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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "1979-1982 phoenix 1976-1982" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
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We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

Energize Phoenix  

Energy Savers [EERE]

May 20, 2011 By: Dimitrios Laloudakis, Program Director Energize Phoenix Corridor Residential Overview * Energize Phoenix Corridor - 14,970 Residential Housing Units * Upgrade...

2

Phoenix rising  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Phoenix Coal currently operates 3 surface coal mines in Western Kentucky and have recently obtained the permits to construct their first underground mine. The expansion of the Phoenix Coal company since its formation in July 2004 is described. 4 photos.

Buchsbaum, L.

2008-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

3

City of Phoenix - Energize Phoenix Program  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Energize Phoenix (EPHX) was designed as an ambitious, large-scale, three-year pilot program to provide energy efficiency upgrades in buildings, along Phoenix’s new Light Rail Corridor – part of a federal effort to reduce energy consumption and stimulate job growth, while simultaneously reducing the country’s carbon footprint and promoting a shift towards a green economy. The program was created through a 2010 competitive grant awarded to the City of Phoenix who managed the program in partnership with Arizona State University (ASU), the state’s largest university, and Arizona Public Service (APS), the state’s largest electricity provider. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Better Buildings Neighborhood Program (BBNP) and the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA) of 2009 provided $25M in funding for the EPHX program. The Light Rail Corridor runs through the heart of downtown Phoenix, making most high-rise and smaller commercial buildings eligible to participate in the EPHX program, along with a diverse mix of single and multi-family residential buildings. To ensure maximum impact and deeper market penetration, Energize Phoenix was subdivided into three unique parts: i. commercial rebate program, ii. commercial financing program, and iii. residential program Each component was managed by the City of Phoenix in partnership with APS. Phoenix was fortunate to partner with APS, which already operated robust commercial and residential rebate programs within its service territory. Phoenix tapped into the existing utility contractor network, provided specific training to over 100 contracting firms, and leveraged the APS rebate program structure (energy efficiency funding) to launch the EPHX commercial and residential rebate programs. The commercial finance program was coordinated and managed through a contract with National Bank of Arizona, NBAZ, which also provided project capital leveraging EPHX finance funds. Working in unison, approved contractors jointly produced more than 161,000 labor hours in pursuit of EPHX goals over the life of the project. Labor hours were spread among electricians, heating, ventilating and air-conditioning (HVAC) technicians, marketing professionals, engineers, sales, and administrative support staff across the approved contractor workforce. Program participants received both the utility rebate along with the EPHX rebate, and depending on project size and utility rebate structure some projects resulted in low to no-cost upgrades for customers. Phoenix also partnered with ASU, a grant sub-recipient, to leverage the institution’s expertise in research and data analysis. In this partnership, ASU accepted marketing responsibilities for the grant and partnered with DRA Communications (DRA), a Phoenix-based marketing firm, to create and communicate the message out to the marketplace. The EPHX program has completed its energy upgrade activities. A review of the work completed by ASU revealed that the EPHX program substantially exceeded the program’s stated goals by retrofitting/upgrading over 33 million sq ft of commercial space (30 million sq ft goal exceeded by 11%) and 2,014 residential units (1,700 unit goal exceeded by 18%) along the Light Rail Corridor. The program helped stimulate economic growth by adding $31million to the local economy and enhanced an already robust energy efficiency contractor network. This contractor network will continue to promote utility energy incentives to sustain energy efficiency upgrade activities in the future. Finally, EPHX helped reduce participants annual energy consumption by 135 million kilowatt-hour (kWh) translating into over $12.5 million of annual energy cost avoidance for the community. This also resulted in projected payback period of 4.5 years for total investment by all parties and reduced greenhouse gas emissions by over 95,000 metric tons of carbon dioxide equivalent (CO2e).

Laloudakis, Dimitrios J.

2014-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

4

Phoenix, Arizona | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Energize Phoenix: Collecting and Using Data to Improve the Program May 20, 2011 Better Buildings Grantees: Green Zones November 9, 2010 Energizing Efficiency Upgrades in a...

5

Phoenix, Arizona Summary of Reported Data | Department of Energy  

Energy Savers [EERE]

Summary of Reported Data Phoenix, Arizona Summary of Reported Data Summary of data reported by Better Buildings Neighborhood Program partner Phoenix, Arizona. Phoenix, Arizona...

6

City of Phoenix- Energize Phoenix Commercial Incentives (Arizona)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Through a partnership with Arizona State University and Arizona Public Service (APS), the City of Phoenix is providing incentives for businesses located along a 10-mile stretch of the Metro light...

7

City of Phoenix- Energize Phoenix Residential Incentives (Arizona)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The city of Phoenix was awarded a $25 million federal grant from the U.S. Department of Energy Better Buildings Neighborhood Program and the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA) to launch...

8

Phoenix, Arizona Data Dashboard | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

The data dashboard for Phoenix, Arizona, a partner in the Better Buildings Neighborhood Program. bbnpbban0003563pmcdashboardy13-q3.xls More Documents & Publications Austin...

9

City of Phoenix- Design Standards for City Buildings  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The City of Phoenix has had energy standards for public buildings in place since 2005. In June 2005, the Phoenix City Council adopted a policy requiring all new city buildings built with 2006 bond...

10

Energize Phoenix: Testing Innovative Approaches to Engaging Consumers  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Presents an up-close look at the residential rebate match program by Energize Phoenix, including the process and results.

11

NNSA to conduct Aerial Radiation Assessment Survey over Phoenix...  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

conduct Aerial Radiation Assessment Survey over Phoenix, Scottsdale, Glendale, Tempe Areas | National Nuclear Security Administration Facebook Twitter Youtube Flickr RSS People...

12

PHOENIX ENERGIZES LIGHT RAIL CORRIDOR WITH UPGRADES | Department...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

duct sealing; heating, ventilation, and air conditioning (HVAC) upgrades; sunscreens; and solar water heaters. Energize Phoenix eventually expanded its service area beyond the...

13

Phoenix, Arizona: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia: Energy ResourcesLoadingPenobscot County, Maine: Energy Resources2003) |FacilityPhoenix Silicon InternationalJump

14

Phoenix, Illinois: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia: Energy ResourcesLoadingPenobscot County, Maine: Energy Resources2003) |FacilityPhoenix Silicon

15

Phoenix, Oregon: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia: Energy ResourcesLoadingPenobscot County, Maine: Energy Resources2003) |FacilityPhoenix Silicon1907029°

16

Abell 1033: birth of a radio phoenix  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Extended steep-spectrum radio emission in a galaxy cluster is usually associated with a recent merger. However, given the complex scenario of galaxy cluster mergers, many of the discovered sources hardly fit into the strict boundaries of a precise taxonomy. This is especially true for radio phoenixes that do not have very well defined observational criteria. Radio phoenixes are aged radio galaxy lobes whose emission is reactivated by compression or other mechanisms. Here, we present the detection of a radio phoenix close to the moment of its formation. The source is located in Abell 1033, a peculiar galaxy cluster which underwent a recent merger. To support our claim, we present unpublished Westerbork Synthesis Radio Telescope and Chandra observations together with archival data from the Very Large Array and the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. We discover the presence of two sub-clusters displaced along the N-S direction. The two sub-clusters probably underwent a recent merger which is the cause of a moderately per...

de Gasperin, F; van Weeren, R J; Dawson, W A; Brüggen, M; Bonafede, A; Simionescu, A

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

17

Tuesday, March 14, 2006 SPECIAL SESSION: PHOENIX LANDING SITE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

polar cap have been characterized. This situation changed early in 2002 when large amounts of water ice. Regional melting and atmos- pheric exchange will affect all the soils. Science goal #1: Study the history of the Phoenix Mission Landing Site [#1910] The Phoenix mission will study the subsurface ice discovered in 2002

Rathbun, Julie A.

18

Monday, March 23, 2009 PHOENIX: SOIL, CHEMISTRY, AND HABITABILITY  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Monday, March 23, 2009 PHOENIX: SOIL, CHEMISTRY, AND HABITABILITY 2:30 p.m. Waterway Ballroom 1 and porous. Its cohesiveness changes when separated from the ground, most probable due to sublimation of its Aqueous Carbonate Chemistry of the Martian Soil at the Phoenix Landing Site [#2489] The Wet Chemistry Labs

Rathbun, Julie A.

19

Phoenix Roundtable Summary | Department of Energy  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "of Energy Power.pdf11-161-LNG |September 15, 2010Energy6 Frontera STAT.Paul L.3Phoenix Roundtable Summary

20

ARIZONA STATE UNIVERSITY STETSON UNIVERSITY Phoenix, AZ Deland, FL  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

English Literature English BOWLING GREEN STATE UNIVERSITY Bowling Green, OH SYRACUSE UNIVERSITY IndustrialARIZONA STATE UNIVERSITY STETSON UNIVERSITY Phoenix, AZ Deland, FL Interdisciplinary Studies Leadership FLORIDA STATE UNIVERSITY Instructional Systems Design Tallahassee, FL Interdisciplinary Studies

Wu, Shin-Tson

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "1979-1982 phoenix 1976-1982" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Posted 2/7/13 **JOB OPPS: PHOENIX CLOSURES**  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

designer. They use Solid Works and the job involves performing cap and equipment designs is a must for this candidate. Phoenix is a very solid company. Our markets are quite stable ­ basic food

Heller, Barbara

22

DOE Challenge Home Case Study, Mandalay Homes, Phoenix, AZ, Affordable  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

impact the affordability of his homes. But when the City of Phoenix awarded him the contract to build 14 new homes at Gordon Estates, a foreclosed subdivision of mostly empty...

23

On-Road Remote Sensing of Automobile Emissions in the Phoenix Area: Year 4,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

On-Road Remote Sensing of Automobile Emissions in the Phoenix Area: Year 4, November 2002 Gary A Sensing of Automobile Emissions in the Phoenix Area: Year 4 1 EXECUTIVE SUMMARY The University of Denver #12;On-Road Remote Sensing of Automobile Emissions in the Phoenix Area: Year 4 2 by 5 years

Denver, University of

24

Lidar on the Phoenix mission to Mars James Whiteway,1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Cameron Dickinson,1 Leonce Komguem,1 and Clive Cook1 Received 30 August 2007; revised 9 March 2008 of backscattered laser light from airborne dust and clouds. These observations will be coordinated with solar, and C. Cook (2008), Lidar on the Phoenix mission to Mars, J. Geophys. Res., 113, E00A08, doi:10

Duck, Thomas J.

