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1

Assessment of high temperature nuclear energy storage systems for the production of intermediate and peak-load electric power  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Increased cost of energy, depletion of domestic supplies of oil and natural gas, and dependence on foreign suppliers, have led to an investigation of energy storage as a means to displace the use of oil and gas presently being used to generate intermediate and peak-load electricity. Dedicated nuclear thermal energy storage is investigated as a possible alternative. An evaluation of thermal storage systems is made for several reactor concepts and economic comparisons are presented with conventional storage and peak power producing systems. It is concluded that dedicated nuclear storage has a small but possible useful role in providing intermediate and peak-load electric power.

Fox, E. C.; Fuller, L. C.; Silverman, M. D.

1977-04-18T23:59:59.000Z

2

Verktyg för lönsamhetsberäkningar vid bränslekonvertering av spetslastpannor frĺn olja till pellets; Tool for estimating the profitability of converting a peak-load oil-fired boiler to pellets.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

?? This report summarizes the development of a calculation program estimating the profitability of converting a peak-load oil-fired boiler to pellets. To convert an oil-fired… (more)

Sorby, Jonathan

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

3

Word Pro - Untitled1  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3 3 Electric Utility Demand-Side Management Programs Actual Peakload Reductions Total, 1989-2010 Actual Peakload Reductions, 2010 Energy Savings, 1989-2010 Electric Utility Costs,Âą 1989-2010 266 U.S. Energy Information Administration / Annual Energy Review 2011 1 Program costs consist of all costs associated with providing the various Demand-Side Management (DSM) programs or measures. The costs of DSM programs fall into these major categories: customer rebates/incentives, administration/marketing/training, performance incen- tives, research and evaluation, and other (most likely indirect) costs. 2 Prices are not adjusted for inflation. See "Nominal Dollars" in Glossary. Source: Table 8.13. 12 14 16 17 23 25 30 30 25 27 26 23 25 23 23 24 26 27 30 32 32 33 1989 1991 1993

4

Hydrogen-or-Fossil-Combustion Nuclear Combined-Cycle Systems for Base- and Peak-Load Electricity Production  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A combined-cycle power plant is described that uses (1) heat from a high-temperature nuclear reactor to meet base-load electrical demands and (2) heat from the same high-temperature reactor and burning natural gas, jet fuel, or hydrogen to meet peak-load electrical demands. For base-load electricity production, fresh air is compressed; then flows through a heat exchanger, where it is heated to between 700 and 900 C by heat provided by a high-temperature nuclear reactor via an intermediate heat-transport loop; and finally exits through a high-temperature gas turbine to produce electricity. The hot exhaust from the Brayton-cycle gas turbine is then fed to a heat recovery steam generator that provides steam to a steam turbine for added electrical power production. To meet peak electricity demand, the air is first compressed and then heated with the heat from a high-temperature reactor. Natural gas, jet fuel, or hydrogen is then injected into the hot air in a combustion chamber, combusts, and heats the air to 1300 C-the operating conditions for a standard natural-gas-fired combined-cycle plant. The hot gas then flows through a gas turbine and a heat recovery steam generator before being sent to the exhaust stack. The higher temperatures increase the plant efficiency and power output. If hydrogen is used, it can be produced at night using energy from the nuclear reactor and stored until needed. With hydrogen serving as the auxiliary fuel for peak power production, the electricity output to the electric grid can vary from zero (i.e., when hydrogen is being produced) to the maximum peak power while the nuclear reactor operates at constant load. Because nuclear heat raises air temperatures above the auto-ignition temperatures of the various fuels and powers the air compressor, the power output can be varied rapidly (compared with the capabilities of fossil-fired turbines) to meet spinning reserve requirements and stabilize the electric grid. This combined cycle uses the unique characteristics of high-temperature reactors (T>700 C) to produce electricity for premium electric markets whose demands can not be met by other types of nuclear reactors. It may also make the use of nuclear reactors economically feasible in smaller electrical grids, such as those found in many developing countries. The ability to rapidly vary power output can be used to stabilize electric grid performance-a particularly important need in small electrical grids.

Forsberg, Charles W [ORNL; Conklin, Jim [ORNL

2007-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

5

How People Actually Use Thermostats  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Residential thermostats have been a key element in controlling heating and cooling systems for over sixty years. However, today's modern programmable thermostats (PTs) are complicated and difficult for users to understand, leading to errors in operation and wasted energy. Four separate tests of usability were conducted in preparation for a larger study. These tests included personal interviews, an on-line survey, photographing actual thermostat settings, and measurements of ability to accomplish four tasks related to effective use of a PT. The interviews revealed that many occupants used the PT as an on-off switch and most demonstrated little knowledge of how to operate it. The on-line survey found that 89% of the respondents rarely or never used the PT to set a weekday or weekend program. The photographic survey (in low income homes) found that only 30% of the PTs were actually programmed. In the usability test, we found that we could quantify the difference in usability of two PTs as measured in time to accomplish tasks. Users accomplished the tasks in consistently shorter times with the touchscreen unit than with buttons. None of these studies are representative of the entire population of users but, together, they illustrate the importance of improving user interfaces in PTs.

Meier, Alan; Aragon, Cecilia; Hurwitz, Becky; Mujumdar, Dhawal; Peffer, Therese; Perry, Daniel; Pritoni, Marco

2010-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

6

Before Getting There: Potential and Actual Collaboration  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper we introduce the concepts of Actual and Potential Collaboration Spaces. The former applies to the space where collaborative activities are performed, while the second relates to the initial space where opportunities for collaboration are ... Keywords: Doc2U, PIŃAS, casual and informal interactions, potential and actual collaboration spaces, potential collaboration awareness

Alberto L. Morán; Jesús Favela; Ana María Martínez Enríquez; Dominique Decouchant

2002-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

7

Table 13. Coal Production, Projected vs. Actual  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Coal Production, Projected vs. Actual" Coal Production, Projected vs. Actual" "Projected" " (million short tons)" ,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,2000,2001,2002,2003,2004,2005,2006,2007,2008,2009,2010,2011 "AEO 1994",999,1021,1041,1051,1056,1066,1073,1081,1087,1098,1107,1122,1121,1128,1143,1173,1201,1223 "AEO 1995",,1006,1010,1011,1016,1017,1021,1027,1033,1040,1051,1066,1076,1083,1090,1108,1122,1137 "AEO 1996",,,1037,1044,1041,1045,1061,1070,1086,1100,1112,1121,1135,1156,1161,1167,1173,1184,1190 "AEO 1997",,,,1028,1052,1072,1088,1105,1110,1115,1123,1133,1146,1171,1182,1190,1193,1201,1209 "AEO 1998",,,,,1088,1122,1127.746338,1144.767212,1175.662598,1176.493652,1182.742065,1191.246948,1206.99585,1229.007202,1238.69043,1248.505981,1260.836914,1265.159424,1284.229736

8

Table 22. Energy Intensity, Projected vs. Actual  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Energy Intensity, Projected vs. Actual" Energy Intensity, Projected vs. Actual" "Projected" " (quadrillion Btu / real GDP in billion 2005 chained dollars)" ,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,2000,2001,2002,2003,2004,2005,2006,2007,2008,2009,2010,2011 "AEO 1994",11.24893441,11.08565002,10.98332766,10.82852279,10.67400621,10.54170176,10.39583203,10.27184573,10.14478673,10.02575883,9.910410202,9.810812106,9.69894802,9.599821783,9.486985399,9.394733753,9.303329725,9.221322623 "AEO 1995",,10.86137373,10.75116461,10.60467959,10.42268977,10.28668187,10.14461664,10.01081222,9.883759026,9.759022105,9.627404949,9.513643295,9.400418762,9.311729546,9.226142899,9.147374752,9.071102491,8.99599906 "AEO 1996",,,10.71047701,10.59846153,10.43655044,10.27812088,10.12746866,9.9694713,9.824165152,9.714832565,9.621874334,9.532324916,9.428169355,9.32931308,9.232716414,9.170931044,9.086870061,9.019963901,8.945602337

9

Improving Industrial Refrigeration System Efficiency - Actual Applications  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper discusses actual design and modifications for increased system efficiency and includes reduced chilled liquid flow during part load operation, reduced condensing and increased evaporator temperatures for reduced system head, thermosiphon cycle cooling during winter operation, compressor intercooling, direct refrigeration vs. brine cooling, insulation of cold piping to reduce heat gain, multiple screw compressors for improved part load operation, evaporative condensers for reduced system head and pumping energy, and using high efficiency motors.

White, T. L.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

10

A Sensitivity Study of Building Performance Using 30-Year Actual...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Contacts Media Contacts A Sensitivity Study of Building Performance Using 30-Year Actual Weather Data Title A Sensitivity Study of Building Performance Using 30-Year Actual...

11

Table 14. Coal Production, Projected vs. Actual  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Coal Production, Projected vs. Actual Coal Production, Projected vs. Actual (million short tons) 1985 1986 1987 1988 1989 1990 1991 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 AEO 1982 914 939 963 995 1031 1080 AEO 1983 900 926 947 974 1010 1045 1191 AEO 1984 899 921 948 974 1010 1057 1221 AEO 1985 886 909 930 940 958 985 1015 1041 1072 1094 1116 AEO 1986 890 920 954 962 983 1017 1044 1073 1097 1126 1142 1156 1176 1191 1217 AEO 1987 917 914 932 962 978 996 1020 1043 1068 1149 AEO 1989* 941 946 977 990 1018 1039 1058 1082 1084 1107 1130 1152 1171 AEO 1990 973 987 1085 1178 1379 AEO 1991 1035 1002 1016 1031 1043 1054 1065 1079 1096 1111 1133 1142 1160 1193 1234 1272 1309 1349 1386 1433 AEO 1992 1004 1040 1019 1034 1052 1064 1074 1087 1102 1133 1144 1156 1173 1201 1229 1272 1312 1355 1397 AEO 1993 1039 1043 1054 1065 1076 1086 1094 1102 1125 1136 1148 1161 1178 1204 1237 1269 1302 1327 AEO 1994 999 1021

12

Peak-load pricing and thermal energy storage  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Twenty papers were presented at the meeting. A separate abstract was prepared for each of 19 papers. One paper was processed previously for the Energy Data Base (EDB). Fifteen of the papers were processed for inclusion in Energy Abstracts for Policy Analysis (EAPA). (LCL)

Not Available

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

13

Table 23. Energy Intensity, Projected vs. Actual  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Energy Intensity, Projected vs. Actual Energy Intensity, Projected vs. Actual (quadrillion Btu / $Billion Nominal GDP) 1985 1986 1987 1988 1989 1990 1991 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 AEO 1982 20.1 18.5 16.9 15.5 14.4 13.2 AEO 1983 19.9 18.7 17.4 16.2 15.1 14.0 9.5 AEO 1984 20.1 19.0 17.7 16.5 15.5 14.5 10.2 AEO 1985 20.0 19.1 18.0 16.9 15.9 14.7 13.7 12.7 11.8 11.0 10.3 AEO 1986 18.3 17.8 16.8 16.1 15.2 14.3 13.4 12.6 11.7 10.9 10.2 9.5 8.9 8.3 7.8 AEO 1987 17.6 17.0 16.3 15.4 14.5 13.7 12.9 12.1 11.4 8.2 AEO 1989* 16.9 16.2 15.2 14.2 13.3 12.5 11.7 10.9 10.2 9.6 9.0 8.5 8.0 AEO 1990 16.1 15.4 11.7 8.6 6.4 AEO 1991 15.5 14.9 14.2 13.6 13.0 12.5 11.9 11.3 10.8 10.3 9.7 9.2 8.7 8.3 7.9 7.4 7.0 6.7 6.3 6.0 AEO 1992 15.0 14.5 13.9 13.3 12.7 12.1 11.6 11.0 10.5 10.0 9.5 9.0 8.6 8.1 7.7 7.3 6.9 6.6 6.2 AEO 1993 14.7 13.9 13.4 12.8 12.3 11.8 11.2 10.7 10.2 9.6 9.2 8.7 8.3 7.8 7.4 7.1 6.7 6.4

14

Table 8.13 Electric Utility Demand-Side Management Programs, 1989-2010  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

State Energy Data System ... 2 "Energy Efficiency" refers to programs that are aimed at reducing the energy used by specific end-use ... efficient building design, ...

15

Table 14a. Average Electricity Prices, Projected vs. Actual  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

a. Average Electricity Prices, Projected vs. Actual" "Projected Price in Constant Dollars" " (constant dollars, cents per kilowatt-hour in ""dollar year"" specific to each AEO)"...

16

Shale Gas Production: Potential versus Actual GHG Emissions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Shale Gas Production: Potential versus Actual GHG Emissions Francis O'Sullivan and Sergey Paltsev://globalchange.mit.edu/ Printed on recycled paper #12;1 Shale Gas Production: Potential versus Actual GHG Emissions Francis O'Sullivan* and Sergey Paltsev* Abstract Estimates of greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions from shale gas production and use

17

Table 13. Coal Production, Projected vs. Actual Projected  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Coal Production, Projected vs. Actual Projected (million short tons) 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 AEO 1994 999...

18

Table 14b. Average Electricity Prices, Projected vs. Actual  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

b. Average Electricity Prices, Projected vs. Actual Projected Price in Nominal Dollars (nominal dollars, cents per kilowatt-hour) 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002...

19

Table 14b. Average Electricity Prices, Projected vs. Actual  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

b. Average Electricity Prices, Projected vs. Actual" "Projected Price in Nominal Dollars" " (nominal dollars, cents per kilowatt-hour)" ,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,2000,200...

20

Table 8. Total Natural Gas Consumption, Projected vs. Actual  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Natural Gas Consumption, Projected vs. Actual" "Projected" " (trillion cubic feet)" ,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,2000,2001,2002,2003,2004,2005,2006,2007,2008,2009,2010,2011...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "1989-2010 actual peakload" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Predicted vs. Actual Energy Savings of Retrofitted House  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper reports the results of actual energy savings and the predicted energy savings of retrofitted one-story house located in Dhahran, Saudi Arabia. The process started with modeling the house prior to retrofitting and after retrofitting. The monthly metered energy consumption is acquired from the electric company archives for seven years prior to retrofitting and recording the actual monthly energy consumption of the post retrofitting. The house model is established on DOE 2.1. Actual monthly energy consumption is used to calibrate and fine-tuning the model until the gap between actual and predicted consumption was narrowed. Then the Energy Conservation Measures (ECMs) are entered into the modeled house according to the changes in thermo-physical properties of the envelope and the changes in schedules and number of users. In order to account for those differences, electrical consumption attributed to A/C in summer was isolated and compared. The study followed the International Performance Measurement & Verification Protocol (IPMVP) in assessing the impact of energy conservation measures on actual, metered, building energy consumption. The study aimed to show the predicted savings by the simulated building model and the actual utility bills' analysis in air conditioning consumption and peak at monthly load due to building envelope.

Al-Mofeez, I.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

22

Shale gas production: potential versus actual greenhouse gas emissions*  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Shale gas production: potential versus actual greenhouse gas emissions* Francis O Environ. Res. Lett. 7 (2012) 044030 (6pp) doi:10.1088/1748-9326/7/4/044030 Shale gas production: potential gas (GHG) emissions from shale gas production and use are controversial. Here we assess the level

23

Attachment Implementation Procedures to Report Deferred, Actual, and Required Maintenance  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Final July 01, 2010 Final July 01, 2010 1 Attachment Implementation Procedures to Report Deferred, Actual, and Required Maintenance On Real Property 1. The following is the FY 2010 implementation procedures for the field offices/sites to determine and report deferred maintenance on real property as required by the Statement of Federal Financial Accounting Standards (SFFAS) No. 6, Accounting for Property, Plant, and Equipment (PP&E) and DOE Order 430.1B, Real Property Asset Management (RPAM). a. This document is intended to assist field offices/sites in consistently and accurately applying the appropriate methods to determine and report deferred maintenance estimates and reporting of annual required and actual maintenance costs. b. This reporting satisfies the Department's obligation to recognize and record deferred

24

Attachment Implementation Procedures to Report Deferred, Actual, and Required Maintenance  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Draft July 9, 2009 Draft July 9, 2009 1 Attachment Implementation Procedures to Report Deferred, Actual, and Required Maintenance On Real Property 1. The following is the FY 2009 implementation procedures for the field offices/sites to determine and report deferred maintenance on real property as required by the Statement of Federal Financial Accounting Standards (SFFAS) No. 6, Accounting for Property, Plant, and Equipment (PP&E) and DOE Order 430.1B, Real Property Asset Management (RPAM). a. This document is intended to assist field offices/sites in consistently and accurately applying the appropriate methods to determine and report deferred maintenance estimates and reporting of annual required and actual maintenance costs. b. This reporting satisfies the Department's obligation to recognize and record deferred

25

Table 12. Total Coal Consumption, Projected vs. Actual  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Coal Consumption, Projected vs. Actual" Coal Consumption, Projected vs. Actual" "Projected" " (million short tons)" ,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,2000,2001,2002,2003,2004,2005,2006,2007,2008,2009,2010,2011 "AEO 1994",920,928,933,938,943,948,953,958,962,967,978,990,987,992,1006,1035,1061,1079 "AEO 1995",,935,940,941,947,948,951,954,958,963,971,984,992,996,1002,1013,1025,1039 "AEO 1996",,,937,942,954,962,983,990,1004,1017,1027,1033,1046,1067,1070,1071,1074,1082,1087 "AEO 1997",,,,948,970,987,1003,1017,1020,1025,1034,1041,1054,1075,1086,1092,1092,1099,1104 "AEO 1998",,,,,1009,1051,1043.875977,1058.292725,1086.598145,1084.446655,1089.787109,1096.931763,1111.523926,1129.833862,1142.338257,1148.019409,1159.695312,1162.210815,1180.029785

26

Table 4. Total Petroleum Consumption, Projected vs. Actual  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Petroleum Consumption, Projected vs. Actual Petroleum Consumption, Projected vs. Actual Projected (million barrels) 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 AEO 1994 6450 6566 6643 6723 6811 6880 6957 7059 7125 7205 7296 7377 7446 7523 7596 7665 7712 7775 AEO 1995 6398 6544 6555 6676 6745 6822 6888 6964 7048 7147 7245 7337 7406 7472 7537 7581 7621 AEO 1996 6490 6526 6607 6709 6782 6855 6942 7008 7085 7176 7260 7329 7384 7450 7501 7545 7581 AEO 1997 6636 6694 6826 6953 7074 7183 7267 7369 7461 7548 7643 7731 7793 7833 7884 7924 AEO 1998 6895 6906 7066 7161 7278 7400 7488 7597 7719 7859 7959 8074 8190 8286 8361 AEO 1999 6884 7007 7269 7383 7472 7539 7620 7725 7841 7949 8069 8174 8283 8351 AEO 2000 7056 7141 7266 7363 7452 7578 7694 7815 7926 8028 8113 8217 8288

27

Table 6. Petroleum Net Imports, Projected vs. Actual Projected  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Petroleum Net Imports, Projected vs. Actual Petroleum Net Imports, Projected vs. Actual Projected (million barrels) 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 AEO 1994 2935 3201 3362 3504 3657 3738 3880 3993 4099 4212 4303 4398 4475 4541 4584 4639 4668 4672 AEO 1995 2953 3157 3281 3489 3610 3741 3818 3920 4000 4103 4208 4303 4362 4420 4442 4460 4460 AEO 1996 3011 3106 3219 3398 3519 3679 3807 3891 3979 4070 4165 4212 4260 4289 4303 4322 4325 AEO 1997 3099 3245 3497 3665 3825 3975 4084 4190 4285 4380 4464 4552 4617 4654 4709 4760 AEO 1998 3303 3391 3654 3713 3876 4053 4137 4298 4415 4556 4639 4750 4910 4992 5087 AEO 1999 3380 3442 3888 4022 4153 4238 4336 4441 4545 4652 4780 4888 4999 5073 AEO 2000 3599 3847 4036 4187 4320 4465 4579 4690 4780 4882 4968 5055 5113

28

Tropical Africa: Calculated Actual Aboveground Live Biomass in Open and  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Calculated Actual Aboveground Live Biomass in Open and Calculated Actual Aboveground Live Biomass in Open and Closed Forests (1980) image Brown, S., and G. Gaston. 1996. Tropical Africa: Land Use, Biomass, and Carbon Estimates For 1980. ORNL/CDIAC-92, NDP-055. Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center, U.S. Department of Energy, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee, U.S.A. More Maps Land Use Maximum Potential Biomass Density Area of Closed Forests (By Country) Mean Biomass of Closed Forests (By Country) Area of Open Forests (By Country) Mean Biomass of Open Forests (By County) Percent Forest Cover (By Country) Total Forest Biomass (By Country) Population Density - 1990 (By Administrative Unit) Population Density - 1980 (By Administrative Unit) Population Density - 1970 (By Administrative Unit) Population Density - 1960 (By Administrative Unit)

29

Table 5. Domestic Crude Oil Production, Projected vs. Actual  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Domestic Crude Oil Production, Projected vs. Actual Domestic Crude Oil Production, Projected vs. Actual Projected (million barrels) 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 AEO 1994 2508 2373 2256 2161 2088 2022 1953 1891 1851 1825 1799 1781 1767 1759 1778 1789 1807 1862 AEO 1995 2402 2307 2205 2095 2037 1967 1953 1924 1916 1905 1894 1883 1887 1887 1920 1945 1967 AEO 1996 2387 2310 2248 2172 2113 2062 2011 1978 1953 1938 1916 1920 1927 1949 1971 1986 2000 AEO 1997 2362 2307 2245 2197 2143 2091 2055 2033 2015 2004 1997 1989 1982 1975 1967 1949 AEO 1998 2340 2332 2291 2252 2220 2192 2169 2145 2125 2104 2087 2068 2050 2033 2016 AEO 1999 2340 2309 2296 2265 2207 2171 2141 2122 2114 2092 2074 2057 2040 2025 AEO 2000 2193 2181 2122 2063 2016 1980 1957 1939 1920 1904 1894 1889 1889

30

Table 7b. Natural Gas Wellhead Prices, Projected vs. Actual  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

b. Natural Gas Wellhead Prices, Projected vs. Actual" b. Natural Gas Wellhead Prices, Projected vs. Actual" "Projected Price in Nominal Dollars" " (nominal dollars per thousand cubic feet)" ,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,2000,2001,2002,2003,2004,2005,2006,2007,2008,2009,2010,2011 "AEO 1994",1.983258692,2.124739238,2.26534793,2.409252566,2.585728477,2.727400662,2.854942053,2.980927152,3.13861755,3.345819536,3.591100993,3.849544702,4.184279801,4.510016556,4.915074503,5.29147351,5.56022351,5.960471854 "AEO 1995",,1.891706924,1.998384058,1.952818035,2.064227053,2.152302174,2.400016103,2.569033816,2.897681159,3.160088567,3.556344605,3.869033816,4.267391304,4.561932367,4.848599034,5.157246377,5.413405797,5.660917874 "AEO 1996",,,1.630674532,1.740334763,1.862956911,1.9915856,2.10351261,2.194934146,2.287655669,2.378991658,2.476043002,2.589847464,2.717610782,2.836870306,2.967124845,3.117719429,3.294003735,3.485657428,3.728419409

31

Steam Trap Testing and Evaluation: An Actual Plant Case Study  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

With rising steam costs and a high failure rate on the Joliet Plants standard steam trap, a testing and evaluation program was begun to find a steam trap that would work at Olin-Joliet. The basis was to conduct the test on the actual process equipment and that a minimum life be achieved. This paper deals with the history of the steam system/condensate systems, the setting up of the testing procedure, which traps were and were not tested and the results of the testing program to date.

Feldman, A. L.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

32

Table 10. Natural Gas Net Imports, Projected vs. Actual  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Natural Gas Net Imports, Projected vs. Actual" Natural Gas Net Imports, Projected vs. Actual" "Projected" " (trillion cubic feet)" ,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,2000,2001,2002,2003,2004,2005,2006,2007,2008,2009,2010,2011 "AEO 1994",2.02,2.4,2.66,2.74,2.81,2.85,2.89,2.93,2.95,2.97,3,3.16,3.31,3.5,3.57,3.63,3.74,3.85 "AEO 1995",,2.46,2.54,2.8,2.87,2.87,2.89,2.9,2.9,2.92,2.95,2.97,3,3.03,3.19,3.35,3.51,3.6 "AEO 1996",,,2.56,2.75,2.85,2.88,2.93,2.98,3.02,3.06,3.07,3.09,3.12,3.17,3.23,3.29,3.37,3.46,3.56 "AEO 1997",,,,2.82,2.96,3.16,3.43,3.46,3.5,3.53,3.58,3.64,3.69,3.74,3.78,3.83,3.87,3.92,3.97 "AEO 1998",,,,,2.95,3.19,3.531808376,3.842532873,3.869043112,3.894513845,3.935930967,3.976293564,4.021911621,4.062207222,4.107616425,4.164502144,4.221304417,4.277039051,4.339964867

33

Table 12. Total Coal Consumption, Projected vs. Actual Projected  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Total Coal Consumption, Projected vs. Actual Total Coal Consumption, Projected vs. Actual Projected (million short tons) 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 AEO 1994 920 928 933 938 943 948 953 958 962 967 978 990 987 992 1006 1035 1061 1079 AEO 1995 935 940 941 947 948 951 954 958 963 971 984 992 996 1002 1013 1025 1039 AEO 1996 937 942 954 962 983 990 1004 1017 1027 1033 1046 1067 1070 1071 1074 1082 1087 AEO 1997 948 970 987 1003 1017 1020 1025 1034 1041 1054 1075 1086 1092 1092 1099 1104 AEO 1998 1009 1051 1044 1058 1087 1084 1090 1097 1112 1130 1142 1148 1160 1162 1180 AEO 1999 1040 1075 1092 1109 1113 1118 1120 1120 1133 1139 1150 1155 1156 1173 AEO 2000 1053 1086 1103 1124 1142 1164 1175 1184 1189 1194 1199 1195 1200 AEO 2001 1078 1112 1135 1153 1165 1183 1191 1220 1228 1228 1235 1240

34

Table 22. Total Carbon Dioxide Emissions, Projected vs. Actual  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Total Carbon Dioxide Emissions, Projected vs. Actual Total Carbon Dioxide Emissions, Projected vs. Actual (million metric tons) 1985 1986 1987 1988 1989 1990 1991 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 AEO 1982 AEO 1983 AEO 1984 AEO 1985 AEO 1986 AEO 1987 AEO 1989* AEO 1990 AEO 1991 AEO 1992 AEO 1993 5009 5053 5130 5207 5269 5335 5401 5449 5504 5562 5621 5672 5724 5771 5819 5867 5918 5969 AEO 1994 5060 5130 5185 5240 5287 5335 5379 5438 5482 5529 5599 5658 5694 5738 5797 5874 5925 AEO 1995 5137 5174 5188 5262 5309 5361 5394 5441.3 5489.0 5551.3 5621.0 5679.7 5727.3 5775.0 5841.0 5888.7 AEO 1996 5182 5224 5295 5355 5417 5464 5525 5589 5660 5735 5812 5879 5925 5981 6030 AEO 1997 5295 5381 5491 5586 5658 5715 5781 5863 5934 6009 6106 6184 6236 6268 AEO 1998 5474 5621 5711 5784 5893 5957 6026 6098 6192 6292 6379 6465 6542 AEO 1999 5522 5689 5810 5913 5976 6036 6084 6152 6244 6325 6418 6493 AEO 2000

35

Table 16. Total Electricity Sales, Projected vs. Actual  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Electricity Sales, Projected vs. Actual Electricity Sales, Projected vs. Actual (billion kilowatt-hours) 1985 1986 1987 1988 1989 1990 1991 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 AEO 1982 2364 2454 2534 2626 2708 2811 AEO 1983 2318 2395 2476 2565 2650 2739 3153 AEO 1984 2321 2376 2461 2551 2637 2738 3182 AEO 1985 2317 2360 2427 2491 2570 2651 2730 2808 2879 2949 3026 AEO 1986 2363 2416 2479 2533 2608 2706 2798 2883 2966 3048 3116 3185 3255 3324 3397 AEO 1987 2460 2494 2555 2622 2683 2748 2823 2902 2977 3363 AEO 1989* 2556 2619 2689 2760 2835 2917 2994 3072 3156 3236 3313 3394 3473 AEO 1990 2612 2689 3083 3488.0 3870.0 AEO 1991 2700 2762 2806 2855 2904 2959 3022 3088 3151 3214 3282 3355 3427 3496 3563 3632 3704 3776 3846 3916 AEO 1992 2746 2845 2858 2913 2975 3030 3087 3146 3209 3276 3345 3415 3483 3552 3625 3699 3774 3847 3921 AEO 1993 2803 2840 2893 2946 2998 3052 3104 3157 3214 3271 3327

36

Table 16. Total Energy Consumption, Projected vs. Actual  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Total Energy Consumption, Projected vs. Actual" Total Energy Consumption, Projected vs. Actual" "Projected" " (quadrillion Btu)" ,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,2000,2001,2002,2003,2004,2005,2006,2007,2008,2009,2010,2011 "AEO 1994",88.02,89.53,90.72,91.73,92.71,93.61,94.56,95.73,96.69,97.69,98.89,100,100.79,101.7,102.7,103.6,104.3,105.23 "AEO 1995",,89.21,89.98,90.57,91.91,92.98,93.84,94.61,95.3,96.19,97.18,98.38,99.37,100.3,101.2,102.1,102.9,103.88 "AEO 1996",,,90.6,91.26,92.54,93.46,94.27,95.07,95.94,96.92,97.98,99.2,100.38,101.4,102.1,103.1,103.8,104.69,105.5 "AEO 1997",,,,92.64,93.58,95.13,96.59,97.85,98.79,99.9,101.2,102.4,103.4,104.7,105.8,106.6,107.2,107.9,108.6 "AEO 1998",,,,,94.68,96.71,98.61027527,99.81855774,101.254303,102.3907928,103.3935776,104.453476,105.8160553,107.2683716,108.5873566,109.8798981,111.0723877,112.166893,113.0926208

37

Table 7a. Natural Gas Wellhead Prices, Projected vs. Actual  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

a. Natural Gas Wellhead Prices, Projected vs. Actual" a. Natural Gas Wellhead Prices, Projected vs. Actual" "Projected Price in Constant Dollars" " (constant dollars per thousand cubic feet in ""dollar year"" specific to each AEO)" ,"AEO Dollar Year",1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,2000,2001,2002,2003,2004,2005,2006,2007,2008,2009,2010,2011 "AEO 1994",1992,1.9399,2.029,2.1099,2.1899,2.29,2.35,2.39,2.42,2.47,2.55,2.65,2.75,2.89,3.01,3.17,3.3,3.35,3.47 "AEO 1995",1993,,1.85,1.899,1.81,1.87,1.8999,2.06,2.14,2.34,2.47,2.69,2.83,3.02,3.12,3.21,3.3,3.35,3.39 "AEO 1996",1994,,,1.597672343,1.665446997,1.74129355,1.815978527,1.866241336,1.892736554,1.913619637,1.928664207,1.943216205,1.964540124,1.988652706,2.003382921,2.024799585,2.056392431,2.099974155,2.14731431,2.218094587

38

Table 14a. Average Electricity Prices, Projected vs. Actual  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

a. Average Electricity Prices, Projected vs. Actual a. Average Electricity Prices, Projected vs. Actual Projected Price in Constant Dollars (constant dollars, cents per kilowatt-hour in "dollar year" specific to each AEO) AEO Dollar Year 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 AEO 1995 1993 6.80 6.80 6.70 6.70 6.70 6.70 6.70 6.80 6.80 6.90 6.90 6.90 7.00 7.00 7.10 7.10 7.20 AEO 1996 1994 7.09 6.99 6.94 6.93 6.96 6.96 6.96 6.97 6.98 6.97 6.98 6.95 6.95 6.94 6.96 6.95 6.91 AEO 1997 1995 6.94 6.89 6.90 6.91 6.86 6.84 6.78 6.73 6.66 6.60 6.58 6.54 6.49 6.48 6.45 6.36

39

Table 4. Total Petroleum Consumption, Projected vs. Actual  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Total Petroleum Consumption, Projected vs. Actual" Total Petroleum Consumption, Projected vs. Actual" "Projected" " (million barrels)" ,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,2000,2001,2002,2003,2004,2005,2006,2007,2008,2009,2010,2011 "AEO 1994",6449.55,6566.35,6643,6723.3,6810.9,6880.25,6956.9,7059.1,7124.8,7205.1,7296.35,7376.65,7446,7522.65,7595.65,7665,7712.45,7774.5 "AEO 1995",,6398.45,6544.45,6555.4,6675.85,6745.2,6821.85,6887.55,6964.2,7048.15,7146.7,7245.25,7336.5,7405.85,7471.55,7537.25,7581.05,7621.2 "AEO 1996",,,6489.7,6526.2,6606.5,6708.7,6781.7,6854.7,6942.3,7008,7084.65,7175.9,7259.85,7329.2,7383.95,7449.65,7500.75,7544.55,7581.05 "AEO 1997",,,,6635.7,6694.1,6825.5,6953.25,7073.7,7183.2,7267.15,7369.35,7460.6,7548.2,7643.1,7730.7,7792.75,7832.9,7884,7924.15

40

Direct quantum communication without actual transmission of the message qubits  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Recently an orthogonal state based protocol of direct quantum communication without actual transmission of particles is proposed by Salih \\emph{et al.}{[}Phys. Rev. Lett. \\textbf{110} (2013) 170502{]} using chained quantum Zeno effect. As the no-transmission of particle claim is criticized by Vaidman {[}arXiv:1304.6689 (2013){]}, the condition (claim) of Salih \\emph{et al.} is weaken here to the extent that transmission of particles is allowed, but transmission of the message qubits (the qubits on which the secret information is encoded) is not allowed. Remaining within this weaker condition it is shown that there exists a large class of quantum states, that can be used to implement an orthogonal state based protocol of secure direct quantum communication using entanglement swapping, where actual transmission of the message qubits is not required. The security of the protocol originates from monogamy of entanglement. As the protocol can be implemented without using conjugate coding its security is independent of non-commutativity.

Chitra Shukla; Anirban Pathak

2013-07-23T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "1989-2010 actual peakload" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Table 5. Domestic Crude Oil Production, Projected vs. Actual  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Domestic Crude Oil Production, Projected vs. Actual" Domestic Crude Oil Production, Projected vs. Actual" "Projected" " (million barrels)" ,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,2000,2001,2002,2003,2004,2005,2006,2007,2008,2009,2010,2011 "AEO 1994",2507.55,2372.5,2255.7,2160.8,2087.8,2022.1,1952.75,1890.7,1850.55,1825,1799.45,1781.2,1766.6,1759.3,1777.55,1788.5,1806.75,1861.5 "AEO 1995",,2401.7,2306.8,2204.6,2095.1,2036.7,1967.35,1952.75,1923.55,1916.25,1905.3,1894.35,1883.4,1887.05,1887.05,1919.9,1945.45,1967.35 "AEO 1996",,,2387.1,2310.45,2248.4,2171.75,2113.35,2062.25,2011.15,1978.3,1952.75,1938.15,1916.25,1919.9,1927.2,1949.1,1971,1985.6,2000.2 "AEO 1997",,,,2361.55,2306.8,2244.75,2197.3,2142.55,2091.45,2054.95,2033.05,2014.8,2003.85,1996.55,1989.25,1981.95,1974.65,1967.35,1949.1

42

Table 9. Natural Gas Production, Projected vs. Actual  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Natural Gas Production, Projected vs. Actual" Natural Gas Production, Projected vs. Actual" "Projected" " (trillion cubic feet)" ,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,2000,2001,2002,2003,2004,2005,2006,2007,2008,2009,2010,2011 "AEO 1994",17.71,17.68,17.84,18.12,18.25,18.43,18.58,18.93,19.28,19.51,19.8,19.92,20.13,20.18,20.38,20.35,20.16,20.19 "AEO 1995",,18.28,17.98,17.92,18.21,18.63,18.92,19.08,19.2,19.36,19.52,19.75,19.94,20.17,20.28,20.6,20.59,20.88 "AEO 1996",,,18.9,19.15,19.52,19.59,19.59,19.65,19.73,19.97,20.36,20.82,21.25,21.37,21.68,22.11,22.47,22.83,23.36 "AEO 1997",,,,19.1,19.7,20.17,20.32,20.54,20.77,21.26,21.9,22.31,22.66,22.93,23.38,23.68,23.99,24.25,24.65 "AEO 1998",,,,,18.85,19.06,20.34936142,20.27427673,20.60257721,20.94442177,21.44076347,21.80969238,22.25416183,22.65365219,23.176651,23.74545097,24.22989273,24.70069313,24.96691322

43

Table 7a. Natural Gas Wellhead Prices, Projected vs. Actual  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

a. Natural Gas Wellhead Prices, Projected vs. Actual a. Natural Gas Wellhead Prices, Projected vs. Actual Projected Price in Constant Dollars (constant dollars per thousand cubic feet in "dollar year" specific to each AEO) AEO Dollar Year 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 AEO 1994 1992 1.94 2.03 2.11 2.19 2.29 2.35 2.39 2.42 2.47 2.55 2.65 2.75 2.89 3.01 3.17 3.30 3.35 3.47 AEO 1995 1993 1.85 1.90 1.81 1.87 1.90 2.06 2.14 2.34 2.47 2.69 2.83 3.02 3.12 3.21 3.30 3.35 3.39 AEO 1996 1994 1.60 1.67 1.74 1.82 1.87 1.89 1.91 1.93 1.94 1.96 1.99 2.00 2.02 2.06 2.10 2.15 2.22

44

After the copy : creativity, originality and the labor of appropriation : Dafen Village, Shenzhen, China (1989-2010)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Since 1989, Dafen village in Shenzhen, China, has supplied millions of hand-painted oil-on-canvas paintings each year to global consumer markets. Accused of copying Western masterpieces, and spurred by the Chinese party-state's ...

