National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for 1993-2013 oman 1995-2012

  1. Building America 1995-2012 Top Innovations | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    America 1995-2012 Top Innovations Building America 1995-2012 Top Innovations This page provides a listing of and links to legacy Building America Top Innovations developed from 1995-2012. Advanced Technologies and Practices Building Science Solutions Thermal Enclosure: Basement Insulation Systems Advanced Framing Systems and Packages Unvented, Conditioned Crawlspaces Unvented, Conditioned Attics High-R Walls Optimized Comfort Systems: Integration of HVAC System Design with Simplified Duct

  2. Oman Oil Company | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Oil Company (S.A.O.C.) Name: Oman Oil Company (S.A.O.C.) Place: Muscat, Oman Product: Oil exploration and production Year Founded: 1966 Phone Number: + 968 - 2457 3100 Website:...

  3. Oman: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Country Profile Name Oman Population 2,773,479 GDP 78,788,000,000 Energy Consumption 0.71 Quadrillion Btu 2-letter ISO code OM 3-letter ISO code OMN Numeric ISO...

  4. Case studies from Oman for coiled tubing deployed completion techniques

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Taylor, R.W.; Conrad, B.

    1996-09-01

    Although the use of ultra-large coiled tubing to complete wells is relatively new, it is gaining widespread industry application. This paper will detail the equipment necessary to perform an operation of this type and will present information from several case studies in Oman in which an operator has successfully deployed completion equipment on 3-1/2-inch-OD coiled tubing. In addition to a discussion of the equipment required to perform the necessary operations, the trial parameters that were established by this operator will be given. The information presented has been selected to allow an initial evaluation to be made of coiled tubing completions in general and will help to determine whether this method can prove to be less expensive than traditional rig-based completions. The topics presented have been chosen to provide the reader with a thorough understanding of the techniques and preparation needed to execute a coiled tubing completion. The summary of experiences will conclude that this innovative completion technique can be a viable method for completing wells. Although long-term advantages regarding production and well maintenance cannot yet be determined, the operator`s experiences to date have confirmed his initial belief that use of coiled tubing in ultra-large continuous-pipe applications can be cost effective.

  5. Price of Lake Charles, LA Natural Gas LNG Imports from Oman (Dollars per

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Thousand Cubic Feet) Oman (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet) Price of Lake Charles, LA Natural Gas LNG Imports from Oman (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1990's NA 2000's 3.36 5.56 3.34 3.76 5.59 5.72 -- - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 2/29/2016 Next Release Date: 3/31/2016 Referring Pages: U.S. Price of

  6. U.S. LNG Imports from Oman

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    2000-2015 Liquefied Natural Gas Prices -- -- -- -- -- -- 2001

  7. Oman Ministry of Oil and Gas | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    of oil and gas. Prepare legislation and regulations governing oil and gas. Oversee oil and gas exploration and production activities. Establish "Petroleum Agreements" with...

  8. Price of U.S. Liquefied Natural Gas Imports From Oman (Dollars per Thousand

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2001 -- 8.70 -- 4.65 -- 3.99 4.65 4.99 4.65 -- -- -- 2002 -- -- -- -- -- -- -- 3.34 -- -- -- -- 2003 -- -- -- -- -- -- -- 3.52 3.52 -- 4.08 -- 2004 5.60 -- -- -- 5.76 -- 5.42 -- -- -- -- -- 2005 5.72 -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- 2006 -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- 2007 -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- 2008 -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- 2009 -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- 2010 -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- --

  9. U.S. Liquefied Natural Gas Imports From Oman (Million Cubic Feet)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2000 2,464 2,461 2,740 2,333 2001 0 2,738 0 1,702 0 1,616 1,635 2,728 1,635 0 0 0 2002 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 3,013 0 0 0 0 2003 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2,646 2,322 0 3,664 0 2004 3,041 0 0 0 3,203 0 3,167 0 0 0 0 0 2005 2,464 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2006 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2007 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2008 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2009 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2010 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2011 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2012 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2013 0 0 0 0 0

  10. ,"U.S. Liquefied Natural Gas Imports From Oman (MMcf)"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Monthly","12/2015" ,"Release Date:","2/29/2016" ,"Next Release Date:","3/31/2016" ,"Excel File Name:","n9103mu2m.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n9103mu2m.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"2/26/2016 2:31:02 PM" "Back to