25

Phoenix Silicon International Corp Psi | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia: Energy ResourcesLoadingPenobscot County, Maine: Energy Resources2003) |FacilityPhoenix Silicon International

26

Phoenix, North Dakota: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia: Energy ResourcesLoadingPenobscot County, Maine: Energy Resources2003) |FacilityPhoenix Silicon1907029° Loading

27

On-Road Remote Sensing of Automobile Emissions in the Phoenix Area: Year 5,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

On-Road Remote Sensing of Automobile Emissions in the Phoenix Area: Year 5, November 2004 Gary A, Suite 140 Alpharetta, Georgia 30022 Contract No. E-23-9 #12;On-Road Remote Sensing of Automobile campaigns.14 #12;On-Road Remote Sensing of Automobile Emissions in the Phoenix Area: Year 5 2 INTRODUCTION

Denver, University of

28

On-Road Remote Sensing of Automobile Emissions in the Phoenix Area: Year 3  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

On-Road Remote Sensing of Automobile Emissions in the Phoenix Area: Year 3 Sajal S. Pokharel, Gary Alpharetta, Georgia 30022 Contract No. E-23-4 #12;On-Road Remote Sensing of Automobile Emissions a slight negative dependence on #12;On-Road Remote Sensing of Automobile Emissions in the Phoenix Area

Denver, University of

29

Geochemical anomalies in soil and sandstone overlying the Phoenix uranium deposit, Athabasca Basin Natural Resources  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Co Mo Ni UU Geochemical anomalies in soil and sandstone overlying the Phoenix uranium deposit, Athabasca Basin Natural Resources Canada Geological Survey of Canada with Provincial and Territorial Collaboration Introduction The Wheeler River Property, host of Denison Mine's Phoenix uranium deposit

30

Restructuring the urban neighborhood : the dialogue between image and ideology in Phoenix Hill, Louisville, Kentucky  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This thesis addresses the problems of restructuring the urban neighborhood as specifically applied to the Phoenix Hill community in Louisville, Kentucky. Theory and concepts are briefly presented as a basis for design ...

Isaacs, Mark Andrew

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

31

On-Road Remote Sensing of Automobile Emissions in the Phoenix Area: Year 1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

On-Road Remote Sensing of Automobile Emissions in the Phoenix Area: Year 1 Gary A. Bishop, Sajal S to the national emission inventory.1 According to Heywood2 , carbon monoxide emissions from automobiles

Denver, University of

32

Soluble sulfate in the martian soil at the Phoenix landing site Samuel P. Kounaves,1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Click Here for Full Article Soluble sulfate in the martian soil at the Phoenix landing site Samuel of Fe, Ca, and Mgsulfates [Johnson et al., 2007; Yen et al., 2008; Ming et al., 2006]. The MER Mini

Kounaves, Samuel P.

33

Ceramics from the American steamboat Phoenix (1815-1819), and their role in understanding shipboard life  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Ceramics recovered from the steamboat Phoenix are used to examine life aboard an early American passenger steam-driven vessel. The primary goal of the research is to establish what general type of surroundings passengers experienced on the ship...

Haddan, Lester James

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

34

Photoelastic stress analysis on a Phoenix 7. 9-meter blade  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Photoelastic tests were conducted on the Phoenix 7.9-meter blade to develop the basic methodology for locating critical strain areas on full-scale composite structures. Under relatively low elastic loading the strain fields over various regions on the blade planform were documented with 35mm photographs under different loading conditions at the Solar Energy Research Institute (SERI) Structural Test Facility (STF). Strain concentrations were easily located and quantified. Principal strain magnitudes and directions were determined at the highest strain areas using separator gages. Results were compared to measured operating loads. This experiment demonstrated the value of experimental stress analysis using the photoelastic technique for the evaluation of composite blade designs. 9 refs., 6 figs., 3 tabs.

Musial, W.D.; Jenks, M.D.; Osgood, R.M.; Johnson, J.A.

1991-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

35

American Solar Energy Society Proc. ASES Annual Conference, Phoenix, AZ, May 2010 IMPROVING THE PERFORMANCE OF SATELLITE-TO-IRRADIANCE MODELS USING  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

© American Solar Energy Society ­ Proc. ASES Annual Conference, Phoenix, AZ, May 2010 IMPROVING;© American Solar Energy Society ­ Proc. ASES Annual Conference, Phoenix, AZ, May 2010 between the snow

Perez, Richard R.

36

Proceedings of ASME 2010 4th International Conference on Energy Sustainability May 17-22, 2010 Phoenix, Arizona, USA  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Proceedings of ASME 2010 4th International Conference on Energy Sustainability ES2010 May 17 International Conference on Energy Sustainability ES2010 May 17-22, 2010, Phoenix, Arizona, USA ES2010- 0 #12-22, 2010 Phoenix, Arizona, USA ES2010-90190 CO-DESIGN OF ENERGY-EFFICIENT HOUSING WITH THE PINOLEVILLE

Agogino, Alice M.

37

Environmental Tradeoffs in a Desert City: An Investigation of Water Use, Energy Consumption, and Local Air Temperature in Phoenix, AZ  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Environmental Tradeoffs in a Desert City: An Investigation of Water Use, Energy Consumption Area This study examined 16 Census Block Groups (2000) within the City of Phoenix to investigate are critical for long-term urban planning. Figure 2: Study Area: 16 Census Block Groups within City of Phoenix

Hall, Sharon J.

38

Influences of Urban Land-Use on the Frequency of Scorpion Stings in the Phoenix Metropolitan Area  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and beestings. Between 3000-4000 people in the Phoenix metro area report being stung by scorpions each yearInfluences of Urban Land-Use on the Frequency of Scorpion Stings in the Phoenix Metropolitan Area Nancy E. McIntyre Center for Environmental Studies, Arizona State University Summary Between 3000

Hall, Sharon J.

39

Parcel-Level Land Architecture and Land Surface Temperature in the Phoenix Metropolitan Area  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Parcel-Level Land Architecture and Land Surface Temperature in the Phoenix Metropolitan Area Xiaoxiao Li1, Yun Ouyang1, Billie Turner II1,2, Sharon Harlan3, Anthony Brazel2 1 School of Sustainability system architecture--composition and configuration of different land-cover classes--on LST in the central

Hall, Sharon J.

40

On-Road Remote Sensing of Automobile Emissions in the Phoenix Area: Year 2  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

On-Road Remote Sensing of Automobile Emissions in the Phoenix Area: Year 2 Sajal S. Pokharel, Gary Alpharetta, Georgia 30022 Contract No. E-23-4 #12;On-Road Remote Sensing of Automobile Emissions when the measurements were binned by model year. #12;On-Road Remote Sensing of Automobile Emissions

Denver, University of

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "1979-1982 phoenix 1976-1982" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Environmental determinants of unscheduled residential outages in the electrical power distribution of Phoenix, Arizona  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Phoenix, Arizona. Consistent with perceptions of increased exposure, overhead power lines positively. In the presence of overhead lines, the interaction between birds and vegetation as well as proximity to nearest Floor, P.O. Box 875302, Tempe, AZ 85287-5302, United States b Department of Urban Design and Planning

42

3D Downtown Phoenix Modeling This project is to develop the efficient and effective method for  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

3D Downtown Phoenix Modeling ABSTRACT This project is to develop the efficient and effective method for creating 3D city models that will be used with GIS (Geographical Information Systems) data in VR (Virtual Reality) environment. Here introduces the modeling process to create 3D city model from aerial photos

Hall, Sharon J.

43

Water Environment Federation. National TMDL Science and Policy Conference. Phoenix, AZ. November 13 16, 2002.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Water Environment Federation. National TMDL Science and Policy Conference. Phoenix, AZ. November 13 ­ 16, 2002. AVAILABILITY OF ATMOSPHERICALLY DEPOSITED MERCURY TO RUNOFF AND RECEIVING WATERS Mark C to receiving waters; such estimates are overly conservative, and do not reflect the complex nature of mercury

Pitt, Robert E.

44

Tuesday, March 24, 2009 POSTER SESSION I: PHOENIX LANDING SITE: PERCHLORATE AND OTHER TASTY TREATS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

at the Bed of Mars Northern Ice Cap that Would Allow Flow with Very Low Basal Temperatures: Possible the flow of ice. Phoenix discovered polar soils contain perchlorate salts. These salts depress the melting Mechanism for Water Table Re-Charge [#2281] The north cap of Mars has basal temperature that precludes

Rathbun, Julie A.

45

ASES Proc. Solar 2010, Phoenix, AZ HIGH PERFORMANCE MSG SATELLITE MODEL FOR OPERATIONAL  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

terrain affects exploitation of solar energy. In this article we present innovative features of MSG area of interest, which extends from North Europe to North Africa. The satellite data calibration© ASES ­ Proc. Solar 2010, Phoenix, AZ HIGH PERFORMANCE MSG SATELLITE MODEL FOR OPERATIONAL SOLAR

Perez, Richard R.

46

WestSolarGroundMount City of Phoenix/ASU West  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Fletcher WestSolarGroundMount Lawn Field City of Phoenix/ASU West South Fields Community Park Parking Lot 12 North Zone #12; 2E · Credit Union · Parking & Transit Services · Devils Den · Jamba Juice · P.O.D. Market

47

Phoenix : Complex Adaptive System of Systems (CASoS) engineering version 1.0.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Complex Adaptive Systems of Systems, or CASoS, are vastly complex ecological, sociological, economic and/or technical systems which we must understand to design a secure future for the nation and the world. Perturbations/disruptions in CASoS have the potential for far-reaching effects due to pervasive interdependencies and attendant vulnerabilities to cascades in associated systems. Phoenix was initiated to address this high-impact problem space as engineers. Our overarching goals are maximizing security, maximizing health, and minimizing risk. We design interventions, or problem solutions, that influence CASoS to achieve specific aspirations. Through application to real-world problems, Phoenix is evolving the principles and discipline of CASoS Engineering while growing a community of practice and the CASoS engineers to populate it. Both grounded in reality and working to extend our understanding and control of that reality, Phoenix is at the same time a solution within a CASoS and a CASoS itself.

Moore, Thomas W.; Quach, Tu-Thach; Detry, Richard Joseph; Conrad, Stephen Hamilton; Kelic, Andjelka; Starks, Shirley J.; Beyeler, Walter Eugene; Brodsky, Nancy S.; Verzi, Stephen J.; Brown, Theresa Jean; Glass, Robert John, Jr.; Sunderland, Daniel J.; Mitchell, Michael David; Ames, Arlo Leroy; Maffitt, S. Louise; Finley, Patrick D.; Russell, Eric Dean; Zagonel, Aldo A.; Reedy, Geoffrey E.; Mitchell, Roger A.; Corbet, Thomas Frank, Jr.; Linebarger, John Michael

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

48

EIS-0107: Mead-Phoenix +500-kV Direct Current Transmission Line  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The U.S. Department of Energy’s Western Area Power Administration (WAPA) prepared this statement to analyze the potential environmental and socioeconomic impacts arising from WAPA and regional project sponsors’ proposal to construct a 500 kilovolt (kV) alternating current (AC) transmission line with the capability to be upgraded later to 500kV direct current (DC), connecting the Westwing Substation, located north of Phoenix, Arizona, with a new McCullough II Substation, located approximately 14 miles west of Boulder City, Nevada. This statement modifies a previously prepared federal statement from which the participants' election to proceed had not occurred at the time this statement was prepared.

