere decreased by two orders of magnitude between the 1980 and 1994 eclipses. We obtain the reddening E(B - V) {approx} 0.3 and distance to PU Vul d {approx} 4.7 kpc. We interpret the recent recovery of brightness in terms of eclipse of the hot nebula surrounding the WD, suggesting that hydrogen burning is ongoing. To detect supersoft X-rays, we recommend X-ray observations around 2014 June when absorption by neutral hydrogen is minimum.

Kato, Mariko [Department of Astronomy, Keio University, Hiyoshi, Yokohama 223-8521 (Japan); Mikolajewska, Joanna [N. Copernicus Astronomical Center, Bartycka 18, 00-716 Warszawa (Poland); Hachisu, Izumi, E-mail: mariko@educ.cc.keio.ac.jp [Department of Earth Science and Astronomy, College of Arts and Sciences, University of Tokyo, Komaba, Meguro-ku, Tokyo 153-8902 (Japan)

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

293

High-precision molecular dynamics simulation of UO2-PuO2: superionic transition in uranium dioxide  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Our series of articles is devoted to high-precision molecular dynamics simulation of mixed actinide-oxide (MOX) fuel in the rigid ions approximation using high-performance graphics processors (GPU). In this article we assess the 10 most relevant interatomic sets of pair potential (SPP) by reproduction of the Bredig superionic phase transition (anion sublattice premelting) in uranium dioxide. The measurements carried out in a wide temperature range from 300K up to melting point with 1K accuracy allowed reliable detection of this phase transition with each SPP. The {\\lambda}-peaks obtained are smoother and wider than it was assumed previously. In addition, for the first time a pressure dependence of the {\\lambda}-peak characteristics was measured, in a range from -5 GPa to 5 GPa its amplitudes had parabolic plot and temperatures had linear (that is similar to the Clausius-Clapeyron equation for melting temperature).

Potashnikov, S I; Nekrasov, K A; Kupryazhkin, A Ya

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

294

Plutonium in human urine: Normal levels in the US public. 1991 Annual report, Volume 2  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A neutron induced fission track method was successfully developed for assaying {sup 239}Pu in human urine with a detection limit below 20 aCi/sample. The technique involves the co-precipitation of {sup 239}Pu with rhodizonic acid, separation of {sup 239}Pu from potentially interfering natural uranium and other inorganic materials by ion-exchange techniques, collection of the sample onto lexan detectors, irradiation of sample in MIT reactor at a fluence of 1.1 x 10{sup 17} n/cm{sup 2}, etching of the lexan slide and counting the track either manually or by some automated counting system.

Wrenn, M.E.; Singh, N.P.; Xue, Ying-Hua

1997-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

295

Full-length U-xPu-10Zr (x=0, 8, 19 wt%) Fast Reactor Fuel Test in FFTF  

SciTech Connect

The Integral Fast Reactor-1 (IFR-1) experiment performed in the Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF) was the only U-Pu-10Zr (Pu-0, 8 and 19 wt%) metallic fast reactor test with commercial-length (91.4 cm active fuel column length) conducted to date. With few remaining test reactors there is little opportunity for performing another test with a long active fuel column. The assembly was irradiated to the goal burnup of 10 at.%. The beginning of life (BOL) peak cladding temperature of the hottest pin was 608?C, cooling to 522?C at end of life (EOL). Selected fuel pins were examined non destructively using neutron radiography, precision axial gamma scanning, and both laser and spiral contact cladding profilometry. Destructive exams included plenum gas pressure, volume, and gas composition determinations on a number of pins followed by optical metallography, electron probe microanalysis (EPMA), and alpha and beta gamma autoradiography on a single U-19Pu-10Zr pin. The post-irradiation examinations (PIEs) showed very few differences compared to the short-pin (34.3 cm fuel column) testing performed on fuels of similar composition in Experimental Breeder Reactor-II (EBR-II). The fuel column grew axially slightly less than observed in the short pins, but with the same pattern of decreasing growth with increasing Pu content. There was a difference in the fuel-cladding chemical interaction (FCCI) in that the maximum cladding penetration by interdiffusion with fuel/fission products did not occur at the top of the fuel column where the cladding temperature is highest, as observed in EBR-II tests. Instead, the more exaggerated fission-rate profile of the FFTF pins resulted in a peak FCCI at ~0.7 X/L axial location along the fuel column. This resulted from a lower production of rare earth fission products higher in the fuel column as well as a much smaller delta-T between fuel center and cladding, and therefore less FCCI, despite the higher cladding temperature. This behavior could actually help extend the life of a fuel pin in a long pin reactor design to a higher peak fuel burnup.

D. L. Porter; H.C. Tsai

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

296

Reactor Decay Heat in {sup 239}Pu: Solving the {gamma} Discrepancy in the 4-3000-s Cooling Period  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The {beta} feeding probability of {sup 102,104,105,106,107}Tc, {sup 105}Mo, and {sup 101}Nb nuclei, which are important contributors to the decay heat in nuclear reactors, has been measured using the total absorption technique. We have coupled for the first time a total absorption spectrometer to a Penning trap in order to obtain sources of very high isobaric purity. Our results solve a significant part of a long-standing discrepancy in the {gamma} component of the decay heat for {sup 239}Pu in the 4-3000 s range.

Algora, A. [IFIC - CSIC-Univ. Valencia, Valencia (Spain); Institute of Nuclear Research, Debrecen (Hungary); Jordan, D.; Tain, J. L.; Rubio, B.; Agramunt, J.; Perez-Cerdan, A. B.; Molina, F.; Caballero, L.; Nacher, E. [IFIC - CSIC-Univ. Valencia, Valencia (Spain); Krasznahorkay, A.; Hunyadi, M. D.; Gulyas, J.; Vitez, A.; Csatlos, M.; Csige, L. [Institute of Nuclear Research, Debrecen (Hungary); Aeysto, J.; Penttilae, H.; Moore, I. D.; Eronen, T.; Jokinen, A. [University of Jyvaeskylae, Jyvaeskylae (Finland)

2010-11-12T23:59:59.000Z

297

Total Prompt Energy Release in the Neutron-Induced Fission of 235-U, 238-U, and 239-Pu  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This study addresses, for the first time, the total prompt energy release and its components for the fission of 235-U, 238-U, and 239-Pu as a function of the kinetic energy of the neutron inducing the fission. The components are extracted from experimental measurements, where they exist, together with model-dependent calculation, interpolation, and extrapolation. While the components display clear dependencies upon the incident neutron energy, their sums display only weak, yet definite, energy dependencies. Also addressed is the total prompt energy deposition in fission for the same three systems. Results are presented in equation form. New measurements are recommended as a consequence of this study.

Madland, D G

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

298

Total Prompt Energy Release in the Neutron-Induced Fission of 235-U, 238-U, and 239-Pu  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This study addresses, for the first time, the total prompt energy release and its components for the fission of 235-U, 238-U, and 239-Pu as a function of the kinetic energy of the neutron inducing the fission. The components are extracted from experimental measurements, where they exist, together with model-dependent calculation, interpolation, and extrapolation. While the components display clear dependencies upon the incident neutron energy, their sums display only weak, yet definite, energy dependencies. Also addressed is the total prompt energy deposition in fission for the same three systems. Results are presented in equation form. New measurements are recommended as a consequence of this study.

D. G. Madland

2006-03-29T23:59:59.000Z

299

Evidence for nascent equilibrium nuclei as progenitors of anomalous transformation kinetics in a Pu-Ga alloy  

SciTech Connect

By alloying Pu with Ga, the face-centered-cubic {delta} phase can be retained down to room temperature in a metastable configuration, which ultimately yields to chemical driving forces by undergoing the {delta} {yields} {alpha}' isothermal martensitic transformation below M{sub s} {approx} = -100 C. This transformation is found to exhibit anomalous transformation kinetics, the nature of which has remained elusive for over 30 years. Recently, a 'conditioning' treatment - an isothermal hold above M{sub s} - has been shown to dramatically affect the amount of {alpha}' phase formed during the transformation. Herein, we report evidence that the conditioning treatment induces the lower-C of the double-C curve, and we furthermore implicate the classical nucleation of equilibrium phases within the conditioning range as the underlying mechanism behind conditioning in Pu-Ga alloys. This mechanism should not be rigorously exclusive to plutonium alloys as it arises from the proximity between the retained metastable phase and the low-energy equilibrium phases.

Jeffries, J R; Blobaum, K M; Wall, M A; Schwartz, A J

2009-05-27T23:59:59.000Z

300

CONTAINMENT VESSEL TEMPERATURE FOR PU-238 HEAT SOURCE CONTAINER UNDER AMBIENT, FREE CONVECTION AND LOW EMISSIVITY COOLING CONDITIONS  

SciTech Connect

The EP-61 primary containment vessel of the 5320 shipping package has been used for storage and transportation of Pu-238 plutonium oxide heat source material. For storage, the material in its convenience canister called EP-60 is placed in the EP-61 and sealed by two threaded caps with elastomer O-ring seals. When the package is shipped, the outer cap is seal welded to the body. While stored, the EP-61s are placed in a cooling water bath. In preparation for welding, several containers are removed from storage and staged to the welding booth. The significant heat generation of the contents, and resulting rapid rise in component temperature necessitates special handling practices. The test described here was performed to determine the temperature rise with time and peak temperature attained for an EP-61 with 203 watts of internal heat generation, upon its removal from the cooling water bath.

Gupta, N.; Smith, A.

2011-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "2 glenwood pu" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Development of Applicable Benchmark Experiments for (Th,Pu)O2 Power Reactor Designs Using TSUNAMI Analysis.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

?? When simulating reactor physics experiments, uncertainties in nuclear data result in a bias between simulated and experimental values. For new reactor designs or for (more)

Langton, Stephanie E

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

302

Effects of fabrication and irradiation on the dissolution of (U,Pu)O$sub 2$ reactor fuels  

SciTech Connect

From American Ceramics Society nuclear division meeting; San Francisco, California, USA (29 Oct 1973). LMFBR-type reactors will be fueled with stainless- steel-clad MFBR fuel cycle are the recovery of uranium and plutonium and the refabrication of the fuel elements in the minimum practicable time at lowest cost. Effect of fabrication method and irradiation conditions on recovery of the fuel is discussed. The Purex process is used to prepare the feed solutions. Test specimens contained fuels derived from sol-gel, coprecipitated, and mechanically blended oxides. Irradiation levels varied from unirradiated to 100,000 MWd/ton. Solubility of the fuels in terms of the fabrication method is coprecipitated> sol- gel > mechanically blended. Irradiation tends to increase the fuel solubility. (LK)

Goode, J.H.; Fitzgerald, C.L.; Vaughen, V.C.A.

1973-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

303

Rational Ligand Design for U(VI) and Pu(IV)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

therapies ... 12 Figure 1-5. Catechol and hydroxamate:20 Figure 1-13. [M(catechol) 4 ] 4- (M = Th, Ce, U) complex3,2- and 1,2-HOPO) and catechol-analog (CAM, TAM) chelating

Szigethy, Geza

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

304

Table A1. Total First Use (formerly Primary Consumption) of Energy for All Pu  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2" 2" " (Estimates in Trillion Btu)" " "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," ",," " " "," "," ",," "," ",," "," ",," ","Shipments","RSE" "SIC"," ",,"Net","Residual","Distillate",," ",,"Coke and"," ","of Energy Sources","Row" "Code(a)","Industry Group and Industry","Total(b)","Electricity(c)","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(d)","Natural Gas(e)","LPG","Coal","Breeze","Other(f)","Produced Onsite(g)","Factors"

305

Colorado geothermal commercialization program. Geothermal energy opportunities at four Colorado towns: Durango, Glenwood Springs, Idaho Springs, Ouray  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The potential of four prospective geothermal development sites in Colorado was analyzed and hypothetical plans prepared for their development. Several broad areas were investigated for each site. The first area of investigation was the site itself: its geographic, population, economic, energy demand characteristics and the attitudes of its residents relative to geothermal development potential. Secondly, the resource potential was described, to the extent it was known, along with information concerning any exploration or development that has been conducted. The third item investigated was the process required for development. There are financial, institutional, environmental, technological and economic criteria for development that must be known in order to realistically gauge the possible development. Using that information, the next concern, the geothermal energy potential, was then addressed. Planned, proposed and potential development are all described, along with a possible schedule for that development. An assessment of the development opportunities and constraints are included. Technical methodologies are described in the Appendix. (MHR)

Coe, B.A.; Zimmerman, J.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

306

Rational Ligand Design for U(VI) and Pu(IV)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

waste, the various isotopes of plutonium compose up to 1% of10 5 yr). 2,3 Therefore, plutonium (which in biological andare gray, oxygens red, and plutonium silver. Figure A4-5.

Szigethy, Geza

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

307

Current Inconsistencies in {sup 238}Pu, {sup 241,243}Am and {sup 242}Cm Evaluations and their Impact on Uncertainties  

SciTech Connect

Improvements in the nuclear reaction modeling and nuclear parameter systematics, consistent with the description of neutron data on major actinides {sup 232}Th, {sup 233}U, {sup 235}U, {sup 238}U and {sup 239}Pu will be shown to provide a sound basis for critical assessment of the fission, capture, inelastic scattering, and (n,xn) reaction cross sections on minor actinides. This will largely help to avoid substituting possible model deficiencies by enlarging parameter uncertainties in the conventional nuclear models. In a number of minor actinides, the uncertainty estimation of cross sections and prompt fission neutron spectra would require complete re-evaluation of basic data. Otherwise, extremely large cross section uncertainty estimates will have to be adopted, especially in the case of poorly investigated Np, Pu, Am, Cm targets.

Maslov, V.M. [Joint Institute for Nuclear and Energy Research Krasina Street 99, 220109 Minsk-Sosny (Belarus)], E-mail: maslov@bas-net.by

2008-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

308

Neutron emission effects on fragment mass and kinetic energy distribution from fission of 239{sup Pu} induced by thermal neutrons  

SciTech Connect

The average of fragment kinetic energy (E-bar sign*) and the multiplicity of prompt neutrons ({nu}(bar sign)) as a function of fragment mass (m*), as well as the fragment mass yield (Y(m*)) from thermal neutron-induced fission of {sup 239}Pu have been measured by Tsuchiya et al.. In that work the mass and kinetic energy are calculated from the measured kinetic energy of one fragment and the difference of time of flight of the two complementary fragments. However they do not present their results about the standard deviation {sigma}{sub E}*(m*). In this work we have made a numerical simulation of that experiment which reproduces its results, assuming an initial distribution of the primary fragment kinetic energy (E(A)) with a constant value of the standard deviation as function of fragment mass ({sigma}{sub E}(A)). As a result of the simulation we obtain the dependence {sigma}{sub E}*(m*) which presents an enhancement between m* = 92 and m* = 110, and a peak at m* = 121.

Montoya, M. [Instituto Peruano de Energia Nuclear, Av. Canada 1470, Lima 41 (Peru); Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad Nacional de Ingenieria, Av. Tupac Amaru 210, Apartado 31-139, Lima (Peru); Rojas, J. [Instituto Peruano de Energia Nuclear, Av. Canada 1470, Lima 41 (Peru); Facultad de Ciencias Fisicas, Universidad Nacional Mayor de San Marcos, Av. Venezuela Cdra 34, Apartado Postal 14-0149, Lima 1 (Peru); Lobato, I. [Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad Nacional de Ingenieria, Av. Tupac Amaru 210, Apartado 31-139, Lima (Peru)

2010-08-04T23:59:59.000Z

309

Parity restoration in the Highly Truncated Diagonalization Approach: application to the outer fission barrier of $^{240}$Pu  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The restoration of the parity symmetry has been performed in the framework of the Highly Truncated Diagonalization Approach suited to treat correlations in an explicitly particle-number conserving microscopic approach. To do so we have assumed axial symmetry and used a generalized Wick's theorem due to L\\"owdin in a projection-after-variation scheme. We have chosen the Skyrme SkM$^*$ energy-density functional for the particle-hole channel and a density-independent delta force for the residual interaction. We have applied this approach in the region of the outer fission barrier of the $^{240}$Pu nucleus. As a result, we have shown that the $K^{\\pi} = 0^+$ fission isomeric state is statically unstable against intrinsic-parity breaking modes, while the projection does not affect the energy at the top of the intrinsic outer fission barrier. Altogether, this leads to an increase of the height of the outer fission barrier--with respect to the fission isomeric state--by about 350 keV, affecting thus significantly th...