  11. ,"U.S. Liquefied Natural Gas Imports From Oman (MMcf)"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Annual",2015 ,"Release Date:","2/29/2016" ,"Next Release Date:","3/31/2016" ,"Excel File Name:","n9103mu2a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n9103mu2a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"2/26/2016 2:31:02 PM" "Back to

  12. U.S. Liquefied Natural Gas Imports From Oman (Million Cubic Feet)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1990's 0 0 0 2000's 9,998 12,055 3,013 8,632 9,412 2,464 0 0 0 0 2010's

  13. Price of U.S. Liquefied Natural Gas Imports From Oman (Dollars per Thousand

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1990's -- -- -- 2000's 3.36 5.56 3.34 3.76 5.59 5.72 -- -- -- -- 2010's

  14. Effective Guidance and Tools - Building America Top Innovations...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    High-Performance Home Metrics These Top Innovations provide key technical tools and databases for analyzing energy efficiency measures and achieving optimal savings. 1995-2012...

  15. ,"Price of U.S. Liquefied Natural Gas Imports From Oman (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Monthly","12/2015" ,"Release Date:","2/29/2016" ,"Next Release Date:","3/31/2016" ,"Excel File Name:","n9103mu3m.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n9103mu3m.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"2/26/2016 2:31:03 PM" "Back to

  16. ,"Price of U.S. Liquefied Natural Gas Imports From Oman (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Annual",2015 ,"Release Date:","2/29/2016" ,"Next Release Date:","3/31/2016" ,"Excel File Name:","n9103mu3a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n9103mu3a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"2/26/2016 2:31:02 PM" "Back to

  17. U.S. Crude Oil Imports

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    (Brazzaville) 24 8 13 20 12 15 1993-2015 Congo (Kinshasa) 1993-2013 Denmark 1997-2004 Egypt 17 1993-2015 Equatorial Guinea 1996-2014 Estonia 1999-1999 Gabon 4 18 1993-2015...

  18. SFS Exhibit A General Conditions

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    country (FTA)(Australia, Bahrain, Canada, Chile, Costa Rica, Dominican Republic, El Salvador, Guatemala, Honduras, Israel, Mexico, Morocco, Nicaragua, Oman, Peru, or Singapore);...

  19. CPFFS Exhibit A General Conditions

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    country (FTA)(Australia, Bahrain, Canada, Chile, Costa Rica, Dominican Republic, El Salvador, Guatemala, Honduras, Israel, Mexico, Morocco, Nicaragua, Oman, Peru, or Singapore);...

  20. LFS Exhibit A General Conditions

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    country (FTA)(Australia, Bahrain, Canada, Chile, Costa Rica, Dominican Republic, El Salvador, Guatemala, Honduras, Israel, Mexico, Morocco, Nicaragua, Oman, Peru, or Singapore);...

  1. How to Obtain Authorization to Import and/or Export Natural Gas...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    natural gas with Australia, Bahrain, Canada, Chile, Colombia, Dominican Republic, El Salvador, Guatemala, Honduras, Jordan, Mexico, Morocco, Nicaragua, Oman, Panama, Peru,...

  2. EFS Exhibit A General Conditions

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    country (FTA)(Australia, Bahrain, Canada, Chile, Costa Rica, Dominican Republic, El Salvador, Guatemala, Honduras, Israel, Mexico, Morocco, Nicaragua, Oman, Peru, or Singapore);...

  3. AES Exhibit A General Conditions

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    country (FTA)(Australia, Bahrain, Canada, Chile, Costa Rica, Dominican Republic, El Salvador, Guatemala, Honduras, Israel, Mexico, Morocco, Nicaragua, Oman, Peru, or Singapore);...

  4. Time and Materials Exhibit A General Conditions

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    country (FTA)(Australia, Bahrain, Canada, Chile, Costa Rica, Dominican Republic, El Salvador, Guatemala, Honduras, Israel, Mexico, Morocco, Nicaragua, Oman, Peru, or Singapore);...