49

Phoenix, Arizona , Summary of Reported Data From July 1, 2010 - September 30, 2013  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankCombustion | Department ofT ib l L d F SSalesOE0000652GrowE-mail on August 24, 2005Philadelphia,Phoenix,

50

Summer cooling efficiency of landscapes in Phoenix, AZ Ariane Middel , Anthony J. Brazel , Shai Kaplan , Soe W. Myint  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

above canopy for July 6, 2005 lTo investigate the trade-off between water demand of irrigated landscape, Tempe AZ 85287-8209 2 School of Geographical Sciences and Urban Planning, Arizona State University, POIntyre, N., Steiner, F. R., Nelson, A., Musacchio, L., 2002, Urbanization and warming of Phoenix (Arizona

Hall, Sharon J.

51

The contribution of evapotranspiration and evaporation to the water budget of a treatment wetland in Phoenix, AZ, USA  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The contribution of evapotranspiration and evaporation to the water budget of a treatment wetland evapotranspiration and evaporation rates in a constructed treatment wetland in Phoenix during the summer, when both budget for the Tres Rios treatment wetland, and will improve our general knowledge of wetland water

Hall, Sharon J.

52

THE STATE OF THE WARM AND COLD GAS IN THE EXTREME STARBURST AT THE CORE OF THE PHOENIX GALAXY CLUSTER (SPT-CLJ2344-4243)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present new optical integral field spectroscopy (Gemini South) and submillimeter spectroscopy (Submillimeter Array) of the central galaxy in the Phoenix cluster (SPT-CLJ2344-4243). This cluster was previously reported ...

McDonald, Michael A.

53

Towards a phoenix phase in aeolian research: shifting geophysical perspectives from fluvial dominance  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Aeolian processes are a fundamental driver of earth surface dynamics, yet the importance of aeolian processes in a broader geosciences context may be overshadowed by an unbalanced emphasis on fluvial processes. Here we wish to highlight that aeolian and fluvial processes need to be considered in concert relative to total erosion and to potential interactions, that relative dominance and sensitivity to disturbance vary with mean annual precipitation, and that there are important scale-dependencies associated with aeolian-fluvial interactions. We build on previous literature to present relevant conceptual syntheses highlighting these issues. We then highlight the relative investments that have been made in aeolian research on dust emission and management relative to that in fluvial research on sediment production. Literature searches highlight that aeolian processes are greatly understudied relative to fluvial processes when considering total erosion in different environmental settings. Notably, within the USA, aeolian research was triggered by the Dust Bowl catastrophe of the 1930s, but the resultant research agencies have shifted to almost completely focusing on fluvial processes, based on number of remaining research stations and on monetary investments in control measures. However, numerous research issues associated with intensification of land use and climate change impacts require a rapid ramping up in aeolian research that improves information about aeolian processes relative to fluvial processes, which could herald a post-Dust Bowl Phoenix phase in which aeolian processes are recognized as broadly critical to geo- and environmental sciences.

Whicker, Jeffrey J [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Field, Jason P [UNIV OF ARIZONA; Breshears, David D [UNIV OF ARIZONA

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

54

Solar energy system performance evaluation - final report for Honeywell OTS 45, Salt River Project, Phoenix, Arizona  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes the operation and technical performance of the Solar Operational Test Site (OTS 45) at Salt River Project in Phoenix, Arizona, based on the analysis of data collected between April 1981 and March 31, 1982. The following topics are discussed: system description, performance assessment, operating energy, energy savings, system maintenance, and conclusions. The solar energy system at OTS 45 is a hydronic heating and cooling system consisting of 8208 square feet of liquid-cooled flat-plate collectors; a 2500-gallon thermal storage tank; two 25-ton capacity organic Rankine-cycle-engine-assisted water chillers; a forced-draft cooling tower; and associated piping, pumps, valves, controls and heat rejection equipment. The solar system has eight basic modes of operation and several combination modes. The system operation is controlled automatically by a Honeywell-designed microprocessor-based control system, which also provides diagnostics. Based on the instrumented test data monitored and collected during the 8 months of the Operational Test Period, the solar system collected 1143 MMBtu of thermal energy of the total incident solar energy of 3440 MMBtu and provided 241 MMBtu for cooling and 64 MMBtu for heating. The projected net annual electrical energy savings due to the solar system was approximately 40,000 kWh(e).

Mathur, A K

1983-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

55

The U.S. Department of Energy Office of Indian Energy Policy and Programs Phoenix, Arizona, Roundtable Summary  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Phoenix, Arizona, Roundtable on Tribal Energy Policy convened at 8:30 a.m., Tuesday, April 5th, at the downtown Phoenix Hyatt. The meeting was hosted by the Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Indian Energy Policy and Programs (DOE Office of Indian Energy) and facilitated by the Udall Foundation’s U.S. Institute for Environmental Conflict Resolution (U.S. Institute). Approximately thirty?eight people attended the meeting, including representatives of ten different tribes, as well as representatives of the Colorado Indian Tribes, the All Indian Pueblo Council and the Inter?Tribal Council of Arizona. Interested state, federal, university, NGO and industry representatives also were present. A full list of attendees is at the end of this summary. DOE representatives were Tracey LeBeau, Directory of the DOE Office of Indian Energy, Pilar Thomas, Deputy Director?Policy of the DOE Office of Indian Energy, and David Conrad, Director of Tribal and Intergovernmental Affairs, DOE Office of Congressional and Intergovernmental Affairs.

none,

2011-04-05T23:59:59.000Z

56

Effects of urban land cover modifications in a mesoscale meteorological model on surface temperature and heat fluxes in the Phoenix metropolitan area.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and latent heat fluxes and therefore the ground temperature, Tg. Evaporation, E, for each grid cell temperature and heat fluxes in the Phoenix metropolitan area. S. Grossman-Clarke1, J.A. Zehnder2, and W) satellite images [2]. The data were upscaled to a 30-second grid and used to augment and correct

Hall, Sharon J.

57

Foreseeing critical phosphorus cycle transitions in constructed wetlands: applied to the new Tres Rios arid-land constructed wetlands with the city of Phoenix  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Foreseeing critical phosphorus cycle transitions in constructed wetlands: applied to the new Tres Rios arid-land constructed wetlands with the city of Phoenix E.Chapman1 and B.Warner2 1 School of Life Sciences, 2 School of Sustainability, Arizona State University,Tempe, AZ Abstract Constructed wetland

Hall, Sharon J.

58

Ecosystem Services and Trade-Offs Mediated by Urban Water Bodies for Homeless Popula@ons in Phoenix Wolf, A.1,2, M.M. Palta,2 N.B. Grimm,2 J. Gwiszcz,3 O. Schwake,4  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Ecosystem Services and Trade-Offs Mediated by Urban Water Bodies for Homeless · Urban runoff entering stormwater ouPalls in Phoenix have created "accidental" wetlands in the otherwise dry Salt River bed · Urban wetland environments

Hall, Sharon J.

59

Trap cultures reveal higher species richness of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi in comparison to soil samples in the Phoenix metropolitan area.Arbuscular mycorrhizal fungal and dark septate endophytes colonization of plant roots from urban desert preserves a  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

samples in the Phoenix metropolitan area.Arbuscular mycorrhizal fungal and dark septate endophytes mycorrhizal fungal and dark septate endophytes colonization of plant roots from urban desert preserves (Brundett 1999). Dark septate endophytes (DSE) are another type of root colonizing fungi mainly classified

Hall, Sharon J.

60

The 17th IASTED Int. Conf. on Parallel and Distributed Computing and Systems (PDCS 2005), Nov. 14-16, 2005, Phoenix, AZ, USA EFFICIENT MINING OF DISCRIMINATIVE MOLECULAR FRAGMENTS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-16, 2005, Phoenix, AZ, USA EFFICIENT MINING OF DISCRIMINATIVE MOLECULAR FRAGMENTS Giuseppe Di Fatta. In this paper we present a parallel formula- tion of the frequent subgraph mining problem to discover National Cancer Institute's HIV-screening dataset. KEY WORDS Distributed computing, frequent subgraph

Reiterer, Harald

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "1979-1982 phoenix 1976-1982" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Phoenix Area Social Survey: Long Term Monitoring of Social Interaction and Environmental Change in Urban Neighborhoods Amy Nelson, Sharon Harlan, Edward Hackett, Andrew Kirby, Robert Bolin, David Pijawka, Tom Rex  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

a sustainable urban environment and for mitigating environmental damage? 3. How do neighborhood characteristicsPhoenix Area Social Survey: Long Term Monitoring of Social Interaction and Environmental Change, and how changing environmental conditions, in turn, affect the quality of human life. 1. How do

Hall, Sharon J.

62

Phoenix-UrbanNon-Sacramentorural.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the ecosystem has yet to be fully constructed. Goals 1. To understand the drivers of carbon dynamics in urban. Vegetation (Trees and Shrubs) Storage and NPP Tree and Shrub Total NPP: 172 Gg C / Year Tree and Shrub Total on a per area basis, but there is more storage in trees and less in shrubs · NPP in urban mesic plots

Hall, Sharon J.

63

Phoenix Press | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 No revision hasInformation Earth'sOklahoma/GeothermalOrangePeru: Energy ResourcesPhilippines:San Francisco,Press

64

Energize Phoenix | Department of Energy  

Energy Savers [EERE]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of Inspector General Office of Audit| Department ofNon-Road Engines,Employee

65

Phoenix Analog | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia: Energy ResourcesLoadingPenobscot County, Maine: Energy Resources2003) |Facility |Phillipston,Phoenicia,Analog

66

Central Arizona -Phoenix Long-Term Ecological  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, Meegan, and Swanson Elser and Saltz Gonzales and Allen Hope and Gries Goodman Hu, Fortuna, Sommerfeld

Hall, Sharon J.

67

Welcome Indian Gaming Phoenix 2013 Attendees!  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Thank you for visiting the DOE Office of Indian Energy booth. Below are links to our booth materials and resources.