Wong, Winnie Won Yin, 1978-

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

45

Nonlinear excitations in DNA: Aperiodic models vs actual genome sequences  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We study the effects of the sequence on the propagation of nonlinear excitations in simple models of DNA in which we incorporate actual DNA sequences obtained from human genome data. We show that kink propagation requires forces over a certain threshold, a phenomenon already found for aperiodic sequences [F. Dom\\'\\i nguez-Adame {\\em et al.}, Phys. Rev. E {\\bf 52}, 2183 (1995)]. For forces below threshold, the final stop positions are highly dependent on the specific sequence. The results of our model are consistent with the stick-slip dynamics of the unzipping process observed in experiments. We also show that the effective potential, a collective coordinate formalism introduced by Salerno and Kivshar [Phys. Lett. A {\\bf 193}, 263 (1994)] is a useful tool to identify key regions in DNA that control the dynamical behavior of large segments. Additionally, our results lead to further insights in the phenomenology observed in aperiodic systems.

Sara Cuenda; Angel Sanchez

2004-07-02T23:59:59.000Z

46

Word Pro - Untitled1  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

7 7 Table 8.13 Electric Utility Demand-Side Management Programs, 1989-2010 Year Actual Peakload Reductions 1 Energy Savings Electric Utility Costs 4 Energy Efficiency 2 Load Management 3 Total Megawatts Million Kilowatthours Thousand Dollars 5 1989 NA NA 12,463 14,672 872,935 1990 NA NA 13,704 20,458 1,177,457 1991 NA NA 15,619 24,848 1,803,773 1992 7,890 9,314 17,204 35,563 2,348,094 1993 10,368 12,701 23,069 45,294 2,743,533 1994 11,662 13,340 25,001 52,483 2,715,657 1995 13,212 16,347 29,561 57,421 2,421,284 1996 14,243 15,650 29,893 61,842 1,902,197 1997 13,327 11,958 25,284 56,406 1,636,020 1998 13,591 13,640 27,231 49,167 1,420,920 1999 13,452 13,003 26,455 50,563 1,423,644 2000 12,873 10,027 22,901 53,701 1,564,901 2001 13,027 11,928 24,955 53,936 1,630,286 2002 13,420 9,516 22,936 54,075 1,625,537 2003 13,581 9,323

47

Table 18. Total Delivered Commercial Energy Consumption, Projected vs. Actual  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Total Delivered Commercial Energy Consumption, Projected vs. Actual Total Delivered Commercial Energy Consumption, Projected vs. Actual Projected (quadrillion Btu) 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 AEO 1994 6.8 6.9 6.9 7.0 7.1 7.1 7.2 7.2 7.3 7.3 7.4 7.4 7.4 7.5 7.5 7.5 7.5 7.6 AEO 1995 6.9 6.9 7.0 7.0 7.0 7.1 7.1 7.1 7.1 7.1 7.2 7.2 7.2 7.2 7.3 7.3 7.3 AEO 1996 7.1 7.2 7.2 7.3 7.3 7.4 7.4 7.5 7.6 7.6 7.7 7.7 7.8 7.9 8.0 8.0 8.1 AEO 1997 7.4 7.4 7.4 7.5 7.5 7.6 7.7 7.7 7.8 7.8 7.9 7.9 8.0 8.1 8.1 8.2 AEO 1998 7.5 7.6 7.7 7.8 7.9 8.0 8.0 8.1 8.2 8.3 8.4 8.4 8.5 8.6 8.7 AEO 1999 7.4 7.8 7.9 8.0 8.1 8.2 8.2 8.3 8.4 8.5 8.6 8.7 8.8 8.9 AEO 2000 7.7 7.8 7.9 8.0 8.1 8.2 8.3 8.4 8.5 8.5 8.7 8.7 8.8 AEO 2001 7.8 8.1 8.3 8.6 8.7 8.9 9.0 9.2 9.3 9.5 9.6 9.7 AEO 2002 8.2 8.4 8.7 8.9 9.0 9.2 9.4 9.6 9.7 9.9 10.1

48

Table 21. Total Transportation Energy Consumption, Projected vs. Actual  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Transportation Energy Consumption, Projected vs. Actual Transportation Energy Consumption, Projected vs. Actual (quadrillion Btu) 1985 1986 1987 1988 1989 1990 1991 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 AEO 1982 18.6 18.2 17.7 17.3 17.0 16.9 AEO 1983 19.8 20.1 20.4 20.4 20.5 20.5 20.7 AEO 1984 19.2 19.0 19.0 19.0 19.1 19.2 20.1 AEO 1985 20.0 19.8 20.0 20.0 20.0 20.1 20.3 AEO 1986 20.5 20.8 20.8 20.6 20.7 20.3 21.0 AEO 1987 21.3 21.5 21.6 21.7 21.8 22.0 22.0 22.0 21.9 22.3 AEO 1989* 21.8 22.2 22.4 22.4 22.5 22.5 22.5 22.5 22.6 22.7 22.8 23.0 23.2 AEO 1990 22.0 22.4 23.2 24.3 25.5 AEO 1991 22.1 21.6 21.9 22.1 22.3 22.5 22.8 23.1 23.4 23.8 24.1 24.5 24.8 25.1 25.4 25.7 26.0 26.3 26.6 26.9 AEO 1992 21.7 22.0 22.5 22.9 23.2 23.4 23.6 23.9 24.1 24.4 24.8 25.1 25.4 25.7 26.0 26.3 26.6 26.9 27.1 AEO 1993 22.5 22.8 23.4 23.9 24.3 24.7 25.1 25.4 25.7 26.1 26.5 26.8 27.2 27.6 27.9 28.1 28.4 28.7 AEO 1994 23.6

49

Table 10. Natural Gas Production, Projected vs. Actual  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Production, Projected vs. Actual Production, Projected vs. Actual (trillion cubic feet) 1985 1986 1987 1988 1989 1990 1991 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 AEO 1982 14.74 14.26 14.33 14.89 15.39 15.88 AEO 1983 16.48 16.27 16.20 16.31 16.27 16.29 14.89 AEO 1984 17.48 17.10 17.44 17.58 17.52 17.32 16.39 AEO 1985 16.95 17.08 17.11 17.29 17.40 17.33 17.32 17.27 17.05 16.80 16.50 AEO 1986 16.30 16.27 17.15 16.68 16.90 16.97 16.87 16.93 16.86 16.62 16.40 16.33 16.57 16.23 16.12 AEO 1987 16.21 16.09 16.38 16.32 16.30 16.30 16.44 16.62 16.81 17.39 AEO 1989* 16.71 16.71 16.94 17.01 16.83 17.09 17.35 17.54 17.67 17.98 18.20 18.25 18.49 AEO 1990 16.91 17.25 18.84 20.58 20.24 AEO 1991 17.40 17.48 18.11 18.22 18.15 18.22 18.39 18.82 19.03 19.28 19.62 19.89 20.13 20.07 19.95 19.82 19.64 19.50 19.30 19.08 AEO 1992 17.43 17.69 17.95 18.00 18.29 18.27 18.51 18.75 18.97

50

Table 17. Total Energy Consumption, Projected vs. Actual  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Energy Consumption, Projected vs. Actual Energy Consumption, Projected vs. Actual (quadrillion Btu) 1985 1986 1987 1988 1989 1990 1991 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 AEO 1982 79.1 79.6 79.9 80.8 82.1 83.3 AEO 1983 78.0 79.5 81.0 82.4 83.9 84.6 89.0 AEO 1984 78.5 79.4 81.2 83.1 85.1 86.4 93.0 AEO 1985 77.6 78.5 79.8 81.2 82.7 83.3 84.2 85.0 85.7 86.3 87.2 AEO 1986 77.0 78.8 79.8 80.7 81.5 82.9 83.8 84.6 85.3 86.0 86.6 87.4 88.3 89.4 90.2 AEO 1987 78.9 80.0 82.0 82.8 83.9 85.1 86.2 87.1 87.9 92.5 AEO 1989* 82.2 83.8 84.5 85.4 86.2 87.1 87.8 88.7 89.5 90.4 91.4 92.4 93.5 AEO 1990 84.2 85.4 91.9 97.4 102.8 AEO 1991 84.4 85.0 86.0 87.0 87.9 89.1 90.4 91.8 93.1 94.3 95.6 97.1 98.4 99.4 100.3 101.4 102.5 103.6 104.7 105.8 AEO 1992 84.7 87.0 88.0 89.2 90.5 91.4 92.4 93.4 94.5 95.6 96.9 98.0 99.0 100.0 101.2 102.2 103.2 104.3 105.2 AEO 1993 87.0 88.3 89.8 91.4 92.7 94.0 95.3 96.3 97.5 98.6

51

Table 3. Gross Domestic Product, Projected vs. Actual  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Gross Domestic Product, Projected vs. Actual Gross Domestic Product, Projected vs. Actual (cumulative average percent growth in projected real GDP from first year shown for each AEO) 1985 1986 1987 1988 1989 1990 1991 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 AEO 1982 4.3% 3.8% 3.6% 3.3% 3.2% 3.2% AEO 1983 3.3% 3.3% 3.4% 3.3% 3.2% 3.1% 2.7% AEO 1984 2.7% 2.4% 2.9% 3.1% 3.1% 3.1% 2.7% AEO 1985 2.3% 2.2% 2.7% 2.8% 2.9% 3.0% 3.0% 3.0% 2.9% 2.8% 2.8% AEO 1986 2.6% 2.5% 2.7% 2.5% 2.5% 2.6% 2.6% 2.6% 2.5% 2.5% 2.5% 2.5% 2.5% 2.5% 2.5% AEO 1987 2.7% 2.3% 2.4% 2.5% 2.5% 2.6% 2.6% 2.5% 2.4% 2.3% AEO 1989* 4.0% 3.4% 3.1% 3.0% 2.9% 2.8% 2.7% 2.7% 2.7% 2.6% 2.6% 2.6% 2.6% AEO 1990 2.9% 2.3% 2.5% 2.5% 2.4% AEO 1991 0.8% 1.0% 1.7% 1.8% 1.8% 1.9% 2.0% 2.1% 2.1% 2.1% 2.2% 2.2% 2.2% 2.2% 2.2% 2.2% 2.2% 2.2% 2.2% 2.2% AEO 1992 -0.1% 1.6% 2.0% 2.2% 2.3% 2.2% 2.2% 2.2% 2.2% 2.3% 2.3% 2.3% 2.3% 2.2%

52

Table 20. Total Industrial Energy Consumption, Projected vs. Actual  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Industrial Energy Consumption, Projected vs. Actual Industrial Energy Consumption, Projected vs. Actual (quadrillion Btu) 1985 1986 1987 1988 1989 1990 1991 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 AEO 1982 24.0 24.1 24.4 24.9 25.5 26.1 AEO 1983 23.2 23.6 23.9 24.4 24.9 25.0 25.4 AEO 1984 24.1 24.5 25.4 25.5 27.1 27.4 28.7 AEO 1985 23.2 23.6 23.9 24.4 24.8 24.8 24.4 AEO 1986 22.2 22.8 23.1 23.4 23.4 23.6 22.8 AEO 1987 22.4 22.8 23.7 24.0 24.3 24.6 24.6 24.7 24.9 22.6 AEO 1989* 23.6 24.0 24.1 24.3 24.5 24.3 24.3 24.5 24.6 24.8 24.9 24.4 24.1 AEO 1990 25.0 25.4 27.1 27.3 28.6 AEO 1991 24.6 24.5 24.8 24.8 25.0 25.3 25.7 26.2 26.5 26.1 25.9 26.2 26.4 26.6 26.7 27.0 27.2 27.4 27.7 28.0 AEO 1992 24.6 25.3 25.4 25.6 26.1 26.3 26.5 26.5 26.0 25.6 25.8 26.0 26.1 26.2 26.4 26.7 26.9 27.2 27.3 AEO 1993 25.5 25.9 26.2 26.8 27.1 27.5 27.8 27.4 27.1 27.4 27.6 27.8 28.0 28.2 28.4 28.7 28.9 29.1 AEO 1994 25.4 25.9

53

Table 8. Natural Gas Wellhead Prices, Projected vs. Actual  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Natural Gas Wellhead Prices, Projected vs. Actual Natural Gas Wellhead Prices, Projected vs. Actual (current dollars per thousand cubic feet) 1985 1986 1987 1988 1989 1990 1991 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 AEO 1982 4.32 5.47 6.67 7.51 8.04 8.57 AEO 1983 2.93 3.11 3.46 3.93 4.56 5.26 12.74 AEO 1984 2.77 2.90 3.21 3.63 4.13 4.79 9.33 AEO 1985 2.60 2.61 2.66 2.71 2.94 3.35 3.85 4.46 5.10 5.83 6.67 AEO 1986 1.73 1.96 2.29 2.54 2.81 3.15 3.73 4.34 5.06 5.90 6.79 7.70 8.62 9.68 10.80 AEO 1987 1.83 1.95 2.11 2.28 2.49 2.72 3.08 3.51 4.07 7.54 AEO 1989* 1.62 1.70 1.91 2.13 2.58 3.04 3.48 3.93 4.76 5.23 5.80 6.43 6.98 AEO 1990 1.78 1.88 2.93 5.36 9.2 AEO 1991 1.77 1.90 2.11 2.30 2.42 2.51 2.60 2.74 2.91 3.29 3.75 4.31 5.07 5.77 6.45 7.29 8.09 8.94 9.62 10.27 AEO 1992 1.69 1.85 2.03 2.15 2.35 2.51 2.74 3.01 3.40 3.81 4.24 4.74 5.25 5.78 6.37 6.89 7.50 8.15 9.05 AEO 1993 1.85 1.94 2.09 2.30

54

Table 18. Total Residential Energy Consumption, Projected vs. Actual  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Residential Energy Consumption, Projected vs. Actual Residential Energy Consumption, Projected vs. Actual (quadrillion Btu) 1985 1986 1987 1988 1989 1990 1991 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 AEO 1982 10.1 10.1 10.1 10.1 10.2 10.2 AEO 1983 9.8 9.9 10.0 10.1 10.2 10.1 10.0 AEO 1984 9.9 9.9 10.0 10.2 10.3 10.3 10.5 AEO 1985 9.8 10.0 10.1 10.3 10.6 10.6 10.9 AEO 1986 9.6 9.8 10.0 10.3 10.4 10.8 10.9 AEO 1987 9.9 10.2 10.3 10.3 10.4 10.5 10.5 10.5 10.5 10.6 AEO 1989* 10.3 10.5 10.4 10.5 10.5 10.5 10.5 10.5 10.5 10.5 10.5 10.5 10.5 AEO 1990 10.4 10.7 10.8 11.0 11.3 AEO 1991 10.2 10.7 10.7 10.8 10.8 10.8 10.9 10.9 10.9 11.0 11.0 11.0 11.1 11.2 11.2 11.3 11.4 11.4 11.5 11.6 AEO 1992 10.6 11.1 11.1 11.1 11.1 11.1 11.2 11.2 11.3 11.3 11.4 11.5 11.5 11.6 11.7 11.8 11.8 11.9 12.0 AEO 1993 10.7 10.9 11.0 11.0 11.0 11.1 11.1 11.1 11.1 11.2 11.2 11.2 11.2 11.3 11.3 11.4 11.4 11.5 AEO 1994 10.3 10.4 10.4 10.4

55

Table 6. Domestic Crude Oil Production, Projected vs. Actual  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Domestic Crude Oil Production, Projected vs. Actual Domestic Crude Oil Production, Projected vs. Actual (million barrels per day) 1985 1986 1987 1988 1989 1990 1991 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 AEO 1982 8.79 8.85 8.84 8.80 8.66 8.21 AEO 1983 8.67 8.71 8.66 8.72 8.80 8.63 8.11 AEO 1984 8.86 8.70 8.59 8.45 8.28 8.25 7.19 AEO 1985 8.92 8.96 9.01 8.78 8.38 8.05 7.64 7.27 6.89 6.68 6.53 AEO 1986 8.80 8.63 8.30 7.90 7.43 6.95 6.60 6.36 6.20 5.99 5.80 5.66 5.54 5.45 5.43 AEO 1987 8.31 8.18 8.00 7.63 7.34 7.09 6.86 6.64 6.54 6.03 AEO 1989* 8.18 7.97 7.64 7.25 6.87 6.59 6.37 6.17 6.05 6.00 5.94 5.90 5.89 AEO 1990 7.67 7.37 6.40 5.86 5.35 AEO 1991 7.23 6.98 7.10 7.11 7.01 6.79 6.48 6.22 5.92 5.64 5.36 5.11 4.90 4.73 4.62 4.59 4.58 4.53 4.46 4.42 AEO 1992 7.37 7.17 6.99 6.89 6.68 6.45 6.28 6.16 6.06 5.91 5.79 5.71 5.66 5.64 5.62 5.63 5.62 5.55 5.52 AEO 1993 7.20 6.94 6.79 6.52 6.22 6.00 5.84 5.72

56

Table 17. Total Delivered Residential Energy Consumption, Projected vs. Actual  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Total Delivered Residential Energy Consumption, Projected vs. Actual Total Delivered Residential Energy Consumption, Projected vs. Actual Projected (quadrillion Btu) 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 AEO 1994 10.3 10.4 10.4 10.4 10.4 10.4 10.4 10.4 10.4 10.4 10.4 10.5 10.5 10.5 10.5 10.5 10.6 10.6 AEO 1995 11.0 10.8 10.8 10.8 10.8 10.8 10.8 10.7 10.7 10.7 10.7 10.7 10.7 10.7 10.8 10.8 10.9 AEO 1996 10.4 10.7 10.7 10.7 10.8 10.8 10.9 10.9 11.0 11.2 11.2 11.3 11.4 11.5 11.6 11.7 11.8 AEO 1997 11.1 10.9 11.1 11.1 11.2 11.2 11.2 11.3 11.4 11.5 11.5 11.6 11.7 11.8 11.9 12.0 AEO 1998 10.7 11.1 11.2 11.4 11.5 11.5 11.6 11.7 11.8 11.9 11.9 12.1 12.1 12.2 12.3 AEO 1999 10.5 11.1 11.3 11.3 11.4 11.5 11.5 11.6 11.6 11.7 11.8 11.9 12.0 12.1 AEO 2000 10.7 10.9 11.0 11.1 11.2 11.3 11.4 11.5 11.6 11.7 11.8 11.9 12.0

57

Table 2. Real Gross Domestic Product, Projected vs. Actual  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Real Gross Domestic Product, Projected vs. Actual Real Gross Domestic Product, Projected vs. Actual Projected Real GDP Growth Trend (cumulative average percent growth in projected real GDP from first year shown for each AEO) 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 AEO 1994 3.1% 3.2% 2.9% 2.8% 2.7% 2.7% 2.6% 2.6% 2.6% 2.5% 2.5% 2.5% 2.4% 2.4% 2.4% 2.4% 2.3% 2.3% AEO 1995 3.7% 2.8% 2.5% 2.7% 2.7% 2.6% 2.6% 2.5% 2.5% 2.5% 2.5% 2.4% 2.4% 2.4% 2.3% 2.3% 2.2% AEO 1996 2.6% 2.2% 2.5% 2.5% 2.5% 2.5% 2.4% 2.4% 2.4% 2.4% 2.4% 2.3% 2.3% 2.2% 2.2% 2.2% 1.6% AEO 1997 2.1% 1.9% 2.0% 2.2% 2.3% 2.3% 2.2% 2.2% 2.2% 2.2% 2.2% 2.2% 2.2% 2.1% 2.1% 1.5% AEO 1998 3.4% 2.9% 2.6% 2.5% 2.4% 2.4% 2.3% 2.3% 2.3% 2.3% 2.3% 2.3% 2.3% 2.2% 1.8% AEO 1999 3.4% 2.5% 2.5% 2.4% 2.4% 2.4% 2.3% 2.4% 2.4% 2.4% 2.4% 2.4% 2.4% 1.8% AEO 2000 3.8% 2.9% 2.7% 2.6% 2.6% 2.6% 2.6% 2.6% 2.5% 2.5%

58

Table 7. Petroleum Net Imports, Projected vs. Actual  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Petroleum Net Imports, Projected vs. Actual Petroleum Net Imports, Projected vs. Actual (million barrels per day) 1985 1986 1987 1988 1989 1990 1991 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 AEO 1982 7.58 7.45 7.12 6.82 6.66 7.09 AEO 1983 5.15 5.44 5.73 5.79 5.72 5.95 6.96 AEO 1984 4.85 5.11 5.53 5.95 6.31 6.59 8.65 AEO 1985 4.17 4.38 4.73 4.93 5.36 5.72 6.23 6.66 7.14 7.39 7.74 AEO 1986 5.15 5.38 5.46 5.92 6.46 7.09 7.50 7.78 7.96 8.20 8.47 8.74 9.04 9.57 9.76 AEO 1987 5.81 6.04 6.81 7.28 7.82 8.34 8.71 8.94 8.98 10.01 AEO 1989* 6.28 6.84 7.49 7.96 8.53 8.83 9.04 9.28 9.60 9.64 9.75 10.02 10.20 AEO 1990 7.20 7.61 9.13 9.95 11.02 AEO 1991 7.28 7.25 7.34 7.48 7.72 8.10 8.57 9.09 9.61 10.07 10.51 11.00 11.44 11.72 11.86 12.11 12.30 12.49 12.71 12.91 AEO 1992 6.86 7.42 7.88 8.16 8.55 8.80 9.06 9.32 9.50 9.80 10.17 10.35 10.56 10.61 10.85 11.00 11.15 11.29 11.50 AEO 1993 7.25 8.01 8.49 9.06

59

Table 7b. Natural Gas Wellhead Prices, Projected vs. Actual  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

b. Natural Gas Wellhead Prices, Projected vs. Actual b. Natural Gas Wellhead Prices, Projected vs. Actual Projected Price in Nominal Dollars (nominal dollars per thousand cubic feet) 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 AEO 1994 1.98 2.12 2.27 2.41 2.59 2.73 2.85 2.98 3.14 3.35 3.59 3.85 4.18 4.51 4.92 5.29 5.56 5.96 AEO 1995 1.89 2.00 1.95 2.06 2.15 2.40 2.57 2.90 3.16 3.56 3.87 4.27 4.56 4.85 5.16 5.41 5.66 AEO 1996 1.63 1.74 1.86 1.99 2.10 2.19 2.29 2.38 2.48 2.59 2.72 2.84 2.97 3.12 3.29 3.49 3.73 AEO 1997 2.03 1.82 1.90 1.99 2.06 2.13 2.21 2.32 2.43 2.54 2.65 2.77 2.88 3.00 3.11 3.24 AEO 1998 2.30 2.20 2.26 2.31 2.38 2.44 2.52 2.60 2.69 2.79 2.93 3.06 3.20 3.35 3.48 AEO 1999 1.98 2.15 2.20 2.32 2.43 2.53 2.63 2.76 2.90 3.02 3.12 3.23 3.35 3.47

60

Table 20. Total Delivered Transportation Energy Consumption, Projected vs. Actual  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Total Delivered Transportation Energy Consumption, Projected vs. Actual Total Delivered Transportation Energy Consumption, Projected vs. Actual Projected (quadrillion Btu) 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 AEO 1994 23.6 24.1 24.5 24.7 25.1 25.4 25.7 26.2 26.5 26.9 27.2 27.6 27.9 28.3 28.6 28.9 29.2 29.5 AEO 1995 23.3 24.0 24.2 24.7 25.1 25.5 25.9 26.2 26.5 26.9 27.3 27.7 28.0 28.3 28.5 28.7 28.9 AEO 1996 23.9 24.1 24.5 24.8 25.3 25.7 26.0 26.4 26.7 27.1 27.5 27.8 28.1 28.4 28.6 28.9 29.1 AEO 1997 24.7 25.3 25.9 26.4 27.0 27.5 28.0 28.5 28.9 29.4 29.8 30.3 30.6 30.9 31.1 31.3 AEO 1998 25.3 25.9 26.7 27.1 27.7 28.3 28.8 29.4 30.0 30.6 31.2 31.7 32.3 32.8 33.1 AEO 1999 25.4 26.0 27.0 27.6 28.2 28.8 29.4 30.0 30.6 31.2 31.7 32.2 32.8 33.1 AEO 2000 26.2 26.8 27.4 28.0 28.5 29.1 29.7 30.3 30.9 31.4 31.9 32.5 32.9

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "1989-2010 actual peakload" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Table 22. Energy Intensity, Projected vs. Actual Projected  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Energy Intensity, Projected vs. Actual Energy Intensity, Projected vs. Actual Projected (quadrillion Btu / real GDP in billion 2005 chained dollars) 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 AEO 1994 11.2 11.1 11.0 10.8 10.7 10.5 10.4 10.3 10.1 10.0 9.9 9.8 9.7 9.6 9.5 9.4 9.3 9.2 AEO 1995 10.9 10.8 10.6 10.4 10.3 10.1 10.0 9.9 9.8 9.6 9.5 9.4 9.3 9.2 9.1 9.1 9.0 AEO 1996 10.7 10.6 10.4 10.3 10.1 10.0 9.8 9.7 9.6 9.5 9.4 9.3 9.2 9.2 9.1 9.0 8.9 AEO 1997 10.3 10.3 10.2 10.1 9.9 9.8 9.7 9.6 9.5 9.4 9.3 9.2 9.2 9.1 9.0 8.9 AEO 1998 10.1 10.1 10.1 10.0 9.9 9.8 9.7 9.6 9.5 9.5 9.4 9.3 9.2 9.1 9.0 AEO 1999 9.6 9.7 9.7 9.7 9.6 9.4 9.3 9.1 9.0 8.9 8.8 8.7 8.6 8.5 AEO 2000 9.4 9.4 9.3 9.2 9.1 9.0 8.9 8.8 8.7 8.7 8.6 8.5 8.4 AEO 2001 8.7 8.6 8.5 8.4 8.3 8.1 8.0 7.9 7.8 7.6 7.5 7.4

62

Table 15. Average Electricity Prices, Projected vs. Actual  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Average Electricity Prices, Projected vs. Actual Average Electricity Prices, Projected vs. Actual (nominal cents per kilowatt-hour) 1985 1986 1987 1988 1989 1990 1991 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 AEO 1982 6.38 6.96 7.63 8.23 8.83 9.49 AEO 1983 6.85 7.28 7.74 8.22 8.68 9.18 13.12 AEO 1984 6.67 7.05 7.48 7.89 8.25 8.65 11.53 AEO 1985 6.62 6.94 7.32 7.63 7.89 8.15 8.46 8.85 9.20 9.61 10.04 AEO 1986 6.67 6.88 7.05 7.18 7.35 7.52 7.65 7.87 8.31 8.83 9.41 10.01 10.61 11.33 12.02 AEO 1987 6.63 6.65 6.92 7.12 7.38 7.62 7.94 8.36 8.86 11.99 AEO 1989* 6.50 6.75 7.14 7.48 7.82 8.11 8.50 8.91 9.39 9.91 10.49 11.05 11.61 AEO 1990 6.49 6.72 8.40 10.99 14.5 AEO 1991 6.94 7.31 7.59 7.82 8.18 8.38 8.54 8.73 8.99 9.38 9.83 10.29 10.83 11.36 11.94 12.58 13.21 13.88 14.58 15.21 AEO 1992 6.97 7.16 7.32 7.56 7.78 8.04 8.29 8.57 8.93 9.38 9.82 10.26 10.73 11.25 11.83 12.37 12.96 13.58 14.23 AEO 1993

63

Table 11. Natural Gas Net Imports, Projected vs. Actual  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Natural Gas Net Imports, Projected vs. Actual Natural Gas Net Imports, Projected vs. Actual (trillion cubic feet) 1985 1986 1987 1988 1989 1990 1991 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 AEO 1982 1.19 1.19 1.19 1.19 1.19 1.19 AEO 1983 1.08 1.16 1.23 1.23 1.23 1.23 1.23 AEO 1984 0.99 1.05 1.16 1.27 1.43 1.57 2.11 AEO 1985 0.94 1.00 1.19 1.45 1.58 1.86 1.94 2.06 2.17 2.32 2.44 AEO 1986 0.74 0.88 0.62 1.03 1.05 1.27 1.39 1.47 1.66 1.79 1.96 2.17 2.38 2.42 2.43 AEO 1987 0.84 0.89 1.07 1.16 1.26 1.36 1.46 1.65 1.75 2.50 AEO 1989* 1.15 1.32 1.44 1.52 1.61 1.70 1.79 1.87 1.98 2.06 2.15 2.23 2.31 AEO 1990 1.26 1.43 2.07 2.68 2.95 AEO 1991 1.36 1.53 1.70 1.82 2.11 2.30 2.33 2.36 2.42 2.49 2.56 2.70 2.75 2.83 2.90 2.95 3.02 3.09 3.17 3.19 AEO 1992 1.48 1.62 1.88 2.08 2.25 2.41 2.56 2.68 2.70 2.72 2.76 2.84 2.92 3.05 3.10 3.20 3.25 3.30 3.30 AEO 1993 1.79 2.08 2.35 2.49 2.61 2.74 2.89 2.95 3.00 3.05 3.10

64

Table 16. Total Energy Consumption, Projected vs. Actual Projected  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Total Energy Consumption, Projected vs. Actual Total Energy Consumption, Projected vs. Actual Projected (quadrillion Btu) 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 AEO 1994 88.0 89.5 90.7 91.7 92.7 93.6 94.6 95.7 96.7 97.7 98.9 100.0 100.8 101.7 102.7 103.6 104.3 105.2 AEO 1995 89.2 90.0 90.6 91.9 93.0 93.8 94.6 95.3 96.2 97.2 98.4 99.4 100.3 101.2 102.1 102.9 103.9 AEO 1996 90.6 91.3 92.5 93.5 94.3 95.1 95.9 96.9 98.0 99.2 100.4 101.4 102.1 103.1 103.8 104.7 105.5 AEO 1997 92.6 93.6 95.1 96.6 97.9 98.8 99.9 101.2 102.4 103.4 104.7 105.8 106.6 107.2 107.9 108.6 AEO 1998 94.7 96.7 98.6 99.8 101.3 102.4 103.4 104.5 105.8 107.3 108.6 109.9 111.1 112.2 113.1 AEO 1999 94.6 97.0 99.2 100.9 102.0 102.8 103.6 104.7 106.0 107.2 108.5 109.7 110.8 111.8

65

Table 9. Natural Gas Production, Projected vs. Actual Projected  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Natural Gas Production, Projected vs. Actual Natural Gas Production, Projected vs. Actual Projected (trillion cubic feet) 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 AEO 1994 17.71 17.68 17.84 18.12 18.25 18.43 18.58 18.93 19.28 19.51 19.80 19.92 20.13 20.18 20.38 20.35 20.16 20.19 AEO 1995 18.28 17.98 17.92 18.21 18.63 18.92 19.08 19.20 19.36 19.52 19.75 19.94 20.17 20.28 20.60 20.59 20.88 AEO 1996 18.90 19.15 19.52 19.59 19.59 19.65 19.73 19.97 20.36 20.82 21.25 21.37 21.68 22.11 22.47 22.83 23.36 AEO 1997 19.10 19.70 20.17 20.32 20.54 20.77 21.26 21.90 22.31 22.66 22.93 23.38 23.68 23.99 24.25 24.65 AEO 1998 18.85 19.06 20.35 20.27 20.60 20.94 21.44 21.81 22.25 22.65 23.18 23.75 24.23 24.70 24.97 AEO 1999 18.80 19.13 19.28 19.82 20.23 20.77 21.05 21.57 21.98 22.47 22.85 23.26 23.77 24.15

66

Table 19. Total Delivered Industrial Energy Consumption, Projected vs. Actual  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Total Delivered Industrial Energy Consumption, Projected vs. Actual Total Delivered Industrial Energy Consumption, Projected vs. Actual Projected (quadrillion Btu) 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 AEO 1994 25.4 25.9 26.3 26.7 27.0 27.1 26.8 26.6 26.9 27.2 27.7 28.1 28.3 28.7 29.1 29.4 29.7 30.0 AEO 1995 26.2 26.3 26.5 27.0 27.3 26.9 26.6 26.8 27.1 27.5 27.9 28.2 28.4 28.7 29.0 29.3 29.6 AEO 1996 26.5 26.6 27.3 27.5 26.9 26.5 26.7 26.9 27.2 27.6 27.9 28.2 28.3 28.5 28.7 28.9 29.2 AEO 1997 26.2 26.5 26.9 26.7 26.6 26.8 27.1 27.4 27.8 28.0 28.4 28.7 28.9 29.0 29.2 29.4 AEO 1998 27.2 27.5 27.2 26.9 27.1 27.5 27.7 27.9 28.3 28.7 29.0 29.3 29.7 29.9 30.1 AEO 1999 26.7 26.4 26.4 26.8 27.1 27.3 27.5 27.9 28.3 28.6 28.9 29.2 29.5 29.7 AEO 2000 25.8 25.5 25.7 26.0 26.5 26.9 27.4 27.8 28.1 28.3 28.5 28.8 29.0

67

Table 8. Total Natural Gas Consumption, Projected vs. Actual  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Total Natural Gas Consumption, Projected vs. Actual Total Natural Gas Consumption, Projected vs. Actual Projected (trillion cubic feet) 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 AEO 1994 19.87 20.21 20.64 20.99 21.20 21.42 21.60 21.99 22.37 22.63 22.95 23.22 23.58 23.82 24.09 24.13 24.02 24.14 AEO 1995 20.82 20.66 20.85 21.21 21.65 21.95 22.12 22.25 22.43 22.62 22.87 23.08 23.36 23.61 24.08 24.23 24.59 AEO 1996 21.32 21.64 22.11 22.21 22.26 22.34 22.46 22.74 23.14 23.63 24.08 24.25 24.63 25.11 25.56 26.00 26.63 AEO 1997 22.15 22.75 23.24 23.64 23.86 24.13 24.65 25.34 25.82 26.22 26.52 27.00 27.35 27.70 28.01 28.47 AEO 1998 21.84 23.03 23.84 24.08 24.44 24.81 25.33 25.72 26.22 26.65 27.22 27.84 28.35 28.84 29.17 AEO 1999 21.35 22.36 22.54 23.18 23.65 24.17 24.57 25.19 25.77 26.41 26.92 27.42 28.02 28.50

68

Table 19. Total Commercial Energy Consumption, Projected vs. Actual  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Commercial Energy Consumption, Projected vs. Actual Commercial Energy Consumption, Projected vs. Actual (quadrillion Btu) 1985 1986 1987 1988 1989 1990 1991 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 AEO 1982 6.6 6.7 6.8 6.8 6.8 6.9 AEO 1983 6.4 6.6 6.8 6.9 7.0 7.1 7.2 AEO 1984 6.2 6.4 6.5 6.7 6.8 6.9 7.3 AEO 1985 5.9 6.1 6.2 6.3 6.4 6.5 6.7 AEO 1986 6.2 6.3 6.4 6.4 6.5 7.1 7.4 AEO 1987 6.1 6.1 6.3 6.4 6.6 6.7 6.8 6.9 6.9 7.3 AEO 1989* 6.6 6.7 6.9 7.0 7.0 7.1 7.2 7.3 7.3 7.4 7.5 7.6 7.7 AEO 1990 6.6 6.8 7.1 7.4 7.8 AEO 1991 6.7 6.9 7.0 7.1 7.1 7.2 7.3 7.4 7.5 7.6 7.7 7.8 7.9 8.0 8.1 8.2 8.3 8.4 8.6 8.7 AEO 1992 6.8 7.1 7.2 7.3 7.3 7.4 7.5 7.6 7.7 7.8 7.9 8.0 8.1 8.2 8.3 8.4 8.5 8.6 8.7 AEO 1993 7.2 7.3 7.4 7.4 7.5 7.6 7.7 7.7 7.8 7.9 7.9 8.0 8.0 8.1 8.1 8.1 8.2 8.2 AEO 1994 6.8 6.9 6.9 7.0 7.1 7.1 7.2 7.2 7.3 7.3 7.4 7.4 7.4 7.5 7.5 7.5 7.5 AEO 1995 6.94 6.9 7.0 7.0 7.0 7.1 7.1 7.1 7.1 7.1 7.2 7.2 7.2 7.2 7.3 7.3 AEO 1996 7.1 7.2 7.2 7.3 7.3 7.4 7.4 7.5 7.6 7.6 7.7 7.7 7.8 7.9 8.0

69

The University of Texas at Austin Jan-03 PART I CRIMES Reported Unfounded Actual Cleared % Clrd.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The University of Texas at Austin Jan-03 PART I CRIMES Reported Unfounded Actual Cleared % Clrd. 1/93) #12;The University of Texas at Austin Feb-03 PART I CRIMES Reported Unfounded Actual Cleared % Clrd. 1/93) #12;The University of Texas at Austin Mar-03 PART I CRIMES Reported Unfounded Actual Cleared % Clrd. 1

Johns, Russell Taylor

70

Stress Actually Makes You Stronger ... At Least Some of the Time  

Office of Science (SC) Website

Stress Actually Makes You Stronger ... At Least Some of the Time News Featured Articles 2013 2012 2011 2010 2009 2008 2007 2006 2005 Science Headlines Presentations & Testimony...