  5. CI-OFF Ex A (Rev. 0.2, 4/9/13) Exhibit A General Conditions

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    country (FTA)(Australia, Bahrain, Canada, Chile, Costa Rica, Dominican Republic, El Salvador, Guatemala, Honduras, Israel, Mexico, Morocco, Nicaragua, Oman, Peru, or Singapore);...

  6. Christopher Smith Principal Deputy Assistant Secretary Office...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    El Salvador, Guatemala, Honduras, Jordan, Mexico, Morocco, Nicaragua, Oman, Panama, Peru, Republic of Korea, and Singapore. There also are two countries - Israel and Costa Rica...

  7. --No Title--

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Nicaragua Niger Nigeria Niue Norway Oman Pakistan Palestine Panama Papua New Guinea Paraguay Peru Philippines Poland Portugal Puerto Rico Qatar Reunion Romania Russia Rwanda...

  8. Category:Countries | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Korea Northern Mariana Islands Norway O Oman P Pakistan Palau Panama Papua New Guinea Paraguay Peru Philippines Pitcairn Poland Portugal Puerto Rico Q Qatar R Republic of Macedonia...

  9. Stump the Scientist Question Form | GE Global Research

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Norway Northern Mariana Islands Oman Pakistan Palau Palestine Panama Papua New Guinea Paraguay Peru Philippines Poland Portugal Puerto Rico Qatar Romania Russia Rwanda Saint Kitts...

  10. Utility Rate Database | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Islands Norway Oman Pakistan Palau Palestinian Territories Panama Papua New Guinea Paraguay Peru Philippines Pitcairn Islands Poland Portugal Puerto Rico Qatar Romania Russia...

  11. DOE - Fossil Energy:

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    States. The United States imports natural gas from Canada, Mexico, Algeria, Australia, Egypt, Equatorial Guinea, Malaysia, Nigeria, Norway, Oman, Qatar, Trinidad and Tobago, and...

  12. Governance for Sustainable Development in the Arab Region | Open...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Resource Type Guidemanual Website http:www.escwa.un.orginform Country Bahrain, Egypt, Iraq, Jordan, Kuwait, Lebanon, Oman, Qatar, Saudi Arabia, Sudan, Syria, United Arab...

  13. Best Practices and Tools for Large-scale Deployment of Renewable...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    www.escwa.un.orginformationpublicationsedituploadsdpd-09-TP3.pdf Country: Bahrain, Egypt, Iraq, Jordan, Kuwait, Lebanon, Oman, Qatar, Saudi Arabia, Sudan, Syria, United Arab...

  14. United Nations Economic and Social Commission for Western Asia...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Background Membership "ESCWA comprises 14 Arab countries in Western Asia: Bahrain, Egypt, Iraq, Jordan, Kuwait, Lebanon, Oman, Qatar, Saudi Arabia, Sudan, Syria, United Arab...

  15. Caledonian College of Engineering | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Caledonian College of Engineering Jump to: navigation, search Name: Caledonian College of Engineering Place: Oman Product: The College has many labs and workshops for various...

  16. Matt Schatzman € Houston € 22 October 2007

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    ... US as the balancing market in action 11 US as part of the global marketplace Algeria Australia Egypt Equatorial Guinea Malaysia Nigeria Trinidad & Tobago Oman Qatar Belgium Japan ...

  17. Oil and gas developments in Middle East in 1981

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hemer, D.O; Mason, J.F.; Hatch, G.C.

    1982-11-01

    Petroleum production in Middle East countries during 1981 totaled 5,741,096,000 bbl, or an average rate of 15,729,030 BOPD, down 14.9% from 1980. Increases were in Oman, Dubai, and Turkey. Significant decreases occurred in Iraq, Iran, Kuwait, Divided Neutral Zone, Qatar, and Abu Dhabi. New discoveries were made in Oman, Saudi Arabia, and Abu Dhabi.

  18. Oil and gas developments in Middle East in 1986

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hemer, D.O.; Gohrbandt, K.H.A.