68

Phoenix, Arizona Data Dashboard | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "ofEarly Careerlumens_placard-green.epsEnergy1.pdfMarket | Department ofSecretaryMarch 26, 2015 DOEThe data

69

Central Arizona -Phoenix Long-Term Ecological  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, and Roach Martin, Day, Briggs, Stutz, and Sommerfeld Jenerette, Luck, Wu, Grimm, Hope, and Zhu Marussich, and Faeth Nelson, Bolin, Hackett, Pijawka, Sadalla, Sicotte, Brewer, and Matrangra Roach, Coppola, and Grimm

Hall, Sharon J.

70

Central Arizona -Phoenix Long-Term Ecological  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, Goldsmith, Marussich, Roach, & Wu Jenerette & Wu Katti, Shochat, Stuart, Lemmer, & Rambo Lewis, Wu, & Grimm, Sicotte, & Yang Roach & Grimm Quay Stuart Shochat, Faeth, Fagan, Tseng, Rambo, & Cassalata Swanson Shochat

Hall, Sharon J.

71

ARM - Field Campaign - 2001 Phoenix Sunrise Experiment  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLasDelivered‰PNGExperience4AJ01)3, 2010September 30,JuneMay 15,October 6,

72

Phoenix Canada Oil Company | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 No revision hasInformation Earth'sOklahoma/GeothermalOrangePeru: Energy ResourcesPhilippines:

73

Phoenix Energy LLC | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 No revision hasInformation Earth'sOklahoma/GeothermalOrangePeru: Energy ResourcesPhilippines:San Francisco,

74

Phoenix, Arizona: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 No revision hasInformation Earth'sOklahoma/GeothermalOrangePeru: Energy ResourcesPhilippines:San

75

Phoenix Geothermal Services | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia: Energy ResourcesLoadingPenobscot County, Maine: Energy Resources2003) |Facility

76

Phoenix Roundtable Summary | Department of Energy  

Energy Savers [EERE]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of Inspector GeneralDepartment of Energy from Elizabeth C. P - . . - -EndPavingSecretaryOrderDepartment

77

annual meeting phoenix: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

3.1 93rd Annual General Meeting - June 4, 2009 Marianne asked - 10 Review Engagement Report - Dr. Bryan Harvey, President Elect Dr. Bryan Harvey reviewed Saskatchewan,...

78

The Phoenix series large scale LNG pool fire experiments.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The increasing demand for natural gas could increase the number and frequency of Liquefied Natural Gas (LNG) tanker deliveries to ports across the United States. Because of the increasing number of shipments and the number of possible new facilities, concerns about the potential safety of the public and property from an accidental, and even more importantly intentional spills, have increased. While improvements have been made over the past decade in assessing hazards from LNG spills, the existing experimental data is much smaller in size and scale than many postulated large accidental and intentional spills. Since the physics and hazards from a fire change with fire size, there are concerns about the adequacy of current hazard prediction techniques for large LNG spills and fires. To address these concerns, Congress funded the Department of Energy (DOE) in 2008 to conduct a series of laboratory and large-scale LNG pool fire experiments at Sandia National Laboratories (Sandia) in Albuquerque, New Mexico. This report presents the test data and results of both sets of fire experiments. A series of five reduced-scale (gas burner) tests (yielding 27 sets of data) were conducted in 2007 and 2008 at Sandia's Thermal Test Complex (TTC) to assess flame height to fire diameter ratios as a function of nondimensional heat release rates for extrapolation to large-scale LNG fires. The large-scale LNG pool fire experiments were conducted in a 120 m diameter pond specially designed and constructed in Sandia's Area III large-scale test complex. Two fire tests of LNG spills of 21 and 81 m in diameter were conducted in 2009 to improve the understanding of flame height, smoke production, and burn rate and therefore the physics and hazards of large LNG spills and fires.

Simpson, Richard B.; Jensen, Richard Pearson; Demosthenous, Byron; Luketa, Anay Josephine; Ricks, Allen Joseph; Hightower, Marion Michael; Blanchat, Thomas K.; Helmick, Paul H.; Tieszen, Sheldon Robert; Deola, Regina Anne; Mercier, Jeffrey Alan; Suo-Anttila, Jill Marie; Miller, Timothy J.

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

79

CAP LTER 20042007 Central ArizonaPhoenix LTER  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Conceptual framework 2 Research design and approach 4 IPA: Landuse and landcover change (LULCC) 4 IPA: Climateecosystem interactions (CLIMECOS) 6 IPA: Water policy, use, and supply (WATER) 9 IPA: Material fluxes and socioecosystem

Hall, Sharon J.

80

SME Annual Meeting Feb. 28-Mar. 03, 2010, Phoenix, AZ  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-066 DESIGNING AND MODELING WIRELESS MESH COMMUNICATIONS IN UNDERGROUND COAL MINES K. R. Griffin, Virginia Tech, Blacksburg, VA S. J. Schafrik, Virginia Tech, Blacksburg, VA M. E. Karmis, Virginia Tech, Blacksburg, VA

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "1979-1982 phoenix 1976-1982" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Phoenix Landing Mission to the Martian Polar North  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

that the spacecraft is ready to conduct its surface mission, the center of operations will be at the University of Arizona's Sci- ence Operations Center, Tucson. For information about covering operations there in person will originate from the University of Arizona's Science Operations Center, Tucson. The briefings from both

Kounaves, Samuel P.

82

SME Annual Meeting Feb. 28-Mar. 03, 2010, Phoenix, AZ  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in China. Advanced, three-dimensional gas reservoir simulation software will be utilized to determine of the increase (2). Methane, the main constituent of natural gas, possesses radiative trapping capabilities greater than 300 cubic feet per ton. Comparatively, gas content's of deep coal seams located in China

83

PHOENIX NATURAL GAS LIMITED PRICE DETERMINATION REFERENCE Disclosures of interest  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Member disclosures Martin Cave (Group Chairman) is a joint academic director of a Brussels-based think tank on regulation called CERRE (www.cerre.eu). This has occupied about ten days per year, mostly attending seminars in Brussels with regulators and regulatees. Another joint academic director is Prof C Waddams. They have not collaborated on any research projects, but he has chaired a panel which she was on. He has co-written a general book, or textbook, on regulation, which includes chapters on price control. The index lists three brief references to energy regulation: Baldwin, Cave &

Richard Taylor

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

84

Phoenix Flora Project D. Damrel, D. Pinkava, L. Landrum  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ASTERACEAE - Gymnosperma glutinosum 297 ASTERACEAE - Machaeranthera arida 298 ASTERACEAE - Machaeranthera

Hall, Sharon J.

85

DOE Zero Energy Ready Home Case Study, Mandalay Homes, Phoenix...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

home has R-21 framed walls, a sealed closed-cell spray foamed attic, an air-source heat pump with forced air, and a solar combo system that provides PV, hot water, and space...

86

Phoenix: Detecting and Recovering from Permanent Processor Design Bugs  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

approaches are ineffective Micro-code patching Compiler workarounds OS hacks Firmware #12;http Condition L1, ALU, Memory, etc. Hang, data corruption IO failure, wrong data A (BCD) Signal Snoop L1 hit IO

Torrellas, Josep

87

Federal Correctional Institution - Phoenix, Arizona | Department of Energy  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "of EnergyEnergyENERGY TAX POLICIES ANDIndustrial

88

NNSA to conduct Aerial Radiation Assessment Survey over Phoenix,  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLas Conchas recoveryLaboratory | National Nuclear

89

Phoenix Overcomes Barriers and Energizes Homeowners to Make Upgrades |  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "ofEarly Careerlumens_placard-green.epsEnergy1.pdfMarket | Department ofSecretaryMarch 26, 2015 DOE

90

Phoenix, Arizona Summary of Reported Data | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "ofEarly Careerlumens_placard-green.epsEnergy1.pdfMarket | Department ofSecretaryMarch 26, 2015 DOEThe

91

PHOENIX ENERGIZES LIGHT RAIL CORRIDOR WITH UPGRADES | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:Year in3.pdfEnergyDepartment ofOil's Impact on OurSempriusEnergy PART 708PHEV

92

Microsoft Word - Phoenix_RTG_TECmeetingsummaryApr05.doc  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

affect routing. FRA and AAR representatives responded by saying that whether dedicated trains are used over a suite of routes will not affect routing criteria, but issues such as...

93

ARM - Field Campaign - 1998 Phoenix Air Quality Study  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLasDelivered‰PNGExperience4AJ01)3, 2010September 30,JuneMay 15,October 6, 20105 Southern6

94

Solar Phoenix 2 Launch Event | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "of EnergyEnergyENERGYWomenthe House Committee on Energy andDepartment ofAnShare yourA NewGrowth of Solar114

95

Federal Correctional Institution - Phoenix, Arizona | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:Year in Review:Department ofDistribution Infrastructure | Department of1,Energy Bills

96

Phoenix American Rooftop Solar Technologies | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia: Energy ResourcesLoadingPenobscot County, Maine: Energy Resources2003) |Facility |Phillipston,Phoenicia,

97

Municipal Consortium Annual Meeting Presentations and Materials-Phoenix,  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "ofEarly Careerlumens_placard-green.eps MoreWSRC-STI-2007-00250 Rev.Tech Brief answers:This pageLow-Cost SolarAZ

98

Clean Cities: Valley of the Sun Clean Cities coalition (Phoenix)  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home PageEmerging FuelsRelated4Rogue ValleyValley of the Sun Clean

99

Salt River (Rio Salado Oeste), Phoenix, Maricopa County, Arizona  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and cottonwood/willow, mesquite, and wetland cover types restored throught the project area. Two old gravel pit lakes would also be restored to wetland and riparian complexes. The plan also includes control) of reclaimed effluent from the 23rd Avenue Waste Water Treatment Plant, and by harvesting of storm water

US Army Corps of Engineers

100

Zoning, Land-use Fragmentation And Environmental Justice In Early Phoenix, AZ Euclidean Zoning adopted by Phoenix in 1930 to  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

(6) Planing and flour mills, industrial steam laundries, ice manufacturing and cold storage, chemical and Light Industrial ·Multifamily Residential zones as buffers between homogeneous, racially+ : distancing of Phoenecian suburbs from expanding industry and problems of CBD; Boosterism thrives ·Onset

Hall, Sharon J.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "1979-1982 phoenix 1976-1982" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Psychological Review Copyright 1991 by the American Psychological Assoeiation~ Inc. 199I, Vol.98, No. 4, 569-603 0033-295X/91/$3.00  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, No. 4, 569-603 0033-295X/91/$3.00 The How and Why of What Went Where in Apparent Motion: Modeling as the construction of useful representations about the world (e.g.,Horn, 1986; Marr, 1976,1982; Ullman, 1979

Dawson, Michael

102

Cultural colonizers : persistence and empire in the Indian antiremoval movement, 1815-1859  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

this Country,” printed in the Cherokee Phoenix, Vol. II, n.32, November 11, 1829. Cherokee Phoenix 1828-1829, ANreproduced from the Cherokee Phoenix, in Smith, ed. , The

Gonzales, Christian Michael

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

103

Managed Properties  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

the country. Reindustrialization Team Honored with Phoenix Award for Excellence in Brownfield Redevelopment phoenix2 Oak Ridge, Tenn -- The Phoenix is regarded in many cultures...