Hao, T V Nhan; Bonneau, L

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

310

Parity restoration in the Highly Truncated Diagonalization Approach: application to the outer fission barrier of $^{240}$Pu  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The restoration of the parity symmetry has been performed in the framework of the Highly Truncated Diagonalization Approach suited to treat correlations in an explicitly particle-number conserving microscopic approach. To do so we have assumed axial symmetry and used a generalized Wick's theorem due to L\\"owdin in a projection-after-variation scheme. We have chosen the Skyrme SkM$^*$ energy-density functional for the particle-hole channel and a density-independent delta force for the residual interaction. We have applied this approach in the region of the outer fission barrier of the $^{240}$Pu nucleus. As a result, we have shown that the $K^{\\pi} = 0^+$ fission isomeric state is statically unstable against intrinsic-parity breaking modes, while the projection does not affect the energy at the top of the intrinsic outer fission barrier. Altogether, this leads to an increase of the height of the outer fission barrier--with respect to the fission isomeric state--by about 350 keV, affecting thus significantly the fission-decay lifetime of the considered fission isomer.

T. V. Nhan Hao; P. Quentin; L. Bonneau

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

311

International Workshop on Gamma Spectrometry Analysis Codes for U and Pu Isotopics: Workshop Results and Next Steps  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In November 2008, the Institute of Nuclear Materials Management (INMM) and the European Safeguards Research and Development Association (ESARDA) co-hosted the International Workshop on Gamma Spectrometry Analysis Codes for U and Pu Isotopics at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). This workshop was conducted in response to needs expressed by the international safeguards community to understand better the capabilities and limitations of the codes; to ensure these codes are sustained; and to ensure updates or revisions are performed in a controlled manner. The workshop was attended by approximately 100 participants. The participants included code developers, code suppliers, safeguards specialists, domestic and international inspectors, process operators, regulators, and programme sponsors from various government agencies. The workshop provided a unique opportunity for code developers, commercial distributors and end users to interact in a hands-on laboratory environment to develop solutions for programmatic and technical issues associated with the various codes. The workshop also provided an international forum for discussing development of an internationally accepted standard test method. This paper discusses the organization of the workshop, its goals and objectives and feedback received from the participants. The paper also describes the significance of the working group's contribution to improving codes that are commonly used during inspections to verify that nuclear facilities are compliant with treaty obligations that ensure nuclear fuel cycle facilities are used for peaceful purposes.

McGinnis, Brent R [ORNL; Solodov, Alexander A [ORNL; Shipwash, Jacqueline L [ORNL; Zhernosek, Alena V [ORNL; McKinney, Teressa L [ORNL; Pickett, Chris A [ORNL; Peerani, Paolo [ORNL

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

312

The study of synchronous (by local time) changes of the statistical properties of thermal noise and alpha-activity fluctuations of a 239-Pu sample  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Experimentally obtained and analyzed fine structure of statistical distributions for two physically independent processes: alpha-decay rate fluctuations of Pu-239 sample in Pushchino (Moscow region, Russia) and equilibrium voltage fluctuations (Johnson noise) from metal-film resistor in Tbilisi (Georgia). Special investigation of histograms shape similarity in these processes demonstrated majority of previously studied effects, called - macroscopic fluctuations. Offered qualitative model of the observed effects.

A. V. Kaminsky; S. E. Shnoll

2006-05-06T23:59:59.000Z

313

Spermatogonia survival in mice after exposure to low doses of $^{60}$Co gamma-ray neutrons of 14 MeV and 400 MeV and neutrons from a Pu Be source  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Spermatogonia survival in mice after exposure to low doses of $^{60}$Co gamma-ray neutrons of 14 MeV and 400 MeV and neutrons from a Pu

Quintiliani, M; Baarli, Johan

1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

314

REDUCTION OF PLUTONIUM TO Pu$sup +3$ BY SODIUM DITHIONITE IN POTASSIUM CARBONATE  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Plutonium values are reduced in an alkaline aqueous medlum to the trlvalent state by means of sodium dlthionite. Plutonlum values are also separated from normally assoclated contaminants by metathesizing a lanthanum fluoride carrier precipitate containing plutonium with a hydroxide solution, performing the metathesis in the presence of about 0.2 M sodium dithionite at a temperature of between 40 and 90 icient laborato C.

Miller, D.R.; Hoekstra, H.R.

1958-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

315

Plutonium residue recovery (PuRR) project: Quarterly progress report, January--March 1989  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This quarterly report presents experimental and conceptual design information covering the development of a new pyrochemical process to recover weapons-grade plutonium from and reduce the amount of aqueous process intractable transuranic (TRU) residues now stored at Department of Energy facilities. During this period, experiments were performed in which zinc-calcium alloys were used to reduce the Rocky Flats ash heel. They offer potential advantages to reduce wastes because of reagent recycle. One reduction run using zinc-10 wt % calcium alloy was 99.7% complete. In another run, the calcium was titrated into the zinc alloy to observe the stepwise progression of the reduction. In support of planned electrochemical recovery of calcium, experiments were performed to determine the solubility of calcium CaCl/sub 2/-CaF/sub 2/ in the presence of zinc-calcium alloys. Also, initial experiments with reference electrodes for electrochemical operations or titration-type chemical reactions were encouraging. Pyrolytic boron nitride and vitreous carbon underwent preliminary evaluation for use as materials in the equipment under development. Electrochemical cells were designed for recovering calcium from the salt used in the oxide reduction step. Calculations were made to estimate activity coefficients for plutonium in calcium-zinc alloys. 16 refs., 9 figs., 5 tabs.

Alire, R.M.; Gregg, D.W.; Hickman, R.G.; Kuhl, W.D.; Landrum, J.H.; Johnson, G.K.; Johnson, I.; Mulcahey, T.P.; Pierce, R.D.; Poa, D.S.

1989-05-26T23:59:59.000Z

316

LAKESHORE AVON BR ANT-EDEN ALD EN-LANC ASTER AU BURN W SH ELDON  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

81 81 § ¨ ¦ 81 LAKESHORE AVON BR ANT-EDEN ALD EN-LANC ASTER AU BURN W SH ELDON CALEDONIA HURON C REEK LEIC EST ER COL DEN ASH FORD INDIAN FALLS LAWTONS SAR DINIA RPD-037 -2 GLENWOOD PU LASKI PAVILION CON CORD COL LINS N ELM A ORC HARD PARK-H AMBU RG DANLEY CORNERS ST ILLWAT ER CHAFF EE-ARCAD E FAYETT E-WATERLOO LAKEVIEW JAVA SEN EC A W ELLER Y AU RORA E ZOAR BU FFALO TIOGA SILVER LAKE AKR ON ROM E RAT HBON E ALM A BET HANY WYOMING ULYSSES BR ANCH W SAN DY CREEK COL LINS BLOOMFIELD E LEBANON STATE LINE ALLEN CHUR CHVILLE BATH ATT ICA ELLI COT VILLE ROU LETT E BR ADFORD BU FFALO CREEK PEN N YAN N BEECH HILL-INDEPENDENC E GERRY-CH ARLOTTE STAGECOACH CHIPMUN K HEBRON VIN CENT BALD WI NSVILLE AKELEY OLEAN COWLESVILLE AN NIN SMET HPORT BR ADLEY BR OOK BU STI FIVE MILE BLOOMFIELD W SEN EC A FALLS NILE STAGECOACH LEWIS R UN BR ADFORD CAMDEN VAN ETT EN ROAN OKE SH ARON RICHBU RG FULTON N FINN EGAN H ILL TONAWANDA

317

Spin-orbit holds the heavyweight title for Pu and Am: Exchange regains it for Cm  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The conclusions of this paper are: (1) The 5f electrons in Cm are near an LS coupling scheme. (2) This coupling scheme allows for a large spin polarization of the 5f electrons, which in turn stabilizes the Cm III crystal structure. (3) Results for Cm show us the recipe for magnetic stabilization of the crystal structure of metals: (A) The metal must be near the itinerant-localized transition where multiple crystal structures have close energies; (B) The metal is just on the magnetic side of the transition; and (C) There must be a magnetic moment large enough to overcome the energy difference between crystal structures, thus dictating the atomic geometry. (4) These results solidify our understanding of magnetically-stabilized metals, showing us where to look for engineered materials with magnetic applications.

Moore, K; der Laan, G v; Soderlind, P

2008-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

318

NMIS with Imaging and Gamma Ray Spectrometry for Pu, HEU, HE and Other Materials  

SciTech Connect

The Nuclear Material Identification System (NMIS) has been under development at ORNL and the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) Y-12 National Security Complex since 1984. In the mid-1990s, what is now the US Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Nuclear Verification (ONV) realized that it was a useful technology for future arms control treaty applications and supported further development of the system. In 2004, fast-neutron imaging was incorporated into the system. In 2007, the ONV decided to develop a fieldable version of the system, designated as FNMIS, for potential use in future treaties. The FNMIS is being developed to be compatible with the eventual incorporation of gamma-ray spectrometry and an information barrier. This report addresses how and what attributes could be determined by the FNMIS system with gamma-ray spectrometry. The NMIS is a time-dependent coincidence system that incorporates tomographic imaging (including mapping of the fission sites) and gamma-ray spectrometry. It utilizes a small, lightweight (30 lb), portable deuterium-tritium (DT) neutron (14.1 MeV) generator (4 x 10{sup 7} neutrons/second) for active interrogation and can also perform passive interrogation. A high-purity germanium (HPGe) gamma-ray detector with multichannel analysis can be utilized in conjunction with the source for active interrogation or passively. The system uses proton recoil scintillators: 32 small 2.5 x 2.5 x 10.2-cm-thick plastic scintillators for imaging and at least two 2 x 2 arrays of 27 x 27 x 10-cm-thick plastic scintillators that detect induced fission radiation. The DT generator contains an alpha detector that time and directionally tags a fan beam of some of the neutrons emitted and subdivides it into pixels. A fast (1 GHz) time correlation processor measures the time-dependent coincidence among all detectors in the system. A computer-controlled scanner moves the small detectors and the source appropriately for scanning a target object for imaging. The system is based on detection of transmitted 14.1 MeV neutrons, fission neutrons, and gamma rays from spontaneous, inherent source fission of the target, fission neutrons and gamma rays induced by the external DT source, gamma rays from natural emissions of uranium and plutonium, and induced gamma-ray emission by the interaction of the 14.1 MeV neutrons from the DT source. The NMIS can and has been used with a time-tagged californium spontaneous fission source. It has also been used with pulsed interrogation sources such as LINACs, DT, and deuterium-deuterium (DD) sources. This system is uniquely suited for detection of shielded highly enriched uranium (HEU), plutonium, and other special nuclear materials and detection of high explosives (HE) and chemical agents. The NMIS will be adapted to utilize a trusted processor that incorporates information barrier and authentication techniques using open software and then be useful in some international applications for materials whose characteristics may be classified. The proposed information barrier version of the NMIS system would consist of detectors and cables, the red (classified side) computer system, which processes the data, and the black (unclassified side) computer, which handles the computer interface. The system could use the 'IB wrapper' concept proposed by Los Alamos National Laboratory and the software integrity (digital signatures) system proposed by Sandia. Since it is based entirely on commercially available components, the entire system, including NMIS data acquisition boards, can be built with commercial off-the-shelf components. This system is being developed into a fieldable system (FNMIS) for potential arms control treaties by the ONV. The system will be modularly constructed with the RF shielded modules connected to the processor by appropriate control and signal cable in metal conduit. The FNMIS is presently being designed for eventual incorporation of gamma-ray spectrometry and an information barrier to protect classified information. The system hardware and software can be configu

Mihalczo, John T [ORNL; Mullens, James Allen [ORNL

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

319

Quantitative NDA Measurements of Advanced Reprocessing Product Materials Containing U, NP, PU, and AM  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The ability of inspection agencies and facility operators to measure powders containing several actinides is increasingly necessary as new reprocessing techniques and fuel forms are being developed. These powders are difficult to measure with nondestructive assay (NDA) techniques because neutrons emitted from induced and spontaneous fission of different nuclides are very similar. A neutron multiplicity technique based on first principle methods was developed to measure these powders by exploiting isotope-specific nuclear properties, such as the energy-dependent fission cross sections and the neutron induced fission neutron multiplicity. This technique was tested through extensive simulations using the Monte Carlo N-Particle eXtended (MCNPX) code and by one measurement campaign using the Active Well Coincidence Counter (AWCC) and two measurement campaigns using the Epithermal Neutron Multiplicity Counter (ENMC) with various (?,n) sources and actinide materials. Four potential applications of this first principle technique have been identified: (1) quantitative measurement of uranium, neptunium, plutonium, and americium materials; (2) quantitative measurement of mixed oxide (MOX) materials; (3) quantitative measurement of uranium materials; and (4) weapons verification in arms control agreements. This technique still has several challenges which need to be overcome, the largest of these being the challenge of having high-precision active and passive measurements to produce results with acceptably small uncertainties.

Goddard, Braden

2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

320

Event-by-event evaluation of the prompt fission neutron spectrum from 239Pu(n,f)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We have developed an improved evaluation method for the spectrum of neutrons emitted in fission of {sup 239}Pu induced by incident neutrons with energies up to 20 MeV. The covariance data, including incident energy correlations introduced by the evaluation method, were used to fix the input parameters in our event-by-event model of fission, FREYA, by applying formal statistical methods. Formal estimates of uncertainties in the evaluation were developed by randomly sampling model inputs and calculating likelihood functions based on agreement with the evaluated . Our approach is able to employ a greater variety of fission measurements than the relatively coarse spectral data alone. It also allows the study of numerous fission observables for more accurate model validation. The combination of an event-by-event Monte Carlo fission model with a statistical-likelihood analysis is thus a powerful tool for evaluation of fission-neutron data. Our empirical model FREYA follows the complete fission event from birth of the excited fragments through their decay via neutron emission until the fragment excitation energy is below the neutron separation energy when neutron emission can no longer occur. The most recent version of FREYA incorporates pre-equilibrium neutron emission, the emission of the first neutron before equilibrium is reached in the compound nucleus, and multi-chance fission, neutron evaporation prior to fission when the incident neutron energy is above the neutron separation energy. Energy, momentum, charge and mass number are conserved throughout the fission process. The best available values of fragment masses and total kinetic energies are used as inputs to FREYA. We fit three parameters that are not well under control from previous measurements: the shift in the total fragment kinetic energy; the energy scale of the asymptotic level density parameter, controlling the fragment 'temperature' for neutron evaporation; and the relative excitation of the light and heavy fragments, governing the number and energy of neutrons emitted from each fragment. The latter two parameters are assumed to be independent of the incident neutron energy while the first varies with incident energy. We describe our method and the subsequent spectral evaluation and present the results of several standard validation calculations that test our new evaluation. These benchmarks include critical assemblies, sensitive to criticality in fast systems; pulsed sphere measurements testing the spectra at incident neutron energies of 14 MeV; and other tests.