    1987-10-01

    Petroleum production in Middle East countries during 1986 totaled 4,493,973,000 bbl (an average rate of 12,312,254 BOPD), up 22.3% from the revised 1985 total of 3,673,729,000 bbl. Iraq, Kuwait, Saudi Arabia, Abu Dhabi, and Oman had significant increased; Iran was the only Middle East country with a significant decrease. New fields went on production in Oman and Yemen Arab Republic, and significant discoveries were reported in Iraq, Yemen Arab Republic, Oman, and Syria. However, exploration was generally down in most countries. Exploration and production operations continued to be affected by war in Iraq and Iran. 8 figures, 7 tables.

  19. Natural Gas Weekly Update

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Bcf from the Point Fortin plant. Algeria was the source of approximately 52 Bcf, while Egypt supplied 5.7 Bcf. Nigeria, Malaysia, Oman, and Qatar delivered the remaining 14 Bcf....

  20. Natural Gas Weekly Update, Printer-Friendly Version

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Bcf from the Point Fortin plant. Algeria was the source of approximately 52 Bcf, while Egypt supplied 5.7 Bcf. Nigeria, Malaysia, Oman, and Qatar delivered the remaining 14 Bcf....

  1. U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Middle East. Long-time Middle East exporters, Oman and Abu Dhabi in the United Arab Emirates, have sent and continue to send most of their gas to Asia-Pacific customers, a...

  2. Middle East

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hemer, D.O.; Mason, J.F.; Hatch, G.C.

    1981-10-01

    Petroleum production in Middle East countries during 1980 totaled 6,747,719,000 bbl or an average rate of 18,436,390,000 bbl/d, down 13.9% from 1979. Increases were in Saudi Arabia and Syria. Significant decreases occurred in Iraq, Iran, Kuwait, and Turkey. New discoveries were made in Abu Dhabi, Iran, Saudi Arabia, Sharjah, and Oman. New areas were explored in Bahrain, Oman, Syria, and Yemen. 9 figures, 16 tables.

  3. Oil and gas developments in Middle East in 1982

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hemer, D.O.; Hatch, G.C.

    1983-10-01

    Petroleum production in Middle East countries during 1982 totaled 4,499,464,000 bbl (an average rate of 12,162,915 BOPD), down 21.5% from 1981. Increases were in Iraq, Iran, and Oman. Significant decreases occurred in Kuwait, Divided Neutral Zone, Saudi Arabia, Qatar, and Abu Dhabi. New discoveries were reported in Oman, Syria, Abu Dhabi, Dubai, Iran, and Saudi Arabia.

  4. Oil and gas developments in Middle East in 1984

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hemer, D.O.; Lyle, J.H.

    1985-10-01

    Petroleum production in Middle East countries during 1984 totaled 4,088,853,000 bbl (an average rate of 11,144,407 BOPD), down less than 1.0% from the revised total of 4,112,116,000 bbl produced in 1983. Iraq, Kuwait, Qatar, and Oman had significant increases; Iran and Dubai had significant decreases. Jordan produced oil, although a minor amount, for the first time ever, and new production facilities were in the planning stage in Syria, North Yemen, and Oman, which will bring new fields on stream when completed.

  5. Oil and gas developments in Middle East in 1985

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hemer, D.O.; Gohrbandt, K.H.A.

    1986-10-01

    Petroleum production in Middle East countries during 1985 totaled 3,837,580,000 bbl (an average rate of 10,513,917 BOPD), down 2.2% from the revised 1984 total of 3,924,034,000 bbl. Iran, Iraq, Dubai, Oman, and Syria had significant increases; Kuwait, Kuwait-Saudi Arabia Divided Neutral Zone, Saudi Arabia, and Qatar had significant decreases. New fields went on production in Iraq, Abu Dhabi, Oman, and Syria. In North Yemen, the first ever oil production in that country was nearing the start-up stage at year end. 9 figures, 9 tables.

  6. Oil and gas developments in Middle East in 1984

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hemer, D.O.; Lyle, J.H.

    1985-10-01

    Petroleum production in Middle East countries during 1984 totaled 4,088,853,000 bbl (an average rate of 11,144,407 BOPD), down less than 1.0% from the revised total of 4,112,116,000 bbl produced in 1983. Iraq, Kuwait, Qatar, and Oman had significant increases; Iran and Dubai had significant decreases. Jordan produced oil, although a minor amount, for the first time ever, and new production facilities were in the planning stage in Syria, North Yemen, and Oman, which will bring new fields on stream when completed. 4 figures, 9 tables.