104

Reference Buildings by Climate Zone and Representative City: 2B Phoenix, Arizona  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

In addition to the ZIP file for each building type, you can directly view the "scorecard" spreadsheet that summarizes the inputs and results for each location. This Microsoft Excel spreadsheet is also included in the ZIP file. For version 1.4, only the IDF file is included.

105

The 3rd International Symposium on Phoenix Leader Education program (Hiroshima Initiative) for  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of nuclear energy policy" 10:40-11:20 Lecture I Dr. Jacques Lochard (Chairman of Committee 4, ICRP "Ethical. ChhemDirector, Human Health, IAEA "Understanding and addressing the Fukushima nuclear accident through:00-10-40 Special Lecture Noriyuki MizunoNHK Science Commentator "Nuclear power plant disaster and direction

Ishii, Hitoshi

106

The Passenger Steamboat Phoenix: An Archaeological Study of Early Steam Propulsion in North America  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The advent of steam contributed heavily to the economic transformation of early America, facilitating trade through the transportation of goods along the country’s lakes, rivers, and canals. Serious experimentation with steam navigation began...

Schwarz, George 1977-

2012-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

107

Introduction to special section on the Phoenix Mission: Landing Site Characterization Experiments, Mission Overviews, and  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

braking strategy. After a safe landing, twin fan-like solar panels are unfurled and provide the energy lander with a science payload inherited from MPL and 2001 instruments gives significant advantages, University of Ottawa, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada. 10 Max Planck Institute for Solar System Research, Katlenburg

Duck, Thomas J.

108

Title Gated Communities, Homogeneity and Social Distance in Las Vegas and Phoenix.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and age. The authors apply an index of local social distance, based on multivariate factor analysis spaces compared to the surrounding neighborhoods. The research contributes to a well established line significant level of dissimilarity between two contiguous census areas. Based on the analysis of discontinuity

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

109

Mary Lou Fulton Teachers College Mailing Address: PO Box 37100, Phoenix, AZ 85069-7100  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

secondary education apprentice teachers in the field. This position also requires a candidate who can teach will be occurring in schools with apprentice teachers carrying out STEM requirements). Familiarity with state

110

Geochemical anomalies in the surface media over the Phoenix Deposit, Athabasca Basin Ressources naturelles  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

summers. The surface topography on the Wheeler River Property consists mainly of gently rolling hills at the Wheeler River Property. The small hills in the background indicate gentle topographical relief. Figure 5: View through the forest, with abundant young black spruce and extensive mossy undergrowth. Samples

111

Coal-Mac, Inc. Phoenix No. 1 mine provides wildlife haven. 2007 Wildlife West Virginia Award  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Coal Mac, Inc.'s Harless Wood Industrial Park off Holden 22 Mines Road in Logan Country, West Virginia is an award-winning reclamation site in the mountains frequented by geese, wild turkey, deer and black bears. Orchard grass and rye is a temporary cover for the timothy, clover and other seedlings. The area was mined several years ago. Some 40,000-50,000 tons of coal per month are surfaced mined with the current permit that takes in 1,500-2,000 acres. After removing the coal, valleys are backfilled as part of the mining and reclamation plan. 10 photos.

Skinner, A.

2007-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

112

Microbial enhanced waterflooding Mink Unit and Phoenix field pilots. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

To determine the feasibility of improving oil recovery and the economics of microbial enhanced waterflooding in mature oil wells in the United States, two field pilots have been conducted. Candidate fields were screened to determine whether they have any potential for a microbial system developed at the National Institute for Petroleum and Energy Research (NIPER), and microbial compatibility tests were conducted in the laboratory to select the target field. A specific microbial formulation was selected that was compatible with the chosen reservoir environment and had been shown to recover oil after waterflooding in Berea sandstone and field core. The microbial formulation was designed to improve microscopic oil displacement efficiency by surfactant, gas and acid production from fermentation of molasses. A 20-acre pilot test was initiated in October 1986, and completed in December 1989. Results from this pilot demonstrated that microorganisms could be injected into an ongoing waterflood and that such injection could increase oil production by at least 13%. A larger test (520 acres) was completed in the same formation to evaluate the feasibility of commercial application of the technology. This field pilot was injected with microorganisms and molasses from a centralized injection station in June 1990. Although microorganisms were injected only once per site, nutrient injection continued throughout the project life. All 19 injection wells were treated, and oil production was monitored from the 47 production wells. Injection pressures and volumes were monitored throughout the project. No operational problems were encountered. At the end of May 1993, oil production was improved by 19.6 %. Results from both projects are presented and the potential for microbial-enhanced waterflooding technology is evaluated.

Bryant, R.S.; Steep, A.K.; Bertus, K.M.; Burchfield, T.E. [National Inst. for Petroleum and Energy Research, Bartlesville, OK (United States); Dennis, M. [Microbial Systems Corp., OK (United States)

1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

113

Mary Lou Fulton Teachers College Mailing Address: PO Box 37100, Phoenix, AZ 85069-7100  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-6350 Technology Infusion Specialist, #10708 The Mary Lou Fulton Teachers College invites applications for one full time Technology Infusion Specialist position. Duties and Responsibilities include: Under the direction of the technology infusion coordinator, the technology infusion specialist will work with MLFTC staff and faculty

114

DOE Zero Energy Ready Home Case Study: Mandalay Homes, Phoenix, AZ,  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "of EnergyEnergyENERGYWomentheATLANTA, GA - U.S. Department ofThe U.S.D.C. -Affordable | Department of

115

A Good Year for Solar in Phoenix Area | Department of Energy  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "of EnergyEnergy Cooperation |South Valley ResponsibleSubmissionof Energy 5ofA Boost forAA First Peek

116

DOE Zero Energy Ready Home Case Study 2013: Mandalay Homes, Phoenix, AZ  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "ofEarly Career Scientists'Montana. DOCUMENTSof EnergyAlliance |Department ofShowerheads |16,

117

Rudd Klein Alternative Energy Ventures LLC aka Phoenix Energy Fund | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 No revisionEnvReviewNonInvasiveExplorationUT-g Grant ofRichardton Abbey Wind Farm ItRoscoe Wind OwnerRoyse

118

Reference Buildings by Climate Zone and Representative City: 2B Phoenix,  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankCombustion | Department ofT ib l L dDepartmentnews-flashes OfficeTexas | Department of Energy

119

Thursday, November 9, 2006 Saskatoon, Saskatchewan The StarPhoenix FORUM A11 LETTERS TO THE EDITOR  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the necessity of change and are rapidly developing their ethanol and bio- diesel capacity. The federal regarding changes to the Cana- dian Wheat Board. It's one regarding the reality of marketing western Canadian grain into the export market. The dramatic and tragic loss of thousands of west- ern grain farmers

Saskatchewan, University of

120

A discussion of the phoenix in day six of Johann Valentin Andreae's The Chymical Wedding of Christian Rosencreutz  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

contributors to fifteen fields. The selections are by and large admirable and similar to ones that might be compiled today upon looking back at the early modern western world: for example, in mathematics Andreae includes Nicolas Copernicus, Tycho Brahe...

Fox, Chryseis Olias

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "1979-1982 phoenix 1976-1982" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
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121

American Solar Energy Society Proc. ASES Annual Conference, Phoenix, AZ, May 2010 QUANTIFYING THE COST OF HIGH PHOTOVOLTAIC PENETRATION  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

are not. The result is that dispersed PV generation's peak-shaving ability decreases with increasing is illustrated in Fig. 1 using measured load and simulated PV data. 2.1 Definitions Peak Load: LPeak (MW. INTRODUCTION An important benefit of PV generation is its ability to satisfy peak electrical demand [1, 2, 3

Perez, Richard R.

122

IEEE Conference on Decision and Control, Phoenix, USA, December 1999 1 Stability Analysis of a Longitudinal Control Law for  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

address the case where all automation intelligence is concentrated within individual vehicles, leading of a Longitudinal Control Law for Autonomous Vehicles Alain Girault 1 and Sergio Yovine 2 Abstract We focus in this article on the analysis of an accelera­ tion law for a following autonomous vehicle with con­ stant time

Girault, Alain

123

PRESS RELEASE FROM THE INDIAN INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY DELHI "Smart Cane" developed jointly by IIT Delhi, Phoenix Medical  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

knee height, for example a metal barrier on the road, or those that protrude in the natural environment, such as a tree branch or a window air- conditioner protruding in the corridor. The "Smart Cane" is an innovative- detachable unit and is powered by a rechargeable lithium-ion battery, such as those commonly found in mobile

Banerjee, Subhashis

124

Cold and dry processes in the Martian Arctic: Geomorphic observations at the Phoenix landing site and comparisons with  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, and thermal contraction crack polygon morphologies strikingly similar to terrestrial sublimation polygons, all, and largely driven by sublimation of buried ice (either pore ice, excess ice, or both) are shaping, perchlorate, and pH soil chemistry comparable to that observed in terrestrial cold and arid terrains [Boynton

Marchant, David R.

125

3610 N. 44th Street, Suite 250, Phoenix, AZ 85018 ● Phone 602-808-2004 ●  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:YearRound-Up from theDepartment(October-December 2013Lamps;5SUMMARIES | Department of10 N. 44th

126

Transportation and Stationary Power Integration Workshop Agenda...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Agenda, October 27, 2008, Phoenix, Arizonia Transportation and Stationary Power Integration Workshop Agenda, October 27, 2008, Phoenix, Arizonia Agenda for the Transportation and...

127

E-Print Network 3.0 - american epilepsy society Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Phoenix,AZ85013 Summary: PERMIT4088 PHOENIX,AZ PRESENTED BY: Epilepsy Foundation of Arizona and The University of Arizona... Department of Neurology Arizona...

128

Application of the Global Positioning System to the Measurement of Overhead Power Transmission Conductor Sag  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Systems Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ Entergy New Orleans, LA Arizona Public Service Phoenix, AZ

129

Effects of Regulated Water Flows on Regen-eration of Fremont Cottonwood  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-long dam and reservoir system designed to provide water and hydroelectric power to the greater Phoenix

130

Type B Accident Investigation Board Report of the January 20, 1998, Electrical Accident at the Casa Grande Substation,South of Phoenix, Arizona  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This report is an independent product of the Type-B Accident Investigation Board appointed by Michael S.Cowan, Chief Program Officer, Western Area Power Administration.