Vogt, R; Randrup, J; Brown, D A; Descalle, M A; Ormand, W E

2011-11-28T23:59:59.000Z

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321

Event-by-event evaluation of the prompt fission neutron spectrum from 239Pu(n,f)  

SciTech Connect

We have developed an improved evaluation method for the spectrum of neutrons emitted in fission of {sup 239}Pu induced by incident neutrons with energies up to 20 MeV. The covariance data, including incident energy correlations introduced by the evaluation method, were used to fix the input parameters in our event-by-event model of fission, FREYA, by applying formal statistical methods. Formal estimates of uncertainties in the evaluation were developed by randomly sampling model inputs and calculating likelihood functions based on agreement with the evaluated . Our approach is able to employ a greater variety of fission measurements than the relatively coarse spectral data alone. It also allows the study of numerous fission observables for more accurate model validation. The combination of an event-by-event Monte Carlo fission model with a statistical-likelihood analysis is thus a powerful tool for evaluation of fission-neutron data. Our empirical model FREYA follows the complete fission event from birth of the excited fragments through their decay via neutron emission until the fragment excitation energy is below the neutron separation energy when neutron emission can no longer occur. The most recent version of FREYA incorporates pre-equilibrium neutron emission, the emission of the first neutron before equilibrium is reached in the compound nucleus, and multi-chance fission, neutron evaporation prior to fission when the incident neutron energy is above the neutron separation energy. Energy, momentum, charge and mass number are conserved throughout the fission process. The best available values of fragment masses and total kinetic energies are used as inputs to FREYA. We fit three parameters that are not well under control from previous measurements: the shift in the total fragment kinetic energy; the energy scale of the asymptotic level density parameter, controlling the fragment 'temperature' for neutron evaporation; and the relative excitation of the light and heavy fragments, governing the number and energy of neutrons emitted from each fragment. The latter two parameters are assumed to be independent of the incident neutron energy while the first varies with incident energy. We describe our method and the subsequent spectral evaluation and present the results of several standard validation calculations that test our new evaluation. These benchmarks include critical assemblies, sensitive to criticality in fast systems; pulsed sphere measurements testing the spectra at incident neutron energies of 14 MeV; and other tests.

Vogt, R; Randrup, J; Brown, D A; Descalle, M A; Ormand, W E

2011-11-28T23:59:59.000Z

322

A Light-Curve Model of the Symbiotic Nova PU Vul (1979) -- A Very Quiet Explosion with Long-Lasted Flat Peak  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present a light curve model of the symbiotic nova PU Vul (Nova Vulpeculae 1979) that shows a long-lasted flat peak with no spectral indication of wind mass-loss before decline. Our quasi-evolution models consisting of a series of static solutions explain both the optical flat peak and ultraviolet (UV) light curve simultaneously. The white dwarf mass is estimated to be ~0.6 Mo. We also provide a new determination of the reddening, E(B-V) = 0.43 +/- 0.05, from UV spectral analysis. Theoretical light curve fitting of UV 1455 A provides the distance of d=3.8 +/- 0.7 kpc.

Kato, Mariko; Cassatella, Angelo; Gonzalez-Riestra, Rosario

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

323

Fission Product Yields of {sup 233}U, {sup 235}U, {sup 238}U and {sup 239}Pu in Fields of Thermal Neutrons, Fission Neutrons and 14.7-MeV Neutrons  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The yields of more than fifteen fission products have been carefully measured using radiochemical techniques, for {sup 235}U(n,f), {sup 239}Pu(n,f) in a thermal spectrum, for {sup 233}U(n,f), {sup 235}U(n,f), and {sup 239}Pu(n,f) reactions in a fission neutron spectrum, and for {sup 233}U(n,f), {sup 235}U(n,f), {sup 238}U(n,f), and {sup 239}Pu(n,f) for 14.7 MeV monoenergetic neutrons. Irradiations were performed at the EL3 reactor, at the Caliban and Prospero critical assemblies, and at the Lancelot electrostatic accelerator in CEA-Valduc. Fissions were counted in thin deposits using fission ionization chambers. The number of fission products of each species were measured by gamma spectrometry of co-located thick deposits.

Laurec, J.; Adam, A.; Bruyne, T. de [Commissariat a l'Energie Atomique, Centre DAM-Ile de France (CEA DAM DIF), 91297 Arpajon (France); Bauge, E., E-mail: eric.bauge@cea.f [Commissariat a l'Energie Atomique, Centre DAM-Ile de France (CEA DAM DIF), 91297 Arpajon (France); Granier, T.; Aupiais, J.; Bersillon, O.; Le Petit, G. [Commissariat a l'Energie Atomique, Centre DAM-Ile de France (CEA DAM DIF), 91297 Arpajon (France); Authier, N.; Casoli, P. [Commissariat a l'Energie Atomique, Centre de Valduc, 21120 Is-sur-Tille (France)

2010-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

324

The CO2 Adsorption in Zeolitic Imidazolate Framework 7  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Author(s), Pu Zhao, Giulio Lampronti, Gareth Lloyd, Simon Redfern. On-Site Speaker (Planned), Pu Zhao. Abstract Scope, Zeolitic Imidazolate Framework 7...

325

Evaluating and adjusting {sup 239}Pu, {sup 56}Fe, {sup 28}Si and {sup 95}Mo nuclear data with a Monte Carlo technique  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper, Monte Carlo optimization and nuclear data evaluation are combined to produce optimal adjusted nuclear data files. The methodology is based on the so-called 'Total Monte Carlo' and the TALYS system. Not only a single nuclear data file is produced for a given isotope, but virtually an infinite number, defining probability distributions for each nuclear quantity. Then each of these random nuclear data libraries is used in a series of benchmark calculations. With a goodness-of-fit estimator, best {sup 239}Pu, {sup 56}Fe, {sup 28}Si and {sup 95}Mo evaluations for that benchmark set can be selected. A few thousands of random files are used and each of them is tested with a large number of fast, thermal and intermediate energy criticality benchmarks. From this, the best performing random file is chosen and proposed as the optimum choice among the studied random set. (authors)

Rochman, D.; Koning, A. J. [Nuclear Research and Consultancy Group, Petten (Netherlands)

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

326

Pair breaking and Coulomb effects in cold fission from thermal neutron induced fission of U 233, U 235 and Pu 239  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this paper, the distribution of mass and kinetic energy in the cold region of the thermal neutron induced fission of U 233, U 235 and Pu 239, respectively, is interpreted in terms of nucleon pair-breaking and the Coulomb interaction energy between complementary fragments (Coulomb effect). In order to avoid the erosive consequences of neutron emission, one studies the cold fission regions, corresponding to total kinetic energy (TE) close to the maximum available energy of the reaction (Q). Contrary to expected, in cold fission is not observed high odd-even effect in mass number distribution. Nevertheless, the measured values are compatible with higher odd-even effects on proton or neutron number distribution, respectively. In addition, in cold fission, the minimal total excitation energy (X) is correlated with the Coulomb energy excess, which is defined as the difference between C (the electrostatic interaction energy between complementary fragments taken as spherical in scission configuration) and Q. These...

Montoya, Modesto

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

327

Determination of total Pu content in a Spent Fuel Assembly by Measuring Passive Neutron Count rate and Multiplication with the Differential Die-Away Instrument  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A key objective of the Next Generation Safeguards Initiative (NGSI) is to evaluate and develop non-destructive assay (NDA) techniques to determine the elemental plutonium content in a commercial-grade nuclear spent fuel assembly (SFA) [1]. Within this framework, we investigate by simulation a novel analytical approach based on combined information from passive measurement of the total neutron count rate of a SFA and its multiplication determined by the active interrogation using an instrument based on a Differential Die-Away technique (DDA). We use detailed MCNPX simulations across an extensive set of SFA characteristics to establish the approach and demonstrate its robustness. It is predicted that Pu content can be determined by the proposed method to a few %.

Henzl, Vladimir [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Croft, Stephen [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Swinhoe, Martyn T. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Tobin, Stephen J. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2012-07-18T23:59:59.000Z

328

Fission Product Data Measured at Los Alamos for Fission Spectrum and Thermal Neutrons on {sup 239}Pu, {sup 235}U, {sup 238}U  

SciTech Connect

We describe measurements of fission product data at Los Alamos that are important for determining the number of fissions that have occurred when neutrons are incident on plutonium and uranium isotopes. The fission-spectrum measurements were made using a fission chamber designed by the National Institute for Standards and Technology (NIST) in the BIG TEN critical assembly, as part of the Inter-laboratory Liquid Metal Fast Breeder Reactor (LMFBR) Reaction Rate (ILRR) collaboration. The thermal measurements were made at Los Alamos' Omega West Reactor. A related set of measurements were made of fission-product ratios (so-called R-values) in neutron environments provided by a number of Los Alamos critical assemblies that range from having average energies causing fission of 400-600 keV (BIG TEN and the outer regions of the Flattop-25 assembly) to higher energies (1.4-1.9 MeV) in the Jezebel, and in the central regions of the Flattop-25 and Flattop-Pu, critical assemblies. From these data we determine ratios of fission product yields in different fuel and neutron environments (Q-values) and fission product yields in fission spectrum neutron environments for {sup 99}Mo, {sup 95}Zr, {sup 137}Cs, {sup 140}Ba, {sup 141,143}Ce, and {sup 147}Nd. Modest incident-energy dependence exists for the {sup 147}Nd fission product yield; this is discussed in the context of models for fission that include thermal and dynamical effects. The fission product data agree with measurements by Maeck and other authors using mass-spectrometry methods, and with the ILRR collaboration results that used gamma spectroscopy for quantifying fission products. We note that the measurements also contradict earlier 1950s historical Los Alamos estimates by {approx}5-7%, most likely owing to self-shielding corrections not made in the early thermal measurements. Our experimental results provide a confirmation of the England-Rider ENDF/B-VI evaluated fission-spectrum fission product yields that were carried over to the ENDF/B-VII.0 library, except for {sup 99}Mo where the present results are about 4%-relative higher for neutrons incident on {sup 239}Pu and {sup 235}U. Additionally, our results illustrate the importance of representing the incident energy dependence of fission product yields over the fast neutron energy range for high-accuracy work, for example the {sup 147}Nd from neutron reactions on plutonium. An upgrade to the ENDF library, for ENDF/B-VII.1, based on these and other data, is described in a companion paper to this work.

Selby, H.D., E-mail: hds@lanl.go [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Mac Innes, M.R.; Barr, D.W.; Keksis, A.L.; Meade, R.A.; Burns, C.J.; Chadwick, M.B.; Wallstrom, T.C. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States)

2010-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

329

Computational and Experimental Validation of a WGPu Neutron Leakage Source Using a Shielded PuBe (,n) Neutron Source  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Neutron Measurements / Special Issue on the 11th International Conference on Radiation Shielding and the 15th Topical Meeting of the Radiation Protection and Shielding Division (Part 2) / Radiation Protection

Gabriel Ghita; Glenn Sjoden; James Baciak

330

2  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

by trained personnel. An S-1 alarm can shut down part or all of the H 2 and CNG systems to the normally closed, safe condition. E.1.3 Safety Alarm Level 2 A safety...

331

Pair breaking and Coulomb effects in cold fission from thermal neutron induced fission of U 233, U 235 and Pu 239  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this paper, the distribution of mass and kinetic energy in the cold region of the thermal neutron induced fission of U 233, U 235 and Pu 239, respectively, is interpreted in terms of nucleon pair-breaking and the Coulomb interaction energy between complementary fragments (Coulomb effect). In order to avoid the erosive consequences of neutron emission, one studies the cold fission regions, corresponding to total kinetic energy (TE) close to the maximum available energy of the reaction (Q). Contrary to expected, in cold fission is not observed high odd-even effect in mass number distribution. Nevertheless, the measured values are compatible with higher odd-even effects on proton or neutron number distribution, respectively. In addition, in cold fission, the minimal total excitation energy (X) is correlated with the Coulomb energy excess, which is defined as the difference between C (the electrostatic interaction energy between complementary fragments taken as spherical in scission configuration) and Q. These Coulomb effects increase with the asymmetry of the charge fragmentations. In sum, the experimental data on cold fission suggest that scission configurations explore all the possibilities permitted by the available energy for fission.

Modesto Montoya

2013-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

332

Microdistribution and Long-Term Retention of 239Pu (NO3)4 in the Respiratory Tracts of an Acutely Exposed Plutonium Worker and Experimental Beagle Dogs  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The long-term retention of inhaled soluble forms of plutonium raises concerns as to the potential health effects in persons working in nuclear energy or the nuclear weapons program. The distributions of long-term retained inhaled plutonium-nitrate [239Pu (NO3)4] deposited in the lungs of an accidentally exposed nuclear worker (Human Case 0269) and in the lungs of experimentally exposed beagle dogs with varying initial lung depositions were determined via autoradiographs of selected histological lung, lymph node, trachea, and nasal turbinate tissue sections. These studies showed that both the human and dogs had a non-uniform distribution of plutonium throughout the lung tissue. Fibrotic scar tissue effectively encapsulated a portion of the plutonium and prevented its clearance from the body or translocation to other tissues and diminished dose to organ parenchyma. Alpha radiation activity from deposited plutonium in Human Case 0269 was observed primarily along the sub-pleural regions while no alpha activity was seen in the tracheobronchial lymph nodes of this individual. However, relatively high activity levels in the tracheobronchial lymph nodes of the beagles indicated the lymphatic system was effective in clearing deposited plutonium from the lung tissues. In both the human case and beagle dogs, the appearance of retained plutonium within the respiratory tract was inconsistent with current biokinetic models of clearance for soluble forms of plutonium. Bound plutonium can have a marked effect on the dose to the lungs and subsequent radiation exposure has the potential increase in cancer risk.

Nielsen, Christopher E.; Wilson, Dulaney A.; Brooks, Antone L.; McCord, Stacey; Dagle, Gerald E.; James, Anthony C.; Tolmachev, Sergei Y.; Thrall, Brian D.; Morgan, William F.

2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

333

Numerical simulation of multiconstituent diffusion and helium release characteristics of the /sup 238/PuO/sub 2/ heat source used in radioisotopic thermoelectric generators  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

An analytical model is described that was developed to simulate multiconstituent diffusion within a heat source sphere, helium generation within a heat source sphere, and helium release from the surface of a heat source sphere into the surrounding environment. The model represents the first attempt to simulate multiconstituent mass transport using the continuum thermomechanical theory of mixtures and demonstrates that this theory is a viable alternative to irreversible thermodynamics.

McLaughlin, B.D.

1976-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

334

Environmental and radiological safety studies: interaction of /sup 238/PuO/sub 2/ heat sources with terrestrial and aquatic environments. Progress report, April 1- June 30, 1982  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Although existing radioisotope thermoelectric generator designs have proved more than adequately safe, more information is continually sought about the heat sources to improve their safety. The work here includes studies of the effects on the heat sources on terrestrial and aquatic environments and also of the effects of the heat sources on various simulated environments. This progress report presents recent data from environmental chamber and aquatic experiments and gives the present status of the experiments.

Matlack, G.M.; Patterson, J.H.; Stalnaker, N.D.

1982-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

335

Environmental and radiological safety studies: Interaction of /sup 238/PuO/sub 2/ heat sources with terrestrial and aquatic environments. Progress report, September 26-December 25, 1981  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Although existing radioisotope thermoelectric generator designs have proved more than adequately safe, more information is continually sought about the heat sources to improve their safety. The work here includes studies of the effects on the heat sources of terrestrial and aquatic environments and also of the effect of the heat sources on various simulated environments. This progress report presents recent data from environmental chamber and aquatic experiments and gives the present status of the experiments.

Matlack, G.M.; Patterson, J.H.

1982-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

336

[2  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

AC Argentina AR Aruba AA Bahamas, The BF Barbados BB Belize BH Bolivia BL Brazil BR ... E.2 World Petroleum Consumption (Btu), 1980-2006 Energy Information Administration

337

2  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

in producing products such as polyethylene, polypropylene, methanol, diesel, naphtha and LPG, etc. NETL CO2 Capture Technology Meeting, July 9-12, 2012 in Pittsburgh, PA CHINA...