  7. Finished Motor Gasoline Refinery, Bulk Terminal, and Natural Gas Plant

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Stocks 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 View History U.S. 40,534 39,717 37,768 27,121 20,275 17,991 1993-2015 PAD District 1 3,913 3,741 3,513 3,190 1,785 1,901 1993-2015 Connecticut 1993-2004 Delaware 1993-2009 Florida 586 734 747 545 397 652 1993-2015 Georgia 374 251 220 269 235 220 1993-2015 Maine 130 152 254 1993-2013 Maryland 1993-2008 Massachusetts 2 4 3 6 5 5 1993-2015 New Hampshire 1993-2005 New Jersey 667 275 795 489 102 384 1993-2015 New York 194 628 483 394 43 11 1993-2015 North

  8. Specialized equipment enabled completions with large coiled tubing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Taylor, R.W.; Conrad, B.

    1996-02-19

    Specialized equipment enabled successful well completions in Oman with large 3{1/2}-inch coiled tubing. Conventional drilling or completion rigs were not needed. Although the use of 3{1/2}-inch coiled tubing to complete wells is relatively new, it is gaining widespread industry application. One Middle East operating company felt that if downhole completion equipment could be successfully run using coiled tubing, greater cost efficiency, both in initial deployment and in maintenance, could be derived. The paper lists some of the technical considerations for these assumptions. The long-term advantages regarding production and well maintenance cannot yet be determined, but experience in Oman has confirmed the belief that large coiled tubing completions can be technically achieved.

  9. LNG Observer: Second Qatargas train goes onstream

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1997-01-01

    The January-February, 1997 issue of the LNG Observer is presented. The following topics are discussed: second Qatargas train goes onstream; financing for the eighth Indonesian liquefaction train; Koreans take stakes in Oman LNG; US imports and exports of LNG in 1996; A 60% increase in proved reserves on the North West Shelf; proposals for Indian LNG terminal CEDIGAZ forecasts world LNG trade by 2010; growth for North African gas production and exports; and new forecast sees strong growth for Asian gas.

  10. Technically Recoverable Shale Oil and Shale Gas Resources:

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Oman Independent Statistics & Analysis www.eia.gov U.S. Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 September 2015 September 2015 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Technically Recoverable Shale Oil and Shale Gas Resources i This report was prepared by the U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA), the statistical and analytical agency within the U.S. Department of Energy. By law, EIA's data, analyses, and forecasts are independent of approval by any other officer or employee of the

  11. Closing Statement to the GNEP Ministerial | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Statement to the GNEP Ministerial Closing Statement to the GNEP Ministerial October 1, 2008 - 3:43pm Addthis Remarks as Prepared for Secretary Bodman Thank you, Minister Borloo . . . and many thanks to the French government for hosting this meeting and for your leadership within GNEP. I also want to acknowledge the four newest members of our Partnership: Armenia, Estonia, Morocco and Oman, each of which signed our Statement of Principles today. As Minister Borloo indicated, today the GNEP

  12. Middle East: Output expansions boost drilling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1996-08-01

    Iraqi exports may return to the market in limited fashion, but none of the region`s producers seems particularly concerned. They believe that global oil demand is rising fast enough to justify their additions to productive capacity. The paper discusses exploration, drilling and development, and production in Saudi Arabia, Kuwait, the Neutral Zone, Abu Dhabi, Dubai, Oman, Iran, Iraq, Yemen, Qatar, Syria, Turkey, and Sharjah. The paper also briefly mentions activities in Bahrain, Israel, Jordan, and Ras al Khaimah.

  13. Middle East oil and gas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1984-12-01

    The following subjects are covered in this publication: (1) position of preeminence of the Middle East; (2) history of area's oil operations for Iran, Iraq, Bahrain, Kuwait, Saudi Arabia, neutral zone, Qatar, United Arab Emirates, Oman and Egypt; (3) gas operations of Saudi Arabia, Iran, Kuwait, Qatar, Iraq and United Arab Emirates; (4) changing relationships with producing countries; (5) a new oil pricing environment; (6) refining and other industrial activities; and (7) change and progress. 10 figs., 12 tabs.