71

The Multiple Peril Crop Insurance Actual Production History (APH) Insurance Plan  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Actual Production History insurance plan protects against crop losses from a number of causes. All aspects of this insurance are described, including reporting requirements for the producer.

Stokes, Kenneth; Barnaby, G. A. Art; Waller, Mark L.; Outlaw, Joe

2008-10-07T23:59:59.000Z

72

Trends of Calculated and Simulated Actual Evaporation in the Yangtze River Basin  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Actual evaporation in the Yangtze River basin is calculated by the complementary relationship approach—that is, the advection–aridity (AA) model with parameter validation from 1961 to 2007—and simulated by the general circulation model (GCM) ...

Yanjun Wang; Bo Liu; Buda Su; Jianqing Zhai; Marco Gemmer

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

73

Assessing Climate Information Use in Agribusiness. Part I: Actual and Potential Use and Impediments to Usage  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A project for the development of methodology to enable agribusiness decision makers to utilize more effectively climate information involved investigation of three agribusiness firms, as well as measurement of their actual and potential use. The ...

Stanley A. Changnon; Steven T. Sonka; Steven Hofing

1988-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

74

Use of Remotely Sensed Actual Evapotranspiration to Improve Rainfall–Runoff Modeling in Southeast Australia  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper explores the use of the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS), mounted on the polar-orbiting Terra satellite, to determine leaf area index (LAI), and use actual evapotranspiration estimated using MODIS LAI data combined ...

Yongqiang Zhang; Francis H. S. Chiew; Lu Zhang; Hongxia Li

2009-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

75

Estimating Actual Evapotranspiration from Satellite and Meteorological Data in Central Bolivia  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Spatial estimates of actual evapotranspiration are useful for calculating the water balance of river basins, quantifying hydrological services provided by ecosystems, and assessing the hydrological impacts of land-use practices. To provide this ...

Christian Seiler; Arnold F. Moene

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

76

A Sensitivity Study of Building Performance Using 30-Year Actual Weather  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Sensitivity Study of Building Performance Using 30-Year Actual Weather Sensitivity Study of Building Performance Using 30-Year Actual Weather Data Title A Sensitivity Study of Building Performance Using 30-Year Actual Weather Data Publication Type Conference Paper Year of Publication 2013 Authors Hong, Tianzhen, Wen-Kuei Chang, and Hung-Wen Lin Date Published 05/2013 Keywords Actual meteorological year, Building simulation, Energy use, Peak electricity demand, Typical meteorological year, Weather data Abstract Traditional energy performance calculated using building simulation with the typical meteorological year (TMY) weather data represents the energy performance in a typical year but not necessarily the average or typical energy performance of a building in long term. Furthermore, the simulated results do not provide the range of variations due to the change of weather, which is important in building energy management and risk assessment of energy efficiency investment. This study analyzes the weather impact on peak electric demand and energy use by building simulation using 30-year actual meteorological year (AMY) weather data for three types of office buildings at two design efficiency levels across all 17 climate zones. The simulated results from the AMY are compared to those from TMY3 to determine and analyze the differences. It was found that yearly weather variation has significant impact on building performance especially peak electric demand. Energy savings of building technologies should be evaluated using simulations with multi-decade actual weather data to fully consider investment risk and the long term performance.

77

Comparison of actual and predicted energy savings in Minnesota gas-heated single-family homes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Data available from a recent evaluation of a home energy audit program in Minnesota are sufficient to allow analysis of the actual energy savings achieved in audited homes and of the relationship between actual and predicted savings. The program, operated by Northern States Power in much of the southern half of the state, is part of Minnesota's version of the federal Residential Conservation Service. NSP conducted almost 12 thousand RCS audits between April 1981 (when the progam began) and the end of 1982. The data analyzed here, available for 346 homes that obtained an NSP energy audit, include monthly natural gas bills from October 1980 through April 1983; heating degree day data matched to the gas bills; energy audit reports; and information on household demographics, structure characteristics, and recent conservation actions from mail and telephone surveys. The actual reduction in weather-adjusted natural gas use between years 1 and 3 averaged 19 MBtu across these homes (11% of preprogram consumption); the median value of the saving was 16 MBtu/year. The variation in actual saving is quite large: gas consumption increased in almost 20% of the homes, while gas consumption decreased by more than 50 MBtu/year in more than 10% of the homes. These households reported an average expenditure of almost $1600 for the retrofit measures installed in their homes; the variation in retrofit cost, while large, was not as great as the variation in actual natural gas savings.

Hirst, E.; Goeltz, R.

1984-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

78

The University of Texas at Austin Jan-11 PART I CRIMES Reported Unfounded Actual Cleared % Clrd.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The University of Texas at Austin Jan-11 PART I CRIMES Reported Unfounded Actual Cleared % Clrd. 1.7% DP Form #31 - Page 1(Rev. 1/93) #12;The University of Texas at Austin Jan-11 PART I CRIMES BURGLARY/93) #12;The University of Texas at Austin Jan-11 PART I CRIMES BURGLARY & THEFT TARGET SECTION (List Other

Johns, Russell Taylor

79

The University of Texas at Austin Jan-00 PART I CRIMES Reported Unfounded Actual Cleared % Clrd.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The University of Texas at Austin Jan-00 PART I CRIMES Reported Unfounded Actual Cleared % Clrd. 1.3% DP Form #31 - Page 1(Rev. 1/93) #12;The University of Texas at Austin Jan-00 PART I CRIMES BURGLARY of Texas at Austin Jan-00 PART I CRIMES BURGLARY & THEFT TARGET SECTION (List Other Target Areas) #/Month

Johns, Russell Taylor

80

The University of Texas at Austin Jan-06 PART I CRIMES Reported Unfounded Actual Cleared % Clrd.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The University of Texas at Austin Jan-06 PART I CRIMES Reported Unfounded Actual Cleared % Clrd. 1 Total % Rcvd. 1.0% DP Form #31 - Page 1(Rev. 1/93) #12;The University of Texas at Austin Jan-06 PART I/93) #12;The University of Texas at Austin Jan-06 PART I CRIMES BURGLARY & THEFT TARGET SECTION (List Other

Johns, Russell Taylor

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "1989-2010 actual peakload" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

The University of Texas at Austin Jan-09 PART I CRIMES Reported Unfounded Actual Cleared % Clrd.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The University of Texas at Austin Jan-09 PART I CRIMES Reported Unfounded Actual Cleared % Clrd. 1. 8.0% DP Form #31 - Page 1(Rev. 1/93) #12;The University of Texas at Austin Jan-09 PART I CRIMES/93) #12;The University of Texas at Austin Jan-09 PART I CRIMES BURGLARY & THEFT TARGET SECTION (List Other

Johns, Russell Taylor

82

The University of Texas at Austin Jan-08 PART I CRIMES Reported Unfounded Actual Cleared % Clrd.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The University of Texas at Austin Jan-08 PART I CRIMES Reported Unfounded Actual Cleared % Clrd. 1 Total % Rcvd. 2.2% DP Form #31 - Page 1(Rev. 1/93) #12;The University of Texas at Austin Jan-08 PART I(Rev. 1/93) #12;The University of Texas at Austin Jan-08 PART I CRIMES BURGLARY & THEFT TARGET SECTION

Johns, Russell Taylor

83

The University of Texas at Austin Jan-04 PART I CRIMES Reported Unfounded Actual Cleared % Clrd.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The University of Texas at Austin Jan-04 PART I CRIMES Reported Unfounded Actual Cleared % Clrd. 1.1% DP Form #31 - Page 1(Rev. 1/93) #12;The University of Texas at Austin Jan-04 PART I CRIMES BURGLARY University of Texas at Austin Jan-04 PART I CRIMES BURGLARY & THEFT TARGET SECTION (List Other Target Areas

Johns, Russell Taylor

84

The University of Texas at Austin Jan-01 PART I CRIMES Reported Unfounded Actual Cleared % Clrd.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The University of Texas at Austin Jan-01 PART I CRIMES Reported Unfounded Actual Cleared % Clrd. 1/93) #12;The University of Texas at Austin Jan-01 PART I CRIMES BURGLARY & THEFT TARGET SECTION Maintenance. 1/93)Co #12;The University of Texas at Austin Jan-01 PART I CRIMES BURGLARY & THEFT TARGET SECTION

Johns, Russell Taylor

85

The University of Texas at Austin Jan-05 PART I CRIMES Reported Unfounded Actual Cleared % Clrd.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The University of Texas at Austin Jan-05 PART I CRIMES Reported Unfounded Actual Cleared % Clrd. 1/93) #12;The University of Texas at Austin Jan-05 PART I CRIMES BURGLARY & THEFT TARGET SECTION Maintenance - Page 2(Rev. 1/93) #12;The University of Texas at Austin Jan-05 PART I CRIMES BURGLARY & THEFT TARGET

Johns, Russell Taylor

86

The University of Texas at Austin Jan-10 PART I CRIMES Reported Unfounded Actual Cleared % Clrd.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The University of Texas at Austin Jan-10 PART I CRIMES Reported Unfounded Actual Cleared % Clrd. 1 of Texas at Austin Jan-10 PART I CRIMES BURGLARY & THEFT TARGET SECTION Maintenance Shops Offices 6 OF REPORT DP Form #31 - Page 2(Rev. 1/93) #12;The University of Texas at Austin Jan-10 PART I CRIMES

Johns, Russell Taylor

87

The University of Texas at Austin Jan-02 PART I CRIMES Reported Unfounded Actual Cleared % Clrd.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The University of Texas at Austin Jan-02 PART I CRIMES Reported Unfounded Actual Cleared % Clrd. 1 Theft Total $280 $280 Total % Rcvd 0.4% DP Form #31 - Page 1(Rev. 1/93) #12;The University of Texas/93)Co #12;The University of Texas at Austin Jan-02 PART I CRIMES BURGLARY & THEFT TARGET SECTION (List

Johns, Russell Taylor

88

The University of Texas at Austin Jan07 PART I CRIMES Reported Unfounded Actual Cleared % Clrd.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The University of Texas at Austin Jan07 PART I CRIMES Reported Unfounded Actual Cleared.1% DP Form #31 Page 1(Rev. 1/93) #12;The University of Texas at Austin Jan07 PART I CRIMES BURGLARY Form #31 Page 2(Rev. 1/93) #12;The University of Texas at Austin Jan07 PART I CRIMES BURGLARY

Johns, Russell Taylor

89

Modeling of Optimal Oil Production and Comparing with Actual and Contractual Oil Production: Iran Case  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Modeling of Optimal Oil Production and Comparing with Actual and Contractual Oil Production: Iran, Davis Introduction · The Iran Oil Project, initiated in 2007, aims to find the inefficiencies and their possible sources in Iranian oil and gas policies. Background Information Assumptions · Perfect Competition

California at Davis, University of

90

Satellite-Based Actual Evapotranspiration over Drying Semiarid Terrain in West Africa  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A simple satellite-based algorithm for estimating actual evaporation based on Makkink’s equation is applied to a seasonal cycle in 2002 at three test sites in Ghana, West Africa: at a location in the humid tropical southern region and two in the ...

D. Schüttemeyer; Ch Schillings; A. F. Moene; H. A. R. de Bruin

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

91

Actual and Estimated Energy Savings Comparison for Deep Energy Retrofits in the Pacific Northwest  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Seven homes from the Pacific Northwest were selected to evaluate the differences between estimated and actual energy savings achieved from deep energy retrofits. The energy savings resulting from these retrofits were estimated, using energy modeling software, to save at least 30% on a whole-house basis. The modeled pre-retrofit energy use was trued against monthly utility bills. After the retrofits were completed, each of the homes was extensively monitored, with the exception of one home which was monitored pre-retrofit. This work is being conducted by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for the U.S. Department of Energy Building Technologies Program as part of the Building America Program. This work found many discrepancies between actual and estimated energy savings and identified the potential causes for the discrepancies. The differences between actual energy use and modeled energy use also suggest improvements to improve model accuracy. The difference between monthly whole-house actual and estimated energy savings ranged from 75% more energy saved than predicted by the model to 16% less energy saved for all the monitored homes. Similarly, the annual energy savings difference was between 36% and -14%, which was estimated based on existing monitored savings because an entire year of data is not available. Thus, on average, for all six monitored homes the actual energy use is consistently less than estimates, indicating home owners are saving more energy than estimated. The average estimated savings for the eight month monitoring period is 43%, compared to an estimated savings average of 31%. Though this average difference is only 12%, the range of inaccuracies found for specific end-uses is far greater and are the values used to directly estimate energy savings from specific retrofits. Specifically, the monthly post-retrofit energy use differences for specific end-uses (i.e., heating, cooling, hot water, appliances, etc.) ranged from 131% under-predicted to 77% over-predicted by the model with respect to monitored energy use. Many of the discrepancies were associated with occupant behavior which influences energy use, dramatically in some cases, actual versus modeled weather differences, modeling input limitations, and complex homes that are difficult to model. The discrepancy between actual and estimated energy use indicates a need for better modeling tools and assumptions. Despite the best efforts of researchers, the estimated energy savings are too inaccurate to determine reliable paybacks for retrofit projects. While the monitored data allows researchers to understand why these differences exist, it is not cost effective to monitor each home with the level of detail presented here. Therefore an appropriate balance between modeling and monitoring must be determined for more widespread application in retrofit programs and the home performance industry. Recommendations to address these deficiencies include: (1) improved tuning process for pre-retrofit energy use, which currently utilized broad-based monthly utility bills; (2) developing simple occupant-based energy models that better address the many different occupant types and their impact on energy use; (3) incorporating actual weather inputs to increase accuracy of the tuning process, which uses utility bills from specific time period; and (4) developing simple, cost-effective monitoring solutions for improved model tuning.

Blanchard, Jeremy; Widder, Sarah H.; Giever, Elisabeth L.; Baechler, Michael C.

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

92

"Table 21. Total Energy Related Carbon Dioxide Emissions, Projected vs. Actual"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Total Energy Related Carbon Dioxide Emissions, Projected vs. Actual" Total Energy Related Carbon Dioxide Emissions, Projected vs. Actual" "Projected" " (million metric tons)" ,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,2000,2001,2002,2003,2004,2005,2006,2007,2008,2009,2010,2011 "AEO 1994",5060,5129.666667,5184.666667,5239.666667,5287.333333,5335,5379,5437.666667,5481.666667,5529.333333,5599,5657.666667,5694.333333,5738.333333,5797,5874,5925.333333,5984 "AEO 1995",,5137,5173.666667,5188.333333,5261.666667,5309.333333,5360.666667,5393.666667,5441.333333,5489,5551.333333,5621,5679.666667,5727.333333,5775,5841,5888.666667,5943.666667 "AEO 1996",,,5181.817301,5223.645142,5294.776326,5354.687297,5416.802205,5463.67395,5525.288005,5588.52771,5660.226888,5734.87972,5812.398031,5879.320068,5924.814575,5981.291626,6029.640422,6086.804077,6142.120972

93

How many people actually see the price signal? Quantifying market failures in the end use of energy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

investment, behaviour, energy price, consumers Abstract “suggest that raising energy prices—such as in the form ofconsumers actually “see” energy prices and are therefore

Meier, Alan; Eide, Anita

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

94

The Actual Impact of the International Tribunal for former Yugoslavia on the Reconciliation Process in Bosnia-Herzegovina.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This thesis explores the actual impact of the International Criminal Tribunal for the former Yugoslavia (ICTY) on the reconciliation process in Bosnia-Herzegovina and analyses possible… (more)

Johansen, Kristine

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

95

Actual versus predicted impacts of three ethanol plants on aquatic and terrestrial resources  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

To help reduce US dependence on imported petroleum, Congress passed the Energy Security Act of 1980 (public Law 96-294). This legislation authorized the US Department of Energy (DOE) to promote expansion of the fuel alcohol industry through, among other measures, its Alcohol Fuels Loan Guarantee Program. Under this program, selected proposals for the conversion of plant biomass into fuel-grade ethanol would be granted loan guarantees. of 57 applications submitted for loan guarantees to build and operate ethanol fuel projects under this program, 11 were considered by DOE to have the greatest potential for satisfying DOE`s requirements and goals. In accordance with the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA), DOE evaluated the potential impacts of proceeding with the Loan Guarantee Program in a programmatic environmental assessment (DOE 1981) that resulted in a finding of no significant impact (FANCY) (47 Federal Register 34, p. 7483). The following year, DOE conducted site-specific environmental assessments (EAs) for 10 of the proposed projects. These F-As predicted no significant environmental impacts from these projects. Eventually, three ethanol fuel projects received loan guarantees and were actually built: the Tennol Energy Company (Tennol; DOE 1982a) facility near Jasper in southeastern Tennessee; the Agrifuels Refining Corporation (Agrifuels; DOE 1985) facility near New Liberia in southern Louisiana; and the New Energy Company of Indiana (NECI; DOE 1982b) facility in South Bend, Indiana. As part of a larger retrospective examination of a wide range of environmental effects of ethanol fuel plants, we compared the actual effects of the three completed plants on aquatic and terrestrial resources with the effects predicted in the NEPA EAs several years earlier. A secondary purpose was to determine: Why were there differences, if any, between actual effects and predictions? How can assessments be improved and impacts reduced?

Eddlemon, G.K.; Webb, J.W.; Hunsaker, D.B. Jr.; Miller, R.L.

1993-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

96

Method and apparatus for distinguishing actual sparse events from sparse event false alarms  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Remote sensing method and apparatus wherein sparse optical events are distinguished from false events. "Ghost" images of actual optical phenomena are generated using an optical beam splitter and optics configured to direct split beams to a single sensor or segmented sensor. True optical signals are distinguished from false signals or noise based on whether the ghost image is presence or absent. The invention obviates the need for dual sensor systems to effect a false target detection capability, thus significantly reducing system complexity and cost.

Spalding, Richard E. (Albuquerque, NM); Grotbeck, Carter L. (Albuquerque, NM)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

97

Use of Residential Smart Appliances for Peak-Load Shifting and Spinning Reserves Cost/Benefit Analysis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this report, we present the results of an analytical cost/benefit study of residential smart appliances from a utility/grid perspective in support of a joint stakeholder petition to the ENERGY STAR program within the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and Department of Energy (DOE). The goal of the petition is in part to provide appliance manufacturers incentives to hasten the production of smart appliances. The underlying hypothesis is that smart appliances can play a critical role in addressing some of the societal challenges, such as anthropogenic global warming, associated with increased electricity demand, and facilitate increased penetration of renewable sources of power. The appliances we consider include refrigerator/freezers, clothes washers, clothes dryers, room air-conditioners, and dishwashers. The petition requests the recognition that providing an appliance with smart grid capability, i.e., products that meet the definition of a smart appliance, is at least equivalent to a corresponding five percent in operational machine efficiencies. It is then expected that given sufficient incentives and value propositions, and suitable automation capabilities built into smart appliances, residential consumers will be adopting these smart appliances and will be willing participants in addressing the aforementioned societal challenges by more effectively managing their home electricity consumption. The analytical model we utilize in our cost/benefit analysis consists of a set of user-definable assumptions such as the definition of on-peak (hours of day, days of week, months of year), the expected percentage of normal consumer electricity consumption (also referred to as appliance loads) that can shifted from peak hours to off-peak hours, the average power rating of each appliance, etc. Based on these assumptions, we then formulate what the wholesale grid operating-cost savings, or benefits, would be if the smart capabilities of appliances were invoked, and some percentage of appliance loads were shifted away from peak hours to run during off-peak hours, and appliance loads served power-system balancing needs such as spinning reserves that would otherwise have to be provided by generators. The rationale is that appliance loads can be curtailed for about ten minutes or less in response to a grid contingency without any diminution in the quality of service to the consumer. We then estimate the wholesale grid operating-cost savings based on historical wholesale-market clearing prices (location marginal and spinning reserve) from major wholesale power markets in the United States. The savings derived from the smart grid capabilities of an appliance are then compared to the savings derived from a five percent increase in traditional operational machine efficiencies, referred to as cost in this report, to determine whether the savings in grid operating costs (benefits) are at least as high as or higher than the operational machine efficiency credit (cost).

Sastry, Chellury; Pratt, Robert G.; Srivastava, Viraj; Li, Shun

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

98

Table 3b. Imported Refiner Acquisition Cost of Crude Oil, Projected vs. Actual  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

b. Imported Refiner Acquisition Cost of Crude Oil, Projected vs. Actual b. Imported Refiner Acquisition Cost of Crude Oil, Projected vs. Actual Projected Price in Nominal Dollars (nominal dollars per barrel) 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 AEO 1994 17.06 17.21 18.24 19.43 20.64 22.12 23.76 25.52 27.51 29.67 31.86 34.00 36.05 38.36 40.78 43.29 45.88 48.37 AEO 1995 15.24 17.27 18.23 19.26 20.39 21.59 22.97 24.33 25.79 27.27 28.82 30.38 32.14 33.89 35.85 37.97 40.28 AEO 1996 17.16 17.74 18.59 19.72 20.97 22.34 23.81 25.26 26.72 28.22 29.87 31.51 33.13 34.82 36.61 38.48 40.48

99

Table 11a. Coal Prices to Electric Generating Plants, Projected vs. Actual  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

a. Coal Prices to Electric Generating Plants, Projected vs. Actual a. Coal Prices to Electric Generating Plants, Projected vs. Actual Projected Price in Constant Dollars (constant dollars per million Btu in "dollar year" specific to each AEO) AEO Dollar Year 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 AEO 1994 1992 1.47 1.48 1.53 1.57 1.58 1.57 1.61 1.63 1.68 1.69 1.70 1.72 1.70 1.76 1.79 1.81 1.88 1.92 AEO 1995 1993 1.39 1.39 1.38 1.40 1.40 1.39 1.39 1.42 1.41 1.43 1.44 1.45 1.46 1.46 1.46 1.47 1.50 AEO 1996 1994 1.32 1.29 1.28 1.27 1.26 1.26 1.25 1.27 1.27 1.27 1.28 1.27 1.28 1.27 1.28 1.26 1.28

100

Table 11b. Coal Prices to Electric Generating Plants, Projected vs. Actual  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

b. Coal Prices to Electric Generating Plants, Projected vs. Actual" b. Coal Prices to Electric Generating Plants, Projected vs. Actual" "Projected Price in Nominal Dollars" " (nominal dollars per million Btu)" ,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,2000,2001,2002,2003,2004,2005,2006,2007,2008,2009,2010,2011 "AEO 1994",1.502753725,1.549729719,1.64272351,1.727259934,1.784039735,1.822135762,1.923203642,2.00781457,2.134768212,2.217425497,2.303725166,2.407715232,2.46134106,2.637086093,2.775389073,2.902293046,3.120364238,3.298013245 "AEO 1995",,1.4212343,1.462640338,1.488780998,1.545300242,1.585877053,1.619428341,1.668671498,1.7584219,1.803937198,1.890547504,1.968695652,2.048913043,2.134750403,2.205281804,2.281690821,2.375434783,2.504830918 "AEO 1996",,,1.346101641,1.350594221,1.369020126,1.391737646,1.421340737,1.458772082,1.496497523,1.561369914,1.619940033,1.674758358,1.749420803,1.800709877,1.871110564,1.924495246,2.006850327,2.048938234,2.156821499

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "1989-2010 actual peakload" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

"Table 20. Total Delivered Transportation Energy Consumption, Projected vs. Actual"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Total Delivered Transportation Energy Consumption, Projected vs. Actual" Total Delivered Transportation Energy Consumption, Projected vs. Actual" "Projected" " (quadrillion Btu)" ,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,2000,2001,2002,2003,2004,2005,2006,2007,2008,2009,2010,2011 "AEO 1994",23.62,24.08,24.45,24.72,25.06,25.38,25.74,26.16,26.49,26.85,27.23,27.55,27.91,28.26,28.61,28.92,29.18,29.5 "AEO 1995",,23.26,24.01,24.18,24.69,25.11,25.5,25.86,26.15,26.5,26.88,27.28,27.66,27.99,28.25,28.51,28.72,28.94 "AEO 1996",,,23.89674759,24.08507919,24.47502899,24.84881783,25.25887871,25.65527534,26.040205,26.38586426,26.72540092,27.0748024,27.47158241,27.80837631,28.11616135,28.3992157,28.62907982,28.85912895,29.09081459 "AEO 1997",,,,24.68686867,25.34906006,25.87225533,26.437994,27.03513145,27.52499771,27.96490097,28.45482063,28.92999458,29.38239861,29.84147453,30.26097488,30.59760475,30.85550499,31.10873222,31.31938744

102

"Table 19. Total Delivered Industrial Energy Consumption, Projected vs. Actual"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Total Delivered Industrial Energy Consumption, Projected vs. Actual" Total Delivered Industrial Energy Consumption, Projected vs. Actual" "Projected" " (quadrillion Btu)" ,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,2000,2001,2002,2003,2004,2005,2006,2007,2008,2009,2010,2011 "AEO 1994",25.43,25.904,26.303,26.659,26.974,27.062,26.755,26.598,26.908,27.228,27.668,28.068,28.348,28.668,29.068,29.398,29.688,30.008 "AEO 1995",,26.164,26.293,26.499,27.044,27.252,26.855,26.578,26.798,27.098,27.458,27.878,28.158,28.448,28.728,29.038,29.298,29.608 "AEO 1996",,,26.54702756,26.62236823,27.31312376,27.47668697,26.90313339,26.47577946,26.67685979,26.928811,27.23795407,27.58448499,27.91057103,28.15050595,28.30145734,28.518,28.73702901,28.93001263,29.15872662 "AEO 1997",,,,26.21291769,26.45981795,26.88483478,26.67847443,26.55107968,26.78246968,27.07367604,27.44749539,27.75711339,28.02446072,28.39156621,28.69999783,28.87316602,29.01207631,29.19475644,29.37683575

103

File:Theoretical vs Actual Data Lesson Plan .pdf | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

source source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search File Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » File:Theoretical vs Actual Data Lesson Plan .pdf Jump to: navigation, search File File history File usage Metadata File:Theoretical vs Actual Data Lesson Plan .pdf Size of this preview: 463 × 599 pixels. Other resolution: 464 × 600 pixels. Go to page 1 2 Go! next page → next page → Full resolution ‎(1,275 × 1,650 pixels, file size: 257 KB, MIME type: application/pdf, 2 pages) File history Click on a date/time to view the file as it appeared at that time. Date/Time Thumbnail Dimensions User Comment current 09:33, 3 January 2014 Thumbnail for version as of 09:33, 3 January 2014 1,275 × 1,650, 2 pages (257 KB) Foteri (Talk | contribs) Category:Wind for Schools Portal CurriculaCategory:Wind for Schools High School Curricula

104

Table 3a. Imported Refiner Acquisition Cost of Crude Oil, Projected vs. Actual  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

a. Imported Refiner Acquisition Cost of Crude Oil, Projected vs. Actual a. Imported Refiner Acquisition Cost of Crude Oil, Projected vs. Actual Projected Price in Constant Dollars (constant dollars per barrel in "dollar year" specific to each AEO) AEO Dollar Year 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 AEO 1994 1992 16.69 16.43 16.99 17.66 18.28 19.06 19.89 20.72 21.65 22.61 23.51 24.29 24.90 25.60 26.30 27.00 27.64 28.16 AEO 1995 1993 14.90 16.41 16.90 17.45 18.00 18.53 19.13 19.65 20.16 20.63 21.08 21.50 21.98 22.44 22.94 23.50 24.12 AEO 1996 1994 16.81 16.98 17.37 17.98 18.61 19.27 19.92 20.47 20.97 21.41 21.86 22.25 22.61 22.97 23.34 23.70 24.08

105

"Table 18. Total Delivered Commercial Energy Consumption, Projected vs. Actual"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Total Delivered Commercial Energy Consumption, Projected vs. Actual" Total Delivered Commercial Energy Consumption, Projected vs. Actual" "Projected" " (quadrillion Btu)" ,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,2000,2001,2002,2003,2004,2005,2006,2007,2008,2009,2010,2011 "AEO 1994",6.82,6.87,6.94,7,7.06,7.13,7.16,7.22,7.27,7.32,7.36,7.38,7.41,7.45,7.47,7.5,7.51,7.55 "AEO 1995",,6.94,6.9,6.95,6.99,7.02,7.05,7.08,7.09,7.11,7.13,7.15,7.17,7.19,7.22,7.26,7.3,7.34 "AEO 1996",,,7.059859276,7.17492485,7.228339195,7.28186655,7.336973667,7.387932777,7.442782879,7.501244545,7.561584473,7.623688221,7.684037209,7.749266148,7.815915108,7.884147644,7.950204372,8.016282082,8.085801125 "AEO 1997",,,,7.401538849,7.353548527,7.420701504,7.48336792,7.540113449,7.603093624,7.663851738,7.723834991,7.783358574,7.838726044,7.89124918,7.947964668,8.008976936,8.067288399,8.130317688,8.197405815

106

Filtration and Leach Testing for REDOX Sludge and S-Saltcake Actual Waste Sample Composites  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A testing program evaluating actual tank waste was developed in response to Task 4 from the M-12 External Flowsheet Review Team (EFRT) issue response plan.( ) The test program was subdivided into logical increments. The bulk water-insoluble solid wastes that are anticipated to be delivered to the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) were identified according to type such that the actual waste testing could be targeted to the relevant categories. Under test plan TP-RPP-WTP-467, eight broad waste groupings were defined. Samples available from the 222S archive were identified and obtained for testing. Under this test plan, a waste-testing program was implemented that included: • Homogenizing the archive samples by group as defined in the test plan • Characterizing the homogenized sample groups • Performing parametric leaching testing on each group for compounds of interest • Performing bench-top filtration/leaching tests in the hot cell for each group to simulate filtration and leaching activities if they occurred in the UFP2 vessel of the WTP Pretreatment Facility. This report focuses on filtration/leaching tests performed on two of the eight waste composite samples and follow-on parametric tests to support aluminum leaching results from those tests.

Shimskey, Rick W.; Billing, Justin M.; Buck, Edgar C.; Daniel, Richard C.; Draper, Kathryn E.; Edwards, Matthew K.; Geeting, John GH; Hallen, Richard T.; Jenson, Evan D.; Kozelisky, Anne E.; MacFarlan, Paul J.; Peterson, Reid A.; Snow, Lanee A.; Swoboda, Robert G.

2009-02-20T23:59:59.000Z

107

Laboratory Demonstration of the Pretreatment Process with Caustic and Oxidative Leaching Using Actual Hanford Tank Waste  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes the bench-scale pretreatment processing of actual tank waste materials through the entire baseline WTP pretreatment flowsheet in an effort to demonstrate the efficacy of the defined leaching processes on actual Hanford tank waste sludge and the potential impacts on downstream pretreatment processing. The test material was a combination of reduction oxidation (REDOX) tank waste composited materials containing aluminum primarily in the form of boehmite and dissolved S saltcake containing Cr(III)-rich entrained solids. The pretreatment processing steps tested included • caustic leaching for Al removal • solids crossflow filtration through the cell unit filter (CUF) • stepwise solids washing using decreasing concentrations of sodium hydroxide with filtration through the CUF • oxidative leaching using sodium permanganate for removing Cr • solids filtration with the CUF • follow-on solids washing and filtration through the CUF • ion exchange processing for Cs removal • evaporation processing of waste stream recycle for volume reduction • combination of the evaporated product with dissolved saltcake. The effectiveness of each process step was evaluated by following the mass balance of key components (such as Al, B, Cd, Cr, Pu, Ni, Mn, and Fe), demonstrating component (Al, Cr, Cs) removal, demonstrating filterability by evaluating filter flux rates under various processing conditions (transmembrane pressure, crossflow velocities, wt% undissolved solids, and PSD) and filter fouling, and identifying potential issues for WTP. The filterability was reported separately (Shimskey et al. 2008) and is not repeated herein.

Fiskum, Sandra K.; Billing, Justin M.; Buck, Edgar C.; Daniel, Richard C.; Draper, Kathryn E.; Edwards, Matthew K.; Jenson, Evan D.; Kozelisky, Anne E.; MacFarlan, Paul J.; Peterson, Reid A.; Shimskey, Rick W.; Snow, Lanee A.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

108

Comparison of Projections to Actual Performance in the DOE-EPRI Wind Turbine Verification Program  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

As part of the US Department of Energy/Electric Power Research Institute (DOE-EPRI) Wind Turbine Verification Program (TVP), Global Energy Concepts (GEC) worked with participating utilities to develop a set of performance projections for their projects based on historical site atmospheric conditions, turbine performance data, operation and maintenance (O and M) strategies, and assumptions about various energy losses. After a preliminary operation period at each project, GEC compared the actual performance to projections and evaluated the accuracy of the data and assumptions that formed the performance projections. This paper presents a comparison of 1999 power output, turbine availability, and other performance characteristics to the projections for TVP projects in Texas, Vermont, Iowa, Nebraska, Wisconsin, and Alaska. Factors that were overestimated or underestimated are quantified. Actual wind speeds are compared to projections based on long-term historical measurements. Turbine power curve measurements are compared with data provided by the manufacturers, and loss assumptions are evaluated for accuracy. Overall, the projects performed well, particularly new commercial turbines in the first few years of operation. However, some sites experienced below average wind resources and greater than expected losses. The TVP project owners successfully developed and constructed wind power plants that are now in full commercial operation, serving a total of approximately 12,000 households.

Rhoads, H.; VandenBosche, J.; McCoy, T.; Compton, A. (Global Energy Concepts, LLC); Smith, B. (National Renewable Energy Laboratory)

2000-09-11T23:59:59.000Z

109

PERFORMANCE TESTING OF THE NEXT-GENERATION CSSX SOLVENT WITH ACTUAL SRS TANK WASTE  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Efforts are underway to qualify the Next-Generation Solvent for the Caustic Side Solvent Extraction (CSSX) process. Researchers at multiple national laboratories have been involved in this effort. As part of the effort to qualify the solvent extraction system at the Savannah River Site (SRS), SRNL performed a number of tests at various scales. First, SRNL completed a series of batch equilibrium, or Extraction-Scrub-Strip (ESS), tests. These tests used {approx}30 mL of Next-Generation Solvent and either actual SRS tank waste, or waste simulant solutions. The results from these cesium mass transfer tests were used to predict solvent behavior under a number of conditions. At a larger scale, SRNL assembled 12 stages of 2-cm (diameter) centrifugal contactors. This rack of contactors is structurally similar to one tested in 2001 during the demonstration of the baseline CSSX process. Assembly and mechanical testing found no issues. SRNL performed a nonradiological test using 35 L of cesium-spiked caustic waste simulant and 39 L of actual tank waste. Test results are discussed; particularly those related to the effectiveness of extraction.

Pierce, R.; Peters, T.; Crowder, M.; Fink, S.

2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

110

Exposure of Ceramics and Ceramic Matrix Composites in Simulated and Actual Combustor Environments  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A high-temperature, high-pressure, tube furnace has been used to evaluate the long term stability of different monolithic ceramic and ceramic matrix composite materials in a simulated combustor environment. All of the tests have been run at 150 psia, 1204 degrees C, and 15% steam in incremental 500 h runs. The major advantage of this system is the high sample throughput; >20 samples can be exposed in each tube at the same time under similar exposure conditions. Microstructural evaluations of the samples were conducted after each 500 h exposure to characterize the extent of surface damage, to calculate surface recession rates, and to determine degradation mechanisms for the different materials. The validity of this exposure rig for simulating real combustor environments was established by comparing materials exposed in the test rig and combustor liner materials exposed for similar times in an actual gas turbine combustor under commercial operating conditions.

Brentnall, W.D.; Ferber, M.K.; Keiser, j.R.; Miriyala, N.; More, K.L.; Price, J.R.; Tortorelli, P.F.; Walker, L.R.

1999-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

111

Building a Model Patient Room to Test Design Innovations With Actual Patients  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

comfortable hospital environment SUMMARY Designing and constructing a new hospital is a complex and costly undertaking that involves experts from many disciplines both inside and outside the health care arena. But despite expending funds and time, hospital leaders often discover significant flaws once a hospital opens that can undermine the quality of patient care and staff effectiveness and efficiency. From 2010 to 2012, a team at the Princeton HealthCare System worked to devise an optimal design for inpatient rooms at a new hospital: the University Medical Center of Princeton at Plainsboro. The project entailed building a “functional model patient room.” This was a unique and innovative method to allow the team to test design innovations with actual patients, according to project director Susan Lorenz, DrNP, RN, vice president of patient care services and chief nursing officer for the Princeton HealthCare System. The project helped support the emerging field of evidence-based hospital design.

A Princeton; More Efficient; Key Results

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

112

Characterization, Leaching, and Filtrations Testing of Ferrocyanide Tank sludge (Group 8) Actual Waste Composite  

SciTech Connect

This is the final report in a series of eight reports defining characterization, leach, and filtration testing of a wide variety of Hanford tank waste sludges. The information generated from this series is intended to supplement the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) project understanding of actual waste behaviors associated with tank waste sludge processing through the pretreatment portion of the WTP. The work described in this report presents information on a high-iron waste form, specifically the ferrocyanide tank waste sludge. Iron hydroxide has been shown to pose technical challenges during filtration processing; the ferrocyanide tank waste sludge represented a good source of the high-iron matrix to test the filtration processing.

Fiskum, Sandra K.; Billing, Justin M.; Crum, J. V.; Daniel, Richard C.; Edwards, Matthew K.; Shimskey, Rick W.; Peterson, Reid A.; MacFarlan, Paul J.; Buck, Edgar C.; Draper, Kathryn E.; Kozelisky, Anne E.