338

2  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

F - FLAME SCANNERS AND SENSORS Figures F.1 and F.2 depict the gas detector scan footprint (blue). The six combustible gas detectors monitor both hydrogen and natural gas levels in...

339

Potential health risks from postulated accidents involving the Pu-238 RTG (radioisotope thermoelectric generator) on the Ulysses solar exploration mission  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Potential radiation impacts from launch of the Ulysses solar exploration experiment were evaluated using eight postulated accident scenarios. Lifetime individual dose estimates rarely exceeded 1 mrem. Most of the potential health effects would come from inhalation exposures immediately after an accident, rather than from ingestion of contaminated food or water, or from inhalation of resuspended plutonium from contaminated ground. For local Florida accidents (that is, during the first minute after launch), an average source term accident was estimated to cause a total added cancer risk of up to 0.2 deaths. For accidents at later times after launch, a worldwide cancer risk of up to three cases was calculated (with a four in a million probability). Upper bound estimates were calculated to be about 10 times higher. 83 refs.

Goldman, M. (California Univ., Davis, CA (USA)); Nelson, R.C. (EG and G Idaho, Inc., Idaho Falls, ID (USA)); Bollinger, L. (Air Force Inspection and Safety Center, Kirtland AFB, NM (USA)); Hoover, M.D. (Lovelace Biomedical and Environmental Research Inst., Albuquerque, NM (USA). Inhalation Toxicology Research Inst.); Templeton, W. (Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (USA)); Anspaugh, L. (Lawren

1990-11-02T23:59:59.000Z

340

Theoretical analyses of (n,xn) reactions on sup 235 U, sup 238 U, sup 237 Np, and sup 239 Pu for ENDF/B-VI  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Theoretical analyses were performed of neutron-induced reactions on {sup 235}U, {sup 238}U, {sup 237}Np, and {sup 239}Pu between 0.01 and 20 MeV in order to calculate neutron emission cross sections and spectra for ENDF/B-VI evaluations. Coupled-channel optical model potentials were obtained for each target nucleus by fitting total, elastic, and inelastic scattering cross section data, as well as low-energy average resonance data. The resulting deformed optical model potentials were used to calculate direct (n,n{prime}) cross sections and transmission coefficients for use in Hauser-Feshbach statistical theory analyses. A fission model with multiple barrier representation, width fluctuation corrections, and preequilibrium corrections were included in the analyses. Direct cross sections for higher-lying vibrational states were calculated using DWBA theory, normalized using B(E{ell}) values determined from (d,d{prime}) and Coulomb excitation data, where available, and from systematics otherwise. Initial fission barrier parameters and transition state density enhancements appropriate to the compound systems involved were obtained from previous analyses, especially fits to charged-particle fission probability data. The parameters for the fission model were adjusted for each target system to obtain optimum agreement with direct (n,f) cross section measurements, taking account of the various multichance fission channels, that is, the different compound systems involved. The results from these analyses were used to calculate most of the neutron (n,n), (n,n{prime}), and (n,xn) cross section data in the ENDF/B/VI evaluations for the above nuclei, and all of the energy-angle correlated spectra. The deformed optical model and fission model parameterizations are described. Comparisons are given between the results of these analyses and the previous ENDF/B-V evaluations as well as with the available experimental data. 14 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

Young, P.G.; Arthur, E.D.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "2 glenwood pu" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

2  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Oil & Natural Gas Technology Oil & Natural Gas Technology DOE Award No.: ESD12-011 Topical Report Properties of Hydrate-Bearing Sediments Subjected to Changing Gas Compositions Submitted by: Timothy Kneafsey, Project PI Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory 1 Cyclotron Road Berkeley, CA 94720 Prepared for: United States Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory Submitted: 2/5/2013 August 7, 2012 Office of Fossil Energy 2 Behavior of methane hydrate when exposed to a 23% carbon dioxide -77% nitrogen gas under conditions similar to the ConocoPhillips 2012 Iġnik Sikumi Gas Hydrate Field Trial Topical Report Timothy J. Kneafsey Seiji Nakagawa Sharon E. Borglin February 5, 2013 ESD12-011 Tasks 2.0 and 3.0 Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

342

2  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

- SYSTEM DRAWINGS - SYSTEM DRAWINGS Figure A-1. APS Alternative Fuel Pilot Plant Facility Plan View Figure A-2. APS Alternative Pilot Plant Production Equipment Plan Figure A-3. APS Alternative Pilot Plant Production And Control Room Plan View Figure A-4. APS Alternative Pilot Plant Production Hydrogen System Piping and Instrument Diagram Figure A-5. APS Alternative Pilot Plant Production CNG System Piping and Instrument Diagram Appendix A - System Drawings: Page 1 Figure A-1. APS Alternative Fuel Pilot Plant Facility Plan View Appendix A - System Drawings: Page 2 Figure A-2. APS Alternative Pilot Plant Production Equipment Plan Appendix A - System Drawings: Page 4 Figure A-3. APS Alternative Pilot Plant Production And Control Room Plan View Appendix A - System Drawings: Page 6

343

2  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

C - GASEOUS HYDROGEN PIPING SPECIFICATION C - GASEOUS HYDROGEN PIPING SPECIFICATION February 19, 2001, Rev. 0 C.1 GENERAL This specification provides guidelines for designing and installing the gaseous low-pressure (<275 psig) and high-pressure (276 to 7,000 psig) high-purity hydrogen process piping. For both low- and high- pressure, stainless steel (303, 304, 316) tubing, piping, fittings, and components are preferred. Piping systems should be designed and built to meet ANSI/ASME B31.3 for process piping. Specifications for the tubing are ASTM A269 TP 304 and 316. Maximum hardness is 80 Rb. C.2 MAXIMUM ALLOWABLE WORKING PRESSURE Maximum allowable working pressures (MAWP) for commercially available tubing and piping are given below. Piping systems must be designed so that the process pressure of the gas will not exceed the

344

2  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Fuel Cycle Subcommittee Fuel Cycle Subcommittee of the Nuclear Energy Advisory Committee December 9, 2010 Washington D.C. Burton Richter (Chairman) Darleane Hoffman Raymond Juzaitis Sekazi Mtingwa Ron Omberg Joy Rempe Dominique Warin 2 1. Introduction and Summary The Fuel Cycle Subcommittee (FCSC) of NEAC met in Washington, August 17- 19, 2010. DOE's new science-based approach to all matters related to nuclear energy is being implemented. The general approach was outlined to NEAC in the briefing on the NE Roadmap. There are many new directions being considered, and this meeting of the FCSC was to brief the Subcommittee on new directions in nuclear energy that might go beyond our present 4.5% enriched LWRs. The goal is to develop new concepts that have advantages over present systems in some combination of cost,

345

REDUCTION IN Pu RECOVERY PROCESSES  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method is described for reducing plutonium from the hexavalent to the tetravalent state in a carrier precipitation process for separating plutonium and nuclear fission products. In accordance with the invention oxalate ions are incorporated in the hexavalent plutoniumcontaining solution prior to a step of precipitating lanthanum fluoride in the solution.

Ritter, D.M.; Black, R.P.S.

1959-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

346

2  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

G - COMPRESSED NATURAL GAS SYSTEM OPERATIONS G - COMPRESSED NATURAL GAS SYSTEM OPERATIONS Rev. 0, July 9, 2001 G.1 NORMAL STARTUP To conduct normal startup, proceed as follows: 1. Open the supply from Southwest Gas (V-101) and activate AOV-102. a. Open one filter (V-105/V-108 or V-109/V-112), with the other filter line closed and filter drains closed. b. Verify that the SWG supply pressure is 30 psi (PI 104 and PI 118). c. Verify that the blowdown filter is set to drain. 2. Open the by-pass supply to Gemini V-119 and V-18. 3. Gemini discharge valve configuration: a. Open V-19, -20, -20A. b. Valve into operation one set of coalescening filters: Open V-21 and V-22 and Close V-23 and V-24 Or Close V-21 and V-22 and Open V-23 and V-24. 4. Open V-25 at fill and dispenser cabinet 1. 5. Optional the booster blower or Hy-Bon compressor:

347

Chemical thermodynamics of nuclear materials. IX. High temperature heat capacity of plutonium-3. 2 at. % gallium alloy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The heat capacity of delta-stabilized plutonium (Pu - 3.2 at. % Ga) has been determined from 330 to 700/sup 0/K by an adiabatic calorimeter. The heat capacity for this alloy may be expressed by: Cp (Pu-3.2 at. % Ga)/(J K/sup -1/ mol/sup -1/) = 39.249 - 0.0264 (T/K) + 3.595 x 10/sup 5/ (T/K)/sup 2/ - 2.506 x 10/sup 5/ (K/T)/sup 2/. It was found that a large contribution to the heat capacity is due to the electronic heat capacity. The thermal functions for this plutonium-gallium alloy are calculated to 700/sup 0/K.

Adams, R.O.; Oetting, F.L.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

348

Monte Carlo Modelling of the Electron Spectra of 235U- and 239Pu- Films, Irradiated by Thermal Neutrons, Due to All Possible Mechanisms Excluding b-Decay. Comparison With Experiment  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The electron energy spectra, not connected to b-decay, of 235U- and 239Pu-films, irradiated by thermal neutrons, obtained by a Monte Carlo method is presented in the given work. The modelling was performed with the help of a computer code MCNP4C (Monte Carlo Neutron Photon transport code system), allowing to carry out the computer experiments on joint transport of neutrons, photons and electrons. The experiment geometry and the parameters of an irradiation were the same, as in [11] (the thickness of a foil varied only). As a result of computer experiments, the electron spectra was obtained for the samples of 235U, 239Pu and uranium dioxide of 93 % enrichment representing a set of films of 22 mm in diameter and different thickness: 0,001 mm, 0,005 mm, 0,02 mm, 0,01 mm, 0,1 mm, 1,0 mm; and also for the uranium dioxide film of 93 % enrichment (diameter 22 mm and thickness 0,01mm), located between two protective 0,025 mm aluminium disks (the conditions of experiment in [11]) and the electron spectrum was fixed at the output surface of a protective disk. The comparative analysis of the experimental [11] and calculated b--spectra is carried out.

V. D. Rusova; V. N. Pavlovychb; V. A. Tarasova; S. V. Iaroshenkob; D. A. Litvinova

2004-07-05T23:59:59.000Z

349

Monte Carlo Modelling of the Electron Spectra of 235U- and 239Pu- Films, Irradiated by Thermal Neutrons, Due to All Possible Mechanisms Excluding b-Decay. Comparison With Experiment  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The electron energy spectra, not connected to b-decay, of 235U- and 239Pu-films, irradiated by thermal neutrons, obtained by a Monte Carlo method is presented in the given work. The modelling was performed with the help of a computer code MCNP4C (Monte Carlo Neutron Photon transport code system), allowing to carry out the computer experiments on joint transport of neutrons, photons and electrons. The experiment geometry and the parameters of an irradiation were the same, as in [11] (the thickness of a foil varied only). As a result of computer experiments, the electron spectra was obtained for the samples of 235U, 239Pu and uranium dioxide of 93 % enrichment representing a set of films of 22 mm in diameter and different thickness: 0,001 mm, 0,005 mm, 0,02 mm, 0,01 mm, 0,1 mm, 1,0 mm; and also for the uranium dioxide film of 93 % enrichment (diameter 22 mm and thickness 0,01mm), located between two protective 0,025 mm aluminium disks (the conditions of experiment in [11]) and the electron spectrum was fixed at...

Rusova, V D; Tarasova, V A; Iaroshenkob, S V; Litvinova, D A

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

350

Calibration of a long counter for fast neutrons with energies from 2 to 14 MeV  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

To determine if a Hansen and McKibben type shielded long counter has a flat response from 2 MeV to 14 Mev detector efficiency was experimentally measured using a PuBe source. Calculations using the Monte Carlo program, MCNP, were performed to determine the efficiency of the detector for both PuBe and 14 MeV neutrons. The detector used a boron triflouride proportional counter as its counting device. Measurements were made using two 1 0 curie PuBe neutron sources (combined source strength of 4.02E+07 neutrons/second) to determine the detectors efficiency at the mean energy of the source, 4.3 MeV. The detector was found to have an efficiency of 0.85 counts-centimeter2/neutron at a source to detector distance of 1 meter. This compares favorably with previous measurements with long counters of similar configuration. The determination of the counter's effective center indicated that the effective center for the counter is 8.7 + 0.1 centimeters behind the front face of the detector. Attempts to use foil activation to determine the flux at the counter proved unsuccessful as the source strength was insufficient to activate the foils sufficiently. The Monte Carlo code, MCNP, was used to model a 150 KeV neutron generator source for 14 MeV neutrons, and the combined 1 0 Ci PuBe source experiment in order to determine the (n, a) reaction rate in the BF3 detector of the long counter, thereby simulating the long counter's response. For the PuBe source the efficiency of the long counter was computed to be 0.54 counts-centimeter2/particle at a source to detector distance of 60 centimeters. This is slightly less than the 0.6 counts-centimeter2/neutron achieved experimentally with the actual long counter, for a 20 Ci PuBe source prior to applying the correction for the detector's effective center, at the same distance. The MCNP model also was used to determined a long counter efficiency of 0.39 counts-centimeter2/particle for 14.74 MeV neutrons at a source to detector distance of 60 centimeters. This suggests that the long counter response is not flat over the 2 to 14 MeV energy range; however, tests indicated that the long counters efficiency on depends on the BF3 tube position in the long counter and that a flatter response over the energy range of interest may be obtained by adjusting the position of the BF3 tube.

Orr, Michael Lee

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

351

Peraluminous and Peralkaline Effects on Gd2O3 and La2O3 Solubilities in Sodium-Alumino-Borosilicate Glasses  

SciTech Connect

La (III) and Gd (III) are considered as potential surrogates for Pu (III) in waste glass. Gd is also a neutron absorber. The peraluminous and peralkaline effects on Gd2O3 and La2O3 solubilities in a sodium-alumino-borosilicate glass system are presented. Baseline glasses used in this study have the following mole compositions: 60SiO2.15B2O3.xNa2O.(25-x) Al2O3, where x varies from 0 to 25.

Li, Liyu (BATTELLE (PACIFIC NW LAB)); Strachan, Denis M. (BATTELLE (PACIFIC NW LAB)); Li, Hong-Shi (ASSOC WESTERN UNIVERSITY); Davis, Linda L. (Associated Western Universities); Qian, Maoxu (ASSOC WESTERN UNIVERSITY); Gregory T Chandler; Xiangdong Feng

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

352

Mechanism of plutonium metal dissolution in HNO/sub 3/-HF-N/sub 2/H/sub 4/ solution  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

An oxidation-reduction balance of the products of the dissolution of plutonium metal and alloys in HNO/sub 3/-HF-N/sub 2/H/sub 4/ solution shows that the major reactions during dissolution are the reduction of nitrate to NH/sub 3/, N/sub 2/ and N/sub 2/O by the metal, and the oxidation of H free radicals to NH/sub 3/ by N/sub 2/H/sub 4/. Reactions between HNO/sub 3/ and N/sub 2/H/sub 4/ produce varying amounts of HN/sub 3/. The reaction rate is greater for delta-Pu than alpha-Pu, and is increased by higher concentrations of HF and HNO/sub 3/. The low yield of reduced nitrogen species indicates that nitrate is reduced on the metal surface without producing a significant concentration of species that react with N/sub 2/H/sub 4/. It is conjectured that intermediate Pu valences and electron transfer within the metal are involved. 7 refs., 3 tabs.