  14. The slowdown continues

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1988-08-01

    The author reviews the oil market in the Middle East. Some of the highlights are: Aramco activity in Saudi Arabi seems to be struck at a historically low level; Iran is maintaining production rates despite persistent Iraqi, U.S. attacks; Iraq plans ambitious 5-year drilling program, development of eight new fields; and Oman set reserves record with any finds, remains the area's biggest driller.

  15. Delaware Natural Gas Summary

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    78-2005 Citygate 5.67 9.03 7.19 5.67 5.54 NA 1984-2015 Residential 15.12 15.38 15.24 13.65 13.21 NA 1967-2015 Commercial 13.26 13.58 13.31 11.78 11.42 10.70 1967-2015 Industrial 10.18 11.69 11.61 11.24 10.95 NA 1997-2015 Vehicle Fuel 24.55 28.76 30.97 1995-2012 Electric Power W W -- -- W -- 1997-2015 Underground Storage (Million Cubic Feet) Injections 1967-1975 Withdrawals 1967-1975 Net Withdrawals 1967-1975 Liquefied Natural Gas Storage (Million Cubic Feet) Additions 73 64 117 63 157 1980-2014

  16. District of Columbia Natural Gas Summary

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    82-2005 Citygate -- -- -- -- -- -- 1989-2015 Residential 13.53 13.06 12.10 12.45 13.05 12.52 1980-2015 Commercial 12.26 12.24 11.19 11.64 12.18 11.55 1980-2015 Industrial -- -- -- -- -- -- 2001-2015 Vehicle Fuel 4.87 4.17 9.38 1995-2012 Electric Power -- 4.96 -- -- -- -- 2001-2015 Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Total Consumption 33,251 32,862 28,561 32,743 34,057 1997-2014 Pipeline & Distribution Use 213 1,703 1,068 1,434 1,305 1997-2014 Delivered to Consumers 33,038 31,159 27,493 31,309

  17. East Coast (PADD 1) Distillate Fuel Oil Imports

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Jul-15 Aug-15 Sep-15 Oct-15 Nov-15 Dec-15 View History All Countries 104 104 76 92 133 130 1981-2015 Persian Gulf 1995-2015 OPEC* 10 1993-2015 Algeria 1994-2010 Angola 1995-2003 Kuwait 1995-2012 Libya 2013-2013 Nigeria 10 1993-2015 Qatar 1995-2015 Saudi Arabia 1995-2015 United Arab Emirates 1995-2014 Venezuela 1993-2014 Non OPEC* 104 104 76 92 133 120 1993-2015 Argentina 1995-2015 Aruba 2005-2012 Bahamas 1994-2014 Bahrain 1995-2007 Belarus 2006-2009 Belgium 1995-2015 Brazil 1994-2014 Cameroon

  18. U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Frequently Requested Methodology Assessed resource basin map Summary tables (2015) Recent Updates Chad Kazakhstan Oman United Arab Emirates Previous Full Reports April 5, 2011 (16.8 mb) June 13, 2013 (64.9 mb) World Shale Resource Assessments Last updated: September 24, 2015 This series of reports provides an initial assessment of world shale oil and shale gas resources. The first edition was released in 2011 and updates are released on an on-going basis. Four countries were added in 2014: Chad,

  19. Non-OPEC oil supply continues to grow

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Knapp, D.H.

    1995-12-25

    Global reserves of crude oil remain at 1 trillion bbl, according to OGJ`s annual survey of producing countries. Significant gains are in Brazil, Colombia, Congo, Egypt, Libya, Nigeria, Oman, and Papua New Guinea. Decreases were reported by Indonesia, Norway, the U.K., Iran, Canada, Mexico, and the US. Natural gas reserves slipped to 4.9 quadrillion cu ft. The major production trend is a lasting surge from outside of OPEC. This year`s Worldwide Production report begins with a detailed analysis of this crucial development by an international authority. This article discusses the OECD outlook by region and the turnaround in production in the former Soviet Union.