2009-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

113

Actual Scale MOX Powder Mixing Test for MOX Fuel Fabrication Plant in Japan  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Japan Nuclear Fuel Ltd. (hereafter, JNFL) promotes a program of constructing a MOX fuel fabrication plant (hereafter, J-MOX) to fabricate MOX fuels to be loaded in domestic light water reactors. Since Japanese fiscal year (hereafter, JFY) 1999, JNFL, to establish the technology for a smooth start-up and the stable operation of J-MOX, has executed an evaluation test for technology to be adopted at J-MOX. JNFL, based on a consideration that J-MOX fuel fabrication comes commercial scale production, decided an introduction of MIMAS technology into J-MOX main process, from powder mixing through pellet sintering, well recognized as mostly important to achieve good quality product of MOX fuel, since it achieves good results in both fuel production and actual reactor irradiation in Europe, but there is one difference that JNFL is going to use Japanese typical plutonium and uranium mixed oxide powder converted with the micro-wave heating direct de-nitration technology (hereafter, MH-MOX) but normal PuO{sub 2} of European MOX fuel fabricators. Therefore, in order to evaluate the suitability of the MH-MOX powder for the MIMAS process, JNFL manufactured small scale test equipment, and implemented a powder mixing evaluation test up until JFY 2003. As a result, the suitability of the MH-MOX powder for the MIMAS process was positively evaluated and confirmed It was followed by a five-years test named an 'actual test' from JFY 2003 to JFY 2007, which aims at demonstrating good operation and maintenance of process equipment as well as obtaining good quality of MOX fuel pellets. (authors)

Osaka, Shuichi; Kurita, Ichiro; Deguchi, Morimoto [Japan Nuclear Fuel Ltd., 4-108, Aza okitsuke, oaza obuchi rokkasyo-mura, kamikita-gun, Aomori 039-3212 (Japan); Ito, Masanori [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, 4-33 Muramatu, Tokai-mura, Ibaraki 319-1194 (Japan); Goto, Masakazu [Nuclear Fuel Industries, Ltd., 14-10, Mita 3-chome, Minato-ku, Tokyo 108-0073 (Japan)

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

114

BENCH-SCALE STEAM REFORMING OF ACTUAL TANK 48H WASTE  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Fluidized Bed Steam Reforming (FBSR) has been demonstrated to be a viable technology to remove >99% of the organics from Tank 48H simulant, to remove >99% of the nitrate/nitrite from Tank 48H simulant, and to form a solid product that is primarily carbonate based. The technology was demonstrated in October of 2006 in the Engineering Scale Test Demonstration Fluidized Bed Steam Reformer1 (ESTD FBSR) at the Hazen Research Inc. (HRI) facility in Golden, CO. The purpose of the Bench-scale Steam Reformer (BSR) testing was to demonstrate that the same reactions occur and the same product is formed when steam reforming actual radioactive Tank 48H waste. The approach used in the current study was to test the BSR with the same Tank 48H simulant and same Erwin coal as was used at the ESTD FBSR under the same operating conditions. This comparison would allow verification that the same chemical reactions occur in both the BSR and ESTD FBSR. Then, actual radioactive Tank 48H material would be steam reformed in the BSR to verify that the actual tank 48H sample reacts the same way chemically as the simulant Tank 48H material. The conclusions from the BSR study and comparison to the ESTD FBSR are the following: (1) A Bench-scale Steam Reforming (BSR) unit was successfully designed and built that: (a) Emulated the chemistry of the ESTD FBSR Denitration Mineralization Reformer (DMR) and Carbon Reduction Reformer (CRR) known collectively as the dual reformer flowsheet. (b) Measured and controlled the off-gas stream. (c) Processed real (radioactive) Tank 48H waste. (d) Met the standards and specifications for radiological testing in the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) Shielded Cells Facility (SCF). (2) Three runs with radioactive Tank 48H material were performed. (3) The Tetraphenylborate (TPB) was destroyed to > 99% for all radioactive Bench-scale tests. (4) The feed nitrate/nitrite was destroyed to >99% for all radioactive BSR tests the same as the ESTD FBSR. (5) The radioactive Tank 48H DMR product was primarily made up of soluble carbonates. The three most abundant species were thermonatrite, [Na{sub 2}CO{sub 3} {center_dot} H{sub 2}O], sodium carbonate, [Na{sub 2}CO{sub 3}], and trona, [Na{sub 3}H(CO{sub 3}){sub 2} {center_dot} 2H{sub 2}O] the same as the ESTD FBSR. (6) Insoluble solids analyzed by X-Ray Diffraction (XRD) did not detect insoluble carbonate species. However, they still may be present at levels below 2 wt%, the sensitivity of the XRD methodology. Insoluble solids XRD characterization indicated that various Fe/Ni/Cr/Mn phases are present. These crystalline phases are associated with the insoluble sludge components of Tank 48H slurry and impurities in the Erwin coal ash. The percent insoluble solids, which mainly consist of un-burnt coal and coal ash, in the products were 4 to 11 wt% for the radioactive runs. (7) The Fe{sup +2}/Fe{sub total} REDOX measurements ranged from 0.58 to 1 for the three radioactive Bench-scale tests. REDOX measurements > 0.5 showed a reducing atmosphere was maintained in the DMR indicating that pyrolysis was occurring. (8) Greater than 90% of the radioactivity was captured in the product for all three runs. (9) The collective results from the FBSR simulant tests and the BSR simulant tests indicate that the same chemistry occurs in the two reactors. (10) The collective results from the BSR simulant runs and the BSR radioactive waste runs indicates that the same chemistry occurs in the simulant as in the real waste. The FBSR technology has been proven to destroy the organics and nitrates in the Tank 48H waste and form the anticipated solid carbonate phases as expected.

Burket, P; Gene Daniel, G; Charles Nash, C; Carol Jantzen, C; Michael Williams, M

2008-09-25T23:59:59.000Z

115

Table 12. Coal Prices to Electric Generating Plants, Projected vs. Actual  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Coal Prices to Electric Generating Plants, Projected vs. Actual Coal Prices to Electric Generating Plants, Projected vs. Actual (nominal dollars per million Btu) 1985 1986 1987 1988 1989 1990 1991 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 AEO 1982 2.03 2.17 2.33 2.52 2.73 2.99 AEO 1983 1.99 2.10 2.24 2.39 2.57 2.76 4.29 AEO 1984 1.90 2.01 2.13 2.28 2.44 2.61 3.79 AEO 1985 1.68 1.76 1.86 1.95 2.05 2.19 2.32 2.49 2.66 2.83 3.03 AEO 1986 1.61 1.68 1.75 1.83 1.93 2.05 2.19 2.35 2.54 2.73 2.92 3.10 3.31 3.49 3.68 AEO 1987 1.52 1.55 1.65 1.75 1.84 1.96 2.11 2.27 2.44 3.55 AEO 1989* 1.50 1.51 1.68 1.77 1.88 2.00 2.13 2.26 2.40 2.55 2.70 2.86 3.00 AEO 1990 1.46 1.53 2.07 2.76 3.7 AEO 1991 1.51 1.58 1.66 1.77 1.88 1.96 2.06 2.16 2.28 2.41 2.57 2.70 2.85 3.04 3.26 3.46 3.65 3.87 4.08 4.33 AEO 1992 1.54 1.61 1.66 1.75 1.85 1.97 2.03 2.14 2.26 2.44 2.55 2.69 2.83 3.00 3.20 3.40 3.58 3.78 4.01 AEO 1993 1.92 1.54 1.61 1.70

116

Actual Dose Variation of Parotid Glands and Spinal Cord for Nasopharyngeal Cancer Patients During Radiotherapy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Purpose: For intensity-modulated radiotherapy of nasopharyngeal cancer, accurate dose delivery is crucial to the success of treatment. This study aimed to evaluate the significance of daily image-guided patient setup corrections and to quantify the parotid gland volume and dose variations for nasopharyngeal cancer patients using helical tomotherapy megavoltage computed tomography (CT). Methods and Materials: Five nasopharyngeal cancer patients who underwent helical tomotherapy were selected retrospectively. Each patient had received 70 Gy in 35 fractions. Daily megavoltage CT scans were registered with the planning CT images to correct the patient setup errors. Contours of the spinal cord and parotid glands were drawn on the megavoltage CT images at fixed treatment intervals. The actual doses delivered to the critical structures were calculated using the helical tomotherapy Planned Adaptive application. Results: The maximal dose to the spinal cord showed a significant increase and greater variation without daily setup corrections. The significant decrease in the parotid gland volume led to a greater median dose in the later phase of treatment. The average parotid gland volume had decreased from 20.5 to 13.2 cm{sup 3} by the end of treatment. On average, the median dose to the parotid glands was 83 cGy and 145 cGy for the first and the last treatment fractions, respectively. Conclusions: Daily image-guided setup corrections can eliminate significant dose variations to critical structures. Constant monitoring of patient anatomic changes and selective replanning should be used during radiotherapy to avoid critical structure complications.

Han Chunhui [Division of Radiation Oncology, City of Hope National Medical Center, Duarte, CA (United States)], E-mail: chan@coh.org; Chen Yijen; Liu An; Schultheiss, Timothy E.; Wong, Jeffrey Y.C. [Division of Radiation Oncology, City of Hope National Medical Center, Duarte, CA (United States)

2008-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

117

Predicted Versus Actual Savings for a Low-Rise Multifamily Retrofit in Boulder, Colorado  

SciTech Connect

To determine the most cost-effective methods of improving buildings, accurate analysis and prediction of the energy use of existing buildings is essential. However, multiple studies confirm that analysis methods tend to over-predict energy use in poorly insulated, leaky homes and thus, the savings associated with improving those homes. In NREL's report titled 'Assessing and Improving the Accuracy of Energy Analysis of Residential Buildings,' researchers propose a method for improving the accuracy of residential energy analysis methods. A key step in this process involves the comparisons of predicted versus metered energy use and savings. In support of this research need, CARB evaluated the retrofit of a multifamily building in Boulder, CO. The updated property is a 37 unit, 2 story apartment complex built in 1950, which underwent renovations in early 2009 to bring it into compliance with Boulder, CO's SmartRegs ordinance. Goals of the study were to: 1) evaluate predicted versus actual savings due to the improvements, 2) identify areas where the modeling assumptions may need to be changed, and 3) determine common changes made by renters that would negatively impact energy savings. In this study, CARB seeks to improve the accuracy of modeling software while assessing retrofit measures to specifically determine which are most effective for large multifamily complexes in the cold climate region. Other issues that were investigated include the effects of improving building efficiency on tenant comfort, the impact on tenant turnover rates, and the potential market barriers for this type of community scale project.

Arena, L.; Williamson, J.

2013-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

118

Actual versus design performance of solar systems in the National Solar Data Network  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report relates field measured performance to the designer predicted performance. The field measured data was collected by the National Solar Data Network (NSDN) over a period of six years. Data from 25 solar systems was selected from a data pool of some 170 solar systems. The scope of the project extends beyond merely presenting comparisons of data. There is an attempt to provide answers which will move the solar industry forward. As a result of some industry and research workshops, several concerns arose which can be partially allayed by careful study of the NSDN data. These are: What types of failures occurred and why. How good was the design versus actual performance. Why was predicted performance not achieved in the field. Which components should be integrated with a system type for good performance. Since the designs span several years and since design philosophies are quite variable, the measured results were also compared to f-Chart 5.1 results. This comparison is a type of normalization in that all systems are modeled with the same process. An added benefit of this normalization is a further validation of the f-Chart model on a fairly large scale. The systems were modeled using equipment design parameters, measured loads, and f-Chart weather data from nearby cities.

Logee, T.L.; Kendall, P.W.

1984-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

119

Modeling of Boehmite Leaching from Actual Hanford High-Level Waste Samples  

SciTech Connect

The Department of Energy plans to vitrify approximately 60,000 metric tons of high level waste sludge from underground storage tanks at the Hanford Nuclear Reservation. To reduce the volume of high level waste requiring treatment, a goal has been set to remove about 90 percent of the aluminum, which comprises nearly 70 percent of the sludge. Aluminum in the form of gibbsite and sodium aluminate can be easily dissolved by washing the waste stream with caustic, but boehmite, which comprises nearly half of the total aluminum, is more resistant to caustic dissolution and requires higher treatment temperatures and hydroxide concentrations. In this work, the dissolution kinetics of aluminum species during caustic leaching of actual Hanford high level waste samples is examined. The experimental results are used to develop a shrinking core model that provides a basis for prediction of dissolution dynamics from known process temperature and hydroxide concentration. This model is further developed to include the effects of particle size polydispersity, which is found to strongly influence the rate of dissolution.

Peterson, Reid A.; Lumetta, Gregg J.; Rapko, Brian M.; Poloski, Adam P.

2007-06-27T23:59:59.000Z

120

Actinide partitioning from actual Idaho chemical processing plant acidic tank waste using centrifugal contactors  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The TRUEX process is being evaluated at the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant (ICPP) for the separation of the actinides from acidic radioactive wastes stored at the ICPP. These efforts have culminated in a recent demonstration of the TRUEX process with actual tank waste. This demonstration was performed using 24 stages of 2-cm diameter centrifugal contactors installed in a shielded hot cell at the ICPP Remote Analytical Laboratory. An overall removal efficiency of 99.97% was obtained for the actinides. As a result, the activity of the actinides was reduced from 457 nCi/g in the feed to 0.12 nCi/g in the aqueous raffinate, which is well below the U.S. NRC Class A LLW requirement of 10 nCi/g for non-TRU waste. Iron was partially extracted by the TRUEX solvent, resulting in 23% of the Fe exiting in the strip product. Mercury was also extracted by the TRUEX solvent (76%) and stripped from the solvent in the 0.25 M Na{sub 2}CO{sub 3} wash section.

Law, J.D.; Brewer, K.N.; Todd, T.A.

1997-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "1989-2010 actual peakload" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Filtration and Leach Testing for PUREX Cladding Sludge and REDOX Cladding Sludge Actual Waste Sample Composites  

SciTech Connect

A testing program evaluating actual tank waste was developed in response to Task 4 from the M-12 External Flowsheet Review Team (EFRT) issue response plan (Barnes and Voke 2006). The test program was subdivided into logical increments. The bulk water-insoluble solid wastes that are anticipated to be delivered to the Hanford Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) were identified according to type such that the actual waste testing could be targeted to the relevant categories. Under test plan TP RPP WTP 467 (Fiskum et al. 2007), eight broad waste groupings were defined. Samples available from the 222S archive were identified and obtained for testing. Under this test plan, a waste testing program was implemented that included: • Homogenizing the archive samples by group as defined in the test plan. • Characterizing the homogenized sample groups. • Performing parametric leaching testing on each group for compounds of interest. • Performing bench-top filtration/leaching tests in the hot cell for each group to simulate filtration and leaching activities if they occurred in the UFP2 vessel of the WTP Pretreatment Facility. This report focuses on a filtration/leaching test performed using two of the eight waste composite samples. The sample groups examined in this report were the plutonium-uranium extraction (PUREX) cladding waste sludge (Group 3, or CWP) and reduction-oxidation (REDOX) cladding waste sludge (Group 4, or CWR). Both the Group 3 and 4 waste composites were anticipated to be high in gibbsite, thus requiring caustic leaching. WTP RPT 167 (Snow et al. 2008) describes the homogenization, characterization, and parametric leaching activities before benchtop filtration/leaching testing of these two waste groups. Characterization and initial parametric data in that report were used to plan a single filtration/leaching test using a blend of both wastes. The test focused on filtration testing of the waste and caustic leaching for aluminum, in the form of gibbsite, and its impact on filtration. The initial sample was diluted with a liquid simulant to simulate the receiving concentration of retrieved tank waste into the UFP2 vessel (< 10 wt% undissolved solids). Filtration testing was performed on the dilute waste sample and dewatered to a higher solids concentration. Filtration testing was then performed on the concentrated slurry. Afterwards, the slurry was caustic leached to remove aluminum present in the undissolved solid present in the waste. The leach was planned to simulate leaching conditions in the UFP2 vessel. During the leach, slurry supernate samples were collected to measure the dissolution rate of aluminum in the waste. After the slurry cooled down from the elevated leach temperature, the leach liquor was dewatered from the solids. The remaining slurry was rinsed and dewatered with caustic solutions to remove a majority of the dissolved aluminum from the leached slurry. The concentration of sodium hydroxide in the rinse solutions was high enough to maintain the solubility of the aluminum in the dewatered rinse solutions after dilution of the slurry supernate. Filtration tests were performed on the final slurry to compare to filtration performance before and after caustic leaching.

Shimskey, Rick W.; Billing, Justin M.; Buck, Edgar C.; Casella, Amanda J.; Crum, Jarrod V.; Daniel, Richard C.; Draper, Kathryn E.; Edwards, Matthew K.; Hallen, Richard T.; Kozelisky, Anne E.; MacFarlan, Paul J.; Peterson, Reid A.; Swoboda, Robert G.

2009-03-02T23:59:59.000Z

122

ACTUAL-WASTE TESTING OF ULTRAVIOLET LIGHT TO AUGMENT THE ENHANCED CHEMICAL CLEANING OF SRS SLUDGE  

SciTech Connect

In support of Savannah River Site (SRS) tank closure efforts, the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) conducted Real Waste Testing (RWT) to evaluate Enhanced Chemical Cleaning (ECC), an alternative to the baseline 8 wt% oxalic acid (OA) chemical cleaning technology for tank sludge heel removal. ECC utilizes a more dilute OA solution (2 wt%) and an oxalate destruction technology using ozonolysis with or without the application of ultraviolet (UV) light. SRNL conducted tests of the ECC process using actual SRS waste material from Tanks 5F and 12H. The previous phase of testing involved testing of all phases of the ECC process (sludge dissolution, OA decomposition, product evaporation, and deposition tank storage) but did not involve the use of UV light in OA decomposition. The new phase of testing documented in this report focused on the use of UV light to assist OA decomposition, but involved only the OA decomposition and deposition tank portions of the process. Compared with the previous testing at analogous conditions without UV light, OA decomposition with the use of UV light generally reduced time required to reach the target of <100 mg/L oxalate. This effect was the most pronounced during the initial part of the decomposition batches, when pH was <4. For the later stages of each OA decomposition batch, the increase in OA decomposition rate with use of the UV light appeared to be minimal. Testing of the deposition tank storage of the ECC product resulted in analogous soluble concentrations regardless of the use or non-use of UV light in the ECC reactor.

Martino, C.; King, W.; Ketusky, E.

2012-07-10T23:59:59.000Z

123

STEAM REFORMING TECHNOLOGY DEMONSTRATION FOR THE DESTRUCTION OF ORGANICS ON ACTUAL DOE SAVANNAH RIVER SITE TANK 48H WASTE 9138  

SciTech Connect

This paper describes the design of the Bench-scale Steam Reformer (BSR); a processing unit for demonstrating steam reforming technology on actual radioactive waste [1]. It describes the operating conditions of the unit used for processing a sample of Savannah River Site (SRS) Tank 48H waste. Finally, it compares the results from processing the actual waste in the BSR to processing simulant waste in the BSR to processing simulant waste in a large pilot scale unit, the Fluidized Bed Steam Reformer (FBSR), operated at Hazen Research Inc. in Golden, CO. The purpose of this work was to prove that the actual waste reacted in the same manner as the simulant waste in order to validate the work performed in the pilot scale unit which could only use simulant waste.

Burket, P

2009-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

124

DEMONSTRATION OF THE GLYCOLIC-FORMIC FLOWSHEET IN THE SRNL SHIELDED CELLS USING ACTUAL WASTE  

SciTech Connect

Glycolic acid was effective at dissolving many metals, including iron, during processing with simulants. Criticality constraints take credit for the insolubility of iron during processing to prevent criticality of fissile materials. Testing with actual waste was needed to determine the extent of iron and fissile isotope dissolution during Chemical Process Cell (CPC) processing. The Alternate Reductant Project was initiated by the Savannah River Remediation (SRR) Company to explore options for the replacement of the nitric-formic flowsheet used for the CPC at the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF). The goals of the Alternate Reductant Project are to reduce CPC cycle time, increase mass throughput of the facility, and reduce operational hazards. In order to achieve these goals, several different reductants were considered during initial evaluations conducted by Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL). After review of the reductants by SRR, SRNL, and Energy Solutions (ES) Vitreous State Laboratory (VSL), two flowsheets were further developed in parallel. The two flowsheet options included a nitric-formic-glycolic flowsheet, and a nitric-formic-sugar flowsheet. As of July 2011, SRNL and ES/VSL have completed the initial flowsheet development work for the nitric-formic-glycolic flowsheet and nitric-formic-sugar flowsheet, respectively. On July 12th and July 13th, SRR conducted a Systems Engineering Evaluation (SEE) to down select the alternate reductant flowsheet. The SEE team selected the Formic-Glycolic Flowsheet for further development. Two risks were identified in SEE for expedited research. The first risk is related to iron and plutonium solubility during the CPC process with respect to criticality. Currently, DWPF credits iron as a poison for the fissile components of the sludge. Due to the high iron solubility observed during the flowsheet demonstrations with simulants, it was necessary to determine if the plutonium in the radioactive sludge slurry demonstrated the same behavior. The second risk is related to potential downstream impacts of glycolate on Tank Farm processes. The downstream impacts will be evaluated by a separate research team. Waste Solidification Engineering (WSE) has requested a radioactive demonstration of the Glycolic-Formic Flowsheet with radioactive sludge slurry be completed in the Shielded Cells Facility of the SRNL. The Shielded Cells demonstration only included a Sludge Receipt and Adjustment Tank (SRAT) cycle, and not a Slurry Mix Evaporator (SME) cycle or the co-processing of salt products. Sludge Batch 5 (SB5) slurry was used for the demonstration since it was readily available, had been previously characterized, and was generally representative of sludges being processing in DWPF. This sample was never used in the planned Shielded Cells Run 7 (SC-7).

Lambert, D.; Pareizs, J.; Click, D.

2011-11-07T23:59:59.000Z

125

The influence of indoor temperature on the difference between actual and theoretical energy consumption for space heating  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Energy Advice procedure (EAP) is developed to evaluate the energetic performance of "existing" dwellings to generate a useful advice for the occupants of the dwelling to invest in rational energy measures. The EAP is based on a theoretical calculation ... Keywords: actual energy consumption, consumer behaviour, indoor temperature, space heating, theoretical energy consumption

Amaryllis Audenaert; Katleen Briffaerts; Dries De Boeck

2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

126

Wind Plant Capacity Credit Variations: A Comparison of Results Using Multiyear Actual and Simulated Wind-Speed Data  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Although it is widely recognized that variations in annual wind energy capture can be significant, it is not clear how significant this effect is on accurately calculating the capacity credit of a wind plant. An important question is raised concerning whether one year of wind data is representative of long-term patterns. This paper calculates the range of capacity credit measures based on 13 years of actual wind-speed data. The results are compared to those obtained with synthetic data sets that are based on one year of data. Although the use of synthetic data sets is a considerable improvement over single-estimate techniques, this paper finds that the actual inter- annual variation in capacity credit is still understated by the synthetic data technique.

Milligan, Michael

1997-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

127

Demonstration of a SREX flowsheet for the partitioning of strontium and lead from actual ICPP sodium-bearing waste  

SciTech Connect

Laboratory experimentation has indicated that the SREX process is effective for partitioning {sup 90}Sr and Pb from acidic radioactive waste solutions located at the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant. Previous countercurrent flowsheet testing of the SREX process with simulated waste resulted in 99.98% removal of Sr and 99.9% removal of Pb. Based on the results of these studies, a demonstration of the SREX flowsheet was performed. The demonstration consisted of (1) countercurrent flowsheet testing of the SREX process using simulated sodium-bearing waste spiked with {sup 85}Sr and (2) countercurrent flowsheet testing of the SREX process using actual waste from tank WM-183. All testing was performed using 24 stages of 2-cm diameter centrifugal contactors which are installed in the Remote Analytical Laboratory hot cell. The flowsheet tested consisted of an extraction section (0. 15 M 4`,4`(5)-di-(tert-butyldicyclohexo)-18-crown-6 and 1.5 M TBP in Isopar-L{reg_sign}), a 2.0 MHNO{sub 3} scrub section to remove extracted K from the SREX solvent, a 0.05 M HNO{sub 3} strip section for the removal of Sr from the SREX solvent, a 0.1 M ammonium citrate strip section for the removal of Pb from the SREX solvent, and a 3.0 M HNO{sub 3} equilibration section. The behavior of {sup 90}Sr, Pb, Na, K, Hg, H{sup +}, the actinides, and numerous other non-radioactive elements was evaluated. The described flowsheet successfully extracted and selectively stripped Sr and Ph from the SBW simulant and the actual tank waste. For the testing with actual tank waste (WM - 183), removal efficiencies of 99.995 % and >94% were obtained for {sup 90}Sr and Pb, respectively.

Law, J.D.; Wood, D.J.; Olson, L.G.; Todd, T.A.

1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

128

Is interactivity actually important?  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

It appears that it is a well-accepted assumption that interactivity will improve the entertainment and/or learning value of a media. This paper reviews various studies exploring the role of interactivity and reports on a study conducted to see whether ... Keywords: game engine, interactivity, learning, simulation, training

Debbie Richards

2006-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

129

An experimental and computational leakage investigation of labyrinth seals with rub grooves of actual size and shape  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A large scale water test facility and a commercial CFD computer program were used to investigate labyrinth seals with rub grooves of actual size and shape found in aircraft engines. The 2-D test rig cases focused on the effect of tooth position and operating condition for the standard geometry. The computed cases considered tooth axial and radial position, different operating conditions, and several geometric dimensions. This investigation also compares the leakage of the standard geometry to that of a modified convex wall geometry. The test facility is a 33 times enlargement of the actual seal. The pressure drop leakage rate and flow visualization digital images for the standard geometry seal were measured at various Reynolds numbers and at nine different tooth positions. The discharge coefficient and a dimensionless pressure drop number were used to plot the leakage data to make it easier for seal designers to predict the leakage of labyrinth seals. The experimental visualization results show for a given Reynolds number that the closer the labryinth tooth gets to the step the deeper the throughflow jet penetrated into the seal cavity. The decrease of the tooth tip clearance also has a similar effect. Specifically the smaller the tooth tip clearance the deeper the flow path penetrated into the seal cavity. The experimental measurements show that the tooth tip axial position, as well as the minimum-tooth clearance, affect the leakage. A significant improvement in leakage was generally observed when the minimum-distance tooth clearance occurs across the entire tip of the tooth. This occurs only at the most upstream tooth position tested. Similarly, the computed results show that the tooth axial position affects the seal leakage. It was also found that the leakage of the modified convex wall geometry was significantly less than that of the standard geometry.

Ambrosia, Matthew Stanley

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

130

Rainfall-Induced Changes in Actual Surface Backscattering Cross Sections and Effects on Rain-Rate Estimates by Spaceborne Precipitation Radar  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this study, the authors used Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission precipitation radar (TRMM PR) data to investigate changes in the actual (attenuation corrected) surface backscattering cross section (?0e) due to changes in surface conditions ...

Shinta Seto; Toshio Iguchi

2007-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

131

Estimation of daily actual evapotranspiration from remotely sensed data under complex terrain over the upper Chao river basin in North China  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Daily actual evapotranspiration over the upper Chao river basin in North China on 23 June 2005 was estimated based on the Surface Energy Balance Algorithm for Land (SEBAL), in which the parameterization schemes for calculating the instantaneous solar ...

Yanchun Gao; Di Long; Zhao-Liang Li

2008-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

132

Demonstration of the UNEX Process for the Simultaneous Separation of Cesium, Strontium, and the Actinides from Actual INEEL Tank Waste  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A universal solvent extraction (UNEX) process for the simultaneous separation of cesium, strontium, and the actinides from actual radioactive acidic tank waste was demonstrated at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory. The waste solution used in the countercurrent flowsheet demonstration was obtained from tank WM-185. The UNEX process uses a tertiary solvent containing 0.08 M chlorinated cobalt dicarbollide, 0.5% polyethylene glycol-400 (PEG-400), and 0.02 M diphenyl-N,N-dibutylcarbamoyl phosphine oxide (Ph2Bu2CMPO) in a diluent consisting of phenyltrifluoromethyl sulfone (FS-13). The countercurrent flowsheet demonstration was performed in a shielded cell facility using 24 stages of 2-cm diameter centrifugal contactors. Removal efficiencies of 99.4%, 99.995%, and 99.96% were obtained for 137Cs, 90Sr, and total alpha, respectively. This is sufficient to reduce the activities of 137Cs, 90Sr, and actinides in the WM-185 waste to below NRC Class A LLW requirement s. Flooding and/or precipitate formation were not observed during testing. Significant amounts of the Zr (87%), Ba (>99%), Pb (98.8%), Fe (8%), Ca (10%), Mo (32%), and K (28%) were also removed from the feed with the universal solvent extraction flowsheet. 99Tc, Al, Hg, and Na were essentially inextractable (<1% extracted).

Law, J.D.; Herbst, R.S.; Todd, T.A. (INEEL); Romanovskiy, V.N.; Esimantovskiy, V.M.; Smirnov, I.V.; Babain, V.A.; Zaitsev, B.N. (V. G. Khlopin Radium Institute); Logunov, M.V. (MAYAK Production Association)

1999-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

133

Demonstration of the SREX process for the removal of {sup 90}Sr from actual highly radioactive solutions in centrifugal contactors  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The SREX process is being evaluated at the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant (ICPP) for the separation of {sup 90}Sr from acidic radioactive wastes stored at the ICPP. These efforts have culminated in a recent demonstration of the SREX process with actual tank waste. This demonstration was performed using 24 stages of 2-cm diameter centrifugal contactors installed in a shielded hot cell at the ICPP Remote Analytical Laboratory. An overall removal efficiency of 99.995% was obtained for {sup 90}Sr. As a result, the activity of {sup 90}Sr was reduced from 201 Ci/m{sup 3} in the feed solution of 0.0089 Ci/m{sup 3} in the aqueous raffinate, which is below the U.S. NRC Class A LLW limit of 0.04 Ci/m{sup 3} for {sup 90}Sr. Lead was extracted by the SREX solvent and successfully partitioned from the {sup 90}Sr using an ammonium citrate strip solution. Additionally, 94% of the total alpha activity, 1.9% of the {sup 241}Am, 99.94% of the {sup 238}Pu, 99.97% of the {sup 239}Pu, 36.4% of the K, 64% of the Ba, and >83% of the Zr were extracted by the SREX solvent. Cs, B, Cd, Ca, Cr, Fe, Mn, Ni, and Na were essentially inextractable. 10 refs., 2 figs., 3 tabs.

Law, J.D.; Wood, D.J.; Todd, T.A.; Olson, L.G.

1997-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

ACTUAL-WASTE TESTS OF ENHANCED CHEMICAL CLEANING FOR RETRIEVAL OF SRS HLW SLUDGE TANK HEELS AND DECOMPOSITION OF OXALIC ACID  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Savannah River National Laboratory conducted a series of tests on the Enhanced Chemical Cleaning (ECC) process using actual Savannah River Site waste material from Tanks 5F and 12H. Testing involved sludge dissolution with 2 wt% oxalic acid, the decomposition of the oxalates by ozonolysis (with and without the aid of ultraviolet light), the evaporation of water from the product, and tracking the concentrations of key components throughout the process. During ECC actual waste testing, the process was successful in decomposing oxalate to below the target levels without causing substantial physical or chemical changes in the product sludge.

Martino, C.; King, W.; Ketusky, E.

2012-01-12T23:59:59.000Z

135

Characterization, Leaching, and Filtration Testing for Bismuth Phosphate Sludge (Group 1) and Bismuth Phosphate Saltcake (Group 2) Actual Waste Sample Composites  

SciTech Connect

A testing program evaluating actual tank waste was developed in response to Task 4 from the M-12 External Flowsheet Review Team (EFRT) issue response plan.() The test program was subdivided into logical increments. The bulk water-insoluble solid wastes that are anticipated to be delivered to the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) were identified according to type such that the actual waste testing could be targeted to the relevant categories. Eight broad waste groupings were defined. Samples available from the 222S archive were identified and obtained for testing. The actual waste-testing program included homogenizing the samples by group, characterizing the solids and aqueous phases, and performing parametric leaching tests. Two of the eight defined groups—bismuth phosphate sludge (Group 1) and bismuth phosphate saltcake (Group 2)—are the subjects of this report. The Group 1 waste was anticipated to be high in phosphorus and was implicitly assumed to be present as BiPO4 (however, results presented here indicate that the phosphate in Group 1 is actually present as amorphous iron(III) phosphate). The Group 2 waste was also anticipated to be high in phosphorus, but because of the relatively low bismuth content and higher aluminum content, it was anticipated that the Group 2 waste would contain a mixture of gibbsite, sodium phosphate, and aluminum phosphate. Thus, the focus of the Group 1 testing was on determining the behavior of P removal during caustic leaching, and the focus of the Group 2 testing was on the removal of both P and Al. The waste-type definition, archived sample conditions, homogenization activities, characterization (physical, chemical, radioisotope, and crystal habit), and caustic leaching behavior as functions of time, temperature, and hydroxide concentration are discussed in this report. Testing was conducted according to TP-RPP-WTP-467.

Lumetta, Gregg J.; Buck, Edgar C.; Daniel, Richard C.; Draper, Kathryn; Edwards, Matthew K.; Fiskum, Sandra K.; Hallen, Richard T.; Jagoda, Lynette K.; Jenson, Evan D.; Kozelisky, Anne E.; MacFarlan, Paul J.; Peterson, Reid A.; Shimskey, Rick W.; Sinkov, Sergey I.; Snow, Lanee A.

2009-02-19T23:59:59.000Z

136

Characterization and Leach Testing for PUREX Cladding Waste Sludge (Group 3) and REDOX Cladding Waste Sludge (Group 4) Actual Waste Sample Composites  

SciTech Connect

A testing program evaluating actual tank waste was developed in response to Task 4 from the M-12 External Flowsheet Review Team (EFRT) issue response plan.(a) The testing program was subdivided into logical increments. The bulk water-insoluble solid wastes that are anticipated to be delivered to the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) were identified according to type such that the actual waste testing could be targeted to the relevant categories. Eight broad waste groupings were defined. Samples available from the 222S archive were identified and obtained for testing. The actual wastetesting program included homogenizing the samples by group, characterizing the solids and aqueous phases, and performing parametric leaching tests. Two of the eight defined groups—plutonium-uranium extraction (PUREX) cladding waste sludge (Group 3, or CWP) and reduction-oxidation (REDOX) cladding waste sludge (Group 4, or CWR)—are the subjects of this report. Both the Group 3 and 4 waste composites were anticipated to be high in gibbsite, requiring caustic leaching. Characterization of the composite Group 3 and Group 4 waste samples confirmed them to be high in gibbsite. The focus of the Group 3 and 4 testing was on determining the behavior of gibbsite during caustic leaching. The waste-type definition, archived sample conditions, homogenization activities, characterization (physical, chemical, radioisotope, and crystal habit), and caustic leaching behavior as functions of time, temperature, and hydroxide concentration are discussed in this report. Testing was conducted according to TP-RPP-WTP-467.

Snow, Lanee A.; Buck, Edgar C.; Casella, Amanda J.; Crum, Jarrod V.; Daniel, Richard C.; Draper, Kathryn E.; Edwards, Matthew K.; Fiskum, Sandra K.; Jagoda, Lynette K.; Jenson, Evan D.; Kozelisky, Anne E.; MacFarlan, Paul J.; Peterson, Reid A.; Swoboda, Robert G.

2009-02-13T23:59:59.000Z

137

Performance evaluation of 24 ion exchange materials for removing cesium and strontium from actual and simulated N-Reactor storage basin water  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes the evaluation of 24 organic and inorganic ion exchange materials for removing cesium and strontium from actual and simulated waters from the 100 Area 105 N-Reactor fuel storage basin. The data described in this report can be applied for developing and evaluating ion exchange pre-treatment process flowsheets. Cesium and strontium batch distribution ratios (K{sub d}`s), decontamination factors (DF), and material loadings (mmol g{sup -1}) are compared as a function of ion exchange material and initial cesium concentration. The actual and simulated N-Basin waters contain relatively low levels of aluminum, barium, calcium, potassium, and magnesium (ranging from 8.33E-04 to 6.40E-05 M), with slightly higher levels of boron (6.63E-03 M) and sodium (1.62E-03 M). The {sup 137}Cs level is 1.74E-06 Ci L-{sup 1} which corresponds to approximately 4.87E-10 M Cs. The initial Na/Cs ratio was 3.33E+06. The concentration of total strontium is 4.45E-06 M, while the {sup 90}Sr radioactive component was measured to be 6.13E-06 Ci L{sup -1}. Simulant tests were conducted by contacting 0.067 g or each ion exchange material with approximately 100 mL of either the actual or simulated N-Basin water. The simulants contained variable initial cesium concentrations ranging from 1.00E-04 to 2.57E- 10 M Cs while all other components were held constant. For all materials, the average cesium K{sub d} was independent of cesium concentration below approximately 1.0E-06 M. Above this level, the average cesium K{sub d} values decreased significantly. Cesium K{sub d} values exceeding 1.0E+07 mL g{sup -1} were measured in the simulated N-Basin water. However, when measured in the actual N-Basin water the values were several orders of magnitude lower, with a maximum of 1.24E+05 mL g{sup -1} observed.

Brown, G.N.; Carson, K.J.; DesChane, J.R.; Elovich, R.J.