Karraker, D G

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

353

Preliminary Neutronics Design and Analysis of D2O Cooled High Conversion PWRs  

SciTech Connect

This report presents a neutronics analysis of tight-pitch D2O-cooled PWRs loaded with MOX fuel and focuses essentially on the Pu breeding potential of such reactors as well as on an important safety parameter, the void coefficient, which has to be negative. It is well known that fast reactors have a better neutron economy and are better suited than thermal reactors to breed fissile material from neutron capture in fertile material. Such fast reactors (e.g. sodium-cooled reactors) usually rely on technologies that are very different from those of existing water-cooled reactors and are probably more expensive. This report investigates another possibility to obtain a fast neutron reactor while still relying mostly on a PWR technology by: (1) Tightening the lattice pitch to reduce the water-to-fuel volume ratio compared to that of a standard PWR. Water-to-fuel volume ratios of between 0.45 and 1 have been considered in this study while a value of about 2 is typical of standard PWRs, (2) Using D2O instead of H2O as a coolant. Indeed, because of its different neutron physics properties, the use of D2O hardens the neutron spectrum to an extent impossible with H2O when used in a tight-pitch lattice. The neutron spectra thus obtained are not as fast as those in sodium-cooled reactor but they can still be characterized as fast compared to that of standard PWR neutron spectra. In the phase space investigated in this study we did not find any configurations that would have, at the same time, a positive Pu mass balance (more Pu at the end than at the beginning of the irradiation) and a negative void coefficient. At this stage, the use of radial blankets has only been briefly addressed whereas the impact of axial blankets has been well defined. For example, with a D2O-to-fuel volume ratio of 0.45 and a core driver height of about 60 cm, the fissile Pu mass balance between the fresh fuel and the irradiated fuel (50 GWd/t) would be about -7.5% (i.e. there are 7.5% fewer fissile Pu isotopes at the end than at the beginning of the irradiation) and the void coefficient would be negative. The addition of 1 cm of U-238 blanket at the top and bottom of the fuel would bring the fissile Pu mass balance from -7.5% to -6.5% but would also impact the void coefficient in the wrong way. In fact, it turns out that the void coefficient is so sensitive to the presence of axial blanket that it limits its size to only a few cm for driver fuel height of about 50-60 cm. For reference, the fissile Pu mass balance is about -35% in a standard PWR MOX fuel such as those used in France. In order to reduce the fissile Pu deficit and potentially reach a true breeding regime (i.e. a positive Pu mass balance), it would be necessary to make extensive use of radial blankets, both internal and external. Even though this was not addressed in detail here, it is reasonable to believe that at least as much U-238 blanket subassemblies as MOX driver fuel subassemblies would be necessary to breed enough Pu to compensate for the Pu deficit in the driver fuel. Hence, whereas a relatively simple D2O-cooled PWR core design makes it possible to obtain a near-breeder core, it may be necessary to more than double the mass of heavy metal in the core as well as the mass of heavy metal to reprocess per unit of energy produced in order to breed the few percents of Pu missing to reach a true breeding regime. It may be interesting to quantify these aspects further in the future.

Hikaru Hiruta; Gilles Youinou

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

354

Biological effects of implanted nuclear energy sources for artificial heart devices. Progress report, September 1, 1975--August 31, 1976. [Heat dissipation from /sup 238/Pu power sources implanted in dogs  

SciTech Connect

A total of sixty dogs were implanted with radioisotope-powered artificial heart systems producing radiation fluxes similar to that of plutonium-238, but having no associated heat, at levels of from one to seventy times the radiation flux expected from a 30-watt plutonium-238 source. Results from studies lasting up to 6 years after implantation indicate that these animals, and by inference human beings, may be able to tolerate the radiation flux from 30-watt /sup 238/Pu power sources. Results of heat dissipation studies in calves indicate that it may be possible to induce a vascularized connective tissue capsule sufficient to dissipate 30 watts of additional heat from a surface area of approximately 500 cm sq., allowing a heat flux of 0.06 watts per cm sq.

Kallfelz, F.A.; Wentworth, R.A.; Cady, K.B.

1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

355

SUSCEPTIBILIT MAGNTIQUE DE QUELQUES SULFURES ET OXYDES DE PLUTONIUM  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

susceptibilite magnétique des sulfures de plutonium : PuS, Pu3S4, PU2S3CXI PuS2. Ces composes non conduc- teurs, semble-t-il, aussi pu3+. II. Prdparation des produits. - II.1. PURET? DES PRODUITS. - Le plutonium que'appuyant sur des mesures cristallographiques, que dans PuS2 et Pu2s3(x le plutonium ait la valence trois. Il

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

356

Role of microRNA?155 in dendritic cells and macrophages MiR?155 directly targets PU.1 and IL13R1.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??In search of genes differentially expressed between M1 (pro?Th1 or pro?inflammatory) and M2 (pro?Th2 or pro?tolerogenic) macrophages, BIC (microRNA 155 hosting gene) was found up (more)

Martinez?Nunez, Rocio Teresa

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

357

Mineralini tr poveikio miko dirvoemiui ir pu radialiajam prieaugiui Akmens cemento gamyklos ... ISSN 02357224. E k o l o g i j a (Vilnius). 2001. Nr. 1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A0 I 02 7,2 6,8 100,0 30 6,8 6,5 1020 Fosfogipsas (10 t/ha) Phosphogypsum (10 t/ha) A0 II 25 7,8 7 Fosfogipsas (5 t/ha) Phosphogypsum (5 t/ha) A0 II 25 7,8 7,2 25,5 33 2,3 4,5 130 T 1 520 7,4 7,2 25,5 7,0 2/ha veikliosios A0 II 25 7,8 7,2 30,0 32 2,0 4,9 1080 medþiagos) Mixture of phosphogypsum (5 t

358

Complexation of Plutonium (IV) with Fluoride at Variable Tempeartures  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for the complexation of Pu(IV) with fluoride. I = 2.2 molp.w. present work. Reaction Pu 4+ + HF PuF 3+ + H + t oI = 0) Ref. p.w. p.w. p.w. Pu 4+ + 2HF 2H + PuF 22+ + dis

Moore, Dean A.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

359

Plutonium Decontamination of Uranium using CO2 Cleaning  

SciTech Connect

A concern of the Department of Energy (DOE) Environmental Management (EM) and Defense Programs (DP), and of the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) and the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), is the disposition of thousands of legacy and recently generated plutonium (Pu)-contaminated, highly enriched uranium (HEU) parts. These parts take up needed vault space. This presents a serious problem for LLNL, as site limit could result in the stoppage of future weapons work. The Office of Fissile Materials Disposition (NN-60) will also face a similar problem as thousands of HEU parts will be created with the disassembly of site-return pits for plutonium recovery when the Pit Disassembly and Conversion Facility (PDCF) at the Savannah River Site (SRS) becomes operational. To send HEU to the Oak Ridge National Laboratory and the Y-12 Plant for disposition, the contamination for metal must be less than 20 disintegrations per minute (dpm) of swipable transuranic per 100 cm{sup 2} of surface area or the Pu bulk contamination for oxide must be less than 210 parts per billion (ppb). LANL has used the electrolytic process on Pu-contaminated HEU weapon parts with some success. However, this process requires that a different fixture be used for every configuration; each fixture cost approximately $10K. Moreover, electrolytic decontamination leaches the uranium metal substrate (no uranium or plutonium oxide) from the HEU part. The leaching rate at the uranium metal grain boundaries is higher than that of the grains and depends on the thickness of the uranium oxide layer. As the leaching liquid flows past the HEU part, it carries away plutonium oxide contamination and uranium oxide. The uneven uranium metal surface created by the leaching becomes a trap for plutonium oxide contamination. In addition, other DOE sites have used CO{sub 2} cleaning for Pu decontamination successfully. In the 1990's, the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory investigated this technology and showed that CO{sub 2} pellet blasting (or CO{sub 2} cleaning) reduced both fixed and smearable contamination on tools. In 1997, LLNL proved that even tritium contamination could be removed from a variety of different matrices using CO{sub 2}cleaning. CO{sub 2} cleaning is a non-toxic, nonconductive, nonabrasive decontamination process whose primary cleaning mechanisms are: (1) Impact of the CO{sub 2} pellets loosens the bond between the contaminant and the substrate. (2) CO{sub 2} pellets shatter and sublimate into a gaseous state with large expansion ({approx}800 times). The expanding CO{sub 2} gas forms a layer between the contaminant and the substrate that acts as a spatula and peels off the contaminant. (3) Cooling of the contaminant assists in breaking its bond with the substrate. Thus, LLNL conducted feasibility testing to determine if CO{sub 2} pellet blasting could remove Pu contamination (e.g., uranium oxide) from uranium metal without abrading the metal matrix. This report contains a summary of events and the results of this test.

Blau, M

2002-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

360

Plutonium Decontamination of Uranium using CO2 Cleaning  

SciTech Connect

A concern of the Department of Energy (DOE) Environmental Management (EM) and Defense Programs (DP), and of the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) and the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), is the disposition of thousands of legacy and recently generated plutonium (Pu)-contaminated, highly enriched uranium (HEU) parts. These parts take up needed vault space. This presents a serious problem for LLNL, as site limit could result in the stoppage of future weapons work. The Office of Fissile Materials Disposition (NN-60) will also face a similar problem as thousands of HEU parts will be created with the disassembly of site-return pits for plutonium recovery when the Pit Disassembly and Conversion Facility (PDCF) at the Savannah River Site (SRS) becomes operational. To send HEU to the Oak Ridge National Laboratory and the Y-12 Plant for disposition, the contamination for metal must be less than 20 disintegrations per minute (dpm) of swipable transuranic per 100 cm{sup 2} of surface area or the Pu bulk contamination for oxide must be less than 210 parts per billion (ppb). LANL has used the electrolytic process on Pu-contaminated HEU weapon parts with some success. However, this process requires that a different fixture be used for every configuration; each fixture cost approximately $10K. Moreover, electrolytic decontamination leaches the uranium metal substrate (no uranium or plutonium oxide) from the HEU part. The leaching rate at the uranium metal grain boundaries is higher than that of the grains and depends on the thickness of the uranium oxide layer. As the leaching liquid flows past the HEU part, it carries away plutonium oxide contamination and uranium oxide. The uneven uranium metal surface created by the leaching becomes a trap for plutonium oxide contamination. In addition, other DOE sites have used CO{sub 2} cleaning for Pu decontamination successfully. In the 1990's, the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory investigated this technology and showed that CO{sub 2} pellet blasting (or CO{sub 2} cleaning) reduced both fixed and smearable contamination on tools. In 1997, LLNL proved that even tritium contamination could be removed from a variety of different matrices using CO{sub 2}cleaning. CO{sub 2} cleaning is a non-toxic, nonconductive, nonabrasive decontamination process whose primary cleaning mechanisms are: (1) Impact of the CO{sub 2} pellets loosens the bond between the contaminant and the substrate. (2) CO{sub 2} pellets shatter and sublimate into a gaseous state with large expansion ({approx}800 times). The expanding CO{sub 2} gas forms a layer between the contaminant and the substrate that acts as a spatula and peels off the contaminant. (3) Cooling of the contaminant assists in breaking its bond with the substrate. Thus, LLNL conducted feasibility testing to determine if CO{sub 2} pellet blasting could remove Pu contamination (e.g., uranium oxide) from uranium metal without abrading the metal matrix. This report contains a summary of events and the results of this test.

Blau, M

2002-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "2 glenwood pu" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

I. Nuclear Production Reaction and Chemical Isolation Procedure for 240Am II. New Superheavy Element Isotopes: 242Pu(48Ca,5n)285-114  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

48 Ca, 5n) 285 114 nuclear reaction cross section. . . . .240 Am(n, f ) cross section 1.4 Nuclear properties of 2401.5 Nuclear reactions for the production of 240 Am . 2

Ellison, Paul Andrew

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

362

Estimation of multi-group cross section covariances for {sup 235,238}U, {sup 239}Pu, {sup 241}Am, {sup 56}Fe, {sup 23}Na and {sup 27}Al  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper presents the methodology used to estimate multi-group covariances for some major isotopes used in reactor physics. The starting point of this evaluation is the modelling of the neutron induced reactions based on nuclear reaction models with parameters. These latest are the vectors of uncertainties as they are absorbing uncertainties and correlation arising from the confrontation of nuclear reaction model to microscopic experiment. These uncertainties are then propagated towards multi-group cross sections. As major breakthroughs were then asked by nuclear reactor physicists to assess proper uncertainties to be used in applications, a solution is proposed by the use of integral experiment information at two different stages in the covariance estimation. In this paper, we will explain briefly the treatment of all type of uncertainties, including experimental ones (statistical and systematic) as well as those coming from validation of nuclear data on dedicated integral experiment (nuclear data oriented). We will illustrate the use of this methodology with various isotopes such as {sup 235,238}U, {sup 239}Pu, {sup 241}Am, {sup 56}Fe, {sup 23}Na and {sup 27}Al. (authors)

De Saint Jean, C.; Archier, P.; Noguere, G.; Litaize, O.; Vaglio-Gaudard, C.; Bernard, D.; Leray, O. [CEA, DEN, DER, Cadarache, F-13108 Saint-Paul-lez-Durance (France)

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

363

PAT-2 (Plutonium Air-Transportable Model 2) safety analysis report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The PAT-2 package is designed for the safe transport of plutonium and/or uranium in small quantities. The PAT-2 package is resistant to severe accidents, including that of a high-speed jet aircraft crash, and is designed to withstand such environments as extreme impact, crushing, puncturing and slashing loads, severe hydrocarbon-fueled fires, and deep underwater immersion, with no escape of contents. The package meets the requirements of 10 CFR 71 for Fissile Class I packages with a cargo of 15 grams of Pu-239, or other isotopic forms described herein, not to exceed 2 watts of thermal activity. This SAR presents design and oprational information including evaluations and analyses, test results, operating procedures, maintenance, and quality assurance information.

Andersen, J.A.; Davis, E.J.; Duffey, T.A.; Dupree, S.A.; George, O.L. Jr.; Ortiz, Z.

1981-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

364

Design and Nuclear-Safety Related Simulations of Bare-Pellet Test Irradiations for the Production of Pu-238 in the High Flux Isotope Reactor using COMSOL  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL)is developing technology to produce plutonium-238 for the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) as a power source material for powering vehicles while in deep-space[1]. The High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) of ORNL has been utilized to perform test irradiations of incapsulated neptunium oxide (NpO2) and aluminum powder bare pellets for purposes of understanding the performance of the pellets during irradiation[2]. Post irradiation examinations (PIE) are currently underway to assess the effect of temperature, thermal expansion, swelling due to gas production, fission products, and other phenomena

Freels, James D [ORNL; Jain, Prashant K [ORNL; Hobbs, Randy W [ORNL

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

365

Microsoft PowerPoint - Campbell-2.ppt  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

MCU Startup and Operations Summary MCU Startup and Operations Summary Seth Campbell ARP/MCU Process Engineer Washington Savannah River Co. May 20, 2009 Waste Management Technical Exchange LWO-LWE-2009-00131 2 MCU Startup and Operations Summary Agenda Mission Process Overview Test Results Startup Processing Results Issues & Resolution Examples Summary 3 MCU Startup and Operations Summary MCU Mission Process dissolved salt solution for disposal - Receive Pu/Sr depleted and clarified waste from ARP - Remove Cs-137 (DF ≥ 12) - Transfer to Tank 50H for Saltstone disposal Provide operational experience for SWPF - Equipment reliability - Process chemistry - Lessons learned 4 MCU Startup and Operations Summary MCU Design Basis Feed - ≤ 1.1 Ci/gal - CSS from 512-S (i.e. filtered) - 4 gpm nominal CSSX

366

Analytical Capability of Plasma Spectrometry Team  

SciTech Connect

Samples analyzed were: (1) Pu and U metal; (2) Pu oxide for nuclear fuel; (3) {sup 238}Pu oxide for heat source; and (4) Nuclear forensic samples - filters, swipes. Sample preparations that we did were: metal dissolution, marple filter dissolution, Pu oxide closed vessel acid digestion, and column separation to remove Pu.