131

Solar Resource & Meteorological Assessment Project (SOLRMAP): Southwest Solar Research Park (Formerly SolarCAT) Rotating Shadowband Radiometer (RSR); Phoenix, Arizona (Data)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy's National Renewable Energy Laboratory collaborates with the solar industry to establish high quality solar and meteorological measurements. This Solar Resource and Meteorological Assessment Project (SOLRMAP) provides high quality measurements to support deployment of power projects in the United States. The no-funds-exchanged collaboration brings NREL solar resource assessment expertise together with industry needs for measurements. The end result is high quality data sets to support the financing, design, and monitoring of large scale solar power projects for industry in addition to research-quality data for NREL model development. NREL provides consultation for instrumentation and station deployment, along with instrument calibrations, data acquisition, quality assessment, data distribution, and summary reports. Industry participants provide equipment, infrastructure, and station maintenance.

Wilcox, S.; Andreas, A.

2010-09-27T23:59:59.000Z

132

The Impact of Mortgage Foreclosures on Existing Home Prices in Housing Boom and Bust Cycles: A Case Study of Phoenix, AZ  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

data sets and problems of heteroskedasticity in error terms. Thus, the preferred specification is a generalized method of moments (GMM) approach which requires weaker assumptions than the maximum likelihood application and has flexible form to large...

Lee, Sang Hyun

2012-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

133

Solar Resource & Meteorological Assessment Project (SOLRMAP): Southwest Solar Research Park (Formerly SolarCAT) Rotating Shadowband Radiometer (RSR); Phoenix, Arizona (Data)  

DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

The U.S. Department of Energy's National Renewable Energy Laboratory collaborates with the solar industry to establish high quality solar and meteorological measurements. This Solar Resource and Meteorological Assessment Project (SOLRMAP) provides high quality measurements to support deployment of power projects in the United States. The no-funds-exchanged collaboration brings NREL solar resource assessment expertise together with industry needs for measurements. The end result is high quality data sets to support the financing, design, and monitoring of large scale solar power projects for industry in addition to research-quality data for NREL model development. NREL provides consultation for instrumentation and station deployment, along with instrument calibrations, data acquisition, quality assessment, data distribution, and summary reports. Industry participants provide equipment, infrastructure, and station maintenance.

Wilcox, S.; Andreas, A.

134

Bill Post is a Valley leader, involved with the ASU Foundation, Blue Cross/Blue Shield of Arizona, The Greater Phoenix Leadership, The Institute of Nuclear  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, The Thunderbird School of Global Management, and Translational Genomics Research Institute. In 2007, he was Valley such as efforts to improve power plant emissions-to-algae-to-biofuel, high efficiency solar cells, and projects for the fifth consecutive year in the 2009 Dow Jones World Sustainability Index and the 2009 Dow Jones North

Zhang, Junshan

135

YOUR LOCAL WEATHER: Scottsdale: 74 | Mesa: 75 | Chandler: 73 | Queen Creek: 75 | Phoenix: 77 | Glendale: 72 | Luke AFB: 70 | More Weather... Friday, October 7, 2005  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

's Top Stories Valley spots offer chance to overcome phobias Fears come personalized. Fear of the dark is telling East Valley homeowners, developers and real estate agents whether fissures are underfoot. Fissure -- the same day another East Valley soldier was laid to rest. Read More... Family secret tests legal system

McGraw, Kevin J.

136

Workshop title: Transmission and Utility Scale Solar Opportunities "South of Phoenix" (or should we say "in Arizona" if we inc  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear SecurityTensile Strain Switched FerromagnetismWaste and MaterialsWenjun1 TableContacts WorkshopTrading

137

Reference Buildings by Climate Zone and Representative City:...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

B Phoenix, Arizona Reference Buildings by Climate Zone and Representative City: 2B Phoenix, Arizona In addition to the ZIP file for each building type, you can directly view the...

138

AHSC in the News Tuesday, July 19, 2011  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

) _ An Arizona native has been named to head the FBI office in Phoenix. FBI Director Robert Mueller (MUHL'-ur) has assigned James Turgal special agent in charge of the FBI's Phoenix Division. Turgal most recently

Arizona, University of

139

Energy Efficiency Exchange 2015: Federal Training and Knowledge  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Presentation offers an overview of the Energy Efficiency Exchange 2015, a federal training event scheduled for August 11-13, 2015, at the Phoenix Convention Center in Phoenix, Arizona.

140

Chase Field Civic Space  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Collier Center Arizona Center APS Arizona Biomedical Complex Phoenix Biotechnology Accelerator Phoenix Preparatory Academy AMC 24 Theatres Heritage Square Phoenix Family Museum Arizona Science Center Herberger Theater Arizona Republic/ 12 News AZ Republic Parking Sheraton Hotel Freeport- McMoRan Westin St. Mary

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "1979-1982 phoenix 1976-1982" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Lead-acid load-leveling battery testing at Argonne National Laboratory  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) has conducted an extensive evaluation of an advanced lead-acid battery development for load-leveling applications. The battery technology was developed by the Exide Corporation under a DOE-sponsored cost-shared R and D contract with ANL during 1979-1982. The objective of that program was to increase battery life from 2000 to 4000 deep discharge cycles while maintaining or reducing initial battery cost. Full-size, 3100-Ah cells were fabricated by Exide and assembled into one 6-cell and two 3-cell batteries. These 36-kWh and 18-kWh batteries were delivered to ANL in April 1982 for testing and evaluation. Southern California Edison is currently installing a 10-MW, 40-MWh load-leveling facility comprised of batteries based on this design.

Miller, J.F.; Mulcahey, T.P.; Christianson, C.C.; Marr, J.J.; Smaga, J.A.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

142

Extension of the Phoenix/City of Colorado Springs solar-assisted heat-pump project. Technical progress report No. 18, sixth quarterly report, 1 October 1980-31 January 1981  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Three gas-driven heat pumps are being considered, which are a Wisconsin engine drive heat pump, a Stirling engine drive heat pump, and a gas turbine drive heat pump. Also considered is an electric driven heat pump. Cost effectiveness of both the electric driven and gas fired solar-assisted heat pumps is demonstrated by comparing the present value of the system over its 20 year life with the present value of the fuel saved in Denver and Colorado Springs. The opinions of the local electric utilities for both cities and the natural gas pipeline company are briefly discussed. (LEW)

Not Available

1981-02-03T23:59:59.000Z

143

PowerPoint Presentation  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

spacer- dampers for Mead-Phoenix. * Given projected decrease in costs of Mead transformers, no rate impact anticipated due to spacer damper project 12 Asset Management...

144

High-Efficiency Low-Cost Solar Receiver for Use in a Supercritical CO2 Recompression Cycle  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This presentation was delivered at the SunShot Concentrating Solar Power (CSP) Program Review 2013, held April 23–25, 2013 near Phoenix, Arizona.

145

Concentrated Solar Thermoelectric Power  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This presentation was delivered at the SunShot Concentrating Solar Power (CSP) Program Review 2013, held April 23–25, 2013 near Phoenix, Arizona.

146

Metallic Composites Phase-Change Materials for High-Temperature Thermal Energy Storage  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This presentation was delivered at the SunShot Concentrating Solar Power (CSP) Program Review 2013, held April 23–25, 2013 near Phoenix, Arizona.

147

Innovative Application of Maintenance-Free Phase-Change Thermal Energy Storage for Dish Engine Solar Power Generation  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This presentation was delivered at the SunShot Concentrating Solar Power (CSP) Program Review 2013, held April 23–25, 2013 near Phoenix, Arizona.

148

Degradation Mechanisms and Development of Protective Coatings for TES and HTF Containment Materials  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This presentation was delivered at the SunShot Concentrating Solar Power (CSP) Program Review 2013, held April 23–25, 2013 near Phoenix, Arizona.

149

Advanced Ceramic Materials and Packaging Technologies for Realizing Sensors for Concentrating Solar Power Systems  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This presentation was delivered at the SunShot Concentrating Solar Power (CSP) Program Review 2013, held April 23–25, 2013 near Phoenix, Arizona.

150

Corrosion in Very High-Temperature Molten Salt for Next Generation CSP Systems  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This presentation was delivered at the SunShot Concentrating Solar Power (CSP) Program Review 2013, held April 23–25, 2013 near Phoenix, Arizona.

151

DOE MURI: Hig-Operating Temperature Heat Transfer Fluids for CSD Applications  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This presentation was delivered at the SunShot Concentrating Solar Power (CSP) Program Review 2013, held April 23–25, 2013 near Phoenix, Arizona.

152

_MainReportGM  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Leafs Enrolled to Date EV Project Chevrolet Volts Enrolled to Date EV Project Smart Electric Drives Enrolled to Date Distance Driven (mi) Phoenix, AZ Metropolitan Area 285...

153

EV Project Overview Report  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Leafs Enrolled to Date EV Project Chevrolet Volts Enrolled to Date EV Project Smart Electric Drives Enrolled to Date Distance Driven (mi) Phoenix, AZ Metropolitan Area 274...

154

EV Project Overview Report  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Leafs Enrolled to Date EV Project Chevrolet Volts Enrolled to Date EV Project Smart Electric Drives Enrolled to Date Distance Driven (mi) Phoenix, AZ Metropolitan Area 259...

155

High-Temperatuer Solar Selective Coating Development for Power Tower Receivers  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This presentation was delivered at the SunShot Concentrating Solar Power (CSP) Program Review 2013, held April 23–25, 2013 near Phoenix, Arizona.

156

High Performance Nanostructured Spectrally Selective Coating  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This presentation was delivered at the SunShot Concentrating Solar Power (CSP) Program Review 2013, held April 23–25, 2013 near Phoenix, Arizona.

157

A Bibliography Of The Early Life History Of Fishes. Volume 1, List Of Titles  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

skipjack ([Katsuwonus pelamis]) from Hawaiian waters anddel bonito, [Katsuwonus] [pelamis]. Torreia (22):14. Howell,skipjack, [Katsuwonus] [pelamis], from the Phoenix Islands.

Hoyt, Robert D

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

158

Climate Change Adaptation for Local Government  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

process. Participating cities were: Chicago, King County (Washington), Los Angeles, Miami-Dade County (Florida), Milwaukee, Nassau County (New York), New York City, Phoenix, San Francisco and

Pedersen, Tom

159

Using Solid Particles as Heat Transfer Fluid for use in Concentrating Solar Power (CSP) Plants  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This presentation was delivered at the SunShot Concentrating Solar Power (CSP) Program Review 2013, held April 23–25, 2013 near Phoenix, Arizona.