1997-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

138

Boehmite Actual Waste Dissolutions Studies  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energy plans to vitrify approximately 60,000 metric tons of high-level waste (HLW) sludge from underground storage tanks at the Hanford Nuclear Reservation. To reduce the volume of HLW requiring treatment, a goal has been set to remove a significant quantity of the aluminum, which comprises nearly 70 percent of the sludge. Aluminum is found in the form of gibbsite, sodium aluminate and boehmite. Gibbsite and sodium aluminate can be easily dissolved by washing the waste stream with caustic. Boehmite, which comprises nearly half of the total aluminum, is more resistant to caustic dissolution and requires higher treatment temperatures and hydroxide concentrations. Samples were taken from four Hanford tanks and homogenized in order to give a sample that is representative of REDOX (Reduction Oxidation process for Pu recovery) sludge solids. Bench scale testing was performed on the homogenized waste to study the dissolution of boehmite. Dissolution was studied at three different hydroxide concentrations, with each concentration being run at three different temperatures. Samples were taken periodically over the 170 hour runs in order to determine leaching kinetics. Results of the dissolution studies and implications for the proposed processing of these wastes will be discussed.

Snow, Lanee A.; Lumetta, Gregg J.; Fiskum, Sandra K.; Peterson, Reid A.

2008-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

139

DESTRUCTION OF TETRAPHENYLBORATE IN TANK 48H USING WET AIR OXIDATION BATCH BENCH SCALE AUTOCLAVE TESTING WITH ACTUAL RADIOACTIVE TANK 48H WASTE  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Wet Air Oxidation (WAO) is one of the two technologies being considered for the destruction of Tetraphenylborate (TPB) in Tank 48H. Batch bench-scale autoclave testing with radioactive (actual) Tank 48H waste is among the tests required in the WAO Technology Maturation Plan. The goal of the autoclave testing is to validate that the simulant being used for extensive WAO vendor testing adequately represents the Tank 48H waste. The test objective was to demonstrate comparable test results when running simulated waste and real waste under similar test conditions. Specifically: (1) Confirm the TPB destruction efficiency and rate (same reaction times) obtained from comparable simulant tests, (2) Determine the destruction efficiency of other organics including biphenyl, (3) Identify and quantify the reaction byproducts, and (4) Determine off-gas composition. Batch bench-scale stirred autoclave tests were conducted with simulated and actual Tank 48H wastes at SRNL. Experimental conditions were chosen based on continuous-flow pilot-scale simulant testing performed at Siemens Water Technologies Corporation (SWT) in Rothschild, Wisconsin. The following items were demonstrated as a result of this testing. (1) Tetraphenylborate was destroyed to below detection limits during the 1-hour reaction time at 280 C. Destruction efficiency of TPB was > 99.997%. (2) Other organics (TPB associated compounds), except biphenyl, were destroyed to below their respective detection limits. Biphenyl was partially destroyed in the process, mainly due to its propensity to reside in the vapor phase during the WAO reaction. Biphenyl is expected to be removed in the gas phase during the actual process, which is a continuous-flow system. (3) Reaction byproducts, remnants of MST, and the PUREX sludge, were characterized in this work. Radioactive species, such as Pu, Sr-90 and Cs-137 were quantified in the filtrate and slurry samples. Notably, Cs-137, boron and potassium were shown as soluble as a result of the WAO reaction. (4) Off-gas composition was measured in the resulting gas phase from the reaction. Benzene and hydrogen were formed during the reaction, but they were reasonably low in the off-gas at 0.096 and 0.0063 vol% respectively. Considering the consistency in replicating similar test results with simulated waste and Tank 48H waste under similar test conditions, the results confirm the validity of the simulant for other WAO test conditions.

Adu-Wusu, K; Paul Burket, P

2009-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

140

Demonstration of the UNEX Process for the Simultaneous Separation of Cesium, Strontium, and the Actinides from Actual INEEL Sodium-Bearing Waste  

SciTech Connect

A universal solvent extraction (UNEX) process for the simultaneous separation of cesium, strontium, and the actinides from actual radioactive acidic tank waste was demonstrated at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory. The waste solution used in the countercurrent flowsheet demonstration was obtained from tank WM-185. The UNEX process uses a tertiary solvent containing 0.08 M chlorinated cobalt dicarbollide, 0.5% polyethylene glycol-400 (PEG-400), and 0.02 M diphenyl-N,N-dibutylcarbamoyl phosphine oxide (Ph2Bu2CMPO) in a diluent consisting of phenyltrifluoromethyl sulfone (FS-13). The countercurrent flowsheet demonstration was performed in a shielded cell facility using 24 stages of 2-cm diameter centrifugal contactors. Removal efficiencies of 99.4%, 99.995%, and 99.96% were obtained for 137Cs, 90Sr, and total alpha, respectively. This is sufficient to reduce the activities of 137Cs, 90Sr, and actinides in the WM-185 waste to below NRC Class A LLW requirements. Flooding and/or precipitate formation were not observed during testing. Significant amounts of the Zr (87%), Ba (>99%), Pb (98.8%), Fe (8%), Ca (10%), Mo (32%), and K (28%) were also removed from the feed with the universal solvent extraction flowsheet. 99Tc, Al, Hg, and Na were essentially inextractable (<1% extracted).

Law, Jack Douglas; Herbst, Ronald Scott; Todd, Terry Allen; Romanovskiy, V.; Smirnov, I.; Babain, V.; Zaitsev, B.; Esimantovskiy, V.

1999-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

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141

The Universal Solvent Exchange (UNEX) Process II: Flowsheet Development & Demonstration of the UNEX Process for the Separation of Cesium, Strontium, and Actinides from Actual Acidic Radioactive Waste  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A novel solvent extraction process, the Universal Extraction (UNEX) process, has been developed for the simultaneous separation of cesium, strontium, and the actinides from acidic waste solutions. The UNEX process solvent consists of chlorinated cobalt dicarbollide for the extraction of 137Cs, polyethylene glycol for the extraction of 90Sr, and diphenyl-N,N-dibutylcarbamoyl phosphine oxide for the extraction of the actinides and lanthanides. A nonnitroaromatic polar diluent consisting of phenyltrifluoromethyl sulfone has been developed for this process. A UNEX flowsheet consisting of a single solvent extraction cycle has been developed as a part of a collaborative effort between the Khlopin Radium Institute (KRI) and the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL). This flowsheet has been demonstrated with actual acidic radioactive tank waste at the INEEL using 24 stages of 2-cm diameter centrifugal contactors installed in a shielded cell facility. The activities of 137Cs, 90Sr, and the actinides were reduced to levels at which a grout waste form would meet NRC Class A LLW requirements. The extraction of 99Tc and several nonradioactive metals by the UNEX solvent has also been evaluated.

Law, Jack Douglas; Herbst, Ronald Scott; Todd, Terry Allen; Romanovskiy, V. N.; Smirnov, I. V.; Esimantovskiy, V. M.; Zaitsev. B. N.; Babain, V. A.

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

142

Demonstration of a Universal Solvent Extraction Process for the Separation of Cesium and Strontium from Actual Acidic Tank Waste at the INEEL  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A universal solvent extraction process is being evaluated for the simultaneous separation of Cs, Sr, and the actinides from acidic high-activity tank waste at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) with the goal of minimizing the high-activity waste volume to be disposed in a deep geological repository. The universal solvent extraction process is being developed as a collaborative effort between the INEEL and the Khlopin Radium Institute in St. Petersburg, Russia. The process was recently demonstrated at the INEEL using actual radioactive, acidic tank waste in 24 stages of 2-cm diameter centrifugal contactors located in a shielded cell facility. With this testing, removal efficiencies of 99.95%, 99.985%, and 95.2% were obtained for 137 Cs, 90 Sr, and total alpha, respectively. This is sufficient to reduce the activities of 137 Cs and 90 Sr to below NRC Class A LLW requirements. The total alpha removal efficiency was not sufficient to reduce the activity of the tank waste to below NRC Class A non-TRU requirements. The lower than expected removal efficiency for the actinides is due to loading of the Ph2Bu2CMPO in the universal solvent exiting the actinide strip section and entering the wash section resulted in the recycle of the actinides back to the extraction section. This recycle of the actinides contributed to the low removal efficiency. Significant amounts of the Zr (>97.7%), Ba (>87%), Pb (>98.5%), Fe (6.9%), Mo (19%), and K (17%) were also removed from the feed with the universal solvent extraction flowsheet.

Law, Jack Douglas; Herbst, Ronald Scott; Todd, Terry Allen; Brewer, Ken Neal; Romanovskiy, V.N.; Esimantovskiy, V.M.; Smirnov, I.V.; Babain, V.A.; Zaitsev, B.N.

1999-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

143

Demonstration of the TRUEX process for partitioning of actinides from actual ICPP tank waste using centrifugal contactors in a shielded cell facility  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

TRUEX is being evaluated at Idaho Chemical Processing Plant (ICPP) for separating actinides from acidic radioactive waste stored at ICPP; efforts have culminated in a recent demonstration with actual tank waste. A continuous countercurrent flowsheet test was successfully completed at ICPP using waste from tank WM-183. This demonstration was performed using 24 states of 2-cm dia centrifugal contactors in the shielded hot cell at the ICPP Remote Analytical Laboratory. The flowsheet had 8 extraction stages, 5 scrub stages, 6 strip stages, 3 solvent wash stages, and 2 acid rinse stages. A centrifugal contactor stage in the scrub section was not working during testing, and the scrub feed (aqueous) solution followed the solvent into the strip section, eliminating the scrub section in the flowsheet. An overall removal efficiency of 99.97% was obtained for the actinides, reducing the activity from 457 nCi/g in the feed to 0.12 nCi/g in the aqueous raffinate, well below the NRC Class A LLW requirement of 10 nCi/g for non-TRU waste.The 0.04 M HEDPA strip section back-extracted 99.9998% of the actinide from the TRUEX solvent. Removal efficiencies of >99. 90, 99.96, 99.98, >98.89, 93.3, and 89% were obtained for {sup 241}Am, {sup 238}Pu, {sup 239}Pu, {sup 235}U, {sup 238}U, and {sup 99}Tc. Fe was partially extracted by the TRUEX solvent, resulting in 23% of the Fe exiting in the strip product. Hg was also extracted by the TRUEX solvent (73%) and stripped from the solvent in the 0.25 M Na2CO3 wash section. Only 1.4% of the Hg exited with the high activity waste strip product.

Law, J.D.; Brewer, K.N.; Herbst, R.S.; Todd, T.A.

1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

144

Demonstration of an optimized TRUEX flowsheet for partitioning of actinides from actual ICPP sodium-bearing waste using centrifugal contactors in a shielded cell facility  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The TRUEX process is being evaluated at the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant (ICPP) for the separation of the actinides from acidic radioactive wastes stored at the ICPP. These efforts have culminated in recent demonstrations of the TRUEX process with actual tank waste. The first demonstration was performed in 1996 using 24 stages of 2-cm diameter centrifugal contactors and waste from tank WM-183. Based on the results of this flowsheet demonstration, the flowsheet was optimized and a second flowsheet demonstration was performed. This test also was performed using 2-cm diameter centrifugal contactors and waste from tank WM-183. However, the total number of contactor stages was reduced from 24 to 20. Also, the concentration of HEDPA in the strip solution was reduced from 0.04 M to 0.01 M in order to minimize the amount of phosphate in the HLW fraction, which would be immobilized into a glass waste form. This flowsheet demonstration was performed using centrifugal contactors installed in the shielded hot cell at the ICPP Remote Analytical Laboratory. The flowsheet tested consisted of six extraction stages, four scrub stages, six strip stages, two solvent was stages, and two acid rinse stages. An overall removal efficiency of 99.79% was obtained for the actinides. As a result, the activity of the actinides was reduced from 540 nCi/g in the feed to 0.90 nCi/g in the aqueous raffinate, which is well below the NRC Class A LLW requirement of 10 nCi/g for non-TRU waste. Removal efficiencies of 99.84%, 99.97%, 99.97%, 99.85%, and 99.76% were obtained for {sup 241}Am, {sup 238}Pu, {sup 239}Pu, {sup 235}U, and {sup 238}U, respectively.

Law, J.D.; Brewer, K.N.; Herbst, R.S.; Todd, T.A.; Olson, L.G.

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

145

Demonstration of a Universal Solvent Extraction Process for the Separation of Cesium and Strontium from Actual Acidic Tank Waste at the INEEL  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A universal solvent extraction process is being evaluated for the simultaneous separation of Cs, Sr, and the actinides from acidic high-activity tank waste at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) with the goal of minimizing the high-activity waste volume to be disposed in a deep geological repository. The universal solvent extraction process is being developed as a collaborative effort between the INEEL and the Khlopin Radium Institute in St. Petersburg, Russia. The process was recently demonstrated at the INEEL using actual radioactive, acidic tank waste in 24 stages of 2-cm-diameter centrifugal contactors located in a shielded cell facility. With the testing, removal efficiencies of 99.95%, 99.985%, and 95.2% were obtained for Cs-137, Sr-90, and total alpha, respectively. This is sufficient to reduce the activities of Cs-137 and Sr-90 to below NRC Class A LLW requirements. The total alpha removal efficiency was not sufficient to reduce the activity of the tank waste to below NRC Class A non-TRU requirements. The lower than expected removal efficiency for the actinides is due to loading of the Ph2Bu2CMPO in the universal solvent with actinides and metals (Zr, Fe, and Mo). Also, the carryover of aqueous solution (flooding) with the solvent exiting the actinide strip section and entering the wash section resulted in the recycle of the actinides back to the extraction section. This recycle of the actinides contributed to the low removal efficiency. Significant amounts of the Zr (>97.7%), Ba (>87%), Pb (>98.5%), Fe (>6.9%), Mo (19%), and K (17%) were also removed from the feed with the universal solvent extraction flowsheet.

B. N. Zaitsev (Khlopin Radium Institute); D. J. Wood (INEEL); I. V. Smirnov; J. D. Law; R. S. Herbst; T. A. Todd; V. A. Babain; V. M. Esimantovskiy; V. N. Romanovskiy

1999-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

146

9/18/09 2:44 PMThunderbolts Forum View topic -Dark Energy may not actually exist Page 1 of 12http://www.thunderbolts.info/forum/phpBB3/viewtopic.php?p=25303&sid=87fbf6c3a5361ee50b143431ee0e553d  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

9/18/09 2:44 PMThunderbolts Forum · View topic - Dark Energy may not actually exist Page 1 of 12 Dark Energy may not actually exist Moderators: arc - On With the New #12;9/18/09 2:44 PMThunderbolts Forum · View topic - Dark Energy may not actually exist Page 2

Temple, Blake

147

Actual Date of Delivery Deliverable Security Class  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This document provides an overview of all NoAH components, defines their requirements and describes the interface between them. The NoAH architecture, as described so far, is a set of individual components that cooperate to form a farm of distributed honeypots. Although the main NoAH components –low- and highinteraction honeypots, signature generation,

unknown authors

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

148

Attachment Implementation Procedures to Report Deferred, Actual...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

maintenance costs should be reported from asset-level data collected in the Site's Maintenance Management and Financial Management Systems. b. Annual Required Maintenance...

149

The Actual Cost of Food Systems on  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

emissions and air quality); infrastructure; energy (fuel); congestion; safety; and user (tax payer) costs emissions and air quality); infrastructure; energy (fuel); congestion; safety; and user (tax payer) costs ...................................................................................................................16 Table 14: Fruit and Vegetable Consumption Rate Per Capita from County Survey

Beresnev, Igor

150

Might Dark Matter be Actually Black?  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

There have been proposals that primordial black hole remnants (BHRs) are the dark matter, but the idea is somewhat vague. We argue here first that the generalized uncertainty principle (GUP) may prevent black holes from evaporating completely, in a similar way that the standard uncertainty principle prevents the hydrogen atom from collapsing. Secondly we note that the hybrid inflation model provides a plausible mechanism for production of large numbers of small black holes. Combining these we suggest that the dark matter might be composed of Planck-size BHRs and discuss the possible constraints and signatures associated with this notion.

Chen, Pisin

2003-08-06T23:59:59.000Z

151

Design Parameters Derived from Actual Forgings*  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

...Minimum R f : R c ratio is 1.0 to 1. Maximum R f : R c ratio is 6.8 to 1. Average R f : R c ratio is 2.8 to 1....

152

Definition: Net Actual Interchange | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

interchange, balancing authority, smart grid, Balancing Authority Area References Glossary of Terms Used in Reliability Standards An inli LikeLike UnlikeLike You like this.Sign...

153

Multi-Function Fuel-Fired Heat Pump Research Project | Department...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

demand. Peak-load conditions can lead to high electricity prices, power quality problems, grid system inefficiencies, and eventually brown outs. Project Description This project...

154

Residential implementation of critical-peak pricing of electricity  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

residential peak-load electricity rate structures. Journalefficiency efforts. Keywords: electricity rates, residentialmust suffer higher electricity rates to pay for the bill

Herter, Karen

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

155

Residential implementation of critical-peak pricing of electricity  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Modeling alternative residential peak-load electricity rateKeywords: electricity rates, residential electricity, demandrates be targeted to the largest residential users of electricity,

Herter, Karen

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

156

Residential implementation of critical-peak pricing of electricity  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to time-of-day electricity pricing: first empirical results.S. The trouble with electricity markets: understandingresidential peak-load electricity rate structures. Journal

Herter, Karen

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

157

www.eia.gov  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

other biomass, solar, and wind power. Facilities co-firing biomass and coal are classified as coal. 7/ Primarily peak-load capacity fueled by natural gas.

158

Residential implementation of critical-peak pricing of electricity  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

L.R. Modeling alternative residential peak-load electricitydemand response to residential critical peak pricing (CPP)analysis of California residential customer response to

Herter, Karen

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

159

Table 10.9 Photovoltaic Cell and Module Shipments by Sector and ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Includes hydropower, solar, wind, geothermal, biomass and ethanol. ... Table 10.9 Photovoltaic Cell and Module Shipments by Sector and End Use, 1989-2010

160

What if you could actually trust your kernel?  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The advent of formally verified OS kernels means that for the first time we have a truly trustworthy foundation for systems. In this paper we explore the design space this opens up. The obvious applications are in security, although not all of them are ...

Gernot Heiser; Leonid Ryzhyk; Michael Von Tessin; Aleksander Budzynowski

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "1989-2010 actual peakload" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Table 5. Total Petroleum Consumption, Projected vs. Actual  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 AEO 1982 18.00 17.89 17.55 17.24 16.98 16.99 AEO 1983 15.82 16.13 16.37 16.50 16.56 16.63 17.37 AEO 1984 15.77 15.76 16.01...

162

Energy Efficiency in Denmark - Results and actual programs  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Renato Ezban is responsible for the implementation of a new system for certification of buildings and inspection of boilers and ventilation systems. Peter Bach is chairman of ECEEE...

163

Shale Gas Production: Potential versus Actual GHG Emissions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Estimates of greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions from shale gas production and use are controversial. Here we assess the level of GHG emissions from shale gas well hydraulic fracturing operations in the United States during ...

O'Sullivan, Francis

164

experiment actually sees," Smith says. "When we were  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

,200 pieces of music from record companies and various artists, and that number is still growing. "As more of ceremonies for a number of nationally known gospel artists' concerts and have produced a CD titled Thank You components. The students' main robot features customized parts made with a titanium powder manufacturing

165

Meteorological field measurements at potential and actual wind turbine sites  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

An overview of experiences gained in a meteorological measurement program conducted at a number of locations around the United States for the purpose of site evaluation for wind energy utilization is provided. The evolution of the measurement program from its inception in 1976 to the present day is discussed. Some of the major accomplishments and areas for improvement are outlined. Some conclusions on research using data from this program are presented.

Renne, D.S.; Sandusky, W.F.; Hadley, D.L.

1982-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

166

Actual Commercial Buildings Energy Use and Emissions and ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

An analysis of trends in energy consumption and energy-related carbon emissions in U.S. buildings, 1970-1998.

167

Pu speciation in actual and simulated aged wastes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

X-ray Absorption Fine Structure Spectroscopy (XAFS) at the Pu L{sub II/III} edge was used to determine the speciation of this element in (1) Hanford Z-9 Pu crib samples, (2) deteriorated waste resins from a chloride process ion-exchange purification line, and (3) the sediments from two Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Liter Scale simulant brine systems. The Pu speciation in all of these samples except one is within the range previously displayed by PuO{sub 2+x-2y}(OH){sub y}{center_dot}zH{sub 2}O compounds, which is expected based on the putative thermodynamic stability of this system for Pu equilibrated with excess H{sub 2}O and O{sub 2} under environmental conditions. The primary exception was a near neutral brine experiment that displayed evidence for partial substitution of the normal O-based ligands with Cl{sup -} and a concomitant expansion of the Pu-Pu distance relative to the much more highly ordered Pu near neighbor shell in PuO{sub 2}. However, although the Pu speciation was not necessarily unusual, the Pu chemistry identified via the history of these samples did exhibit unexpected patterns, the most significant of which may be that the presence of the Pu(V)-oxo species may decrease rather than increase the overall solubility of these compounds. Several additional aspects of the Pu speciation have also not been previously observed in laboratory-based samples. The molecular environmental chemistry of Pu is therefore likely to be more complicated than would be predicted based solely on the behavior of PuO{sub 2} under laboratory conditions.

Lezama-pacheco, Juan S [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Conradson, Steven D [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

168

The potential and actual effectiveness of interactive query expansion  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Van Rijsbergen,C.J. Magennis,M. Proceedings of the 20th Annual International ACM SIGIR Conference on Reseach and Development in Information Retrieval (Seattle, USA) pp 324-332 ACM

Van Rijsbergen, C.J.

169

Shale gas production: potential versus actual greenhouse gas emissions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Estimates of greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions from shale gas production and use are controversial. Here we assess the level of GHG emissions from shale gas well hydraulic fracturing operations in the United States during ...

O’Sullivan, Francis Martin

170

ESTIMATING RISK TO CALIFORNIA ENERGY INFRASTRUCTURE FROM PROJECTED CLIMATE CHANGE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

power plants, the relationship between ambient temperature and transformer (Transformer Thermal Overload Protection. IEEE Transactions on PowerTransformer Winter and Summer Peak-Load Limits. IEEE Transactions on Power

Sathaye, Jayant

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

171

U.S. electric utility demand-side management 1993  

SciTech Connect

This report presents comprehensive information on electric power industry demand-side management activities in the United States at the national, regional, and utility levels. Data is included for energy savings, peakload reductions, and costs.

NONE

1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

172

Wind Generators and Market Power: Does it matter who owns them?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Electricity production from wind generators holds significant importance in European Union’s 20 % renewable energy target by 2020. In this paper, I show that ownership of wind generators affects market outcomes by using both a Cournot oligopoly model and a real options model. In the Cournot oligopoly model, ownership of the wind generators by owners of fossil-fueled (peakload) generators decreases total peakload production and increases the market price. These effects increase with total wind generation and aggregate wind generator ownership. In the real options model, start up and shut down price thresholds are significantly higher when the monopolist at the peakload level owns both types of generators. Furthermore, when producing electricity with the peakload generator, the monopolist can avoid facing prices below marginal cost by owning a certain share of the wind generators.

Nihat Misir

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

173

Report to Congress on Server and Data Center Energy Efficiency: Public Law 109-431: Appendices  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

spaces which meet “green” energy efficiency standards. Theand re-titled “The Green Energy Fund. ” A systems benefitgreen buildings, August 2, 2007 A-55 peak-load reduction, energy

Brown, Richard; Alliance to Save Energy; ICF Incorporated; ERG Incorporated; U.S. Environmental Protection Agency

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

174

The Distributional and Environmental Effects of Time-Varying Prices in Competitive Electricity Markets  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

increases while oil- and gas-?red, peak-load generationoil- and gas-?red generation, the decrease in supply, coupled with the decrease in peak andpeak-hour generation leading to an increase overall. For oil-

Holland, Stephen P.; MANSUR, ERIN T

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

175

Table 11.5b Emissions From Energy Consumption for Electricity ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Table 11.5b Emissions From Energy Consumption for Electricity Generation and Useful Thermal Output: Electric Power Sector, 1989-2010 (Subset of Table 11.5a ...

176

Table 11.5a Emissions From Energy Consumption for Electricity ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Table 11.5a Emissions From Energy Consumption for Electricity Generation and Useful Thermal Output: Total (All Sectors), 1989-2010 (Sum of Tables 11.5b and ...

177

The Climatology of Synoptic-Scale Ascent over Western North America: A Perspective on Storm Tracks  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The position and variability of storm tracks across western North America are examined during the October–April cool seasons spanning 1989–2010. The location and intensity of storms are represented by strong synoptic-scale ascent, which is ...

Neil P. Lareau; John D. Horel

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

178

When home is work : grounding the virtual worker in an actual world  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In our increasingly wired society, the numbers of people who work from their homes is rapidly growing. However, few have the luxury of living in a space designed for office work and as such suffer from a number of problems, ...

Nussbaum Kress, Stephanie N. (Stephanie Nicole), 1975-

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

179

Ferrocyanide Safety Project: Comparison of actual and simulated ferrocyanide waste properties  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In the 1950s, additional high-level radioactive waste storage capacity was needed to accommodate the wastes that would result from the production of recovery of additional nuclear defense materials. To provide this additional waste storage capacity, the Hanford Site operating contractor developed a process to decontaminate aqueous wastes by precipitating radiocesium as an alkali nickel ferrocyanide; this process allowed disposal of the aqueous waste. The radiocesium scavenging process as developed was used to decontaminate (1) first-cycle bismuth phosphate (BiPO{sub 4}) wastes, (2) acidic wastes resulting from uranium recovery operations, and (3) the supernate from neutralized uranium recovery wastes. The radiocesium scavenging process was often coupled with other scavenging processes to remove radiostrontium and radiocobalt. Because all defense materials recovery processes used nitric acid solutions, all of the wastes contained nitrate, which is a strong oxidizer. The variety of wastes treated, and the occasional coupling of radiostrontium and radiocobalt scavenging processes with the radiocesium scavenging process, resulted in ferrocyanide-bearing wastes having many different compositions. In this report, we compare selected physical, chemical, and radiochemical properties measured for Tanks C-109 and C-112 wastes and selected physical and chemical properties of simulated ferrocyanide wastes to assess the representativeness of stimulants prepared by WHC.

Scheele, R.D.; Burger, L.L.; Sell, R.L.; Bredt, P.R.; Barrington, R.J.

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

180

Predicted mouse peroxisome-targeted proteins and their actual subcellular locations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. Sequences that con- tained only motifs incompatible with peroxisomal locali- zation (e.g., RNA-helicase (IPR0006050)), or that were supported by an unequivocal PSORT II [17] nuclear local- ization were eliminated. In addition, we predicted protein solubility...

2008-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "1989-2010 actual peakload" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Characterization and Leach Testing for REDOX Sludge and S-Saltcake Actual Waste Sample Composites  

SciTech Connect

This report describes processing and analysis results of boehmite waste type (Group 5) and insoluble high Cr waste type (Group 6). The sample selection, compositing, subdivision, physical and chemical characterization are described. Extensive batch leach testing was conducted to define kinetics and leach factors of selected analytes as functions of NaOH concentration and temperature. Testing supports issue M-12 resolution for the Waste Treatment Plant.

Fiskum, Sandra K.; Buck, Edgar C.; Daniel, Richard C.; Draper, Kathryn E.; Edwards, Matthew K.; Hubler, Timothy L.; Jagoda, Lynette K.; Jenson, Evan D.; Kozelisky, Anne E.; Lumetta, Gregg J.; MacFarlan, Paul J.; McNamara, Bruce K.; Peterson, Reid A.; Sinkov, Sergey I.; Snow, Lanee A.; Swoboda, Robert G.

2008-07-10T23:59:59.000Z

182

A longitudinal analysis of moving desires, expectations and actual moving behaviour  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

than homeowners; experiencing a deficiency of space increases mobility; longer durations at the same address and housing satisfaction or liking the neighbourhood lead to a lower likelihood of subsequently moving. ***Table 6 about here*** Model...

Coulter, Rory; van Ham, Maarten; Feijten, Peteke

183

Paying for public transportation : the optimal, the actual, and the possible  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Passenger transportation poses challenges to American cities in the form of air pollution, traffic congestion, auto collisions, and barriers to mobility. Public transit has the potential to be part of a solution to these ...

Antos, Justin David

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

184

The myth of the single mode man : how the mobility pass better meets actual travel demand  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The goal of this thesis is to investigate how employer transportation subsidy programs can result in more sustainable outcomes. Cities are growth machines that increasingly seek to mitigate the effects of that growth caused ...

Block-Schachter, David

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

185

The analysis and comparison of actual to predicted collector array performances  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Hottel-Whillier-Bliss (HWB) equation has been the standard tool for the evaluation of collector thermal performance for four decades. This paper presents a technique that applies the criteria of ASHRAE Standard 93-77 to the determination of the HWB ...

W. H. McCumber; M. W. Weston

1979-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

186

Analysis of Actual Operating Conditions of an Off-grid Solid Oxide Fuel Cell  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Fuel cells have been proposed as ideal replacements for other technologies in remote locations such as Rural Alaska. A number of suppliers have developed systems that might be applicable in these locations, but there are several requirements that must be met before they can be deployed: they must be able to operate on portable fuels, and be able to operate with little operator assistance for long periods of time. This project was intended to demonstrate the operation of a 5 kW fuel cell on propane at a remote site (defined as one without access to grid power, internet, or cell phone, but on the road system). A fuel cell was purchased by the National Park Service for installation in their newly constructed visitor center at Exit Glacier in the Kenai Fjords National Park. The DOE participation in this project as initially scoped was for independent verification of the operation of this demonstration. This project met with mixed success. The fuel cell has operated over 6 seasons at the facility with varying degrees of success, with one very good run of about 1049 hours late in the summer of 2006, but in general the operation has been below expectations. There have been numerous stack failures, the efficiency of electrical generation has been lower than expected, and the field support effort required has been far higher than expected. Based on the results to date, it appears that this technology has not developed to the point where demonstrations in off road sites are justified.

Dennis Witmer; Thomas Johnson; Jack Schmid

2008-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

187

Basis for a Waste Management Public Communication Policy: Actual Situation Analysis and Implementation of Corrective Actions  

SciTech Connect

Argentina will require new sites for the location of radioactive waste final disposal systems. It is currently mandatory to have social and political consensus to obtain the corresponding agreements. The experience obtained with the cancellation of the project ''Feasibility Study and Engineering Project--Repository for High Level Radioactive Waste'', reinforces even more the necessity to count with the acceptance of the public to carry out projects of this kind. The first phase of the former was developed in the 80's: geological, geophysical and hydrogeological studies were performed in a compact granitic rock located in Sierra del Medio, Chubut province. This project had to be called off in the early 90's due to strong social rejection. This decision was closely related to the poor attention given to social communication issues. The governmental decision-makers in charge underwent a lot of pressure from social groups claiming for the cancellation of the project due to the lack of information and the fear it triggered. Thus, the lesson learnt: ''social communication activities must be carefully undertaken in order to achieve the appropriate management of the radioactive waste produced in our country.'' The same as in other countries, the specific National Law demands the formulation of a Strategic Plan which will not only include the research into radioactive waste, but the design of a Social Communication Programme as well. The latter will be in charge of informing the population clearly and objectively about the latest scientific and technological advances in the issue. A tentative perception-attitude pattern of the Argentine society about the overall nuclear issue is outlined in this paper. It is meant to contribute to the understanding of the public's adverse reaction to this kind of project. A communication programme is also presented. Its objective is to install the waste management topic in the public's opinion with a positive real outlook.

Jolivet, L. A.; Maset, E. R.

2002-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

188

How many people actually see the price signal? Quantifying marketfailures in the end use of energy  

SciTech Connect

"Getting the price right" is a goal of many market-orientedenergy policies. However, there are situations where the consumer payingfor the energy is separate from the owner of the energy-using device.Economists call this a "principal agent problem". A team organised by theInternational Energy Agency examined seven end uses and one sector whereprincipal agent problems existed: refrigerators, water heating, spaceheating, vending machines, commercial HVAC, company cars, lighting, andfirms. These investigations took place in Australia, Japan, theNetherlands, Norway, and the United States. About 2 100 percent of theenergy consumed in the end uses examined was affected by principal agentproblems. The size (and sometimes even the existence) varied greatly fromone country to another but all countries had significant amounts ofenergy affected by principal agent problems. The presence of a marketfailure does not mean that energy use would fall substantially if thefailure were eliminated; however it does suggest that raising energyprices such as in the form of carbon taxes will not necessarily increaseefficiency investments.

Meier, Alan; Eide, Anita

2007-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

189

Probabilistic structural seismic performance assessment methodology and application to an actual bridge-foundation -ground system  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of Structural Engineering , ASCE, to be submitted, JanuaryJournal of Structural Engineering , ASCE, 113(5), 1011-1028.response of bridge piers. ” ASCE Journal of Structural

Zhang, Yuyi

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

190

Houston, we have a problem...: a survey of actual problems in computer games development  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper presents a survey of problems found in the development process of electronic games. These problems were collected mainly from game postmortems and specialized litterature on game development, allowing a comparison with respect to well-known ... Keywords: electronic games, game development, postmortems, problems in game development, survey

Fábio Petrillo; Marcelo Pimenta; Francisco Trindade; Carlos Dietrich

2008-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

191

Basis for a Waste Management Public Communication Policy: Actual Situation Analysis and Implementation of Corrective Actions  

SciTech Connect

Argentina will require new sites for the location of radioactive waste final disposal systems. It is currently mandatory to have social and political consensus to obtain the corresponding agreements. The experience obtained with the cancellation of the project ''Feasibility Study and Engineering Project--Repository for High Level Radioactive Waste'', reinforces even more the necessity to count with the acceptance of the public to carry out projects of this kind. The first phase of the former was developed in the 80's: geological, geophysical and hydrogeological studies were performed in a compact granitic rock located in Sierra del Medio, Chubut province. This project had to be called off in the early 90's due to strong social rejection. This decision was closely related to the poor attention given to social communication issues. The governmental decision-makers in charge underwent a lot of pressure from social groups claiming for the cancellation of the project due to the lack of information and the fear it triggered. Thus, the lesson learnt: ''social communication activities must be carefully undertaken in order to achieve the appropriate management of the radioactive waste produced in our country.'' The same as in other countries, the specific National Law demands the formulation of a Strategic Plan which will not only include the research into radioactive waste, but the design of a Social Communication Programme as well. The latter will be in charge of informing the population clearly and objectively about the latest scientific and technological advances in the issue. A tentative perception-attitude pattern of the Argentine society about the overall nuclear issue is outlined in this paper. It is meant to contribute to the understanding of the public's adverse reaction to this kind of project. A communication programme is also presented. Its objective is to install the waste management topic in the public's opinion with a positive real outlook.

Jolivet, L. A.; Maset, E. R.

2002-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

192

Actual screens may vary slightly due to the frequent enhancements and  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to move to the latest news--without entering search terms. C Get a document. Select the type; enter for a list of available segments. Choose a segment and enter your search terms. Click Add. (If you know, enter the page number you want to display, and click Go. 3 421 4 Navigating to a Specific Search Term

193

Actual vs anticipated savings from DSM programs: An assessment of the California experience  

SciTech Connect

Since the late 1980`s, utilities in California have used demand-side management (DSM) extensively to achieve a variety of corporate and public policy goals. This commitment to ene efficiency was encouraged by the establishment of financial incentives for the utilities to acquire demand-side resources. With restructuring of electric and gas markets underway in California, including recent cutbacks by the California utilities in their DSM program efforts, it is timely to review retrospectively the accomplishments of California`s DSM investments. This paper summarizes the results of 50 evaluation studies that assess California DSM programs operating between 1990 and 1992. On average, the programs delivered 112% of the energy savings that were planned, and the typical program realized approximately 86% of the energy savings it was expected to deliver. Thus, the California DSM programs outperformed DSM programs from the 1980s, in terms of more accurately forecasting energy impacts. Among the 50 impact studies, lower realization rates are associated with residential-sector programs, relatively high ex-ante estimates of savings, and significant levels of free ridership.

Brown, M.A. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Mihlmester, P.E. [Aspen Systems Corp., Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

194

Stress Actually Makes You Stronger ... At Least Some of the Time  

Office of Science (SC) Website

Accelerator Laboratory (SLAC), and their recent paper in Science magazine. That team, led by Despina Milathianaki and including collaborators from Lawrence Livermore National...

195

Plan Provision Comparison (Summary information only for specific provisions please refer to actual plan document language)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

is effective. Investment Providers (* indicates discontinued contributions) Securian TIAA-CREF* Securian* TIAA-CREF* Vanguard* Fidelity* Defined Benefit Plan ­ Assets managed by the State Board of Investment Securian TIAA-CREF* Fidelity Vanguard DWS Investments T Rowe Price* Securian TIAA-CREF* Fidelity Vanguard #12;All information

Thomas, David D.

196

Selection of the most advantageous gas turbine air filtration system: Comparative study of actual operating experience  

SciTech Connect

This paper discusses relative merits of three types of air filtration systems used by Sui Northern Gas Pipelines Ltd. (Pakistan), on its gas turbine compressor packages. These Filtration systems are: (i) Two stage inertial plus auto oil bath type multi-duty filters by AAF used on Saturn Mark-1 packages manufactured by Solar Turbines Inc. (ii) Three stage high efficiency barrier filters by AAF used on Centaur packages by Solar. (iii) Single stage pulse-jet self-cleaning filter by Donaldson again used on a Centaur package. The selection is primarily based in package performance data collected over a 15 month period analyzing power loss due to fouling effects and related operation and maintenance costs for the three systems. The Company's operating experience indicates that on new installations the pulse clean system offers the best advantage both in terms of filtration costs as well as availability of additional horse power when operating under moderate to severe environmental conditions.