  20. 28. annual offshore technology conference: Proceedings. Volume 4: Field drilling and development systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1996-12-31

    The 88 papers in this volume cover the following topics: Small operator implementation of subsea technology; Control system umbilicals, components and ROV interfacing; DeepStar--Results and plans; Deepwater subsea manifold systems; Drilling technology; Limit state design criteria for pipelines; Liuhua project; Mobile offshore drilling units; Offshore coiled tubing operations; Oman-India gas pipeline; Paraffin and hydrate control; Pompano--A deepwater subsea development; Severe operating conditions; Subsea production systems; and Well completions technology. Papers have been processed separately for inclusion on the data base.

  1. Global warming and the regions in the Middle East

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alvi, S.H.; Elagib, N.

    1996-12-31

    The announcement of NASA scientist James Hansen made at a United States Senate`s hearing in June 1988 about the onset of global warming ignited a whirlwind of public concern in United States and elsewhere in the world. Although the temperature had shown only a slight shift, its warming has the potential of causing environmental catastrophe. According to atmosphere scientists, the effect of higher temperatures will change rainfall patterns--some areas getting drier, some much wetter. The phenomenon of warming in the Arabian Gulf region was first reported by Alvi for Bahrain and then for Oman. In the recent investigations, the authors have found a similar warming in other regions of the Arabian Gulf and in several regions of Sudan in Africa. The paper will investigate the observed data on temperature and rainfall of Seeb in Oman, Bahrain, International Airport in Kuwait as index stations for the Arabian Gulf and Port Sudan, Khartoum and Malakal in the African Continent of Sudan. Based on various statistical methods, the study will highlight a drying of the regions from the striking increase in temperature and decline of rainfall amount. Places of such environmental behavior are regarded as desertifying regions. Following Hulme and Kelly, desertification is taken to mean land degradation in dryland regions, or the permanent decline in the potential of the land to support biological activity, and hence human welfare. The paper will also, therefore, include the aspect of desertification for the regions under consideration.

  2. The oil policies of the Gulf Arab Nations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ripple, R.D.; Hagen, R.E.

    1995-03-01

    At its heart, Arab oil policy is inseparable from Arab economic and social policy. This holds whether we are talking about the Arab nations as a group or each separately. The seven Arab nations covered in this report-Bahrain, Iraq, Kuwait, Oman, Qatar, Saudi Arabia, and the United Arab Emirates--participate in several organizations focusing on regional cooperation regarding economic development, social programs, and Islamic unity, as well as organizations concerned with oil policies. This report focuses on the oil-related activities of the countries that may reveal the de facto oil policies of the seven Persian Gulf nations. Nevertheless it should be kept in mind that the decision makers participating in the oil policy organizations are also involved with the collaborative efforts of these other organizations. Oil policies of five of the seven Arab nations are expressed within the forums of the Organization of Petroleum Exporting Countries (OPEC) and the Organization of Arab Petroleum Exporting Countries (OAPEC). Only Oman, among the seven, is not a member of either OAPEC or OPEC; Bahrain is a member of OAPEC but not of OPEC. OPEC and OAPEC provide forums for compromise and cooperation among their members. Nevertheless, each member state maintains its own sovereignty and follows its own policies. Each country deviates from the group prescription from time to time, depending upon individual circumstances.

  3. Oil and gas development in Middle East in 1987

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hemer, D.O.; Gohrbandt, K.H.A.; Phillips, C.B.

    1988-10-01

    Petroleum production in Middle East countries during 1987 totaled an estimated 4,500,500,000 bbl (an average rate of 12,330,137 b/d), up slightly from the revised 1986 total of 4,478,972,000 bbl. Iran, Iraq, Syria, and Yemen Arab Republic had significant increases; Kuwait and Saudi Arabia had significant decreases. Production was established for the first time in People's Democratic Republic of Yemen. New fields went on production in Iraq, Oman, People's Democratic Republic of Yemen, and Syria, and significant oil discoveries were reported in Iraq, Oman, People's Democratic Republic of Yemen, Syria, and Yemen Arab Republic. The level of exploration increased in 1987 with new concessions awarded in some countries, drilling and seismic activities on the increase, new regions in mature areas explored for the first time, and significant reserve additions reported in new and old permits. The Iraq-Iran war still had a negative impact in some regions of the Middle East, particularly in and around the Gulf. 11 figs., 4 tabs.