160

Halide and Oxy-halide Eutectic Systems for High Performance High Temperature Heat Transfer Fluids  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This presentation was delivered at the SunShot Concentrating Solar Power (CSP) Program Review 2013, held April 23–25, 2013 near Phoenix, Arizona.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "1979-1982 phoenix 1976-1982" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Whats New at the Board on Radioactive Waste Management?  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Phoenix 5 Committee Roster Louis J. Lanzerotti, Chair Bell LabsLucent Technologies New Jersey Institute of Technology Carl A. Alexander Battelle National Laboratories Robert...

162

Tribal and Military Leaders Come Together to Talk Renewable Energy...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

The DOE Office of Indian Energy Tribal Leader Forum on "Leveraging Tribal Renewable Resources to Support Military Energy Goals" was held May 3031 in Phoenix, Arizona. Photo...

163

Planar Optical Waveguide Coupler Transformers for High-Power Solar Enegy Collection and Transmission  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This presentation was delivered at the SunShot Concentrating Solar Power (CSP) Program Review 2013, held April 23–25, 2013 near Phoenix, Arizona.

164

adolescents perceived risk: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Versus Actual Water Scarcity Risks in Phoenix, Arizona Environmental Sciences and Ecology Websites Summary: is a key concern among risk perception scholars and...

165

Flexible Assembly Solar Technology | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Assembly Solar Technology This presentation was delivered at the SunShot Concentrating Solar Power (CSP) Program Review 2013, held April 23-25, 2013 near Phoenix, Arizona....

166

Development of an Advanced, Low-Cost parabolic Trough Collector...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

for Baseload Operation This presentation was delivered at the SunShot Concentrating Solar Power (CSP) Program Review 2013, held April 23-25, 2013 near Phoenix, Arizona....

167

Low-Cost Heliostat for Modular Systems- Presentation from SunShot Concentrating Solar Power (CSP) Program Review 2013  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This presentation was delivered at the SunShot Concentrating Solar Power (CSP) Program Review 2013, held April 23–25, 2013 near Phoenix, Arizona.

168

Advanced Low-Cost Receivers for Parabolic Troughs  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This presentation was delivered at the SunShot Concentrating Solar Power (CSP) Program Review 2013, held April 23–25, 2013 near Phoenix, Arizona.

169

Arguing In an Age of Unreason: Elias Boudinot, Cherokee Factionalism, and the Treaty Of New Echota.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

?? Elias Boudinot (1804 - 1839), editor of the Cherokee Phoenix and a Cherokee leader during his people's political fight to remain a sovereign nation… (more)

Filler, Jonathan

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

170

Brayton Cycle Baseload Power Tower CSP System  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This presentation was delivered at the SunShot Concentrating Solar Power (CSP) Program Review 2013, held April 23–25, 2013 near Phoenix, Arizona.

171

Novel Dry Cooling Technology for Power Plants  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This presentation was delivered at the SunShot Concentrating Solar Power (CSP) Program Review 2013, held April 23–25, 2013 near Phoenix, Arizona.

172

Chemically Reactive Working Fluids for the Capture and Transport of Concentrated Solar Thermal Energy for Power Generation  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This presentation was delivered at the SunShot Concentrating Solar Power (CSP) Program Review 2013, held April 23–25, 2013 near Phoenix, Arizona.

173

Interacting with human physiology I. Pavlidis *, J. Dowdall, N. Sun, C. Puri, J. Fei, M. Garbey  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

a thermal camera. This is a high quality Mid-Wave Infra-Red (MWIR) sensor (Phoenix model) from FLIR Inc. [1

174

High Efficiency Thermal Energy Storage System for CSP  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This presentation was delivered at the SunShot Concentrating Solar Power (CSP) Program Review 2013, held April 23–25, 2013 near Phoenix, Arizona.

175

Innovative Phase hange Thermal Energy Storage Solution for Baseload Power  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This presentation was delivered at the SunShot Concentrating Solar Power (CSP) Program Review 2013, held April 23–25, 2013 near Phoenix, Arizona.

176

Development of Low Cost Industrially Scalable PCM Capsules for Thermal Energy Storage in CSP Plants  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This presentation was delivered at the SunShot Concentrating Solar Power (CSP) Program Review 2013, held April 23–25, 2013 near Phoenix, Arizona.

177

Novel Molten Salts Thermal Energy Storage for Concentrating Solar Power Generation  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This presentation was delivered at the SunShot Concentrating Solar Power (CSP) Program Review 2013, held April 23–25, 2013 near Phoenix, Arizona.

178

E-Print Network 3.0 - allison emittance scanners Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

... Source: Ecole Polytechnique, Centre de mathmatiques Collection: Mathematics 6 HIGH INTENSITY ION BEAMS PROSPECTS FOR ACCELERATORS WITH PHOENIX 28 GHZ Summary: 11 3.3...

179

Slide 1  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Transportation Resource Exchange Center presented at The Transportation External Coordination Working Group (TEC) Meeting Phoenix, AZ, April 4, 2005 ATR Institute 2 The newly...

180

Modular & Scalable Molten Salt Plant Design  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This presentation was delivered at the SunShot Concentrating Solar Power (CSP) Program Review 2013, held April 23–25, 2013 near Phoenix, Arizona.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "1979-1982 phoenix 1976-1982" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Residential Energy Efficiency Solutions: From Innovation to Market...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Moderator: Tom Beierle, Ross Strategic Panelists and Presentations: Aubrey Anaya, City of Phoenix Bob Coleman, California Center for Sustainable Energy Frank Rapley,...

182

Nx-TEC: Next-Generation Thermionic Solar Energy Conversion  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This presentation was delivered at the SunShot Concentrating Solar Power (CSP) Program Review 2013, held April 23–25, 2013 near Phoenix, Arizona.

183

10 MW Supercritical CO2 Turbine Project  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This presentation was delivered at the SunShot Concentrating Solar Power (CSP) Program Review 2013, held April 23–25, 2013 near Phoenix, Arizona.

184

Reducing c-Si Module Operating Temperature via PV Packaging Components  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This presentation was delivered at the SunShot Concentrating Solar Power (CSP) Program Review 2013, held April 23–25, 2013 near Phoenix, Arizona.

185

Advanced Glass Materials for Thermal Energy Storage  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This presentation was delivered at the SunShot Concentrating Solar Power (CSP) Program Review 2013, held April 23–25, 2013 near Phoenix, Arizona.

186

aircraft engine crash: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Aircraft Accident," Crash Injury Res., Phoenix, Arizona (October 18, 1961). 4. Bruggink, G. M. eta., "Injury Reduction Trends in Agricultural Aviation," A m-MnM 35,...

187

aviation crash injury: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Aircraft Accident," Crash Injury Res., Phoenix, Arizona (October 18, 1961). 4. Bruggink, G. M. eta., "Injury Reduction Trends in Agricultural Aviation," A m-MnM 35,...

188

affecting crash severity: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Aircraft Accident," Crash Injury Res., Phoenix, Arizona (October 18, 1961). 4. Bruggink, G. M. eta., "Injury Reduction Trends in Agricultural Aviation," A m-MnM 35,...

189

analyzing severe crash: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Aircraft Accident," Crash Injury Res., Phoenix, Arizona (October 18, 1961). 4. Bruggink, G. M. eta., "Injury Reduction Trends in Agricultural Aviation," A m-MnM 35,...

190

aircraft accidentally crashing: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Aircraft Accident," Crash Injury Res., Phoenix, Arizona (October 18, 1961). 4. Bruggink, G. M. eta., "Injury Reduction Trends in Agricultural Aviation," A m-MnM 35,...

191

Optimizing the CSP Tower Air Brayton Cycle System to Meet the SunShot Objectives  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This presentation was delivered at the SunShot Concentrating Solar Power (CSP) Program Review 2013, held April 23–25, 2013 near Phoenix, Arizona.

192

Low-Cost Light Weigh Thin Film Solar Concentrators  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This presentation was delivered at the SunShot Concentrating Solar Power (CSP) Program Review 2013, held April 23–25, 2013 near Phoenix, Arizona.

193

Using Encapsulated Phase Change Material for Thermal Energy Storage for Baseload CSP  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This presentation was delivered at the SunShot Concentrating Solar Power (CSP) Program Review 2013, held April 23–25, 2013 near Phoenix, Arizona.

194

Development of a High Efficiency Hot Gas Turbo-expander and Low Cost Heat Exchangers for Optimized CSP Supercritical CO2 Operation  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This presentation was delivered at the SunShot Concentrating Solar Power (CSP) Program Review 2013, held April 23–25, 2013 near Phoenix, Arizona.

195

High Efficiency Solar Fuels Reactor Concept  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This presentation was delivered at the SunShot Concentrating Solar Power (CSP) Program Review 2013, held April 23–25, 2013 near Phoenix, Arizona.

196

E-Print Network 3.0 - arizona installation restoration Sample...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

and Fish Department, Research Branch, 2221 W. Greenway Road, Phoenix, AZ 85023, USA... TAD C. THEIMER, Department of Biological Sciences, Northern Arizona University, Flagstaff,...

197

E-Print Network 3.0 - atmospheric pollution biomonitoring Sample...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

other atmospheric pollutants (Puckett 1988... specimen of Xanthoparmelia sp. used for air pollution biomonitoring. View of the Phoenix skyline from South... . Garty, J., 2001....

198

Secretary Chu Announces Middle and High School Finalists Set...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Phoenix Brophy College Preparatory (HS) Scottsdale BASIS Scottsdale (MS) Arkansas Fort Smith Trinity Junior High School Little Rock Little Rock Central High School California...

199

Fluidic Solar Collectors New Materials and Mechanisms for Heliostats  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This presentation was delivered at the SunShot Concentrating Solar Power (CSP) Program Review 2013, held April 23–25, 2013 near Phoenix, Arizona.

200

Low-Cost MHTES Systems for CSP  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This presentation was delivered at the SunShot Concentrating Solar Power (CSP) Program Review 2013, held April 23–25, 2013 near Phoenix, Arizona.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "1979-1982 phoenix 1976-1982" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Deploying Low-Cost Suspension Heliostats  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This presentation was delivered at the SunShot Concentrating Solar Power (CSP) Program Review 2013, held April 23–25, 2013 near Phoenix, Arizona.

202

Low Cost Heliostat Development  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This presentation was delivered at the SunShot Concentrating Solar Power (CSP) Program Review 2013, held April 23–25, 2013 near Phoenix, Arizona.

203

Microtracking and Self-Adaptive Solar Concentration  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This presentation was delivered at the SunShot Concentrating Solar Power (CSP) Program Review 2013, held April 23–25, 2013 near Phoenix, Arizona.