Gilani, S.I.; Mehr, M.Z.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

197

Essays on pricing under uncertainty  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This dissertation analyzes pricing under uncertainty focusing on the U.S. airline industry. It sets to test theories of price dispersion driven by uncertainty in the demand by taking advantage of very detailed information about the dynamics of airline prices and inventory levels as the flight date approaches. Such detailed information about inventories at a ticket level to analyze airline pricing has been used previously by the author to show the importance of capacity constraints in airline pricing. This dissertation proposes and implements many new ideas to analyze airline pricing. Among the most important are: (1) It uses information about inventories at a ticket level. (2) It is the first to note that fare changes can be explained by adding dummy variables representing ticket characteristics. Therefore, the load factor at a ticket level will lose its explanatory power on fares if all ticket characteristics are included in a pricing equation. (3) It is the first to propose and implement a measure of Expected Load Factor as a tool to identify which flights are peak and which ones are not. (4) It introduces a novel idea of comparing actual sales with average sales at various points prior departure. Using these deviations of actual sales from sales under average conditions, it presents is the first study to show empirical evidence of peak load pricing in airlines. (5) It controls for potential endogeneity of sales using dynamic panels. The first essay tests the empirical importance of theories that explain price dispersion under costly capacity and demand uncertainty. The essay calculates a measure of an Expected Load Factor, that is used to calibrate the distribution of demand uncertainty and to identify which flights are peak and which ones are off-peak. It shows that different prices can be explained by the different selling probabilities. The second essay is the first study to provide formal evidence of stochastic peak-load pricing in airlines. It shows that airlines learn about the demand and respond to early sales setting higher prices when expected demand is high and more likely to exceed capacity.

Escobari Urday, Diego Alfonso

2008-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

198

9/18/09 2:57 PMDark energy may not actually exist Page 1 of 9http://www.thaindian.com/newsportal/health/dark-energy-may-not-actually-exist_100234185.html  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

National New Delhi nuclear Ads by Google Origin Universe Albert Einstein E Sabai Body Temple Hero Universe in Pakistan Dundalk Avenue flooded as water main breaks Al Qaeda video threatens Germans ahead of polls

Temple, Blake

199

Demonstration of the TRUEX process for the treatment of actual high activity tank waste at the INEEL using centrifugal contactors  

SciTech Connect

The Idaho Chemical Processing Plant (ICPP), located at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL), formerly reprocessed spent nuclear fuel to recover fissionable uranium. The radioactive raffinates from the solvent extraction uranium recovery processes were converted to granular solids (calcine) in a high temperature fluidized bed. A secondary liquid waste stream was generated during the course of reprocessing, primarily from equipment decontamination between campaigns and solvent wash activities. This acidic tank waste cannot be directly calcined due to the high sodium content and has historically been blended with reprocessing raffinates or non-radioactive aluminum nitrate prior to calcination. Fuel reprocessing activities are no longer being performed at the ICPP, thereby eliminating the option of waste blending to deplete the waste inventory. Currently, approximately 5.7 million liters of high-activity waste are temporarily stored at the ICPP in large underground stainless-steel tanks. The United States Environmental Protection Agency and the Idaho Department of Health and Welfare filed a Notice of Noncompliance in 1992 contending some of the underground waste storage tanks do not meet secondary containment. As part of a 1995 agreement between the State of Idaho, the Department of Energy, and the Department of Navy, the waste must be removed from the tanks by 2012. Treatment of the tank waste inventories by partitioning the radionuclides and immobilizing the resulting high-activity and low-activity waste streams is currently under evaluation. A recent peer review identified the most promising radionuclide separation technologies for evaluation. The Transuranic Extraction-(TRUEX) process was identified as a primary candidate for separation of the actinides from ICPP tank waste.

Law, J.D.; Brewer, K.N.; Todd, T.A.; Olson, L.G.

1997-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

200

Analysis of information exchange activities to actualize and validate situation awareness during shift changeovers in nuclear power plants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Shift work situations occur in almost all safety-critical organizations, and the investigations of some catastrophes like Chernobyl, Exxon Valdez, and the Gol/Legacy mid-air collision indicated that shift work information exchange played an important ... Keywords: Process systems safety, Resilience engineering, Shift work changeover, Situation awareness

Paulo Victor Rodrigues de Carvalho; Tahar-Hakim Benchekroun; Jose Orlando Gomes

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "1989-2010 actual peakload" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

The Theoretical, Discrete, and Actual Response of the Barnes Objective Analysis Scheme for One- and Two-Dimensional Fields  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper examines the response of the Barnes objective analysis scheme as a function of wavenumber or wavelength and extends previous work in two primary areas. First, the first- and second-pass theoretical response functions for continuous two-...

Patricia M. Pauley; Xiaihua Wu

1990-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

202

6.0 UNCERTAINTIES The major uncertainty in this analysis is the actual exposure that people will experience.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

will experience. Because many abandoned uranium mines are on federal lands, the most likely exposure scenario to this are Native Americans who live around the uranium mines and personnel who may work around the sites effect uranium mines have on the ground water and the subsequent use of the water. In many parts

203

How many people actually see the price signal? Quantifying market failures in the end use of energy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the tenant. If energy prices rise (from market fluctuationsenergy consumption that is “affected” by a market failure and “insulated” from pricemarket barriers, principal agent problem, energy efficiency, investment, behaviour, energy price,

Meier, Alan; Eide, Anita

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

204

How many people actually see the price signal? Quantifying market failures in the end use of energy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1991) The Issue of Domestic Energy Market Failure. Canberra,information in energy service markets – leading to problemsis a goal of many market-oriented energy policies. However,

Meier, Alan; Eide, Anita

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

205

How many people actually see the price signal? Quantifying market failures in the end use of energy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to minimize energy and environmental problems by placingprincipal agent problem, energy efficiency, investment,Agent Problem on US Residential Energy Use. Berkeley (CA),

Meier, Alan; Eide, Anita

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

206

Control Strategies of Thermostatically Controlled Appliances in a Competitive Electricity Market  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper discusses the setpoint-control strategies for thermostatically controlled appliances (TCAs) in a competitive electricity market with electric water heater used as an example. By varying the TCA thermostat settings, the TCA power consumption can be shifted from the high-price period to the low-price period to reduce the peak-load and energy cost. Economic benefits and impacts on distribution feeder load shapes when applying different setpoint-control strategies are studied.

Lu, Ning; Katipamula, Srinivas

2005-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

207

Breaking new ground with CAES  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Compressed-air energy storage (CAES) has become more attractive to electric utilities with the rising costs of oil- or gas-fired peaking power and the limited fuel storage options. The utility industry is watching with interest as Soyland Power Cooperative, Inc., develops a 220-MW commercial CAES unit that will deliver off-peak energy storage and peak-load generation. 2 figures.

Lihach, N.

1982-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

208

Technical and economic assessment of fluidized-bed-augmented compressed-air energy-storage system. Volume I. Executive summary  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

An energy storage system which could be attractive for future electric utility peak-load applications is a modified gas turbine power system utilizing underground storage of very high pressure air. The compressed air energy storage (CAES) concept involves using off-peak electricity generated from indigenous coal or nuclear sources to compress air, storing the air in large underground facilities, and withdrawing the air during peak-load periods when it would be heated by combustion and expanded through gas turbines to generate power. The attractiveness of the CAES concept is based upon its potential to supply competitively priced peaking energy, to reduce peak-load power plant dependence on petroleum-based fuels, and to provide a means for leveling the utility system load demand. Therefore, a technical and economic assessment of coal-fired fluidized bed (FBC) combustor/compressed air energy storage (FBC/CAES) systems was performed and is described. The conclusions drawn from the FBC/CAES study program are encouraging. They indicate that pressurized FBC/CAES power plants should be technologically feasible, provide good performance, and be economically competitive. Specifically, it is concluded that: coal-fired FBC/CAES systems should be technically feasible in the near future and potentially attractive for peak-load power generation; and an open-bed PFBC/CAES configuration would provide the best candidate for early commercialization. It has relatively low risk combined with moderate cost and reasonable round-trip heat rate. It also has the potential for future growth options which tend to reduce costs and lower fuel consumption.

Giramonti, A.J.; Lessard, R.D.; Merrick, D.; Hobson, M.J.

1981-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

209

More than Money: The Spatial Mismatch Between Where Homeowners of Color in Metro Boston Can Afford to Live and Where They Actually Reside Part II  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

argue, simply a matter of money. People of color do not livecosts – both in terms of money and time – of traveling vastthe same or slightly less money. Why not have a home Many

Harris, David J.; McArdle, Nancy

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

210

More than Money: The Spatial Mismatch Between Where Homeowners of Color in Metro Boston Can Afford to Live and Where They Actually Reside Part I  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

More than Money: The Spatial Mismatch Between Whereattributable to more than money. We recommend several stepsproposals. More than Money: The Spatial Mismatch Between

Harris, David J.; McArdle, Nancy

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

211

Organic Tank Safety Project: development of a method to measure the equilibrium water content of Hanford organic tank wastes and demonstration of method on actual waste  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Some of Hanford`s underground waste storage tanks contain Organic- bearing high level wastes that are high priority safety issues because of potentially hazardous chemical reactions of organics with inorganic oxidants in these wastes such as nitrates and nitrites. To ensure continued safe storage of these wastes, Westinghouse Hanford Company has placed affected tanks on the Organic Watch List and manages them under special rules. Because water content has been identified as the most efficient agent for preventing a propagating reaction and is an integral part of the criteria developed to ensure continued safe storage of Hanford`s organic-bearing radioactive tank wastes, as part of the Organic Tank Safety Program the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory developed and demonstrated a simple and easily implemented procedure to determine the equilibrium water content of these potentially reactive wastes exposed to the range of water vapor pressures that might be experienced during the wastes` future storage. This work focused on the equilibrium water content and did not investigate the various factors such as @ ventilation, tank surface area, and waste porosity that control the rate that the waste would come into equilibrium, with either the average Hanford water partial pressure 5.5 torr or other possible water partial pressures.

Scheele, R.D.; Bredt, P.R.; Sell, R.L.

1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

212

High potential, but low actual, glycine uptake of dominant plant species in three Australian land-use types with intermediate N availability  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

with intermediate N availability Ansgar Kahmen & Stephen J.with different N availabilities. We here report patterns ofwith intermediate N availability, mineral N is the plants’

Kahmen, Ansgar; Livesley, Stephen J.; Arndt, Stefan K.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

213

CENTIMETER CONTINUUM OBSERVATIONS OF THE NORTHERN HEAD OF THE HH 80/81/80N JET: REVISING THE ACTUAL DIMENSIONS OF A PARSEC-SCALE JET  

SciTech Connect

We present 6 and 20 cm Jansky Very Large Array/Very Large Array observations of the northern head of the HH 80/81/80N jet, one of the largest collimated jet systems known so far, aimed to look for knots farther than HH 80N, the northern head of the jet. Aligned with the jet and 10' northeast of HH 80N, we found a radio source not reported before, with a negative spectral index similar to that of HH 80, HH 81, and HH 80N. The fit of a precessing jet model to the knots of the HH 80/81/80N jet, including the new source, shows that the position of this source is close to the jet path resulting from the modeling. If the new source belongs to the HH 80/81/80N jet, its derived size and dynamical age are 18.4 pc and >9 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 3} yr, respectively. If the jet is symmetric, its southern lobe would expand beyond the cloud edge resulting in an asymmetric appearance of the jet. Based on the updated dynamical age, we speculate on the possibility that the HH 80/81/80N jet triggered the star formation observed in a dense core found ahead of HH 80N, which shows signposts of interaction with the jet. These results indicate that parsec-scale radio jets can play a role in the stability of dense clumps and the regulation of star formation in the molecular cloud.

Masque, Josep M.; Estalella, Robert [Departament d'Astronomia i Meteorologia, Universitat de Barcelona, Marti i Franques 1, E-08028 Barcelona, Catalunya (Spain); Girart, Josep M. [Institut de Ciencies de l'Espai, (CSIC-IEEC), Campus UAB, Facultat de Ciencies, Torre C5-parell 2, E-08193 Bellaterra, Catalunya (Spain); Rodriguez, Luis F. [Centro de Radioastronomia y Astrofisica, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Apartado Postal 3-72, 58090 Morelia, Michoacan (Mexico); Beltran, Maria T. [INAF-Osservatorio Astrofisico di Arcetri, Largo E. Fermi 5, I-50125 Firenze (Italy)

2012-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

214

Examining the Cycle: How Perceived and Actual Bicycling Risk Influence Cycling Frequency, Roadway Design Preferences, and Support for Cycling Among Bay Area Residents  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

street parking, lighting, presence, width, quality, and placement of bicycle infrastructure, etc. However, with the exception of research

Sanders, Rebecca Lauren

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

215

Implementation of a Silver Iodide Cloud-Seeding Parameterization in WRF. Part II: 3D Simulations of Actual Seeding Events and Sensitivity Tests  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Four cloud-seeding cases over southern Idaho during the 2010/11 winter season have been simulated by the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model using the coupled silver iodide (AgI) cloud-seeding scheme that was described in Part I. The ...

Lulin Xue; Sarah A. Tessendorf; Eric Nelson; Roy Rasmussen; Daniel Breed; Shaun Parkinson; Pat Holbrook; Derek Blestrud

2013-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

216

Optical transitions in Cd{sub x}Hg{sub 1-x}Te-based quantum wells and their analysis with account for the actual band structure of the material  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Quantum-confinement levels in a Cd{sub x}Hg{sub 1-x}Te-based rectangular quantum well are calculated in the framework of the four-band Kane model taking into account mixing between the states of electrons and three types of holes (heavy, light, and spin-split holes). Comparison of the calculation results with experimental data on the photoluminescence of Cd{sub x}Hg{sub 1-x}Te-based quantum wells suggests that optical transitions involving the conduction and light-hole bands are possibly observed in the spectra.

Bazhenov, N. L., E-mail: bazhnil.ivom@mail.ioffe.ru; Shilyaev, A. V.; Mynbaev, K. D.; Zegrya, G. G. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Ioffe Physical-Technical Institute (Russian Federation)

2012-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

217

Actual trends of decentralized CHP integration -- The Californian investment subsidy system and its implication for the energy efficiency directive (Aktuelle Trends in der dezentralen KWK Technologie Integration -- Das kalifornische Fordermodell und dessen Implikation fur die Endenergieeffizienzrichtlinie)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

sein (Stadler, 2003). Aktuelle Trends in der dezentralen KWKsich auf 3375€/kW. Aktuelle Trends in der dezentralen KWKdes gesamten Aktuelle Trends in der dezentralen KWK

Stadler, Michael; Lipman, Tim; Marnay, Chris

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

218

(This is a sample cover image for this issue. The actual cover is not yet available at this time.) This article appeared in a journal published by Elsevier. The attached  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

structures in the southern North Sea hold natural gas (Cameron et al., 1992). The study focussed on six UK and manuscript policies are encouraged to visit: http://www.elsevier.com/copyright #12;Author's personal copy International Journal of Greenhouse Gas Control 6 (2012) 210­219 Contents lists available at SciVerse Science

Haszeldine, Stuart

219

(This is a sample cover image for this issue. The actual cover is not yet available at this time.) This article appeared in a journal published by Elsevier. The attached  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Water Bay, Kowloon, Hong Kong, China h i g h l i g h t s " The performance of VRFBs with different flow does. Ă? 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved. 1. Introduction Renewable energies like solar and wind are among a few of the central topics of our time. However, the random and intermittent nature of renewable

Zhao, Tianshou

220

Actual trends of decentralized CHP integration -- The Californian investment subsidy system and its implication for the energy efficiency directive (Aktuelle Trends in der dezentralen KWK Technologie Integration -- Das kalifornische Fordermodell und dessen Implikation fur die Endenergieeffizienzrichtlinie)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Treibstoffe kommen Erdgas, Biogas, Klärgas, Deponiegas,zum Teil verunreinigtem Biogas (Stadler et al. , 2006). Diekönnen mit Erdgas, Biogas oder Benzin betrieben werden.

Stadler, Michael; Lipman, Tim; Marnay, Chris

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "1989-2010 actual peakload" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


222

(This is a sample cover image for this issue. The actual cover is not yet available at this time.) This article appeared in a journal published by Elsevier. The attached  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

edge relative to the forest interior. Increased exposure to solar radiation and wind at forest edges for internal non-commercial research and education use, including for instruction at the authors institution

Malhi, Yadvinder

223

7-88 A geothermal power plant uses geothermal liquid water at 160C at a specified rate as the heat source. The actual and maximum possible thermal efficiencies and the rate of heat rejected from this power plant  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

7-31 7-88 A geothermal power plant uses geothermal liquid water at 160ÂşC at a specified rate and potential energy changes are zero. 3 Steam properties are used for geothermal water. Properties Using saturated liquid properties, the source and the sink state enthalpies of geothermal water are (Table A-4) k

Bahrami, Majid

224

ESS 2012 Peer Review - PV Plus Storage for Simultaneous Voltage Smoothing and Peak Shifting - Steve Willard, PNM  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Mexico (PNM) - Mexico (PNM) - PV Plus Storage for Simultaneous Voltage PV Plus Storage for Simultaneous Voltage Smoothing and Peak Shifting DOE Peer Review Steve Willard, P.E. September 26, 2012 Project Goals - Develop an even more Beneficial Renewable Resource - Transferable Nationwide Renewable Resource Transferable Nationwide *Created a dispatchable, renewables-based peaking resource *Combined PV and storage at a substation targeting 15% peak-load reduction D t ti bi ti th t i lt l iti t lt l l *Demonstrating a combination that can simultaneously mitigate voltage-level fluctuations as well as enable load shifting *Developed power system models (baseline and projected), and cost/benefit economic models eco o c ode s *Generating, collecting, analyzing and sharing resultant data *Enabling distributed solutions that reduce GHG emissions through the

225

ventyxReprint.indd  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

worldPower 2010 worldPower 2010 1 T he utility world has changed drastically in the last 10 years. New technologies like Smart Meters and fully functional Smart Grid concepts have made large inroads into the utility space and no one should want to be left behind. Utilities also face additional pressures from regulatory bodies who are continuing to encourage carbon reduction and greater customer flexibility. Utilities need to balance these new requirements with the financial obligations of providing reliable power (at a reasonable price) while attempting to meet shareholder expectations. Each of these goals are not necessarily complimentary, thus utilities need to determine how to address each one. Some of the ways utilities are addressing these concepts is through the rollout of dynamic pricing for reducing peak-load,

226

PacifiCorp Capacity Power Sale Contract Final Environmental Impact Statement (DOE/EIS-0171)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Statement (DOE/EIS-0171) Statement (DOE/EIS-0171) file:///I|/Data%20Migration%20Task/EIS-0171-FEIS-1994/01.htm[6/27/2011 10:47:34 AM] PacifiCorp Capacity Power Sale Contract Final Environmental Impact Statement (DOE/EIS-0171) Responsible Agency: U.S. Department of Energy, Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) Title of Proposed Action: PacifiCorp Capacity Power Sale Contract States and Provinces Involved: Washington, Oregon, Idaho, Montana, Wyoming, Utah, Colorado, New Mexico, California, Nevada, Arizona, British Columbia. Abstract: The Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) has surplus electrical capacity (peakload energy) that BPA projects will not be required to meet its existing obligations. Such obligations include those to meet the loads of firm power customers, pursuant to the Pacific Northwest Electric Power Planning and Conservation Act (Northwest Power

227

EIS-0171: Final Environmental Impact Statement | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

71: Final Environmental Impact Statement 71: Final Environmental Impact Statement EIS-0171: Final Environmental Impact Statement Bonneville Power Administration, PacifiCorp Capacity Power Sale Contract The Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) must respond to the need for power as represented by PacifiCorp's request for a continued supply of firm capacity. BPA has surplus electrical capacity (peakload energy) that BPA projects will not be required to meet its existing obligations. Such obligations include those to meet the loads of firm power customers, pursuant to the Pacific Northwest Electric Power Planning and Conservation Act (Northwest Power Act), and previously committed capacity contracts. DOE/EIS-0171, Bonneville Power Administration, PacifiCorp Capacity Power Sale Contract Final Environmental Impact Statement (1994)

228

PacifiCorp Capacity Power Sale Contract Final Environmental Impact Statement  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Statement Statement file:///I|/Data%20Migration%20Task/EIS-0171-FEIS-Summary-1994.htm[6/27/2011 10:42:49 AM] Summary PacifiCorp Capacity Sale Final Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) Purpose of and Need for the Action The Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) must respond to the need for power as represented by PacifiCorp's request for a continued supply of firm capacity. BPA has surplus electrical capacity (peakload energy) that BPA projects will not be required to meet its existing obligations. Such obligations include those to meet the loads of firm power customers, pursuant to the Pacific Northwest Electric Power Planning and Conservation Act (Northwest Power Act), and previously committed capacity contracts. BPA is authorized under the Northwest Power Act to sell system capacity and/or energy that is surplus to its needs,

229

Electric storage heating: the experience in England and Wales and in the Federal Republic of Germany  

SciTech Connect

Electric storage heating, a space-heating system for buildings, incorporates a resistively heated storage medium to store energy during off-peak hours for use during peak-load hours. The system, which is widely used in Europe, smooths the utility's daily load curve and retards the growth of the winter peak by displacing new space-heating loads into the off-peak ''valleys'' of the load curve. The most extensive application of this form of space heating has occurred in England and Wales and in the Federal Republic of Germany. This report reviews the policies, methods, and circumstances under which electric storage heating was commercialized in these two market regions, and provides background information for evaluating the feasibility of commercial applications in the United States.

Asbury, J.G.; Kouvalis, A.

1976-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

230

Unalaska geothermal exploration project. Electrical power generation analysis. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objective of this study was to determine the most cost-effective power cycle for utilizing the Makushin Volcano geothermal resource to generate electricity for the towns of Unalaska and Dutch Harbor. It is anticipated that the geothermal power plant would be intertied with a planned conventional power plant consisting of four 2.5 MW diesel-generators whose commercial operation is due to begin in 1987. Upon its completion in late 1988, the geothermal power plant would primarily fulfill base-load electrical power demand while the diesel-generators would provide peak-load electrical power and emergency power at times when the geothermal power plant would be partially or completely unavailable. This study compares the technical, environmental, and economic adequacy of five state-of-the-art geothermal power conversion processes. Options considered are single- and double-flash steam cycles, binary cycle, hybrid cycle, and total flow cycle.

Not Available

1984-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

231

GL Report BU 355 CRSP CONSOLIDATED BUDGET ACTIVITY REPORT RECAP  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

CONSOLIDATED BUDGET ACTIVITY REPORT RECAP JUNE 2013 ( IN THOUSANDS) FY 09 FY 10 FY 11 FY 12 FY 13 FY 13 REGION ACTUALS ACTUALS ACTUALS ACTUALS BUDGET ACTUALS ACTUAL TARGET O&M...

232

Word Pro - Untitled1  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

5 Emissions From Energy Consumption for Electricity Generation and Useful Thermal Output 5 Emissions From Energy Consumption for Electricity Generation and Useful Thermal Output Emissions by Type of Generating Unit, 2010 Emissions by Sector, 1989-2010 314 U.S. Energy Information Administration / Annual Energy Review 2011 5.0 (s) 0.2 0.2 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 Million Metric Tons of Gas Sulfur Dioxide Âą For carbon dioxide: municipal solid waste from non-biogenic sources; tire-derived fuel, and geothermal. For sulfur dioxide and nitrogen oxides: blast furnace gas, propane gas, and other manufactured and waste gases derived from fossil fuels; wood and wood-derived fuels; municipal solid waste, landfill gas, sludge waste, tires, agricultural byproducts, and other biomass; and chemicals, hydrogen, pitch, sulfur, and tar coal. 2 Includes Commercial Sector. (s)=Less than 0.05 million metric tons.

233

University | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

University University Dataset Summary Description Provides annual energy usage for years 1989 through 2010 for UT at Austin; specifically, electricity usage (kWh), natural gas usage (Mcf), associated costs. Also provides water consumption for 2005 through 2010. Source University of Texas (UT) at Austin, Utilities & Energy Management Date Released Unknown Date Updated Unknown Keywords Electricity Consumption Natural Gas Texas Unit Cost Electricity Unit Cost Natural Gas University Water Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon Energy and Water Use Data for UT-Austin (xls, 32.8 KiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Some Review Comment Assume data was reviewed by someone at UT-Austin prior to adding to website. Temporal and Spatial Coverage Frequency Annually Time Period 1989 - 2010

234

Long-term residential load forecasting. Final report  

SciTech Connect

The main objective of this study was to isolate and evaluate the importance of various factors, many of which are household characteristics and weather conditions, that determine the demand for electricity at different times of day. A second purpose was to investigate one of the factors in detail, namely, prices, which was feasible because half of the households in the sample were subjected to time-of-day pricing. Substantial differences between the load curves of the experimental and control groups were found. Households in the experimental group significantly decreased electricity usage when its price was high, the consumption being shifted partly into the early morning hours but more heavily into the evening. The importance of certain appliances in shifting the load curve is also clearly brought out. For example, households with a dishwasher or electric heating appeared to change the timing of use of these appliances under peak-load pricing. Other appliances were also important in determining the load curve for both groups. Swimming pool pumps and air conditioning, for instance, were important determinants in the summer, whereas in the winter, electric heating and dishwashers substantially increased consumption levels.

Granger, C.W.J.; Engle, R.F.; Ramanathan, R.; Andersen, A.

1978-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

235

The Base Load Fallacy and other Fallacies disseminated by Renewable Energy Deniers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abstract: The Base-Load Fallacy is the incorrect notion that renewable energy cannot supply base-load (24-hour) electric power. Alternatives to base-load coal power can be provided by efficient energy use, solar hot water, bioenergy, large-scale wind power, solar thermal electricity with thermal storage, and geothermal, with gas power playing a transitional role. In particular, large-scale wind power from geographically distributed sites is partially reliable and can be made more so by installing a little additional low-cost peak-load back-up from gas turbines. Other fallacies are refuted concisely in the appendix. 1 Opponents of renewable energy, from the coal and nuclear industries and from NIMBY (Not In My Backyard) groups, are disseminating the Base-Load Fallacy, that is, the fallacy that renewable energy cannot provide base-load (24-hour) power to substitute for coal-fired electricity. In Australia, even Government Ministers and some journalists are propagating this conventional ‘wisdom’, although it is false. This fallacy is the principal weapon of renewable energy deniers. Other fallacies are discussed briefly in the appendix. The political implications are that, if these fallacies become widely believed, renewable energy would always have to remain a niche market, rather than achieve its true potential of becoming a

Dr Mark Diesendorf

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

236

Solar thermal electricity in 1998: An IEA/SolarPACES summary of status and future prospects  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Research and development activities sponsored by countries within the International Energy Agency`s solar thermal working group. SolarPACES, have helped reduce the cost of solar thermal systems to one-fifth that of the early pilot plants. Continued technological improvements are currently being proven in next-generation demonstration plants. These advances, along with cost reductions made possible by scale-up to larger production and construction of a succession of power plants, have made solar thermal systems the lowest-cost solar energy in the world and promise cost-competitiveness with fossil-fuel plants in the future. Solar thermal technologies are appropriate for a wide range of applications, including dispatchable central-station power plants where they can meet peak-load to near-base-load needs of a utility, and distributed, modular power plants for both remote and grid-connected applications. In this paper, the authors present the collective position of the SolarPACES community on solar electricity-generating technology. They discuss the current status of the technology and likely near-term improvements; the needs of target markets; and important technical and financial issues that must be resolved for success in near-term global markets.

Tyner, C.E.; Kolb, G.J. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Meinecke, W. [Deutsches Zentrum fuer Luft- und Raumfahrt, Koeln (Germany); Trieb, F. [Deutsches Zentrum fuer Luft- und Raumfahrt, Stuttgart (Germany)

1998-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

237

Rehabilitation of notch damaged steel beam using a carbon fiber reinforced multiphase-matrix composite  

SciTech Connect

The retrofit of notch damaged steel beams is investigated via the experimental testing of nine wide-flange steel beam specimens and finite element simulation. Three notch configurations representing various damage levels were identified, and the beam specimens were retrofitted using CFRP laminates and a recently developed polymeric matrix composite - CarbonFlex - that exhibits superior energy dissipation and ductility properties, where the peak-load deflections were between 49.4% and 65.2% higher using the CarbonFlex-retrofitted beams. The results are attributed to the substantially higher damage tolerance capability of CarbonFlex than conventional CFRP. Finite element models were developed to investigate the damage processes and strain/ stress distributions near the notch tips. The numerical results match closely with the experimentally determined load-deflection curves and the strain fields obtained by the digital imaging correlations (DIC) system. Both experimental and numerical results clearly indicate the effectiveness of CarbonFlex, as a candidate retrofitting material, to retrofit damaged steel structures. Lastly, the micro-mechanisms by which CarbonFlex could sufficiently sustain a significant amount of the peak strength at large displacement ductility values are discussed with the aid of scanning electron microscopy (SEM) pictures.

Zhou, HongYu [Arizona State University; Attard, Dr. Thomas L. [Arizona State University; Wang, Yanli [ORNL; Wang, Jy-An John [ORNL; Ren, Fei [ORNL

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

238

Projected Benefits of New Residential Evaporative Cooling Systems: Progress Report #2  

SciTech Connect

The use of conventional evaporative cooling has rapidly declined in the United States despite the fact that it has high potential for energy savings in dry climates. Evaporative systems are very competitive in terms of first cost and provide significant reductions in operating energy use, as well as peak-load reduction benefits. Significant market barriers still remain and can be addressed through improved systems integration. This report investigates the first of these approaches, exploring innovative components. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Building America research teams are investigating the use of two promising new pieces of residential cooling equipment that employ evaporative cooling as a part of their system design. The OASys unit, which is a combination of direct and indirect evaporative cooling stages developed by Davis Energy Group (DEG) and manufactured by Speakman CRS, is used to ultimately provide outside air to the living space. The outdoor air provided is indirectly and directly evaporatively cooled in two stages to a condition that can be below the wet-bulb (wb) temperature of the outside air, thus outperforming a conventional single-stage direct evaporative cooler.

Kutscher, C.; Eastment, M.; Hancock, E.; Reeves, P.

2006-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

239

Choose best option for enhancing combined-cycle output  

SciTech Connect

This article describes several methods available for boosting the output of gas-turbine-based combined-cycle plants during warm-weather operation. The technology comparisons help choose the option that is most appropriate. Amidst the many advantages of gas-turbine (GT) combined cycles (CC), one drawback is that their achievable output decreases significantly as ambient temperature increases. Reason: The lower density of warm air reduces mass flow through the GT. Unfortunately, hot weather typically corresponds to peak power loads in many areas. Thus, the need to meet peak-load and power-sales contract requirements causes many plant developers to compensate for ambient-temperature-related output loss. The three most common methods of increasing output include: (1) injecting water or steam into the GT, (2) precooling GT inlet air, and/or (3) supplementary firing of the heat-recovery steam generator (HRSG). All of these options require significant capital outlays and affect other performance parameters. In addition, they may uniquely impact the operation and/or selection of other components, including boiler feedwater and condensate pumps, valves, steam turbine/generators, condensers, cooling towers, and emissions control systems. Although plant-specific issues will have a significant effect on selecting an option, comparing the performance of different systems based on a theoretical reference plant can be helpful. The comparisons here illustrate the characteristics, advantages, and disadvantages of the major power augmentation technologies now in use.

Boswell, M.; Tawney, R.; Narula, R.

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

240

CS 302 Data Structures Spring 2013  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Completed Milestone Planned Actual Assignment received. Requirements understood; detailed specification

Gunes, Mehmet Hadi

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "1989-2010 actual peakload" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

The Relation between Lean Construction and Performance in the Korean Construction Industry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1.Project cost growth = (Actual total project cost – Initialpredicted project cost)/Initialpredicted project cost. 2.Project budget factor = Actual

Cho, Seongkyun

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

242

Word Pro - Untitled1  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

7 7 Table 11.5c Emissions From Energy Consumption for Electricity Generation and Useful Thermal Output: Commercial and Industrial Sectors, 1989-2010 (Subset of Table 11.5a; Thousand Metric Tons of Gas) Year Carbon Dioxide 1 Sulfur Dioxide Nitrogen Oxides Coal 2 Natural Gas 3 Petroleum 4 Geo- thermal 5 Non- Biomass Waste 6 Total Coal 2 Natural Gas 3 Petroleum 4 Other 7 Total Coal 2 Natural Gas 3 Petroleum 4 Other 7 Total Commercial Sector 8 1989 2,320 1,542 637 - 804 5,303 37 (s) 5 1 43 9 3 2 3 17 1990 2,418 2,294 706 - 959 6,377 39 (s) 4 1 45 10 6 1 4 21 1991 2,680 2,287 544 - 1,014 6,526 32 (s) 3 1 35 10 6 1 4 21 1992 2,552 2,787 474 - 1,258 7,070 32 (s) 3 1 35 10 7 1 4 21 1993 2,988 3,315 616 - 1,285 8,205 40 (s) 3 1 44 12 7 1 4 24 1994 2,932 3,722 654 - 1,292 8,601 39 (s) 3 (s) 42 11 8 1 4 24 1995 3,106 4,070 509 -

243

Word Pro - Untitled1  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

5 5 Table 11.5a Emissions From Energy Consumption for Electricity Generation and Useful Thermal Output: Total (All Sectors), 1989-2010 (Sum of Tables 11.5b and 11.5c; Thousand Metric Tons of Gas) Year Carbon Dioxide 1 Sulfur Dioxide Nitrogen Oxides Coal 2 Natural Gas 3 Petroleum 4 Geo- thermal 5 Non- Biomass Waste 6 Total Coal 2 Natural Gas 3 Petroleum 4 Other 7 Total Coal 2 Natural Gas 3 Petroleum 4 Other 7 Total 1989 1,573,566 218,384 145,399 363 5,590 1,943,302 14,469 1 984 39 15,493 7,281 495 269 93 8,136 1990 1,592,395 233,852 119,580 384 7,488 1,953,699 14,281 1 937 243 15,462 7,119 513 208 122 7,961 1991 1,592,186 238,084 111,351 398 8,447 1,950,466 14,240 1 856 246 15,342 7,109 498 193 113 7,913 1992 1,617,034 248,149 96,638 400 10,053 1,972,275 14,060 1 704 264 15,030 6,975 477 158 119 7,728 1993 1,687,623 250,411

244

Word Pro - Untitled1  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

8 Photovoltaic Cell and Module Shipments, Trade, and Prices 8 Photovoltaic Cell and Module Shipments, Trade, and Prices Number of U.S. Companies Reporting Shipments, 1982-2010 Total Shipments, 1982-2010 Trade, Modules Only, 1996-2010 Prices, 1989-2010 296 U.S. Energy Information Administration / Annual Energy Review 2011 1 Prices are not adjusted for inflation. See "Nominal Dollars" in Glossary. Note: Shipments are for domestic and export shipments, and may include imports that subsequently were shipped to domestic or foreign customers. Source: Table 10.8. 19 18 23 15 17 17 14 17 19 23 21 19 22 24 25 21 21 19 21 19 19 20 19 29 41 46 66 101 112 1982 1987 1992 1997 2002 2007 0 20 40 60 80 100 120 Number Cells and Modules Imports 1985 1990 1995 2000 2005 2010 0 500 1,000 1,500 2,000 2,500 3,000 Thousand Peak Kilowatts Modules Only Modules 1996 1998 2000 2002 2004

245

Word Pro - Untitled1  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

16 16 U.S. Energy Information Administration / Annual Energy Review 2011 Table 11.5b Emissions From Energy Consumption for Electricity Generation and Useful Thermal Output: Electric Power Sector, 1989-2010 (Subset of Table 11.5a; Thousand Metric Tons of Gas) Year Carbon Dioxide 1 Sulfur Dioxide Nitrogen Oxides Coal 2 Natural Gas 3 Petroleum 4 Geo- thermal 5 Non- Biomass Waste 6 Total Coal 2 Natural Gas 3 Petroleum 4 Other 7 Total Coal 2 Natural Gas 3 Petroleum 4 Other 7 Total 1989 1,520,230 169,653 133,546 363 4,366 1,828,158 13,815 1 810 7 14,633 7,055 390 246 25 7,717 1990 1,534,141 177,232 101,800 384 5,795 1,819,351 13,576 1 628 13 14,218 6,878 390 175 36 7,480 1991 1,534,559 180,541 95,149 398 7,207 1,817,854 13,590 1 621 15 14,227 6,886 384 165 42 7,476 1992 1,556,741 187,730 79,153 400 8,476 1,832,501

246

CRSP CASH PROJECTIONS  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

CASH PROJECTIONS CASH PROJECTIONS FY 2012-FY 2014 ($ IN THOUSANDS) KEY: = more than $70 million = less than $70 million more than $35 million = less than $35 million ACTUAL FORECAST ACTUAL ACTUAL ACTUAL ACTUAL ACTUAL ACTUAL ACTUAL ACTUAL ACTUAL ACTUAL ACTUAL FORECAST ACTUAL ACTUAL FORECAST FORECAST FY 2012 FY 2013 OCT 2012 NOV 2012 DEC 2012 JAN 2013 FEB 2013 MAR 2013 APR 2013 MAY 2013 JUN 2013 JUL 2013 AUG 2013 SEP 2013 SEP 2013 FY 2013 FY 2014 FY 2015 Note REVENUES Firm 141,638 $ 150,984 $ 9,356 $ 14,951 $ 15,015 $ 13,131 $ 12,470 $ 11,088 $ 11,817 $ 11,754 $ 12,954 $ 19,737 $ 13,914 $ 12,582 $ 10,652 $ 156,839 $ 152,591 $ 164,182 $ a WRP 32,170 $ 62,774 $ 755 $ 2,418

247

Annual Energy Outlook Forecast Evaluation - Tables  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Annual Energy Outlook Forecast Evaluation Table 2. Total Energy Consumption, Actual vs. Forecasts Table 3. Total Petroleum Consumption, Actual vs. Forecasts Table 4. Total Natural Gas Consumption, Actual vs. Forecasts Table 5. Total Coal Consumption, Actual vs. Forecasts Table 6. Total Electricity Sales, Actual vs. Forecasts Table 7. Crude Oil Production, Actual vs. Forecasts Table 8. Natural Gas Production, Actual vs. Forecasts Table 9. Coal Production, Actual vs. Forecasts Table 10. Net Petroleum Imports, Actual vs. Forecasts Table 11. Net Natural Gas Imports, Actual vs. Forecasts Table 12. Net Coal Exports, Actual vs. Forecasts Table 13. World Oil Prices, Actual vs. Forecasts Table 14. Natural Gas Wellhead Prices, Actual vs. Forecasts Table 15. Coal Prices to Electric Utilities, Actual vs. Forecasts

248

Technical and economic assessment of fluidized-bed-augmented compressed-air energy-storage system: system load following capability  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The load-following capability of fluidized bed combustion-augmented compressed air energy storage systems was evaluated. The results are presented in two parts. The first part is an Executive Summary which provides a concise overview of all major elements of the study including the conclusions, and, second, a detailed technical report describing the part-load and load following capability of both the pressurized fluid bed combustor and the entire pressurized fluid bed combustor/compressed air energy storage system. The specific tasks in this investigation were to: define the steady-state, part-load operation of the CAES open-bed PFBC; estimate the steady-state, part-load performance of the PFBC/CAES system and evaluate any possible operational constraints; simulate the performance of the PFBC/CAES system during transient operation and assess the load following capability of the system; and establish a start-up procedure for the open-bed PFBC and evaluate the impact of this procedure. The conclusions are encouraging and indicate that the open-bed PFBC/CAES power plant should provide good part-load and transient performance, and should have no major equipment-related constraints, specifically, no major problems associated with the performance or design of either the open-end PFBC or the PFBC/CAES power plant in steady-state, part-load operation are envisioned. The open-bed PFBC/CAES power plant would have a load following capability which would be responsive to electric utility requirements for a peak-load power plant. The open-bed PFBC could be brought to full operating conditions within 15 min after routine shutdown, by employing a hot-start mode of operation. The PFBC/CAES system would be capable of rapid changes in output power (12% of design load per minute) over a wide output power range (25% to 100% of design output). (LCL)

Lessard, R.D.; Blecher, W.A.; Merrick, D.