Gallimore, David L. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2012-07-19T23:59:59.000Z

367

STUDIES OF ACTINIDE SORPTION ON SELECTED GEOLOGIC MATERIALS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and Colloidal Nature of Pu (IV) Polymer" the XXIV thTh I. X-rays Uranium u U Neptunium Plutonium Np Pu 86 and29 kev *Pu Pu Pu 2A3 Am A Np K X-rays 75 kev y-rays

Silva, R.J.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

368

Influence of Sources on Plutonium Mobility and Oxidation State Transformations in Vadose Zone Sediments  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Well-defined solid sources of Pu(III) (PuCl3), Pu(IV) (Pu (NO3)4 and Pu (C2O4)2), and Pu(VI) (PuO2(NO3)2) were placed in lysimeters containing vadose zone sediments and exposed to natural weather conditions for 2 or 11 years. The objective of this study was to measure the release rate of Pu and the changes in the Pu oxidation states from these Pu sources with the intent to develop a reactive transport model source-term. Pu(III) and Pu(IV) sources had identical Pu concentration depth profiles and similar Pu release rates. Source release data indicate that PuIV(C2O4)2 was the least mobile, whereas PuVIO2(NO3)2 was the most mobile. Synchrotron X-ray fluorescence (SXRF) revealed that Pu was very unevenly distributed on the sediment and Mn concentrations were too low (630 mg kg-1) and perhaps of the wrong mineralogy to influence Pu distribution. The high stability of sorbed Pu(IV) is proposed to be due to the formation of a stable hydrolyzed Pu(IV) surface species. Plutonium X-ray absorption near-edge spectroscopy (XANES) analysis conducted on sediment recovered at the end of the study from the PuIV(NO3)4- and PuIIICl3-amended lysimeters contained essentially identical Pu distributions: approximately 37% Pu(III), 67% Pu(IV), 0% Pu(V), and 0% Pu(VI). These results were similar to those using a wet chemistry Pu oxidation state assay, except the latter method did not detect any Pu(III) present on the sediment but instead indicated that 93-98% of the Pu existed as Pu(IV). This discrepancy was likely attributable to incomplete extraction of sediment Pu(III) by the wet chemistry method. Although Pu has been known to exist in the +3 oxidation state under microbially induced reducing conditions for decades, to our knowledge, this is the first observation of steady-state Pu(III) in association with natural sediments. On the basis of thermodynamic considerations, Pu(III) has a wide potential distribution, especially in acidic environments, and as such may warrant further investigation.

Kaplan,D.; Powell, B.; Duff, M.; Demirkanli, D.; Denham, M.; Fjeld, R.; Molz, F.

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

369

2nd World Congress on Integrated Computational Materials ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Nov 15, 2012 ... PI-10: Coupled Composition-Microstructure Modeling of a U-Pu-Zr Fuel PI-11: Creating an Integrated, Community-Sourced, First-Principles...

370

Comparison of Gas Puff Imaging Data in NSTX with the DEGAS 2 Simulation  

SciTech Connect

Gas-Pu -Imaging (GPI) is a two dimensional diagnostic which measures the edge D? light emission from a neutral D? gas puff near the outer mid- plane of the National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX). DEGAS 2 is a 3-D Monte Carlo code used to model neutral transport and plasma-neutral interactions in fusion plasmas. In this paper, we compare the measured and modeled D? light emission for speci c NSTX experiments. Both the simulated spatial distribution and radiance of the D? light emission agree well with the experimental data obtained between Edge Localized Modes (ELMs) in ELMy H-modes.

B. Cao, D.P. Stotler, S.J. Zweben, M. Bell, A.Diallo, B. LeBlanc

2013-04-10T23:59:59.000Z

371

Determining Plutonium Mass in Spent Fuel with Nondestructive Assay Techniques -- Preliminary Modeling Results Emphasizing Integration among Techniques  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Near 2 MeV in U and 239 Pu, PHYSICAL REVIEW C 78, 041601(C. Rudy, Determination of Pu in Spent Fuel Assemblies by X-Induced XRF to Quantify the Pu Content in PWR Spent Nuclear

Tobin, S. J.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

372

Tradeoff between spoofing and jamming a Cognitive Radio link  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Numerical results (Scenario ?) 5.1 N R , PU = 1, N R , SU =1 ... . 36 5.2 N R , PU = 1, N R , SU =10 . . . 44 5.3 N R , PU = 1, N R , SU =

Wang, Jing

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

373

ANALYSIS OF 2H-EVAPORATOR SCALE POT BOTTOM SAMPLE [HTF-13-11-28H  

SciTech Connect

Savannah River Remediation (SRR) is planning to remove a buildup of sodium aluminosilicate scale from the 2H-evaporator pot by loading and soaking the pot with heated 1.5 M nitric acid solution. Sampling and analysis of the scale material from the 2H evaporator has been performed so that the evaporator can be chemically cleaned beginning July of 2013. Historically, since the operation of the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF), silicon in the DWPF recycle stream combines with aluminum in the typical tank farm supernate to form sodium aluminosilicate scale mineral deposits in the 2H-evaporator pot and gravity drain line. The 2H-evaporator scale samples analyzed by Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) came from the bottom cone sections of the 2H-evaporator pot. The sample holder from the 2Hevaporator wall was virtually empty and was not included in the analysis. It is worth noting that after the delivery of these 2H-evaporator scale samples to SRNL for the analyses, the plant customer determined that the 2H evaporator could be operated for additional period prior to requiring cleaning. Therefore, there was no need for expedited sample analysis as was presented in the Technical Task Request. However, a second set of 2H evaporator scale samples were expected in May of 2013, which would need expedited sample analysis. X-ray diffraction analysis (XRD) confirmed the bottom cone section sample from the 2Hevaporator pot consisted of nitrated cancrinite, (a crystalline sodium aluminosilicate solid), clarkeite and uranium oxide. There were also mercury compound XRD peaks which could not be matched and further X-ray fluorescence (XRF) analysis of the sample confirmed the existence of elemental mercury or mercuric oxide. On ?as received? basis, the scale contained an average of 7.09E+00 wt % total uranium (n = 3; st.dev. = 8.31E-01 wt %) with a U-235 enrichment of 5.80E-01 % (n = 3; st.dev. = 3.96E-02 %). The measured U-238 concentration was 7.05E+00 wt % (n=3, st. dev. = 8.25E-01 wt %). Analyses results for Pu-238 and Pu-239, and Pu-241 are 7.06E-05 ? 7.63E-06 wt %, 9.45E-04 ? 3.52E-05 wt %, and <2.24E-06 wt %, respectively. These results are provided so that SRR can calculate the equivalent uranium-235 concentrations for the NCSA. Because this 2H evaporator pot bottom scale sample contained a significant amount of elemental mercury (11.7 wt % average), it is recommended that analysis for mercury be included in future Technical Task Requests on 2H evaporator sample analysis at SRNL. Results confirm that the uranium contained in the scale remains depleted with respect to natural uranium. SRNL did not calculate an equivalent U-235 enrichment, which takes into account other fissionable isotopes U-233, Pu-239 and Pu-241.

Oji, L.

2013-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

374

U.S. Department of Energy Categorical Exclusion ...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

River Site AikenAikenSouth Carolina One new colorimeter is needed for plutonium (Pu) processing in Phase 2. The colorimeter will determine the Pu concentration in the...

375

PowerPoint Presentation  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Pressure - 830 psi CAES Aquifer Storage System Geology of Iowa Mt. Simon Sandstone Jordan Sandstone St. Peter Sandstone Glenwood Fm. Precambrian Geology of Iowa Dallas Center...

376

CONCENTRATION OF Pu USING OXALATE TYPE CARRIER  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method is given for dissolving and reprecipitating an oxalate carrier precipitate in a carrier precipitation process for separating and recovering plutonium from an aqueous solution. Uranous oxalate, together with plutonium being carried thereby, is dissolved in an aqueous alkaline solution. Suitable alkaline reagents are the carbonates and oxulates of the alkali metals and ammonium. An oxidizing agent selected from hydroxylamine and hydrogen peroxide is then added to the alkaline solution, thereby oxidizing uranium to the hexavalent state. The resulting solution is then acidified and a source of uranous ions provided in the acidified solution, thereby forming a second plutoniumcarrying uranous oxalate precipitate.

Ritter, D.M.; Black, R.P.S.

1960-04-19T23:59:59.000Z

377

CONCENTRATION OF Pu USING AN IODATE PRECIPITATE  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method is given for separating plutonium from lanthanum in a lanthanum fluoride carrier precipitation process for the recovery of plutonium values from an aqueous solution. The carrier precipitation process includes the steps of forming a lanthanum fluoride precipi- . tate, thereby carrying plutonium out of solution, metathesizing the fluoride precipitate to a hydroxide precipitate, and then dissolving the hydroxide precipitate in nitric acid. In accordance with the invention, the nitric acid solution, which contains plutonium and lanthanum, is made 0.05 to 0.15 molar in potassium iodate. thereby precipitating plutonium as plutonous iodate and the plutonous iodate is separated from the lanthanum- containing supernatant solution.

Fries, B.A.

1960-02-23T23:59:59.000Z

378

Thermodynamic assessment of Pu-based alloys  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Symposium, Hume-Rothery Award Symposium: Thermodynamics and Kinetics of ... Calphad Data and File Repositories for the Development of Design Tools for...

379

BISMUTH PHOSPHATE CARRIER PROCESS FOR Pu RECOVERY  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An improvement in the bismuth phosphate carrier precipitation process for recovering plutonium is described. It has been found that a more granular and more easily filterable carrier precipitiite is formed if the addition of the bismuth and phosphate ions is effected by first adding 9/10 of the bismuth ions necessary, then slowly adding all of the source of the phosphate ions to be incorporated in the precipitate, while digesting at 75 C and afterwards incorporating the remainder of the total bismuth ions necessary

Finzel, T.G.

1959-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

380

Calorimetry of low mass Pu239 items  

SciTech Connect

Calorimetric assay has the reputation of providing the highest precision and accuracy of all nondestructive assay measurements. Unfortunately, non-destructive assay practitioners and measurement consumers often extend, inappropriately, the high precision and accuracy of calorimetric assay to very low mass items. One purpose of this document is to present more realistic expectations for the random uncertainties associated with calorimetric assay for weapons grade plutonium items with masses of 200 grams or less.

Cremers, Teresa L [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Sampson, Thomas E [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "2 glenwood pu" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Plutonium stabilization and handling (PuSH)  

SciTech Connect

This Functional Design Criteria (FDC) addresses construction of a Stabilization and Packaging System (SPS) to oxidize and package for long term storage remaining plutonium-bearing special nuclear materials currently in inventory at the Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP), and modification of vault equipment to allow storage of resulting packages of stabilized SNM for up to fifty years. The major sections of the project are: site preparation; SPS Procurement, Installation, and Testing; storage vault modification; and characterization equipment additions. The SPS will be procured as part of a Department of Energy nationwide common procurement. Specific design crit1460eria for the SPS have been extracted from that contract and are contained in an appendix to this document.

Weiss, E.V.

1997-01-23T23:59:59.000Z

382

AFCI-2.0 Library of Neutron Cross Section Covariances  

SciTech Connect

Neutron cross section covariance library has been under development by BNL-LANL collaborative effort over the last three years. The primary purpose of the library is to provide covariances for the Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative (AFCI) data adjustment project, which is focusing on the needs of fast advanced burner reactors. The covariances refer to central values given in the 2006 release of the U.S. neutron evaluated library ENDF/B-VII. The preliminary version (AFCI-2.0beta) has been completed in October 2010 and made available to the users for comments. In the final 2.0 release, covariances for a few materials were updated, in particular new LANL evaluations for {sup 238,240}Pu and {sup 241}Am were adopted. BNL was responsible for covariances for structural materials and fission products, management of the library and coordination of the work, while LANL was in charge of covariances for light nuclei and for actinides.

Herman, M.; Herman,M.; Oblozinsky,P.; Mattoon,C.; Pigni,M.; Hoblit,S.; Mughabghab,S.F.; Sonzogni,A.; Talou,P.; Chadwick,M.B.; Hale.G.M.; Kahler,A.C.; Kawano,T.; Little,R.C.; Young,P.G.

2011-06-26T23:59:59.000Z

383

GSW2013-v2.11-FINAL.pptx  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

l ogic i nstrucCons - L---pipe f or l oads, s tores, a nd c ache m anagement Double F PU s upports - standard P owerPC i nstrucCons ( executed o n f pu0) - SIMD i nstrucCons f...

384

RussiaLLNL2-web.indd  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

perform numerical quantum mechanical studies of perform numerical quantum mechanical studies of material properties of selected actinides at or near ambient pressure (~1 atmosphere) and with temperatures in the range of T = 0 K to near room temperature (T = 300 K) to better understand the nature of highly correlated electron systems. This project included a study of Np, including equilibrium geometry, total and partial density of states, magnetic moments, and diff erential with respect to energy magnetic moments. In addition, it provided comparison of the magnetic and electronic properties in the row U-Np-Pu-Am-Cm. Calculations of the total and partial density of states, and of the magnetic structure for Pu 3 Al, Pu 3 Ga and Pu 3 In were performed. In addition, the formation energies for non-spin-polarized and spin-polarized cases were evaluated.

385

1: Mass asymmetric fission barriers for {sup 98}Mo; 2: Synthesis and characterization of actinide-specific chelating agents  

SciTech Connect

Excitation functions have been measured for complex fragment emission from the compound nucleus {sup 98}Mo, produced by the reaction of {sup 86}Kr with {sup 12}C. Mass asymmetric fission barriers have been obtained by fitting the excitation functions with a transition state formalism. The extracted barriers are {approximately} 5.7 MeV higher, on average, than the calculations of the Rotating Finite Range Model (RFRM). These data clearly show an isospin dependence of the conditional barriers when compared with the extracted barriers from {sup 90}Mo and {sup 94}Mo. Eleven different liquid/liquid extractants were synthesized based upon the chelating moieties 3,2-HOPO and 3,4-HOPO; additionally, two liquid/liquid extractants based upon the 1,2-HOPO chelating moiety were obtained for extraction studies. The Pu(IV) extractions, quite surprisingly, yielded results that were very different from the Fe(III) extractions. The first trend remained the same: the 1,2-HOPOs were the best extractants, followed closely by the 3,2-HOPOs, followed by the 3,4-HOPOs; but in these Pu(IV) extractions the 3,4-HOPOs performed much better than in the Fe(III) extractions. 129 refs.

Veeck, A.C. [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States). Dept. of Chemistry]|[Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States). Glenn T. Seaborg Inst. for Transactinium Science]|[Lawrence Berkeley National Lab., CA (United States). Nuclear Science Div.

1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

386

--No Title--  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Serial Number (Teflon bottle ): Serial Number (Teflon bottle ): 238 Pu 239 Pu 240 Pu 241 Pu 242 Pu 244 Pu 238 Pu 239 Pu 240 Pu 241 Pu 242 Pu 244 Pu Atom Percent*: 0.00419...

387

The solubility of hydrogen and deuterium in alloyed, unalloyed and impure plutonium metal  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Pressure-Composition-Temperature (PCT) data are presented for the plutonium-hydrogen (Pu-H) and plutonium-deuterium (Pu-D) systems in the solubility region up to terminal solubility (precipitation of PuH{sub 2}). The heats of solution for PuH{sub s} and PuD{sub s} are determined from PCT data in the ranges 350-625 C for gallium alloyed Pu and 400-575 C for unalloyed Pu. The solubility of high purity plutonium alloyed with 2 at.% gallium is compared to high purity unalloyed plutonium. Significant differences are found in hydrogen solubility for unalloyed Pu versus gallium alloyed Pu. Differences in hydrogen solubility due to an apparent phase change are observable in the alloyed and unalloyed solubilities. The effect of iron impurities on Pu-Ga alloyed Pu is shown via hydrogen solubility data as preventing complete homogenization.