  4. Statistical study of reconnection exhausts in the solar wind

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Enl, J.; P?ech, L.; afrnkov, J.; N?me?ek, Z.

    2014-11-20

    Magnetic reconnection is a fundamental process that changes magnetic field configuration and converts a magnetic energy to flow energy and plasma heating. This paper presents a survey of the plasma and magnetic field parameters inside 418 reconnection exhausts identified in the WIND data from 1995-2012. The statistical analysis is oriented on the re-distribution of the magnetic energy released due to reconnection between a plasma acceleration and its heating. The results show that both the portion of the energy deposited into heat as well as the energy spent on the acceleration of the exhaust plasma rise with the magnetic shear angle in accord with the increase of the magnetic flux available for reconnection. The decrease of the normalized exhaust speed with the increasing magnetic shear suggests a decreasing efficiency of the acceleration and/or the increasing efficiency of heating in high-shear events. However, we have found that the already suggested relation between the exhaust speed and temperature enhancement would be rather considered as an upper limit of the plasma heating during reconnection regardless of the shear angle.

  5. TEAMING AS A SMALL BUSINESS Brent L. Clark, Vice President Performance Results Corporation

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    TEAMING AS A SMALL BUSINESS Brent L. Clark, Vice President Performance Results Corporation 2 WHO IS PERFORMANCE RESULTS CORPORATION? * Incorporated i n A pril 2 000 * SBA C er4fied S mall, W oman---Owned C orpora4on * Kathy C linton O wner a nd P resident * Located a t 6 C anyon R oad, M organtown, W V * Employs o ver 2 30 p ersonnel l ocated a cross 1 6 ci4es a nd 1 3 s tates * 2010 r evenue w as $ 25M, p rojected t o e xceed $30M i n 2 011 * Primary c lients a re t he D OE, D OJ, C DC, a nd A

  6. CO sub 2 emissions from developing countries: Better understanding the role of energy in the long term

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sathaye, J.; Goldman, N.

    1991-07-01

    Recent years have witnessed a growing recognition of the link between emissions of carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) and changes in the global climate. of all anthropogenic activities, energy production and use generate the single largest portion of these greenhouse gases. Although developing countries currently account for a small share of global carbon emissions, their contribution is increasing rapidly. Due to the rapid expansion of energy demand in these nations, the developing world's share in global modern energy use rose from 16 to 27 percent between 1970 and 1990. If the growth rates observed over the past 20 years persist, energy demand in developing nations will surpass that in the countries of the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) early in the 21st century. The study seeks to examine the forces that galvanize the growth of energy use and carbon emissions, to assess the likely future levels of energy and CO{sub 2} in selected developing nations and to identify opportunities for restraining this growth. The purpose of this report is to provide the quantitative information needed to develop effective policy options, not to identify the options themselves. A combined study was carried out for the countries of the Gulf Cooperation Council (Bahrain, Kuwait, Oman, Qatar, Saudi Arabia and the United Arab Emirates).

  7. CO{sub 2} emissions from developing countries: Better understanding the role of energy in the long term. Volume 4, Ghana, Sierra Leone, Nigeria and the Gulf Cooperation Council (GCC) countries

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sathaye, J.; Goldman, N.

    1991-07-01

    Recent years have witnessed a growing recognition of the link between emissions of carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) and changes in the global climate. of all anthropogenic activities, energy production and use generate the single largest portion of these greenhouse gases. Although developing countries currently account for a small share of global carbon emissions, their contribution is increasing rapidly. Due to the rapid expansion of energy demand in these nations, the developing world`s share in global modern energy use rose from 16 to 27 percent between 1970 and 1990. If the growth rates observed over the past 20 years persist, energy demand in developing nations will surpass that in the countries of the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) early in the 21st century. The study seeks to examine the forces that galvanize the growth of energy use and carbon emissions, to assess the likely future levels of energy and CO{sub 2} in selected developing nations and to identify opportunities for restraining this growth. The purpose of this report is to provide the quantitative information needed to develop effective policy options, not to identify the options themselves. A combined study was carried out for the countries of the Gulf Cooperation Council (Bahrain, Kuwait, Oman, Qatar, Saudi Arabia and the United Arab Emirates).