1981-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

249

Market Structure and Competition: A Cross-Market Analysis of U.S. Electricity Deregulation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Cournot Cournot n.v.a. PJM Actual Competitive CournotCournot Cournot n.v.a. PJM Actual Competitive CournotCournot Cournot n.v.a. PJM Actual Competitive Cournot

Bushnell, James; Mansur, Erin T.; Saravia, Celeste

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

250

Reducing the Environmental Footprint and Economic Costs of Automotive Manufacturing through an Alternative Energy Supply  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

where W: actual output of the solar power plant, in kw ?:actual output of the 1 Mw solar power plant based on the GEthe actual output of the solar power plant corresponds to

Yuan, Chris; Dornfeld, David

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

251

Learning from Consumers: Plug-In Hybrid Electric Vehicle (PHEV) Demonstration and Consumer Education, Outreach, and Market Research Program  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

electricity and actual electricity demand to recharge PHEVs.the Project households, electricity demand to recharge theirAs with weekday electricity demand, most actual weekend

Kurani, Kenneth S; Axsen, Jonn; Caperello, Nicolette; Davies, Jamie; Stillwater, Tai

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

252

Estimating carbon dioxide emissions factors for the California electric power sector  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

42 Input actual hydroelectricity production forto replace the loss of hydroelectricity (Table 9). Table 12.years. 3. Input actual hydroelectricity production for 1990

Marnay, Chris; Fisher, Diane; Murtishaw, Scott; Phadke, Amol; Price, Lynn; Sathaye, Jayant

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

253

Solar Adoption and Energy Consumption in the Residential Sector  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

meteorological year (TMY) solar radiation data. The goaleither TMY or actual solar radiation data, and thus servesmodeling (using actual solar radiation data, though this

McAllister, Joseph Andrew

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

254

Energy Factors, Leasing Structure and the Market Price of Office Buildings in the U.S.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

annual benchmarks for energy usage levels across propertythe actual and predicted energy usage of the building usingof the tenant’s actual energy usage. For this reason, modi?

Jaffee, Dwight M.; Stanton, Richard; Wallace, Nancy E.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

255

C:\\WEBSHARE\\WWWROOT\\forecastactuals\\tables2_18.wpd  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Tables 2 through 18 Table 2. Total Energy Consumption, Actual vs. Forecasts Table 3. Total Petroleum Consumption, Actual vs. Forecasts Table 4. Total Natural Gas Consumption,...

256

Essays on Environmental and Resource Economics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the actual market price of the light bulbs. This informationknow the actual market price of the light bulbs if asked. 35

Toledo, Chantal Nathalie

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

257

Data:A9f5a7a9-4010-4108-8c32-46d8907ea320 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

to applicable power factor adjustments. Transmission: Actual cost based on the load ratio of MMU's transmission cost Power Supply: Actual cost based on the load ratio of MMU's...

258

Data:D66e52cb-5db4-494a-9521-4f75bfc6f073 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

the following charges apply for: Transmission: Actual cost based on the load ratio of MMU's transmission cost. Power Supply: Actual cost based on the load ratio of MMU's...

259

Data:Bd65361b-37c1-4cff-846f-195d789607da | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

the following charges apply for: Transmission: Actual cost based on the load ratio of MMU's transmission cost. Power Supply: Actual cost based on the load ratio of MMU's...

260

Word Pro - Untitled1  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

9 9 Table 10.9 Photovoltaic Cell and Module Shipments by Sector and End Use, 1989-2010 (Peak Kilowatts 1 ) Year By Sector By End Use Total Residential Commercial 3 Industrial 4 Electric Power 5 Other 6 Grid-Connected 2 Off-Grid 2 Centralized 7 Distributed 8 Domestic 9 Non-Domestic 10 Total Shipments of Photovoltaic Cells and Modules 11 1989 1,439 R 6,057 3,993 785 551 12 ( ) 12 1,251 2,620 8,954 12,825 1990 1,701 R 8,062 2,817 826 432 12 ( ) 12 469 3,097 10,271 13,837 1991 3,624 R 5,715 3,947 1,275 377 12 ( ) 12 856 3,594 10,489 14,939 1992 4,154 R 5,122 4,279 1,553 477 12 ( ) 12 1,227 4,238 10,118 15,583 1993 5,237 R 8,004 5,352 1,503 856 12 ( ) 12 1,096 5,761 14,094 20,951 1994 6,632 R 9,717 6,855 2,364 510 12 ( ) 12 2,296 9,253 14,528 26,077 1995 6,272 R 12,483 7,198 3,759 1,347 12 ( ) 12 4,585 8,233 18,241 31,059 1996 8,475 R 12,297 8,300 4,753

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "1989-2010 actual peakload" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Strategies for energy benchmarking in cleanrooms and laboratory-type facilities  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

benchmark by the actual energy consumption (Figure 4). The effectiveness metrics from multiple buildings

Sartor, Dale; Piette, Mary Ann; Tschudi, William; Fok, Stephen

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

262

Printed in the United States of America. Available from National Technical Information Service  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of your current estimated navigational performance, also referred to as actual navigation performance (ANP

Oak Ridge National Laboratory

263

1) Ullage Protection Ownership Cost for KC-130J: Explosion ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... polyether polyurethane, explosion suppressant charcoal colored, Type IV ... personnel; witnessed maintenance activities; incorporated actual hours 5 ...

2011-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

264

SECTION 1.2 Refinement for Fault-Tolerance  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the protocol actually was first obtained. The formal methods we use are not particularly esoteric nor

Schneider, Fred B.

265

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) - Sector  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2. Summary of number of over-estimated results between AEO Reference 2. Summary of number of over-estimated results between AEO Reference cases and realized outcomes All AEOs NEMS AEOs Percent of Projections Over-Estimated Percent of Projections Over-Estimated Table 3. Gross Domestic Product (Average Cumulative Growth), Actual vs. Projected 24% 37% Table 4. World Oil Prices, Actual vs. Projected 52% 24% Table 5. Total Petroleum Consumption, Actual vs. Projected 44% 61% Table 6. Domestic Crude Oil Production, Actual vs. Projected 59% 65% Table 7. Petroleum Net Imports, Actual vs. Projected 56% 61% Table 8. Natural Gas Wellhead Prices, Actual vs. Projected 54% 23% Table 9. Total Natural Gas Consumption, Actual vs. Projected 49% 70% Table 10. Natural Gas Production, Actual vs. Projected 56% 71% Table 11. Natural Gas Net Imports, Actual vs. Projected 45% 64%

266

Annual Energy Outlook Retrospective Review: Evaluation of Projections in Past Editions (1982-2006)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

5 5 Table 1. Summary of Differences between AEO Reference Cases and Realized Outcomes Percent Over- Estimated Average Absolute Percent Difference Percent Over- Estimated Average Absolute Percent Difference Table 3. Gross Domestic Product, Actual vs. Forecasts 34% 5.5% 18% 4.5% Table 4. World Oil Prices, Actual vs. Forecasts 68% 52.9% 36% 20.8% Table 5. Total Petroleum Consumption, Actual vs. Forecasts 31% 2.9% 44% 1.8% Table 6. Domestic Crude Oil Production, Actual vs. Forecasts 51% 4.9% 53% 5.2% Table 7. Petroleum Net Imports, Actual vs. Forecasts 49% 6.4% 51% 3.6% Table 8. Natural Gas Wellhead Prices, Actual vs. Forecasts 61% 63.5% 23% 28.9% Table 9. Total Natural Gas Consumption, Actual vs. Forecasts 38% 6.7% 59% 5.6% Table 10. Natural Gas Production, Actual vs. Forecasts 51% 5.5% 70% 5.8%

267

March  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Table 2. Table 2. Summary of Differences between AEO Reference Cases and Realized Outcomes Percent of Projections Over- Estimated Average Absolute Percent Difference Percent of Projections Over- Estimated Average Absolute Percent Difference Table 3. Gross Domestic Product, Actual vs. Projected 41% 1.0% 51% 1.0% Table 4. World Oil Prices, Actual vs. Projected 55% 51.1% 26% 30.6% Table 5. Total Petroleum Consumption, Actual vs. Projected 40% 3.3% 56% 3.0% Table 6. Domestic Crude Oil Production, Actual vs. Projected 58% 5.8% 64% 6.5% Table 7. Petroleum Net Imports, Actual vs. Projected 53% 6.5% 57% 4.7% Table 8. Natural Gas Wellhead Prices, Actual vs. Projected 53% 57.6% 18% 32.7% Table 9. Total Natural Gas Consumption, Actual vs. Projected 47% 7.1% 68% 7.0% Table 10. Natural Gas Production, Actual vs. Projected

268

JGI - Statistics  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Statistics Statistics FY 2014 Overall Sequencing Progress, Updated Quarterly Quarter Total Bases (trillions) Operating Hours Goal Actual Total* Actual % of Goal Goal (hours)** Actual Total Actual % Goal Q1 2014 15,000 18.827 126% 2,164 2208 102% Q2 2014 17,000 2,117 Q3 2014 18,000 2,140 Q4 2014 18,000 2,164 FY 2014 Total 68,000 18.827 28% 8,585 2208 26% * Includes Illumina HiSeq, MiSeq and PacBio sequencing platforms. ** Operating Hour target is based on 98% of the total available hours. FY 2013 Overall Sequencing Progress, Updated Quarterly Quarter Total Bases (Billions) Operating Hours Goal Actual Total* Actual % of Goal Goal (hours)** Actual Total Actual % Goal Q1 2013 15,000 20,004 133% 2,164 2,208 102%

269

San Francisco's Public School Facilities as Public Assets: A Shared Understanding and Policy Recommendations for the Community Use of Schools  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

per year and the cost per square foot per hour using actualJoint Use Cost = (Cost per square foot per hour) X (Totalhours) to determine cost per square foot per hour. Actual

Vincent, Jeffrey M; Filardo, Mary; Klein, Jordan; McKoy, Deborah L

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

270

Solar Adoption and Energy Consumption in the Residential Sector  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

actual solar radiation and other necessary weather dataSolar 71 Table 5.2. 10x10km Weathersolar energy is actually generated; this makes intuitive sense as edge effects such as shading and weather

McAllister, Joseph Andrew

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

271

EM RCA CAP Performance 2013-07-08.xlsx  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Root Cause Analysis Corrective Action Plan Performance Performance Measure Target or Actual FY 2010 FY 2011 FY 2012 FY 2013 Target 85% 90% 90% 90% Actual *Forecast NA 0 of 1...

272

Impact of Energy Imbalance Tariff on Wind Energy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper summarizes the results of a study that uses actual wind power data and actual energy prices to analyze the impact of an energy imbalance tariff imposed by the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission on wind power.

Wan, Y.; Milligan, M.; Kirby, B.

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

273

Strategies for cost reduction in procuring trucking services  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis analyzed truckload shipment transactions from 2006 to 2008 in order to compare planned procurement activity to actual procurement activity. The research specifically focused on three costs: Primary, Actual and ...

Castro Izaguirre, Carlo Gustavo

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

274

The Particle Adventure  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Discovery of the Higgs Boson > An example of an actual event... An example of an actual event with a possible Higgs decay In this event, a Higgs boson may have been produced and...

275

A conceptual framework to energy estimation in buildings using agent based modeling  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Actual energy consumption in buildings is typically different from predictions during the design phase. While differences in occupant energy usage characteristics play an important role in this variation, actual energy estimation software do not account ...

Elie Azar; Carol Menassa

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

276

NEXT\tCALL 2013\tProposal\tCall\t#1 TASK\tPLAN TASK\tPLAN TASK\tENDS...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

NEXT CALL 2013 Proposal Call 1 TASK PLAN TASK PLAN TASK ENDS CYCLE TIME CYCLE TIME CYCLE TIME CYCLE TIME ACTUAL CURRENT SUBMISSIONS TASKS (START DATE) (END DATE) (ACTUAL DATE)...

277

Share Repurchases and Managerial Opportunism  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

David Yermack, Taking Stock: Equity-Based Compensation andassessment of the stock’s actual value, taking into accountassessment of the stock’s actual value, taking into account

Fried, Jesse M.

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

278

October 30, 2008, Visiting Speakers Program - Companion Book...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Transportation LOPC Count 0 10 20 30 40 50 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 Highly Hazardous LOPCs Actual Hazmat LOPCs Actual Hazmat LOPCs Year to Date...

279

GL Report BU 355  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

MC MC BUDGET ACTIVITY REPORT ($ IN THOUSANDS) CRSP MC CRSP MC BUDGET BUDGET FY 09 FY 10 FY 11 FY 12 FY 13 TOTAL DESCRIPTION ACTIVITY ACTUAL ACTUAL ACTUAL ACTUAL BUDGET OBS EXPEND OBS OCT NOV DEC JAN FEB MAR APR MAY JUN JUL AUG SEP O&M N/FLCR ANLVM 100 $ - $ 539 $ 354 $ - $ - $ - $ - $ - $ - $ - $ - $ - $ - $ - $ - $ - $ - $ - $ - $ Power Billing N/FLCR BILLM - $ - $ - $ - $ - $ - $ - $ - $ - $ - $ - $ - $ - $ - $ - $ - $ - $ - $ - $ - $ Conserv & Renew Energy N/FLCR CAREM 159 $ 118

280

An Exact Solution to the Transistor Sizing Problem for CMOS Circuits Using Convex Optimization  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, but is not realistic, since actual signals have nonzero rise or fall times. Hedenstierna and Jeppson 4 have developed

Sapatnekar, Sachin

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "1989-2010 actual peakload" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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281

Application to the 2011-2012 Judgeship of the University of Chicago Scavenger Hunt  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

choice. (a) Kung Fu Brute? (b) Porn 'stache. Must contain actual porn. (c) Hourly Turnips. (d) Handcuff

Sosnick, Tobin R.

282

Improved Antifoam Agents for SRS  

Demonstrate antifoam effectiveness in actual waste testing ... Final Report: Illinois Institute ... The antifoam agent was not impacted by the ...

283

CONSULTANT REPORT SEPTEMBER 2011  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. It may be actually higher What's the Stip percentage? Finance Board- way less than 1% Capp- We won

284

Validating the Estimated Cost of Saving Water Through Infrastructure Rehabilitation in the Texas Lower Rio Grande Valley (Hidalgo County Irrigation District No. 1)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A Case Study Using Actual Construction Costs for the Curry Main Pipeline Project, Hidalgo County Irrigation District No. 1 (Edinburg)

Lacewell, R. D.; Rister, M.; Sturdivant, A. W.

2005-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

285

An Assessment of the Near-Term Costs of Hydrogen Refueling Stations and Station Components  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the literature provides cost estimates of actual stations.Hydrogen Supply: Cost Estimate for Hydrogen Pathways -COST ESTIMATES.

Lipman, T E; Weinert, Jonathan X.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

286

DRAFT  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

context of emergency response planning and actual emergencies. SANCTIONS . ... response, including the time of reviewing instructions, searching

287

DRAFT - Energy Information Administration  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

the context of emergency response planning and actual emergencies. The data collected on Form EIA-817, “Monthly Tanker and

288

Sentential Logic for Psychologists Richard Grandy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

) that a normal person can actually come to enjoy logic. It looks like logic is about formulas in some esoteric

Osherson, Daniel

289

16 18 20 22 Federation of Bosnia  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. It may be actually higher What's the Stip percentage? Finance Board- way less than 1% Capp- We won

290

A Strong Preemptive Relaxation for Weighted Tardiness and ...  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

May 12, 2013 ... Introduction The prevalence of actual manufacturing environments where a ..... observe that “additive objective functions pose a computational ...

291

Master of Science Thesis Stockholm, Sweden 2005  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of total expenditures in the actual experiment. Under a flat rate tarrif, however, these three users would

Maguire Jr., Gerald Q.

292

REFERENCES AND BIBLIOGRAPHY Report #21 in the series: The Annualized Social Cost of Motor-Vehicle Use in  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of total expenditures in the actual experiment. Under a flat rate tarrif, however, these three users would

Delucchi, Mark

293

Behavioral Perspectives on Home Energy Audits: The Role of Auditors, Labels, Reports, and Audit Tools on Homeowner Decision Making  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Loads  and  Appliance   Energy  Usage  Profiles  for  use  Energy  Usage  .  345  reliably  predict  actual  energy  usage.  However,  these  

Ingle, Aaron

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

294

6.4.3.6. Example of Triple Exponential Smoothing  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... data with triple exponential forecasts, Actual Time Series with forecasts. Comparison of MSE's, Comparison of MSE's. MSE, demand, trend, seasonality ...

2012-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

295

Cognitive Approach To e-Learning  

troubleshooting procedures, which helps prepare learners for actual on-the-job experiences and responsibilities. Because the complex interactions are ...

296

Law, Sustainability, and the Pursuit of Happiness  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of the steps needed for sustainability can actually improvesatisfaction. Thus, sustainability for society and theSustainability.

Farber, Daniel A.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

297

EIA-817 MONTHLY TANKER AND BARGE MOVEMENTS REPORT INSTRUCTIONS  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

the context of emergency response planning and actual emergencies. The data collected on Form EIA-817, “Monthly Tanker and

298

Japan's Residential Energy Demand Outlook to 2030 Considering Energy Efficiency Standards "Top-Runner Approach"  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Electricity and Natural Gas Demand in Japanese ResidentialWater Heating Natural Gas Demand Mtoe Actual Projection Mtoe

Komiyama, Ryoichi

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

299

Recovery Act Measurement Science and Engineering ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... performance measures of emerging building energy technologies (ie, actual ... applications in metrology, including the optimization of measurement ...

2010-10-05T23:59:59.000Z

300

8 Management Plan 8.1.1 Introduction  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

density dependence. The use of the acoustic tag tracking data to assess actual mortality of these fish may

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301

Semiannual Program Review1 Use this checklist and the Guide for the Care and Use of Laboratory Animals, (1996 edition)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and Macroenvironment YN?X Has consideration been given to the actual environment surrounding the animal as opposed

Bandettini, Peter A.

302

Dr. Daniel Siderius  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Adsorbent materials have a wide range of actual and potential application, including gas storage, carbon capture, mitigation of environmental ...

2013-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

303

Entering a New Phase for Classifying Matter - Materials Technology ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Dec 26, 2012 ... ESTABLISHED MATERIALS TECHNOLOGIES - - - - - - - - - - - - -. MT@TMS FAQs ... Forget solid, liquid, and gas. There are actually more than ...

304

Designing PV Incentive Programs to Promote System Performance: A Review of Current Practice  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Program Washington Renewable Energy Production Incentivesfor Renewable Energy October 2006 actual energy productionrenewable energy credits (RECs) through energy production-

Barbose, Galen; Wiser, Ryan; Bolinger, Mark

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

305

Process Improvements  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... They are customer order-driven production schedules based on actual demand and consumption rather than forecasting. ...

2012-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

306

Review and comparison of web- and disk-based tools for residential energy analysis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

utilities version of tool and test home's zip code • Initialto Bryan Texas Utilities. Set zip code to actual zip when

Mills, Evan

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

307

Electric Power Annual - Energy Information Administration  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Table 8.6.A. Noncoincident Peak Load by North American Electric Reliability Corporation Assessment Area, 2001 - 2011, Actual

308

Characterization of Current Production AOD+ESR Alloy 625 Plate  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

corrosion resistance are bubble caps, reaction vessels, distillation columns ..... Actual and Simulated Gas Turbine Environments”, Materials and Manufacturing.

309

Validated 140-1 and 140-2 Cryptographic Modules  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... provides an IT automation framework allowing IT ... Juniper Networks integrated security devices address the ... specifies the actual distribution tar file ...

2013-11-08T23:59:59.000Z

310

Annual Energy Outlook Retrospective Review - Energy ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

... historical values and percent differences between projected and actual for all years available. ... change from one year's ... was always ...

311

U.S. Energy Information Administration | Annual Energy Outlook Retrospective Review  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Energy Information Administration | Annual Energy Outlook Retrospective Review Energy Information Administration | Annual Energy Outlook Retrospective Review Annual Energy Outlook Retrospective Review Table 2. Summary of the number o fover-estimated results between AEO Reference cases and realized Outcomes All AEOs NEMS AEOs Percent of Projections Over-Estimated Percent of Projections Over-Estimated Table 3. Gross Domestic Product, (Average Cumulative Growth) Actual vs. Projected 24% 37% Table 4. World Oil Prices, Actual vs. Projected 52% 24% Table 5. Total Petroleum Consumption, Actual vs. Projected 44% 61% Table 6. Domestic Crude Oil Production, Actual vs. Projected 59% 65% Table 7. Petroleum Net Imports, Actual vs. Projected 56% 61% Table 8. Natural Gas Wellhead Prices, Actual vs. Projected 54% 23% Table 9. Total Natural Gas Consumption, Actual vs. Projected

312

Book3  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Function Competed Function Competed Type of Competition Total Estimated Savings (As reported to Congress in past 647 reports) Total Performance Period (in years) Actual Phase-In Completion Date (MM/DD/YYYY) Actual Accrued Savings FY 2002 Actual Accrued Savings FY 2003 Actual Accrued Savings FY 2004 Actual Accrued Savings FY 2005 Total Actual Accrued Savings Pd Over Which Actual Savings Accrued (In Years) Savings Methodology:C alculation/ Proxy Quantifiable Description of Imporvements in Service or Performance (if appropriate) DOE Civil Rights Streamlined cost comparison (old circular) 1.500 5 9/1/2003 0.920 0.575 1.495 2 Calculation DOE National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) Logistics Streamlined competition with MEO 6.000 5 9/30/2004 2.100 2.100 1 Calculation 7.500 3.595 DOE Graphics

313

Sustainable Energy Solutions Task 5.1: Expand the Number of Faculty Working in Wind Energy: Wind Energy Storage  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

EXECUTIVE SUMARRY Energy storage to reduce peak-load demands on utilities is emerging as an important way to address the intermittency of renewable energy resources. Wind energy produced in the middle of the night may be wasted unless it can be stored, and conversely, solar energy production could be used after the sun goes down if we had an efficient way to store it. It is uses an electrochemical process to convert hydrogen gas into electricity. The role of fuel cells in energy storage is a very important criteria and it is compared with regular batteries for the advantages of fuel cells over the latter. For this reason fuel cells can be employed. PEM fuel cells can be effectively used for this reason. But the performance and durability of PEM fuel cells are significantly affected by the various components used in a PEM cell. Several parameters affect the performance and durability of fuel cells. They are water management, degradation of components, cell contamination, reactant starvation and thermal management. Water management is the parameter which plays a major role in the performance of a fuel cell. Based on the reviews, improvement of condensation on the cathode side of a fuel cell is expected to improve the performance of the fuel cell by reducing cathode flooding. Microchannels and minichannels can enhance condensation on the cathode side of a fuel cell. Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) analysis was performed to evaluate and compare the condensation of steam in mini and microchannels with hydraulic diameter of 2mm, 2.66mm, 200µm and 266µm respectively. The simulation was run at various mass flux values ranging from 0.5 kg/m2s and 4 kg/m2s. The length of the mini and microchannels were in the range of 20 mm to 100 mm. CFD software’s GAMBIT and FLUENT were used for simulating the condensation process through the mini and microchannels. Steam flowed through the channels, whose walls were cooled by natural convection of air at room temperature. The outlet temperature of the condensate was in the range of 25oC to 90oC. The condensation process in minichannels was observed to be different from that in microchannels. It was found that the outlet temperature of the condensate decreased as the diameter of the channel decreased. It was also evident that the increase in length of the channel further decreased the outlet temperature of the condensate and subsequently the condensation heat flux. The investigation also showed that the pressure drop along the channel length increased with decreasing hydraulic diameter and length of the mini and micro channel. Conversely, the pressure drop along the channel increased with increasing inlet velocity of the stream. It was then suggested to use microchannels on the cathode section of a fuel cell for improved condensation.

Janet M Twomey, PhD

2010-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

314

Task 5.1: Expand the Number of Faculty Working in Wind Energy: Wind Energy Storage  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Energy storage to reduce peak-load demands on utilities is emerging as an important way to address the intermittency of renewable energy resources. Wind energy produced in the middle of the night may be wasted unless it can be stored, and conversely, solar energy production could be used after the sun goes down if we had an efficient way to store it. It is uses an electrochemical process to convert hydrogen gas into electricity. The role of fuel cells in energy storage is a very important criteria and it is compared with regular batteries for the advantages of fuel cells over the latter. For this reason fuel cells can be employed. PEM fuel cells can be effectively used for this reason. But the performance and durability of PEM fuel cells are significantly affected by the various components used in a PEM cell. Several parameters affect the performance and durability of fuel cells. They are water management, degradation of components, cell contamination, reactant starvation and thermal management. Water management is the parameter which plays a major role in the performance of a fuel cell. Based on the reviews, improvement of condensation on the cathode side of a fuel cell is expected to improve the performance of the fuel cell by reducing cathode flooding. Microchannels and minichannels can enhance condensation on the cathode side of a fuel cell. Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) analysis was performed to evaluate and compare the condensation of steam in mini and microchannels with hydraulic diameter of 2mm, 2.66mm, 200µm and 266µm respectively. The simulation was run at various mass flux values ranging from 0.5 kg/m2s and 4 kg/m2s. The length of the mini and microchannels were in the range of 20 mm to 100 mm. CFD software’s GAMBIT and FLUENT were used for simulating the condensation process through the mini and microchannels. Steam flowed through the channels, whose walls were cooled by natural convection of air at room temperature. The outlet temperature of the condensate was in the range of 25oC to 90oC. The condensation process in minichannels was observed to be different from that in microchannels. It was found that the outlet temperature of the condensate decreased as the diameter of the channel decreased. It was also evident that the increase in length of the channel further decreased the outlet temperature of the condensate and subsequently the condensation heat flux. The investigation also showed that the pressure drop along the channel length increased with decreasing hydraulic diameter and length of the mini and micro channel. Conversely, the pressure drop along the channel increased with increasing inlet velocity of the stream. It was then suggested to use microchannels on the cathode section of a fuel cell for improved condensation.

Janet M Twomey, PhD

2010-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

315

Final Technical Report for Phase I Award DE-SC0003559  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Smart Grid opens the door to the development of many companion technologies which will in turn enable the development of a variety of devices for household electricity-consuming appliances that can communicate with it; especially, many major appliance manufacturers (such as Whirlpool and General Electric) have made public commitments to design their appliances to be Smart Grid-compatible over the next several years. Yet during that same time period, customers will purchase many millions of long-lasting appliances which are not compatible with the Smart Grid. This research project's purpose is to bring significant Smart Grid compatibility to previously-installed appliances that were not specifically designed for any Smart Grid communications, in a way that is both economical and attractive for users who want to share in the energy cost savings and reduction of peak power demand opportunities provided by the evolving Smart Grid infrastructure. The focus of this effort is to identify and research smart control solutions which take advantage of the effective strategies of demand-response (DR) communications from utilities [including time-of-day (TOD) and peak-demand pricing options] and function apart from any need for operational changes to be designed into the non-smart appliances. Our Phase I concepts promote technological advancements for enabling devices that shift the available-use time of millions of different appliances which otherwise have no Smart Grid capability. We researched low-cost microcontroller-based ways of creating devices with the ability to: (1) maintain an accurate time and day (with no need for battery backup throughout a power outage); (2) perform two-way wired and wireless communications directly with the utility company's demand management signals, to identify both low-cost time periods as well as critical-reduction periods when the cost of energy use would otherwise be much higher; (3) measure the power usage of the connected non-smart appliance; and (4) remove power for a period of time from the appliance (such as a dehumidifier, portable heater, or pool pump) in response to both time-pricing schedule and critical peak-load information from the utility, or inform the user of a batch-type appliance (such as a clothes dryer or dishwasher) regarding the current cost associated with using the appliance. The new products that could be developed as a result of this research into new consumer-centric features and characteristics includes smart wall outlets, smart outlet power-monitoring adapters, smart load switches and smart remote electric rate indicators associated with the non-smart appliances. Our Phase I goal of determining the feasibility of the above technologies was successful. The objectives were also met of developing concepts for a family of microprocessor-based control/indicator devices that can provide the above capabilities while connected in series between an appliance and its electrical power source and/or while indicating cost-of-use status to the appliance user.

Blair, Jeff L.; Glenn, Lee J.

2010-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

316

GL Report BU 355  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

DSW DSW BUDGET ACTIVITY REPORT ($ IN THOUSANDS) DSW DSW BUDGET BUDGET FY 09 FY 10 FY 11 FY 12 FY 13 Total DESCRIPTION ACTIVITY ACTUALS ACTUALS ACTUALS ACTUALS BUDGET OBS EXPEND OBS OCT NOV DEC JAN FEB MAR APR MAY JUN JUL AUG SEP O&M Power Billing N/FGCR BILLM 217 $ 170 $ 250 $ 205 $ 231 $ - $ 130 $ 130 $ 12 $ 23 $ 36 $ 44 $ 56 $ 69 $ 77 $ 100 $ 111 $ 116 $ 121 $ 130 $ Conserv & Renew Energy N/FGCR CAREM 21 $ 3 $ 4 $ 3 $ 4 $ - $ 3 $ 3 $ - $ 1 $ 1 $ 1 $ 1 $ 1 $ 2 $ 3 $ 3 $ 3 $ 3 $ 3 $ Communications & Control

317

Rural Democratization and Decentralization at the State/Society Interface: What Counts as ‘Local’ Government in the Mexican Countryside?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the actual communities – rural and urban, continue to lackin large cities. In rural areas, these sub-municipalMobilization in Contemporary Rural Mexico,’, Unpublished PhD

Fox, Jonathan A

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

318

Experiments on short-delay blasting in the experimental coal mine  

SciTech Connect

Results of experiments on short-delay multiple blasting conducted under actual mining conditions in Bureau of Mines Experimental coal mine, Bruceton, Pa., are summarized.

Hartmann, I.; Lewis, B.

1954-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

319

C:\\Documents and Settings\\Fran.ois Martzloff\\My Documents ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... more than 10% of the stored energy is spent ... according to the two ap- proaches discussed above. ... The authors plan to perform actual tests on typical ...

2013-05-17T23:59:59.000Z

320

Furnace Technology and Melt Handling - Programmaster.org  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Feb 16, 2010 ... Before implementing any project for reducing energy consumption, there is a need to assess the actual state of consumption, rate it with respect ...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "1989-2010 actual peakload" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
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321

Circleville, West Virginia 26804  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

does not actually hamper development of these projects. PJM's Regional Transmission Expansion Plan ("RTEP") has prompted the development of several transmission projects in...

322

Evaluating the Solubility and Homogeneity of Plutonium in an ...  

internal standard • On sectioned crucible melts of surrogate SB6 SME glass with Pu • SEM analysis on glass shards of actual SB6 SME glass. 19

323

Two Phase Transitions Make a High-Temperature Superconductor  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

that another phase transition actually exists at a higher temperature in the cuprate phase diagram, below which electrons, instead of pairing up, organize themselves in a...

324

Appendix A Conversion Factors for Standard Units  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Energy, work, heat(a) joule J ... a utility-specific factor that has incorporated actual fuel mix ... Arizona Colorado Idaho Montana Nevada New Mexico Utah Wyoming

325

Dominica - Analysis - U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

... reducing actual operating capacity by almost 40 percent to ... This year Valero Energy announced it would ... refineries that have easy access to relatively ...

326

Essays on Structural Estimation in the European Car Market  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1.4.2 Counterfactual Market Share Simulations . . . . . .Actual and predicted market shares acrossPredicted market shares with no unobserved characteristic (?

Noton Norambuena, Carlos Esteban

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

327

Building Energy Software Tools Directory: Energy Profile Tool  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

utility programs ValidationTesting The analysis approach for determining end-use energy requirements closely agrees with actual DOE-2 simulations, as has been confirmed...

328

Assessing the Impact of NGO Advocacy Campaigns on World Bank Projects and Policies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

projects with actual socěal impact on the ground. Some Bankdepending on their varied social impact and rhe degree tocise), ronmental and social impacts, were due exclusively to

Fox, Jonathan A; Brown, L. David

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

329

Glass Drawing for Wire Arrays  

The size of the wafer is limited only by how much fiber is bundled prior to fusion. Since the wire is not actually being drawn, ...

330

Data:Ddb2bb59-0812-4719-ae20-7059ecf2829f | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

for standby capacity to customers generating all or a part of their electric power requirements, and for intermittent use. The customer's actual demand as determined by...

331

The reality of virtual limbs: does mirror technique for hand has functional consequences for the motor output?.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Motor imagery was proven to excite the motor cortex as actual action execution. Therefore, motor imagery training was suggested as a method of facilitating the… (more)

Bienkiewicz, Marta

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

332

Flow Characterization and Dynamic Analysis of a Radial Compressor with Passive Method of Surge Control.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Due to recent emission regulations, the use of turbochargers for force induction of internal combustion engines has increased. Actually, the trend in diesel engines is… (more)

Guillou, Erwann

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

333

Russell E. Eibling  

actual waste • Contain RCRA ... Damp sludge solids were mixed and then added by wt to sample vessels. Temperature maintained at 25

334

Service Contracts  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

actual installation of major plant equipment such as a centrifugal chillers, boilers, and large air compressors is typically excluded from the contract. Risk and warranty...

335

Loopy Photons Clarify 'Spookiness' of Quantum Physics  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Since the paths are indistinguishable, the weird rules of quantum physics say that the photon pairs actually ... Physical Review A 76, 043836 (2007). ...

2011-07-18T23:59:59.000Z

336

Future Air traffic management Concepts Evaluation Tool ...  

Solar Photovoltaic; Solar Thermal; Startup ... Actual air traffic data and weather information are utilized to evaluate an aircraft’s flight-plan ...

337

Application of the Global Positioning System to the Measurement of Overhead Power Transmission Conductor Sag  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, incident solar radiation, limiting physical conductor characteristics, and conductor configuration case weather condi- tion is assumed while in the dynamic case the actual weather condition is taken

338

Analysis of Demand Controlled Ventilation Technology and ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... The actual health, comfort, and productivity impacts of mechanical ventilation ... p strat i csp o ... in California and elsewhere is the impact of ambient air ...

2011-01-11T23:59:59.000Z

339

Combined Fiscal Year (FY) 2012 Annual Performance Results and FYs 2013 and 2014 Annual Performance Plan  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This report presents the goals, objectives, and strategies for measuring the OIG’s FY 2012 actual performance and FYs 2013 and 2014 planned activities.

340

Combined Fiscal Year (FY) 2011 Annual Performance Results and FY 2012 Annual Performance Plan  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This report presents the goals, objectives, and strategies for measuring the OIG’s FY 2011 actual performance and FY 2012 planned activities.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "1989-2010 actual peakload" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Combined Fiscal Year (FY) 2006 Annual Performance Results and FY 2007 Annual Performance Plan  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This report presents the goals, objectives, and strategies for measuring the OIG’s FY 2006 actual performance and FY 2007 planned activities.