Richmond, Scott [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Bridgewater, Jon S [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Ward, John W [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Allen, Thomas A [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

388

Strongly Anharmonic Phonon Dynamics of Cuprite Ag2O Studied by ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Atomistic Modeling of Radiation Damage in bcc Uranium Atomistic Modeling of Thermodynamic Properties of Pu-Ga Alloys Based on the Invar Mechanism.

389

Table CE2-3c. Space-Heating Energy Consumption in U.S. Households ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Physical Units (PU) per Household4,a Physical Units of Space-Heating Consumption per Household,3 Where the Main Space-Heating Fuel Is:

390

Examining 239Pu and 240Pu Nuclear Resonance Fluorescence Measurements on Spent Fuel for Nuclear Safeguards  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

S.D. Ambers, Assesment of Nuclear Resonance Fluorescencefor Spent Nuclear Fuel Assay, Inst. of Nucl. Mat. Man. ,clandestine material with nuclear resonance fluorescence,

Quiter, Brian

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

391

Microsoft Word - NEAC Meeting Agenda for June 9th v2.DOC  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Renoir Room, 2 Renoir Room, 2 nd Floor Washington, D.C. 20024 June 9, 2009 8:30 a.m. Continental Breakfast NEAC members 9:00 a.m. Welcome and Opening Remarks Chairman Bill Martin and Shane Johnson, Acting Assistant Secretary NE 9:15 a.m. Under Secretary Kristina Johnson 9:35 a.m. NE's FY 2009 Budget and FY 2010 Shane Johnson Budget Request 10:30 a.m. Break 10:45 a.m. University Programs Marsha Lambregts and John Gilligan (INL) 11:45 a.m. Lunch Degas Room 12:45 p.m. Advanced Nuclear Transformation Burton Richter Technology report for approval 1:15 p.m. Pu-238 report John Ahearne, Mike Corridini, and Alice Caponiti 2:00 p.m. ATR Management Assistance Dennis Miotla, Deputy Assist. Secretary, NE Subcommittee

392

X-ray analysis of samples from LH84-2  

SciTech Connect

Each of these samples was analyzed using automated, scanning x-ray diffractometry. The blue vanadium surface was run in the as-received condition, while a new method of sample preparation was used for the scale. This new method involved (1) grinding the sample in a conventional fashion, (2) mixing the sample with collodion to form a castable slurry, (3) pouring and spreading the mixture on a taut, clean sheet of plastic film, and (4) then covering the resultant sample with a second plastic film layer to form a sandwich-type assembly. Only a few milligrams of sample are needed for this procedure, and the resultant data is much more accurate than that obtained by the previously-used Debye-Scherrer technique. The phase analysis for this sample finds vanadium as the major constituent and minor constituents of V{sub 2}C and a surface contaminant, PuO{sub 2}.

Wallace, P.L.; Del Giudice, D.F.

1982-08-04T23:59:59.000Z

393

Radiation-induced non-equilibrium redox chemistry of plutonium: implications for environmental migration  

SciTech Connect

Static concentrations of plutonium oxidation states in solution and at surfaces in oxide-water systems are identified as non-equilibrium steady states. These kinetically controlled systems are described by redox cycles based on irreversible disproportionation of Pu(IV), Pu(V), and Pu(VI) in OH-bridged intermediate complexes and at OH-covered oxide surfaces. Steady state is fixed by continuous redox cycles driven by radioactivity-promoted electron-transfer and energetically favorable reactions of Pu(III) and Pu(VII) disproportionation products with H2O. A model based on the redox cycles accounts for the high steady-state [Pu] coexisting with Pu(IV) hydrous oxide at pH 0-15 and for predominance of Pu(V) and Pu(VI) in solution. The steady-state [Pu] depends on pH and the surface area of oxide in solution, but not on the initial Pu oxidation state. PuO{sub 2+x} formation is attributed to high Pu(V) concentrations existing at water-exposed oxide surfaces. Results infer that migration of Pu in an aqueous environment is controlled by kinetic factors unique to that site and that the predominant oxidation states in solution are Pu(V) and Pu(VI).

Haschke, J M; Siekhaus, W J

2009-02-11T23:59:59.000Z

394

Microsoft PowerPoint - IPRC_2012_Rappleye  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Method Method for Determining Deposition Rates in an Electrorefiner Using Electrode Potentials D. S. Rappleye, M. S. Yim, R. M. Cumberland 2012 International Pyroprocessing Research Conference August 26 - 29, 2012 Fontana, WI Objective * Determine species deposition rates at the cathode - Product optimization - Safeguards * Selected measures: - Electrode potentials - Cell current 8/28/2012 2 Background * "Normal" operating condition - Only uranium U U U U Zr Zr U U U U U U U U U Pu Pu 8/28/2012 3 Background * Two "abnormal" scenarios - Zirconium co-deposition U Zr Zr U U U U U U U U U Pu Pu 8/28/2012 4 Background * Two "abnormal" scenarios - Plutonium co-deposition Pu Pu U Pu U U U U Pu U U U U Pu Pu 8/28/2012 5 Theory * Notation and Symbols 8/28/2012 6 electrode area electrode potential Faraday's constant current i current density c mass transfer coefficient n electrons

395

Preliminary Neutronic Study of D2O-cooled High Conversion PWRs  

SciTech Connect

This paper presents a preliminary neutronics analysis of tight-pitch D2O-cooled high-conversion PWRs loaded with MOX fuel aiming at high Pu conversion and negative void coefficient. SCALE6.1 has been exclusively utilized for this study. The analyses are performed in two separate parts. The first part of this paper investigates the performance of axial and internal blankets and seeks break-even or near-breeder core even without the presence of radial blankets. The second part of this paper performs sensitivity and uncertainty analyses of integral parameters (keff and void coefficient) for selected systems in order to analyze the characters of this high-conversion PWR from different aspects.

Hikaru Hiruta; Gilles Youinou

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

396

Category 2 Case 2  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... 1.3.6.1.4.1.19376. 1.7.3.1.1.14.1 Patient Birth Place SD South Dakota 2.16.840.1.1138 83.6.92 FIPS 5-2 (State) SHALL ...

2013-05-30T23:59:59.000Z

397

Ion exchange separation of plutonium and gallium (1) resource and inventory requirements, (2) waste, emissions, and effluent, and (3) facility size  

SciTech Connect

The following report summarizes an effort intended to estimate within an order-of-magnitude the (1) resource and inventory requirements, (2) waste, emissions, and effluent amounts, and (3) facility size, for ion exchange (IX) separation of plutonium and gallium. This analysis is based upon processing 3.5 MT-Pu/yr. The technical basis for this summary is detailed in a separate document, {open_quotes}Preconceptual Design for Separation of Plutonium and Gallium by Ion Exchange{close_quotes}. The material balances of this separate document are based strictly on stoichiometric amounts rather than details of actual operating experience, in order to avoid classification as Unclassified Controlled Nuclear Information. This approximation neglets the thermodynamics and kinetics which can significantly impact the amount of reagents required. Consequently, the material resource requirements and waste amounts presented here would normally be considered minimums for processing 3.5 MT-Pu/yr; however, the author has compared the inventory estimates presented with that of an actual operating facility and found them similar. Additionally, the facility floor space presented here is based upon actual plutonium processing systems and can be considered a nominal estimate.

DeMuth, S.

1997-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

398

U.S. Department of Energy Categorical Exclusion ...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

is needed for plutonium (Pu) processing in Phase 2. The colorimeter will determine the Pu concentration in the raffinate line going to H-Canyon. B2.2 - Building and equipment...

399

Microsoft PowerPoint - Zr_behavior [Compatibility Mode  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Agency (JAEA) Pyrochemical Reprocessing for Spent LWR Fuels LWR Reduction product (U-Pu-MA +FP) MO 2 + 4e - M + 2O 2- Electrolytic reduction U-Pu-MA, U metal Spent oxide fuel...

400

Tape 2, Side 2  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Suri Kamara 270 323 1/2 29/12/61 Story of two women Suri Kamara 323 270 10/1 1964 Jan to Feb (not in...

Finnegan, Ruth

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "2 glenwood pu" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

BENCHMARKING UPGRADED HOTSPOT DOSE CALCULATIONS AGAINST MACCS2 RESULTS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The radiological consequence of interest for a documented safety analysis (DSA) is the centerline Total Effective Dose Equivalent (TEDE) incurred by the Maximally Exposed Offsite Individual (MOI) evaluated at the 95th percentile consequence level. An upgraded version of HotSpot (Version 2.07) has been developed with the capabilities to read site meteorological data and perform the necessary statistical calculations to determine the 95th percentile consequence result. These capabilities should allow HotSpot to join MACCS2 (Version 1.13.1) and GENII (Version 1.485) as radiological consequence toolbox codes in the Department of Energy (DOE) Safety Software Central Registry. Using the same meteorological data file, scenarios involving a one curie release of {sup 239}Pu were modeled in both HotSpot and MACCS2. Several sets of release conditions were modeled, and the results compared. In each case, input parameter specifications for each code were chosen to match one another as much as the codes would allow. The results from the two codes are in excellent agreement. Slight differences observed in results are explained by algorithm differences.

Brotherton, Kevin

2009-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

402

HB-LINE ANION EXCHANGE PURIFICATION OF AFS-2 PLUTONIUM FOR MOX  

SciTech Connect

Non-radioactive cerium (Ce) and radioactive plutonium (Pu) anion exchange column experiments using scaled HB-Line designs were performed to investigate the feasibility of using either gadolinium nitrate (Gd) or boric acid (B as H{sub 3}BO{sub 3}) as a neutron poison in the H-Canyon dissolution process. Expected typical concentrations of probable impurities were tested and the removal of these impurities by a decontamination wash was measured. Impurity concentrations are compared to two specifications - designated as Column A or Column B (most restrictive) - proposed for plutonium oxide (PuO{sub 2}) product shipped to the Mixed Oxide (MOX) Fuel Fabrication Facility (MFFF). Use of Gd as a neutron poison requires a larger volume of wash for the proposed Column A specification. Since boron (B) has a higher proposed specification and is more easily removed by washing, it appears to be the better candidate for use in the H-Canyon dissolution process. Some difficulty was observed in achieving the Column A specification due to the limited effectiveness that the wash step has in removing the residual B after {approx}4 BV's wash. However a combination of the experimental 10 BV's wash results and a calculated DF from the oxalate precipitation process yields an overall DF sufficient to meet the Column A specification. For those impurities (other than B) not removed by 10 BV's of wash, the impurity is either not expected to be present in the feedstock or process, or recommendations have been provided for improvement in the analytical detection/method or validation of calculated results. In summary, boron is recommended as the appropriate neutron poison for H-Canyon dissolution and impurities are expected to meet the Column A specification limits for oxide production in HB-Line.

Kyser, E.; King, W.

2012-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

403

HB-LINE ANION EXCHANGE PURIFICATION OF AFS-2 PLUTONIUM FOR MOX  

SciTech Connect

Non-radioactive cerium (Ce) and radioactive plutonium (Pu) anion exchange column experiments using scaled HB-Line designs were performed to investigate the feasibility of using either gadolinium nitrate (Gd) or boric acid (B as H{sub 3}BO{sub 3}) as a neutron poison in the H-Canyon dissolution process. Expected typical concentrations of probable impurities were tested and the removal of these impurities by a decontamination wash was measured. Impurity concentrations are compared to two specifications - designated as Column A or Column B (most restrictive) - proposed for plutonium oxide (PuO{sub 2}) product shipped to the Mixed Oxide (MOX) Fuel Fabrication Facility (MFFF). Use of Gd as a neutron poison requires a larger volume of wash for the proposed Column A specification. Since boron (B) has a higher proposed specification and is more easily removed by washing, it appears to be the better candidate for use in the H-Canyon dissolution process. Some difficulty was observed in achieving the Column A specification due to the limited effectiveness that the wash step has in removing the residual B after ~4 BV's wash. However a combination of the experimental 10 BV's wash results and a calculated DF from the oxalate precipitation process yields an overall DF sufficient to meet the Column A specification. For those impurities (other than B) not removed by 10 BV's of wash, the impurity is either not expected to be present in the feedstock or process, or recommendations have been provided for improvement in the analytical detection/method or validation of calculated results. In summary, boron is recommended as the appropriate neutron poison for H-Canyon dissolution and impurities are expected to meet the Column A specification limits for oxide production in HB-Line.

Kyser, E. A.; King, W. D.

2012-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

404

Transect 15:2 (fall 1997)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

H .L." .3NO 51H.L3}11' '5}1." .0 ~uOI~ '(A~oIO! H ;)U!rew pue 'U! 1 -nIOAa '~OIO~ JO . )d;)a HSJru II~q~W ;):JruH~UOI ~ un~ -;)q ;)A~q '(~OIO -! H ;)u! J~W pu~ 'u! 1nIOAa '

UC Natural Reserve System

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

405

Sorption Behavior and Morphology of Plutonium in the Presence of Goethite at 25 and 80C  

SciTech Connect

In this study, we examined the sorption behavior of Pu at elevated temperatures in the presence of one relevant mineral, goethite ({alpha}-FeOOH), over a range of concentrations that span solubility-controlled to adsorption-controlled concentrations. We focused on the sorptive behavior of two common forms of Pu: aqueous Pu(IV) and intrinsic Pu(IV) nano-colloids at 25 and 80 C in a dilute pH 8 NaCl/NaHCO{sub 3} solution. The morphology of Pu sorbed to goethite was characterized using transmission electron microscopy (TEM). We examined the relative stability of PuO{sub 2} precipitates, PuO{sub 2} nano-colloids, Pu{sub 4}O{sub 7} surface precipitates, and monomeric sorbed Pu as a function of temperature and over a time scale of months.

Zavarin, M; Zhao, P; Dai, Z; Carroll, S A; Kersting, A B

2012-06-11T23:59:59.000Z

406

Characterization of the C1 and C2 waste tanks located in the BVEST system at ORNL  

SciTech Connect

There was a major effort to sample and analyze the Active Liquid Low-Level Waste (LLLW) tanks at ORNL which include the Melton Valley Storage Tanks (MVST) and the Bethel Valley Evaporator Service Tanks (BVEST). The characterization data summarized in this report was needed to address waste processing options, address concerns dealing with the performance assessment (PA) data for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP), evaluate the waste characteristics with respect to the waste acceptance criteria (WAC) for WIPP and Nevada Test Site (NTS), address criticality concerns, and meet DOT requirements for transporting the waste. This report discusses the analytical characterization data for the supernatant and sludge in the BVEST waste tanks C-1 and C-2. The isotopic data presented in this report supports the position that fissile isotopes of uranium ({sup 233}U and {sup 235}U) and plutonium ({sup 239}Pu and {sup 241}Pu) were denatured as required by the administrative controls stated in the ORNL LLLW waste acceptance criteria (WAC). In general, the sludge in tanks C1 and C2 was found to be hazardous based on RCRA characteristics and the transuranic alpha activity was well above the 100 nCi/g limit for TRU waste. Additional characteristics of the C1 and C2 sludge inventory relative to the WIPP WAC limits for fissile gram equivalent, plutonium equivalent activity, and thermal power from decay heat were estimated from the data in this report and found to be far below the upper boundary for any of the remote-handled transuranic waste (RH-TRU) requirements for disposal of the waste in WIPP.

Keller, J.M.; Giaquinto, J.M.