342

NIST SP 800-115, Technical Guide to Information Security ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... targets for penetration testing, generating topology maps, determining ... The first part is the start of actual ... A good starting point is to evaluate system ...

2012-02-09T23:59:59.000Z

343

Hanford ETR Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant - Hanford...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

(the percentage of actual operating time). 1 Comprehensive Review of the Hanford Waste Treatment Plant Flowsheet and Throughput Specifically, the following questions were...

344

VIDEOS: Slow motion video of Charpy impact  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Sep 25, 2007 ... This slow motion video of an actual Charpy impact test shows the sample fracturing. The VIMS web resource offers a detailed description of an ...

345

OSTI, US Dept of Energy, Office of Scientific and Technical Informatio...  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

out the person you needed from a listing of multiple names? Actually, searching the internet doesn't make this process any easier. Related Topics: author names, disambiguation,...

346

2005 ORNL Story Tips | ornl.gov  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

fuels may have cleaner emissions and actually perform better than when powered with other diesel fuels, according to findings by Oak Ridge National Laboratory and the Navy....

347

NIST Shows How to Make a Compact Frequency Comb in ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

NIST Shows How to Make a Compact Frequency Comb in Minutes Video Transcript. ... These resonators actually have a pretty wide range of uses. ...

2013-07-11T23:59:59.000Z

348

October 21, 2003, Board Public Meeting - ESE Safety Oversight...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

to do is filter the messages to the contractor more strategically. CHAIRMAN CONWAY: Jessie? MS. ROBERSON: Thank you, sir. Actually I would make two comments. One, you know,...

349

Validating the Estimated Cost of Saving Water Through Infrastructure Rehabilitation in the Texas Lower Rio Grande Valley (Hidalgo County Irrigation District No. 2)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A Case Study Using Actual Construction Costs for the Lateral A Lining Project, Hidalgo County Irrigation District No. 2 (San Juan)

Lacewell, R. D.; Rister, M.; Sturdivant, A. W.

2005-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

350

CONVERGENT NETWORK APPROXIMATION FOR THE ...  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Continuous Length-Constrained Minimum Cost Path Problem (C- .... estimator which gives an unbiased estimate of the path length on the actual underlying.

351

An Assessment of the Near-Term Costs of Hydrogen Refueling Stations and Station Components  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the literature provides cost estimates of actual stations.Hydrogen Supply: Cost Estimate for Hydrogen Pathways -Appendix A: Summary of Cost Estimates for 10 Station Types

Weinert, Jonathan X.; Lipman, Timothy

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

352

Fundamentos de la participación de Red Calle en la política pública para Personas en Situación de Calle .  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Se realizó un estudio de caso en el marco de las actuales relaciones entre Estado y sociedad civil, a través del análisis de la participación… (more)

Márquez Neira, Edison

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

353

Modeling Fragility in Rapidly Evolving Disaster Response Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Multi-Organizational Disaster Response Systems." Pittsburgh,in Rapidly Evolving Disaster Response Systems Louise K.capacity in an actual disaster response system to determine

Comfort, Louise K.; Ko, Kilkon; Zagorecki, Adam

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

354

NATURAL GAS PROCESSING PLANT SURVEY FORM EIA-757 INSTRUCTIONS  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

emergency response planning and actual emergencies. data published from this survey’s information. Thus, there may be some statistics that are based ...

355

DRAFT - Energy Information Administration  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

the context of emergency response planning and actual emergencies. SANCTIONS . The timely submission of Form EIA-809 by those required to

356

EIA-803 WEEKLY CRUDE OIL STOCKS REPORT INSTRUCTIONS  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

the context of emergency response planning and actual emergencies. SANCTIONS The timely submission of Form EIA-803 by those required to

357

Enforcement Action - EA-2003-06  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

investigations. C. The S Tank Farm shift manager, performing a required weekly "Tickler" to assure actual dome loads were consistent with those recorded in the dome load...

358

Awarded Contracts for External Experts to Support the NIST ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... fighting tactics, development of manual fire fighting ... Budnick has also written handbook sections on ... experience ranges from actual pipe fitting and ...

2012-11-18T23:59:59.000Z

359

MONTHLY UNDERGROUND GAS STORAGE REPORT FORM EIA-191M INSTRUCTIONS ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Form Approved ENERGY INFORMATION ADMINISTRATION OMB No. 1905-0175 ... A revised report is required if actual or corrected data

360

Electric Power Annual  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

for Load by North American Electric Reliability Corporation Assessment Area, 2011 Actual, 2012-2016 Projected Net Energy (Thousands of Megawatthours) Eastern Interconnection ERCOT...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "1989-2010 actual peakload" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Enforcement Letter -Rocky Flats-08/02/2000  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

2 It is recognized that the deficiencies did not result in an actual unanticipated event, but given the failure to monitor gas concentration, the demonstrated increase in gas...

362

Building Energy Software Tools Directory: Weather Data Viewer  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Russia South Africa Spain Sweden Switzerland United Kingdom United States Related Links Weather Data Viewer Weather Data Viewer logo. Displays actual design values, coincident...

363

Building Energy Software Tools Directory: E.A.S.Y. - Energy Accounting...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

weather year. Each building is re-calculated with an exact rate analysis revision. Actual weather data is collected from the nearest National Weather Service station to each...

364

Building Energy Software Tools Directory: Weather Data Viewer  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Alphabetically Tools by Platform PC Mac UNIX Internet Tools by Country Related Links Weather Data Viewer Weather Data Viewer logo. Displays actual design values, coincident...

365

Contract/Project Management  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

2 nd Quarter Overall Contract and Project Management Performance Metrics and Targets ContractProject Management Performance Metrics FY 2009 Target FY 2009 Actual Comment 1....

366

Contract/Project Management  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Second Quarter Overall Contract and Project Management Performance Metrics and Targets 1 ContractProject Management Primary Performance Metrics FY 2010 Target FY 2010 Actual FY...

367

Contract/Project Management  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Fourth Quarter Overall Contract and Project Management Performance Metrics and Targets 1 ContractProject Management Primary Performance Metrics FY 2010 Target FY 2010 Actual FY...

368

Contract/Project Management  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

8 4 th Quarter Metrics Final Overall Contract and Project Management Performance Metrics and Targets ContractProject Management Performance Metrics FY 2008 Target FY 2008 Actual...

369

Contract/Project Management  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

3 rd Quarter Overall Contract and Project Management Performance Metrics and Targets ContractProject Management Performance Metrics FY 2009 Target FY 2009 Actual Comment 1....

370

Contract/Project Management  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

1 st Quarter Overall Contract and Project Management Performance Metrics and Targets ContractProject Management Performance Metrics FY 2009 Target FY 2009 Actual Comment 1....

371

Argonne CNM News: Luminescent Solar Concentrators Improved by...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

intensification can exceed the equivalent of one hundred "suns" - the measurement of solar radiation on one spot. However, actual implementation has failed to produce such high...

372

"Table 17. Total Delivered Residential Energy Consumption, Projected...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Total Delivered Residential Energy Consumption, Projected vs. Actual" "Projected" " (quadrillion Btu)" ,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,2000,2001,2002,2003,2004,2005,2006,2007,...

373

Stochastic Nash Equilibrium Problems: Sample Average ...  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

financial instruments which do not involve the actual generation of electricity, but the money paid under the contract is tied to the pool price. There are essentially ...

374

Nonlinear Pricing in Energy and Environmental Markets  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

current five-tier electricity tariffs may result in a slightcurrent five-tier electricity tariffs may result in a slighttier tariffs actually reduce total electricity consumption

Ito, Koichiro

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

375

Documentation of Calculation Methodology, Input data, and Infrastructure for the Home Energy Saver Web Site  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

recommendations. Real-world electricity tariffs are used forusers can select an electricity tariff. For non-electricincludes actual electricity tariffs, which may be selected

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

376

ANALYSIS OF THE PERFORMANCE AND COST EFFECTIVENESS OF NINE SMALL WIND ENERGY CONVERSION SYSTEMS FUNDED BY THE DOE SMALL GRANTS PROGRAM  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

includes an accounting of project costs and a valuation ofpessimistic (e.g. , actual project costs are likely to behas reported the following project costs: Tower Foundation (

Kay, J.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

377

The Complex and Multi-Faceted Nature of School Construction Costs: Factors Affecting California. A Report to the American Institute of Architects California Council  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

construction contract bid project costs comparable, below,of actual final project costs, and are highly applicable tothe construction project cost. The savings are realized over

Vincent, Jeffrey M; McKoy, Deborah

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

378

Evaluation of I-80 Long-Life Corridor Costs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the expenditures for these projects, costs were divided into2 illustrates the Project Cost Breakdown of the Actual Bid18 percent higher than Project Cost Breakdown Original Bid

Santero, Nicholas J; Nokes, William; Harvey, John T

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

379

Production analysis of Marcellus Shale.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The purpose of this thesis was to analyze the production potential of Marcellus shale using actual field data. By using real field production data for… (more)

Belyadi, Hossein.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

380

Cost Avoidance vs. Utility Bill Accounting - Explaining the Discrepancy Between Guaranteed Savings in ESPC Projects and Utility Bills  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

savings is not based on actual utility rate structure, buta “contracted utility rate” that takesthe existing utility rate at the time the contract is signed

Kumar, S.; Sartor, D.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "1989-2010 actual peakload" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Data:3c514310-051c-4bed-a10a-8d88da859cb9 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

amount is determined by comparing MMU's actual power supply costs (minus the Industrial Rate class) to a base kwh cost. The power supply cost adjustment reflects either an...

382

Data:Fccfca46-e5a4-4489-bf18-e7eb9892fef7 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

amount is determined by comparing MMU's actual power supply costs (minus the Industrial Rate class) to a base kwh cost. The power supply cost adjustment reflects either an...

383

NIST Radio Station WWVB  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Antenna. The longwave WWVB antenna is so large it is actually a cable strung between several different towers. ... Support towers of antenna. ...

384

Dairy Industry under New Zealand's Emissions Trading Scheme: Analysis of Farmers' Attitudes towards Climate Change: The Expense Created by the NZETS and the Point that Farmers will Begin to Reduce Emissions.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Adaptation to actual climate change and contingency planning to reduce vulnerability from likely climate change effects is crucial for the New Zealand dairy industry. Thus… (more)

Fowles, Craig

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

385

Worse Than the Great Depression: What Experts Are Missing ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... corresponding increase in the actual petroleum flowing out of the refineries. ... Figure 32: US Refinery and Blender Net Production of Crude Oil and ...

2013-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

386

Delaware | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

be a bigger producer of these magnets - which are not actually rare - and are used in hybrid vehicle motors and wind turbine generators. | Illustration Courtesy of of Electron...

387

“Taken from PL 107-206 FY 2002 Supplemental ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... coming from business conducted within the Borough of Manhattan as eligible ... reports to said Committees regarding the actual projects and needs ...

2012-01-09T23:59:59.000Z

388

BUILDING MATERIALS and STRUCTURES  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... vnlues, when not the actual results of Bureau tests or experiments ... comply with accepted health regulations and minimum rc'quirem~nts for plumbing ...

2008-11-03T23:59:59.000Z

389

APPENDIX A. Description of the rotor program, iar95.exe. The ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Tests have been done by direct comparison with output ... and 'blz_iar_axissw' for actual test runs and ... the TM components and not the :compone nts. ...

2011-10-03T23:59:59.000Z

390

Slide 1  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Instantaneous Fuel Economy * Average Fuel Economy * Fuel Rate * Total Fuel Used * Total Idle Fuel Used * Current Gear * Selected Gear * Output Shaft Speed * Actual Engine -...

391

Modeling of Energy Production Decisions: An Alaska Oil Case Study  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

barrels) calculated Quantity oil produced from unit i inbest representation of the quantity of oil actually presentRemaining for Prudhoe Bay Oil Quantity Wells Count Jun 1968

Leighty, Wayne

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

392

www.eia.gov  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

PJM SERC SPP TRE WECC Contiguous U.S. Actual 2011 / 2012 Projected 2012 / 2013 Projected 2013 / 2014 Projected 2014 / 2015 Projected 2015 / 2016 Projected 2016 / 2017

393

www.eia.gov  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

PJM SERC SPP TRE WECC Contiguous U.S. Actual 2011 Projected 2012 Projected 2013 Projected 2014 Projected 2015 Projected 2016 Notes: NERC region and reliability ...

394

EVALUATION OF ALTERNATIVE AGENTS FOR ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... chilling the suppressors to -32 “C actually improved the perfor- mance, as ... of potassium salts offer significant enhancement over water where there ...

2011-10-04T23:59:59.000Z

395

Matthew Walker  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... performing actual chemical etching of silicon, and learning how to use an atomic force microscope, a scanning electron microscope, and various ...

2010-10-05T23:59:59.000Z

396

Hacking the SEM: Crystal Phase Detection for Nanoscale ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... the "EBSD" detector is actually seeing electrons that scatter ... from 10 nm domains in a scanning electron microscope. Journal of Microscopy, 2011. ...

2012-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

397

Report and survey  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Improved understanding of actual costs Yes - 56.8% No - 43.2% – Improved environmental management systems Yes – 30.1% No - 69.9% ...

2010-05-03T23:59:59.000Z

398

PROGRESS IN ENERGY EFFICIENT BUILDINGS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

I Figure 21. Sample building energy use label expressed inanalyses of actual buildings energy consumption data confirm1983. PROGRESS IN ENERGY EFFICIENT BUILDINGS Leonard W. Wall

Wall, L.W.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

399

NMMSS Software Quality Assurance Plan | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Quality Assurance Plan The Software Quality Assurance Plan (SQAP) for the Nuclear Materials Management and Safeguard System (NMMSS) software upgrade project (an actual DOE...

400

Summary of the SIGIR 2003 Workshop on Defining Evaluation ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... some of which are already being crawled and/or ... Internet Archive both offered to do the actual crawl. ... what was needed last year in crawling .GOV for ...

2006-01-11T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "1989-2010 actual peakload" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Metal hydride switchable mirrors: Factors in?uencing dynamic ...  

2 was introduced are designated by vertical lines with long dashes, air ... actual limits of switching. The maximum transmission achieved was slightly

402

Light Touch: Controlling the Behavior of Quantum Dots  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... dots, just as physicists have been doing with actual single atoms since the mid-1970s and, much more recently, with the artificial quantum dot ...

2011-05-02T23:59:59.000Z

403

Electric Power Annual  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Demand-Side Management Program Incremental Effects by Program Category, 2002 through 2011 Energy Efficiency Load Management Total Year Energy Savings (Thousand MWh) Actual Peak...

404

Electric Power Annual  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1. Demand-Side Management Program Annual Effects by Program Category, 2002 through 2011 Energy Efficiency Load Management Total Year Energy Savings (Thousand MWh) Actual Peak Load...

405

View from the Core: 1663 Science and Technology Magazine | Los...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

for weapons or power production-sometimes requires staring straight into the heart of the matter, into the core where nuclear reactions actually take place. But there's...

406

NREL: Sustainable NREL - Research Support Facility  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

by NREL's Commercial Buildings Research Group to see predicted versus actual data for lighting, plug loads, heating and cooling use, rooftop PV production, and more. Construction...

407

engineering laboratory  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... one-fourth of the extra en- ergy actually used to cool and freeze ... 8 percent of the total energy consumed by 111 million US households ac- cording ...

2012-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

408

The Heat Is On: NIST Zeroes In On Energy Consumption of Ice ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... With only one-fourth of the extra energy actually used to cool and freeze ... of the total energy consumed by 111 million US households according to ...

2011-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

409

Bioinspired velocity control of fast gaze shifts on a robotic ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Dec 22, 2007 ... of actual human movements, we performed a quantitative investigation of the .... error-learning (Berthouze and Kuniyoshi 1998). In the latter.

410

The distributive justice of income inequality  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

the human condition, there is little question of not accepting inequality in practice. ..... approximation of the actual distribution, an error is certainly introduced,.

411

Financial Times (FT) Interview with US e-Chromic CEO and ...  

"What I'm concerned about is that we actually establish an energy policy, and whatever party or president will establish that, ...

412

Evaluation of Persistence of Savings from SMUD Retrocommissioning Program  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

electricity or natural gas usage and monthly outside drycost [$] Saved cost [$] Gas usage [therm] Elec usage [kWh]11 Table 4: Actual Monthly Natural Gas Usage for

Bourassa, Norman J.; Piette, Mary A.; Motegi, Naoya

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

413

SECTION J  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

business zones, woman-owned small businesses, and veteran-owned (including service-disabled veteran-owned) small businesses. The Plan may also discuss actual or planned...

414

DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Naval Petroleum Reserve...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

remediation efforts are underway and a portion of the site is being used to test exploration and production innovations in an actual field setting. The Department of...

415

Task 1: Hydrate Code release, Maintenance and Support  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

budgeted, but overall money is being spent as anticipated. In three of the previous reports, this cost status showed that actual expenditures were less than the original...

416

NIST Chemists Get Scoop on Crude 'Oil' from Pig Manure ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... a matter of fact, we have a collaboration with the University of Illinois, in which Professor Zhang's group is actually making a crude oil substitute out ...

2012-10-02T23:59:59.000Z

417

Conceptual Development and Performance Assessment for the Deployment Staging of Advanced Vehicle Control and Safety Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Also, actual deployment of Smartway, which will become the2003. By the year 2015, Smartway will be deployed on allfew years. The Japanese Smartway concept will implement user

VanderWerf, Joel; Shladover, Steven; Miller, Mark A.

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

418

U.S. Energy Information Administration...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Review: Evaluation of 2011 and Prior Reference Case Projections 35 Table 22. Energy intensity, projected vs. actual Projected (quadrillion Btu Billion 2005 Chained...

419

Table 3a. Imported Refiner Acquisition Cost of Crude Oil, Projected...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

a. Imported Refiner Acquisition Cost of Crude Oil, Projected vs. Actual" "Projected Price in Constant Dollars" " (constant dollars per barrel in ""dollar year"" specific to each...

420

NEWTON, Ask a Scientist at Argonne National Labs  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

and more effective than soap alone. This claim is very dubious. Long after you wash with these products, residues can persist. Continual selection pressure can actually...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "1989-2010 actual peakload" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

ASC eNews Quarterly Newsletter June 2012 | National Nuclear Security...  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

the only way to influence technology providers to build machines that actually meet our national security requirements. Indeed, ASC's ability to deliver to the Stockpile...

422

Data:588b68ac-3f19-4046-9a5a-da63cde91691 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Additional Information: Facility Charge: 360.00 annually All rates subject to an Energy Cost Adjustment. This allows the cooperative to recover the difference in actual...

423

Data:B071f1b7-2544-4554-b011-fea1c0c8904c | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Additional Information: Facility Charge: 690.00 annually All rates subject to an Energy Cost Adjustment. This allows the cooperative to recover the difference in actual...

424

Data:703c4fc2-8504-4992-8018-ed96e848b1f6 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Phase Sector: Commercial Description: Additional Information: All rates subject to an Energy Cost Adjustment. This allows the cooperative to recover the difference in actual...

425

Data:03adadb6-1826-4ba6-bf4e-cbf282ad0866 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

75+ kVA Sector: Commercial Description: Additional Information All rates subject to an Energy Cost Adjustment. This allows the cooperative to recover the difference in actual...

426

Data:B1a94fc6-8de6-48e3-9af4-d9115e253e67 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Rate Sector: Residential Description: Additional Information: All rates subject to an Energy Cost Adjustment. This allows the cooperative to recover the difference in actual...

427

Data:87792f39-1c44-48ac-9d79-07447b5c85b4 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

75+ kVA Sector: Commercial Description: Additional Information: All rates subject to an Energy Cost Adjustment. This allows the cooperative to recover the difference in actual...

428

Data:E6423d52-0daf-490f-b606-52cef5f5b3c5 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Rate Sector: Residential Description: Additional Information: All rates subject to an Energy Cost Adjustment. This allows the cooperative to recover the difference in actual...

429

Data:D4393531-0260-4287-ae10-fb9f6881c74d | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Heat Sector: Residential Description: Additional Information: All rates subject to an Energy Cost Adjustment. This allows the cooperative to recover the difference in actual...

430

Federal Customers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... NIST to exercise its functions for other organizations and to receive reimbursement or advance payment based upon fixed prices or actual costs; ...

2013-07-19T23:59:59.000Z

431

In other news  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

responders get about 30 hours of practice," said Chris Ory, with the Lab's Emergency Response Group. "This year's tasks included functioning in an actual post office in the...

432

EIA-801 WEEKLY BULK TERMINAL REPORT INSTRUCTIONS  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

the context of emergency response planning and actual emergencies. SANCTIONS The timely submission of Form EIA-801 by those required to

433

DRAFT - Energy Information Administration  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

the context of emergency response planning and actual emergencies. SANCTIONS . The timely submission of Form EIA-803 by those required to

434

Selected for a Viewpoint in Physics PHYSICAL REVIEW A 84, 012311 (2011)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Selected for a Viewpoint in Physics PHYSICAL REVIEW A 84, 012311 (2011) Informational derivation features are actually direct consequences of pu- rification. In particular, purification implies

D'Ariano, Giacomo Mauro

435

Designing PV Incentive Programs to Promote System Performance: A Review of Current Practice  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

State Support for Renewable Energy October 2006 actual energy productionstates have established clean energy funds to support renewable and clean forms of electricity production.

Barbose, Galen; Wiser, Ryan; Bolinger, Mark

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

436

Strengthening the Connections: Research Innovation and ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Energy technology: you'll see a mission agency that takes energy technology and ... explain how that actually leads to a very poor optimization of our ...

2013-06-17T23:59:59.000Z

437

Fuel cells for domestic heat and power: are they worth it?.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Fuel cells could substantially decarbonise domestic energy production, but at what cost? It is known that these micro-CHP systems are expensive but actual price data… (more)

Staffell, Iain

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

438

Supplement Analysis For Disposal of Certain Rocky Flats Plutonium...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

of plutonium that will actually be repackaged at RFETS. With regard to the most severe accident scenario, an earthquake, the impacts would be greater than predicted in the...

439

Eastern Power Grid Texas Western  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Form EIA-411 for 2006 Released: February 7, 2008 Next Update: October 2008 Table 3a. January Monthly Peak Hour Demand, Actual and Projected by North American Electric ...

440

Table Definitions, Sources, and Explanatory Notes  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Reservoirs are considered proved if economic producibility is supported by actual production or conclusive formation test (drill stem or wire line), ...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "1989-2010 actual peakload" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Education: Digital Resource Center - VIDEOS: Tensile test video  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Sep 25, 2007 ... This video of an actual tensile test on an unspecified metal sample demonstrates elongation and necking. It is accompanied by an animation of ...

442

STATEMENT OF CONSIDERATIONS ADVANCE WAIVER OF PATENT RIGHTS TO...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Corporation (ITEC) has petitioned for an advanced waiver of domestic and foreign patent rights to inventions conceived or first actually reduced to practice under DOE...

443

STATEMENT OF CONSIDERATIONS ADVANCE WAIVER OF PATENT RIGHTS TO...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Arizona Public Service has petitioned for an advanced waiver of domestic and foreign patent rights to inventions conceived or first actually reduced to practice under DOE...

444

STATEMENT OF CONSIDERATIONS ADVANCE WAIVER OF PATENT RIGHTS TO...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

PPG Industries Inc. (PPG) has petitioned for an advance waiver of domestic and foreign patent rights to inventions conceived or first actually reduced to practice under DOE...

445

STATEMENT OF CONSIDERATIONS ADVANCE WAIVER OF PATENT RIGHTS TO...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Mack Trucks, Inc. (Mack) has petitioned for an advance waiver of domestic and foreign patent rights to inventions conceived or first actually reduced to practice under DOE...

446

Links  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Aug 23, 2012 ... Materials for Nuclear Power ... at my first Sandia job while working on weapons actually gave me the opportunity to systematize a broad range ...

447

Communications Planning  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Ramp Rate • 4 MW Battery smoothes ramp rate of 18 MW wind farm to .5 MW/min ... Actual Wind Farm Output-Smoothing Potential by Battery Storage ...

2011-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

448

'Two-Faced' Bioacids Put a New Face on Carbon Nanotube ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... perhaps the signature material of modern engineering research, but actually trying to organize the atomic scale rods is notoriously like herding cats. ...

2012-10-18T23:59:59.000Z

449

NIST's Role in Laser Measurements and Applications 2000s  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... from the bright glare in the distance transmit images of cat-like face ... Though false color has been added to the cats' faces, they are otherwise actual ...

2011-06-06T23:59:59.000Z

450

Combined Fiscal Year (FY) 2007 Annual Performance Results and FY 2008 Annual Performance Plan  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This report presents the goals, objectives, and strategies for measuring the OIG’s FY 2007 actual performance and FY 2008 planned activities.

451

ALIGNMENT EFFECTS IN CORRELATION SPECTRA  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

was generated from the projections of the actual spectra andfirst step are subtracted from the original projections andthese reduced projections are then used to generate a new

Ellegaard, C.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

452

DOE Retrospective Review Plan Report  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

DOE Retrospective Review Plan Report May 2012 Agency Sub- agency RIN OMB Control Number Title of Initiative RulelCR Brief Description Actual or Target Completion Date...

453

The Design and Implementation of a Self -Calibrating Distributed Acoustic Sensing Platform  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the corresponding ground truth points. In Table 1, we reporttruth and ‘+’ represents the estimated position, with the actual error reported in me- ters. Table

Girod, Lewis; Lukac, Martin; Trifa, Vlad; Estrin, D

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

454

Modeling and Verification of Distributed Generation and Voltage Regulation Equipment for Unbalanced Distribution Power Systems; Annual Subcontract Report, June 2007  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report summarizes the development of models for distributed generation and distribution circuit voltage regulation equipment for unbalanced power systems and their verification through actual field measurements.

Davis, M. W.; Broadwater, R.; Hambrick, J.

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

455

Policy Levers in Patent Law  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of a DNA invention requires disclosure of the actual DNAencouraging the disclosure of inventions that mightheightened disclosure of an invention – and correspondingly

Burk, Dan L.; Lemley, Mark

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

456

Policy Levers and Patent Law  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of a DNA invention requires disclosure of the actual DNAencouraging the disclosure of inventions that mightheightened disclosure of an invention - and correspondingly

Burk, Dan L.; Lemley, Mark A.

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

457

DOE M 483  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

had it been obtained from a nonfederal entity. G. "Subject Invention" means any invention of the Contractor or Participant conceived or first actually reduced to practice...

458

Combined Fiscal Year (FY) 2009 Annual Performance Results and FY 2010 Annual Performance Plan  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This report presents the goals, objectives, and strategies for measuring the OIG’s FY 2009 actual performance and FY 2010 planned activities.

459

Combined Fiscal Year (FY) 2010 Annual Performance Results and FY 2011 Annual Performance Plan  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This report presents the goals, objectives, and strategies for measuring the OIG’s FY 2010 actual performance and FY 2011 planned activities.

460

Energy Harvesting Aware Power Management  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and J. Schiller, “Utilizing solar power in wireless sensorthat only the actual solar power available, and not anyconverted to electric power using solar cells. The magnitude

Kansal, Aman; Srivastava, Mani B

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "1989-2010 actual peakload" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Search for Gluino-Mediated Supersymmetry in Events With Bottom-Quark Jets and Missing Transverse Energy With the Compact Muon Solenoid Detector at the Large Hadron Collider With Proton-Proton Collisions at 8 TeV  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ZL QCD-dominated events, the trigger efficiencies are splitobserved number of events (assuming 100% trigger efficiency)not all events passing the prescaled trigger are actually

Nguyen, Harold

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

462

Travel motivations to selected national parks in South Africa : Karoo-, Tsitsikamma- and Kgalagadi Transfrontier National Parks / L. Bothma.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Research in tourist behaviour follows the cognitive approach. This contains the behavioural cycle of stimulation (motivation and intention formation), the actual behaviour and experience, and… (more)

Bothma, Lee-Ann

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

463

Documentation of Calculation Methodology, Input data, and Infrastructure for the Home Energy Saver Web Site  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

a process to model electricity bills using actual utilityin an annual cooling electricity bill that is 22% lower thantime- differentiated electricity bill calculations. 5.2.2.1

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

464

Mayors, Markets and Municipal Reform: The Politics of Water Delivery in Mexico  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Rica was founded as a PEMEX oil town in 1951, a conditionyears of oil extraction, PEMEX provided employment forimportant city for the PRI. PEMEX actually constructed the

Herrera, Veronica Maria Sol

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

465

Estimating Energy and Water Losses in Residential Hot Water Distribution Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

by showers, faucets, and dishwashers. (Actual leaks of hotdraws for sinks and dishwashers may not waste water, from anheat the water. For dishwashers, not only is energy wasted

Lutz, James

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

466

Going with the flow: Life cycle costing for industrial pumping systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Stavale et al. 2001) for a cooling tower application at thisparameters. The cooling tower pumping system serves asecond system for another cooling tower. To date, the actual

Tutterow, Vestal; Hovstadius, Gunnar; McKane, Aimee

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

467

Market Assessment of Upcoming Planned Refinery Outages December ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Office of Oil and Gas ... U.S. Monthly Distillate Actual and Potential Production, ... While FCC units are major gasoline producing units, ...

468

GREEN'S FUNCTIONS OF VORTEX OPERATORS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

surface clustering the Green's function 5.1 actually spreadsb. Another graph for the same Green's function. c. Anothercomposite divergences. The Green's function 5.6, considered

Polchinski, Joseph

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

469

Data Center Energy Benchmarking Part 1 - Case Studies on Two Co-location Data Centers (No. 16 and 17)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Schematic Figure 17. Condenser Water Flow Diagram Page 24 ofin actual operation. This included primary condenser watersystem, secondary condenser water system, CRAC units, and

Xu, Tengfang; Greenberg, Steve

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

470

Y-12 uranium storage facility?a Ťdream come true?  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ranks and actually provides the first impedance for the just finished highly enriched uranium storage facility. Recently the Highly Enriched Uranium Material Facility was...

471

Ice hockey specific strenght training with elastic bands.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The importance of muscular strength training during the career of all athletes is remarkable in competitive sports. Actual strength training can be started when children… (more)

Nieminen, Valtteri

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

472

Individual player developmental model in ice-hockey.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??In the past few years, there has been plenty of discussion about individual player development in Finnish hockey hockey-scene. Rarely you hear the actual models… (more)

Varmanen, Jukka

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

473

The Differential Deterrent Effects of An Arrest in Incidents of Domestic Violence: A Bayesian Analysis of Four Randomized Field Experiments  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and Actual Savings in a Water Conservation Campaign', Envir.Maddaus, W. O. : 1987, Water Conservation, American WaterTHE IMPACT OF WATER CONSERVATION CAMPAIGNS IN CALIFORNIA

Richard Berk; Alec Campbell; Ruth Klap; Bruce Western

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

474

AVCEM: Advanced-Vehicle Cost and Energy Use Model  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of the battery, according to the battery cost equations (seediscussion of battery cost above). There actually are twoin the amount and cost of fuel-storage, battery, vehicle

Delucchi, Mark

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

475

AVCEM: Advanced Vehicle Cost and Energy Use Model. Overview of AVCEM  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of the battery, according to the battery cost equations (seediscussion of battery cost above). There actually are twoin the amount and cost of fuel-storage, battery, vehicle

Delucchi, Mark

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

476

Optimisation exergoéconomique des systčmes de trigénération d'énergie.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Voir résumé étendu en français en fin de thčse. In the actual energetic and economic context, energy polygeneration represents the answer regarding the efficient use… (more)

Tirca-Dragomirescu, Georgiana

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

477

Building Energy Software Tools Directory: Building Greenhouse...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

against the national benchmark. Computer Platform Internet-based Programming Language Java Strengths Unique tool for providing insight into the actual energy and greenhouse...

478

Cooperacion universidad-empresa| Practicas emergentes entre las instituciones universitarias y las empresas en Puerto Rico.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

?? El actual orden económico mundial requiere que las universidades interaccionen con el sector empresarial para que sean más productivas y contribuyan con la sociedad.… (more)

Caban Morales, Jeannette

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

479

Power and Frequency Control as it Relates to Wind-Powered Generation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

needed to follow the daily load profile is scheduled well inforecast and actual load profile for California (3 Decemberto match the forecast load profile quite closely but, of

Lacommare, Kristina S H

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

480

Regression Models for Demand Reduction based on Cluster Analysis of Load Profiles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

on Cluster Analysis of Load Profiles Nobuyuki Yamaguchi,on Cluster Analysis of Load Profiles Nobuyuki Yamaguchi,regressions, using actual load profile data of Pacific Gas

Kiliccote, Sila

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "1989-2010 actual peakload" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


481

Regression Models for Demand Reduction based on Cluster Analysis...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

respect to the validity of explanatory variables and fitness of regressions, using actual load profile data of Pacific Gas and Electric Company's commercial and industrial...

482

ESS 2012 Peer Review - Organic and Inorganic Solid Electrolytes...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Good match between calculated and synthesized electrolyte (crystal structure and lattice parameters) Figure 9: Actual battery pellet and first cycle voltage profile of the...

483

Microsoft Word - ACEEE_08_FurnaceBlower_Paper484_2008-05-16_...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

widely and that the static pressure used in the test procedure as well as the calculated fan power is not representative of actual field installations. Therefore, accurate...

484

Forecast error metrics for Navy inventory management performance .  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This research establishes metrics for determining overall Navy secondary inventory forecasting accuracy when compared to actual demands at the Naval Inventory Control Point (NAVICP). Specifically,… (more)

Jackson, Kenneth J.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

485

DOCS System Configuration Management Plan | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

DOCS System Configuration Management Plan DOCS System Configuration Management Plan The DOCS Systems Configuration Management Plan (SCMP), from an actual DOE systems engineering...

486

REVISED-FINAL-1ST-QUARTER-FY-2013-SCORECARD-09-05-13.xlsx  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Project MILESTONE FIELD ID MILESTONE NAME MILESTONE DESCRIPTION VARIANCE NARRATIVE FORECAST DATE ACTUAL DATE REGULATORY AGREEMENT NAME DESIGNATIONS BASELINE COMPLETION DATE...

487

Environmental Compliance Performance Scorecard ??? Fourth...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

MILESTONE FIELD ID MILESTONE NAME MILESTONE DESCRIPTION BASELINE COMPLETION DATE FORECAST DATE ACTUAL DATE STATUS NARRATIVE VARIANCE NARRATIVE REGULATORY AGREEMENT NAME...

488

ESS 2012 Peer Review - Wind Firming EnergyFarm - Tom Stepien...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

the Bonneville Power Administration area. Forecasting wind is tricky. Plot shows: (forecast - actual)forecast. 5 sec data shown. 9 Modesto currently integrates intermittent...

489

Environmental Compliance Performance Scorecard ??? First...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

MILESTONE FIELD ID MILESTONE NAME MILESTONE DESCRIPTION BASELINE COMPLETION DATE FORECAST DATE ACTUAL DATE STATUS NARRATIVE VARIANCE NARRATIVE REGULATORY AGREEMENT NAME...

490

Site Acquisition Description/ Category Contracting Office Solicitation  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

is based on publicly available information available published on the DOE Acquisition Forecast (http:hqlnc.doe.govForecast) and other public sources. An actual date is provided...

491

Demand responsive programs - an emerging resource for competitive electricity markets?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

difference between Strike Price & forecast wholesale priceon day-ahead forecast of demand & price Wholesale utilitiesday-of forecast, or actual hourly spot price. A quick

Heffner, Dr. Grayson C.; Goldman, Charles A.

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

492

Technical Options For Distributed Hydrogen Refueling Stations in a Market Driven Situation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

French electricity and natural gas prices, we actually loseis adimensional, the natural gas price and electricity priceline, the needed natural gas/electricity price ratio needed

Simonnet, Antoine

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

493

Casting and heat treatment of water jet entry edge made from ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The number, location and shape of risers and chillers were determined using Nova casting simulation software. ASTM A757 C1Q steel was used for actual ...

494

Relation between Nanotexture and Processing Conditions in ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Then the focus is made on an integrated multi-scale model of pyrocarbon infiltration from pure propane, which compares favorably to actual CVI experiments.

495

Carbon/Carbon  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Then the focus is made on an integrated multi-scale model of pyrocarbon infiltration from pure propane, which compares favorably to actual CVI experiments.

496

EL Program: Fire Risk Reduction in Communities  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... from actual WUI fires using digital burn pattern ... A GIS data library to facilitate WUI ... Society for Optical Engineering (SPIE), International Association ...

2013-01-02T23:59:59.000Z

497

Auto-DR and Pre-cooling of Buildings at Tri-City Corporate Center  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

predicted the actual electric usage throughout the summerincluding sub-metering the electric usage of lighting, plug,energy usage and predicting hourly building electric demand.

Yin, Rongxin

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

498

An analytical and experimental investigation for an interstitial insulation technology.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??An insulation technique has been developed which contains a single or combination of materials to help minimize heat loss in actual industrial applications. For the… (more)

Kim, Dong Keun

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

499

Broadband Dieletric Properties of Impregnated Transformer Paper Insulation at Various Moisture Contents.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

?? The actual life of a transformer is determined by ageing of the cellulosic insulation such as transformer paper. The presence of moisture in the… (more)

Cheng, Jialu

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

500

First-Order Methods of Smooth Convex Optimization with Inexact ...  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abstract We introduce the notion of inexact first-order oracle and analyze ..... Note that parameter ? does not represent an actual accuracy: it can be.