1998-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

407

HEAVY ELEMENT ISOTOPIC ANALYSIS OF UO$sub 2$ FUEL IRRADIATED IN THE VBWR. Report No. 1  

SciTech Connect

Slightly enriched UO/sub 2/ fuel, irradiated in the Vallecitos Boiling Water Reactor (VBWR), with exposures ranging from 100 Mwd/t to 3200 Mwd/t was analyzed for heavy element isotopic composition and compared with computed data. The primary objective of this program is to obtain improved data on the changes in nuclear characteristics with burnup of UO/sub 2/ fuel in a boiling water reactor. This information is important in both evaluating the economics of a given reactor design and also in providing a sounder physics basis for improving reactor designs to minimize the resuiting fuel costs. Uranium oxide pellets, with an enrichment of 2.8 atom percent, were analyzed at several axial positions along the fuel rod, spanning the void (steam fraction) range of 0 to 30%. The isotopic composition for each pellet was computed, utilizing a general fuel cycle depletion code. Results of the analysis of the comparison of the measured and computed data indicate that the total amount of Pu computed is consistently lower than that implied from the measurement by approximately 10%, and the percentage difference between the measured and computed data increases slightly with exposure. One rod was irradiated near a control rod which was approximately 25% inserted. As expected, since no control rod effects were included in the calcuiation, the measured data in that region of the rod shows a greater Pu production per Mwd/t than computed. Physical effects which might explain the small, but apparentiy consistent, differences between the measured and computed data were postulated. It is concluded that the observed differences are the result of a substantial underestimate of void fraction and small uncertainties in fuel exposure and cross sections. (auth)

Hackney, M.R.; Ruiz, C.P.

1962-12-28T23:59:59.000Z

408

BEAMLINE 2-2  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

2 2 CURRENT STATUS: Open with limited support SUPPORTED TECHNIQUES: White light station MAIN SCIENTIFIC DISCIPLINES: X-ray optics characterization and development % TIME GENERAL USE: 100% SCHEDULING: Proposal Submittal and Scheduling Procedures Current SPEAR and Beam Line Schedules SOURCE: Bend Magnet Side Station BEAM LINE SPECIFICATIONS: energy range resolution DE/E spot size flux angular acceptance unfocused 1000-40000 eV NA 4.0 x 8.0 mm NA 0.4 mrad OPTICS: None MONOCHROMATOR: None (white beam) ABSORPTION: 673 microns Be, 12.4 meters He, 15.2 microns C INSTRUMENTATION: X-Y stages, ion chambers, PMT DATA ACQUISITION AND ANALYSIS: SPEC For questions and issues related to SPEC, contact beam line staff or send an email to M$SPEC@ssrl.slac.stanford.edu SUPER

409

Computation of Perfect DCJ Rearrangement Scenarios with ... - CECM  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

adjacency, say b2 with (i, b2) 2 f( pt, su), ( pu, st), ( pu, rt), ( pt, ru)g. ... create i and b3, with (i, b3) 2 f( pt, qu), ( pu,qt)g and the DCJ D that cuts sr and b3 to create o...

410

Evaluation of the advanced mixed oxide fuel test FO-2 irradiated in Fast Flux Test Facility  

SciTech Connect

The advanced mixed-oxide (UO/sub 2/-PuO/sub 2/) test assembly, FO-2, irradiated in the Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF), is undergoing postirradiation examination (PIE). This is one of the first FFTF tests examined that used the advanced ferrite-martensite alloy, HT9, which is highly resistant to irradiation swelling. The FO-2 includes the first annular fueled pins irradiated in FFTF to undergo destructive examination. The FO-2 is a lead assembly for the ongoing FFTF Core Demonstration Experiment (CDE) (Leggett and Omberg 1987) and was designed to evaluate the effects of fuel design variables, such as pellet density, smeared density, and fuel form (annular or solid fuel), on advanced pin performance. The assembly contains a total of 169 fuel pins of twelve different types. The test was irradiated for 312 equivalent full power days (EFPD) in FFTF. It had a peak pin power of 13.7 kW/ft and reached a peak burnup of 65.2 MWd/kgM with a peak fast fluence of 9.9 /times/ 10/sup 22/ n/cm/sup 2/ (E > 0.1 MeV). This document discusses the test and its results. 6 refs., 19 figs., 4 tabs.

Gilpin, L.L.; Baker, R.B.; Chastain, S.A.

1989-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

411

Plutonium Oxidation and Subsequent Reduction by Mn (IV) Minerals  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Plutonium sorbed to rock tuff was preferentially associated with manganese oxides. On tuff and synthetic pyrolusite (Mn{sup IV}O{sub 2}), Pu(IV) or Pu(V) was initially oxidized, but over time Pu(IV) became the predominant oxidation state of sorbed Pu. Reduction of Pu(V/VI), even on non-oxidizing surfaces, is proposed to result from a lower Gibbs free energy of the hydrolyzed Pu(IV) surface species versus that of the Pu(V) or Pu(VI) surface species. This work suggests that despite initial oxidation of sorbed Pu by oxidizing surfaces to more soluble forms, the less mobile form of Pu, Pu(IV), will dominate Pu solid phase speciation during long term geologic storage. The safe design of a radioactive waste or spent nuclear fuel geologic repository requires a risk assessment of radionuclides that may potentially be released into the surrounding environment. Geochemical knowledge of the radionuclide and the surrounding environment is required for predicting subsurface fate and transport. Although difficult even in simple systems, this task grows increasingly complicated for constituents, like Pu, that exhibit complex environmental chemistries. The environmental behavior of Pu can be influenced by complexation, precipitation, adsorption, colloid formation, and oxidation/reduction (redox) reactions (1-3). To predict the environmental mobility of Pu, the most important of these factors is Pu oxidation state. This is because Pu(IV) is generally 2 to 3 orders of magnitude less mobile than Pu(V) in most environments (4). Further complicating matters, Pu commonly exists simultaneously in several oxidation states (5, 6). Choppin (7) reported Pu may exist as Pu(IV), Pu(V), or Pu(VI) oxic natural groundwaters. It is generally accepted that plutonium associated with suspended particulate matter is predominantly Pu(IV) (8-10), whereas Pu in the aqueous phase is predominantly Pu(V) (2, 11-13). The influence of the character of Mn-containing minerals expected to be found in subsurface repository environments on Pu oxidation state distributions has been the subject of much recent research. Kenney-Kennicutt and Morse (14), Duff et al. (15), and Morgenstern and Choppin (16) observed oxidation of Pu facilitated by Mn(IV)-bearing minerals. Conversely, Shaughnessy et al. (17) used X-ray Absorption near-edge spectroscopy (XANES) to show reduction of Pu(VI) by hausmannite (Mn{sup II}Mn{sub 2}{sup III}O{sub 4}) and manganite ({gamma}-Mn{sup III}OOH) and Kersting et al., (18) observed reduction of Pu(VI) by pyrolusite (Mn{sup IV}O{sub 2}). In this paper, we attempt to reconcile the apparently conflicting datasets by showing that Mn-bearing minerals can indeed oxidize Pu, however, if the oxidized species remains on the solid phase, the oxidation step competes with the formation of Pu(IV) that becomes the predominant solid phase Pu species with time. The experimental approach we took was to conduct longer term (approximately two years later) oxidation state analyses on the Pu sorbed to Yucca Mountain tuff (initial analysis reported by Duff et al., (15)) and measure the time-dependant changes in the oxidation state distribution of Pu in the presence of the Mn mineral pyrolusite.

KAPLAN, DANIEL

2005-09-13T23:59:59.000Z

412

First Principles Calculations of the Electronic and Atomic Structure of ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Abstract Scope, U(Pu)O2 solid solution is widely used as nuclear fuel, ... The ground state properties and formation energies of various defects under Pu- or O- rich conditions are calculated. The two ... Uranium Localization in Alpha- Plutonium...

413

CX-007963: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

is needed for plutonium (Pu) processing in Phase 2. The colorimeter will determine the Pu concentration in the raffinate line going to H-Canyon. CX-007963.pdf More Documents &...

414

Stabilization of Rocky Flats Pu-contaminated ash within chemically ...  

Characterization of Plutonium-Bearing Wastes by Chemical Analysis and Analytical Electron Microscopy, Argonne National Laboratory Report ANL-95/35 (1995).

415

NR Pu SEIS Advisory 07152010 _final_.doc  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

SRS: Jim Giusti, (803) 952-7697 Thursday, July 15, 2010 SRS: Jim Giusti, (803) 952-7697 Thursday, July 15, 2010 james-r.giusti@srs.gov CBO: Deb Gill, (575) 234-7270 deg.gill@wipp.ws TVA: Terry Johnson, (423) 751-6875 twjohnson@tva.gov DOE Announces Modification of Supplemental Environmental Study on Plutonium Disposition WASHINGTON, DC -- The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) National Nuclear Security Administration is announcing its intent to modify the scope of the ongoing Surplus Plutonium

416

CONTAINMENT EVALUATION OF PU-METAL TRANSPORT USING MULTIPLE BARRIERS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A methodology was developed previously by SRNL to show that Al-SNF with cladding breaches can be directly transported in standard casks and maintained within the allowable release rates. This novel approach may be extended to other nuclear material systems. Utilizing an adaptation to the methodology, a containment analysis has been performed for the scenario of non-routine transfer of a damaged 9975 package containing plutonium metal from K-area monitored storage to F-area on the Savannah River Site. A multiple barrier system with each barrier having a defined leakage rate of less than 1 x 10{sup -3} cm{sup 3}/sec of air at Standard Temperature and Pressure was analyzed to determine the number of barriers needed to transport the package under normal transportation conditions to meet transportation requirements for containment. The barrier system was analyzed parametrically to achieve a composite system that met the federal requirements for the maximum permissible release rate. The multiple barrier system acts to retard the release of radioactivity. That is, a build-up in the radioactivity release rate occurs with time. For example, a system with three barriers (e.g., sealed plastic barrier) with a total free volume of 4,500 cm{sup 3} could be transported for a total time of up to approximately 10 days with a release rate within the permissible rate. Additional number of barriers, or volume of the barriers, or both, would extend to this period of time. For example, a system with seven barriers with a total free volume of 4,500 cm{sup 3} could be transported for up to 100 days. Plastic bags are one type of barrier used in movement of radioactive materials and capable of achieving a leak rate of 1 x 10{sup -3} cm{sup 3}/sec of air at STP. Low-density polyethylene bags can withstand high temperature (up to 180 C); a barrier thickness of 10 mils should be suitable for the barrier system.

Vinson, D.

2011-07-18T23:59:59.000Z

417

RECOVERY OF Pu FROM CERIUM TRIFLUORIDE BY FLUORINATION  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An improved process is prcsented for selectively recovering plutonium from a solution containing fission products comprising precipitating cerium trifluoride in the solution for effccting carrier precipitation of plutonium. The resulting carrier precipitate is dried and subjected to fluorination at about 600 C. The plutonium forms a volatile fiuoridc and is so separated from the nonvolatile cerium fluoride.

Brown, H.S.; Bohlmann, E.G.

1959-02-10T23:59:59.000Z

418

Photochemical oxidation of oxalate in Pu-238 process streams  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

For over forty years, NASA has relied on plutonium-238 in Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generator (RTG) units and Radioisotope Heater Units ( W s ) to provide power and heat for many space missions including Transit, Pioneer, Viking, Voyager, Galileo, Ulysses and Cassini. RHUs provide heat to keep key components warm in extremely cold environments found on planets, moons, or in deep space. RTGs convert heat generated from the radioactive decay of plutonium-238 into electricity using a themocouple, Plutonium-238 has proven to be an excellent heat source far deep space missions because of its high thermal power density, useful lifetime, minimal shielding requirements, and oxide stability.

Long, K. M. (Kristy M.); Ford, D. K. (Doris K.); Trujillo, L. A. (Leonardo A.)

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

419

Distributional similarity vs. PU learning for entity set expansion  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Distributional similarity is a classic technique for entity set expansion, where the system is given a set of seed entities of a particular class, and is asked to expand the set using a corpus to obtain more entities of the same class as represented ...

Xiao-Li Li; Lei Zhang; Bing Liu; See-Kiong Ng

2010-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

420

RECOVERY OF Pu VALUES BY FLUORINATION AND FRACTIONATION  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method is presented for the concentration and recovery of plutonium by fluorination and fractionation. A metallic mass containing uranium and plutonium is heated to 250 C and contacted with a stream of elemental fluorine. After fluorination of the metallic mass, the rcaction products are withdrawn and subjected to a distillation treatment to separate the fluorination products of uranium and to obtain a residue containing the fluorination products of plutonium.

Brown, H.S.; Webster, D.S.

1959-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "2 glenwood pu" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Microsoft Word - 3Q12 Web Rev 1 1-17-13_DBD .docm  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

() (t 12 ) > 5 yr 2.40E+01 2.40E+01 Pu-238 () (t 12 ) > 5 yr 1.25E+03 1.25E+03 Pu-239 () (t 12 ) > 5 yr 7.12E+01 7.12E+01 Pu-240 () (t 12 ) > 5 yr 7.12E+01...

422

3Q10Web Rev 1, 1-20-11.docm  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

() (t 12 ) > 5 yr <1.46E+01 <1.46E+01 Pu-238 () (t 12 ) > 5 yr 2.03E+04 2.03E+04 Pu-239 () (t 12 ) > 5 yr 1.17E+03 1.17E+03 Pu-240 () (t 12 ) > 5 yr 1.17E+03...

423

Microsoft Word - 1Q10Web Update, 7-15-10.docm  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

() (t 12 ) > 5 yr 9.48E+00 9.48E+00 Pu-238 () (t 12 ) > 5 yr 2.81E+03 2.81E+03 Pu-239 () (t 12 ) > 5 yr 6.98E+01 6.98E+01 Pu-240 () (t 12 ) > 5 yr 6.98E+01...

424

Microsoft Word - CBU-PIT-2004-00010_R1.doc  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Sb-125 1.47E+00 Pu-239 1.48E+01@ Sn-126 2.84E-02 Pu-240 3.36E+00@ I-129 1.28E-06@ Pu-241 2.93E+02@ Cs-134 6.42E-03 Pu-242 5.32E-03@ Cs-135 1.74E-04 Am-241 3.94E+01 Cs-137...

425

Oxidation Potential of the Pu(III)-Pu(IV) Couple in Percloric Acid So lution. Heat Content and Entropy Change  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

by Hindman et al ' to be -0.945 volts in 1 M* J. C. Hindman,a value of -1.026 volts. 4r 'Parenthesis will be used tochange this value to -0.966 volts in 1 M hydrochloric acid.

Connick, Robert E.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

426

Oxidation Potential of the Pu(III)-Pu(IV) Couple in Percloric Acid So lution. Heat Content and Entropy Change  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the three oxidation states of plutonium compare very closelyemployed in the calculation of the Plutonium entropies. Thevalues for uranium and' plutonium entropy is much closer-

Connick, Robert E.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

427

The possibility of fuel cycle design for ABC/ATW complex with molten fuel on LiF-BeF2 basis  

SciTech Connect

The experience gained in the field of the development of molten salt reactors (MSR) can be made a basis of chemical processing of the ABC/ATW liquid fuel. The following combination of two processing principles are proposed for the ABC/ATW fuel (LiF-BeF2-PuF3,(4)-MAFn): -continious removal of radioactive gases, volatile impurities and 'noble fission products'; -portion-by-portion electrochemical processing with removal of rare earth elements and some other fission products at an autonomous plant. After processing the fuel salt is brought back to the blanket of the ABC/ATW complex. The analysis of information previously published in different countries allows for a safe assumption that the ABC/ATW fuel cycle with liquid fuel salt is feasible and can be demonstrated experimentally.

Naumov, V. S.; Bychkov, A. V. [Federal Scientific Center of Russia Research Institute of Atomic Reactors (RIAR) Russia, Dimitrovgrad 433510 (Russian Federation)

1995-09-15T23:59:59.000Z