204

High Flux Microchannel Solar Receiver Development with Adaptive Flow Control  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This presentation was delivered at the SunShot Concentrating Solar Power (CSP) Program Review 2013, held April 23–25, 2013 near Phoenix, Arizona.

205

E-Print Network 3.0 - avian species richness Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

in neighborhood parks in Phoenix. Both ecological and social factors... of biodiversity in urban landscapes. Question How does species richness vary in relation to the...

206

Prototype Development for Self-Cleaning CSP Collectors  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This presentation was delivered at the SunShot Concentrating Solar Power (CSP) Program Review 2013, held April 23–25, 2013 near Phoenix, Arizona.

207

High Temperature Falling Particle Receiver  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This presentation was delivered at the SunShot Concentrating Solar Power (CSP) Program Review 2013, held April 23–25, 2013 near Phoenix, Arizona.

208

Integrating CSP w/ TES into a Utility System  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This presentation was delivered at the SunShot Concentrating Solar Power (CSP) Program Review 2013, held April 23–25, 2013 near Phoenix, Arizona.

209

High-Temperature Solar Thermoelectric Generators (STEG)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This presentation was delivered at the SunShot Concentrating Solar Power (CSP) Program Review 2013, held April 23–25, 2013 near Phoenix, Arizona.

210

Developing the Small Particle Heat Exchange Receiver for a Prototype Test  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This presentation was delivered at the SunShot Concentrating Solar Power (CSP) Program Review 2013, held April 23–25, 2013 near Phoenix, Arizona.

211

Near-Blackbody Enclosed Particle Receiver  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This presentation was delivered at the SunShot Concentrating Solar Power (CSP) Program Review 2013, held April 23–25, 2013 near Phoenix, Arizona.

212

Dish Stirling High Performance Thermal Storage  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This presentation was delivered at the SunShot Concentrating Solar Power (CSP) Program Review 2013, held April 23–25, 2013 near Phoenix, Arizona.

213

Reversible Metal Hydride Thermal Energy Storage for High Temperature Power Generation Systems  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This presentation was delivered at the SunShot Concentrating Solar Power (CSP) Program Review 2013, held April 23–25, 2013 near Phoenix, Arizona.

214

Dirty air conditioners: Energy implications of coil fouling  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1473. Neal, L. 1992. Air Conditioner Efficiency in the Realof a Residential Air Conditioner. Proceedings of the 1992of new residential air conditioners in Phoenix, Arizona.

Siegel, Jeffrey; Walker, Iain; Sherman, Max

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

215

The Viability of Voluntary Visitability: A Case Study of Irvine's Approach  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

West Arena in Phoenix, the HSBC Arena in Buffalo, the Core-in Philadel- phia, and the HSBC Arena in Buffalo (PVA v.

Kaminski, S. E; Mazumdar, S.; DiMento, J. F. C; Geis, G.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

216

Path Analysis Models of an Autonomous Agent  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Path Analysis Models of an Autonomous Agent in a Complex Environment Paul R. Cohen, David M. Hart AFOSR-91-0067. #12;1 Phoenix Phoenix is a simulated environment populated by autonomous agents) the e orts of all, a reboss. Fires burn in unpredictable ways due to wind speed and direction, terrain

217

February 17, 2005 Traffic: See current conditions on all Valley freeways  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

° Flagstaff 34° |Traffic Weather Site search| | | | | |Front Page Valley & State Sports Business Arizona Wheels Yes Ahwatukee Chandler Gilbert Glendale/Peoria Mesa Phoenix Scottsdale Southwest Valley Sun CitiesFebruary 17, 2005 Traffic: See current conditions on all Valley freeways PHOENIX 56° Tucson 53

McGraw, Kevin J.

218

J. Elder1, S. Grossman-Clarke2, A. Brazel1, H. Butler1, P. Gober1,4, N. Jones4 and C. Martin3 1School of Geographical Sciences; 2Global Institute of Sustainability; 3Applied Bio Sciences;  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

has been shown to simulate the components of the urban surface energy balance (see Fig. 1 Center for a Desert City Introduction The greater-Phoenix metropolitan area has endured drought.70 22.50 40.50 6.00 0.30 4.95 Conclusions Across the nine City of Phoenix neighborhoods, the following

Hall, Sharon J.

219

Orbitally Driven Climate Change on Mars  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Tropical Mountain Glacier exchange Polar Cap + Polar Layered Deposits Ice-Rich Permafrost white line;ice-free surface Phoenix on Mars May­November 2008 latitude: 68N ice buried by 5cm #12;1 "sol" = 1 solar day never warm enough for melting #12;Phoenix Self Portrait mosaic of 100 stereo surface im- ager

Schörghofer, Norbert

220

Numerical Investigation of a Reusable Space Transportation System , B. U. Reinartz, J. Ballmann  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Ballmann Lehr- und Forschungsgebiet f¨ur Mechanik RWTH Aachen, Templergraben 64, 52062 Aachen, Germany Abstract The development of a shuttle-like technology demonstrator called PHOENIX, is intended to prove solutions for the clean- configuration of PHOENIX by numerically solving the Euler and Navier

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "1979-1982 phoenix 1976-1982" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Overview of Astrobiology Anton Kapliy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

) Glacier National Park #12;5 Origin of life: bottom-up approach Aims to produce life from primordial soup on Opportunity Rover analysis) Liquid saline drops on Phoenix lander Phoenix digs out water ice #12;14 Solar surface with dynamic bands/ridges ­ Eruptions of warm ice? (Galileo mission) #12;15 Europa: liquid ocean

222

Indian Gaming 2013 Tradeshow & Convention  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The National Indian Gaming Association will host its annual tradeshow and convention on March 24-27 in Phoenix, Arizona. Be sure to visit the DOE Office of Indian Energy booth at the event.

223

Winter Edition, 2013 Globetrotter  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, try this Taiwanese flavored shaved ice, sweetened with condensed milk and green tea! Phoenix Eggs and meat. Calçots- This is a Catalan favorite! Calçots is a grilled green onion dish, dipped in sauce made

Akhmedov, Azer

224

Sustainable Scientists  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and Electric Company; and New York State Energy Research andprojects sponsored by the New York State Energy Research andNew York (US) Berlin (Germany) Miami (US) Taipei (Taiwan) Phoenix (US) Los Angeles (US) Annual Energy

Mills, Evan

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

225

Concentrating Solar Power Program Review 2013 (Book) (Revised)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Concentrating Solar Power Program Review Meeting booklet will be provided to attendees at the Concentrating Solar Power Review Meeting in Phoenix, Arizona on April 23-25, 2013.

Not Available

2013-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

226

The 21st International Conference on Distributed Computing  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-Chairs Eric W.S. Chen, National Chung Hsing University, Taiwan Michel Raynal, IRISA, France Publication Chair Phoenix Section Chair James Hunt, SRP, USA ICDCS Steering Committee Chair Ming T. (Mike) Liu, Ohio State

Choi, Byung K.

227

February 10, 2010, Human Resource Services Jacksonville Update  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

/ Arizona State Univ ­ Phoenix campus (2007) ­ University of Miami / Florida Atlantic University ­ Boca education. 1987/1988 ­ 600 student weeks performed in Jacksonville 2008/2009 ­ 3,242 student weeks perfor

Mazzotti, Frank

228

A Survey of Climate Change Adaptation Planning  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, Colorado Homer, Alaska 2 #12;Keene, New Hampshire King County, Washington Los Angeles, California Miami-Dade County, Florida New York City, New York Phoenix, Arizona San Francisco Bay Canada Quebec Toronto

Ford, Andrew

229

Weatherizing America  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

As Recovery Act money arrives to expand home weatherization programs across the country, Zachary Stewart of Phoenix, Ariz., and others have found an exciting opportunity not only to start working...

230

Cost-allocation-August-24-2011.xlsx  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

2 Vacant 0 Phoenix 0 Loveland 2 Operations Manager GS-340-15 Reliability Compliance Advisor GS-301-13 P 23 v 4 TRANSMISSION SWITCHING OPERATIONS SUPPORT TRANSMISSION SCHEDULING...

231

Communication delay in circuit-switched interconnection networks  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Min,G. Ould-Khaoua,M. Sarbazi-Azad,H. Proceedings 20th IEEE Int. Performance, Computing, and Communications Conference (IEEE-IPCCC 2001), Phoenix, Arizona, April 4-6, 2001. pp 51-56 IEEE Computer Society Press

Min, G.; Ould-Khaoua, M.

232

Weatherizing America  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

As Recovery Act money arrives to expand home weatherization programs across the country, Zachary Stewart of Phoenix, Ariz., and others have found an exciting opportunity not only to start working again, but also to find a calling.

Stewart, Zachary; Bergeron, T.J.; Barth, Dale; Qualis, Xavier; Sewall, Travis; Fransen, Richard; Gill, Tony;

2013-05-29T23:59:59.000Z

233

DOE to Address Small Businesses Barriers in Government Contracting at Waste Management Conference  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

PHOENIX – EM and the DOE Office of Small and Disadvantaged Business Utilization (OSDBU) are working to address barriers that hinder small businesses from competing for prime contracts for work in the Cold War cleanup program.

234

Weakening of ice by magnesium perchlorate hydrate  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

I show that perchlorate hydrates, which have been indirectly detected at high Martian circumpolar latitudes by the Phoenix Mars Lander, have a dramatic effect upon the rheological behavior of polycrystalline water ice under ...

Lenferink, Hendrik J., 1985-

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

235

In Partial Fulfillment of the Requirements for the Degree of Doctor of Philosophy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

change, including transition governance, backcasting, intervention research, change management Will defend his dissertation Developing and Testing Transition Strategies for Urban Sustainability: Case Studies in Transition Research in Phoenix, Arizona Sustainability challenges with severe local to global

Hall, Sharon J.

236

Calendar Year 2010 | Department of Energy  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

30, 2010 Audit Report: OAS-RA-11-03 The Department of Energy's Weatherization Assistance Program under the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act for the City of Phoenix -...

237

Arizona Foundation Expands Weatherization Training Center | Department...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

upgrades for low-income residents, but in Maricopa County and the Phoenix area it also trains a good part of the weatherization workforce to do that. Expanding building science...

238

Summary of INEL research on the iron-enriched basalt waste form  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report summarizes the knowledge base on the iron-enriched basalt (IEB) waste form developed at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) during 1979--1982. The results presented discuss the applicability of IEB in converting retrieved transuranic (TRU) waste from INEL`s Radioactive Waste Management Complex (RWMC) into a vitreous/ceramic (glassy/rock) stable waste form suitable for permanent disposal in an appropriate repository, such as the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) in New Mexico. Borosilicate glass (BSG), the approved high-level waste form, appears unsuited for this application. Melting the average waste-soil mix from the RWMC produces the IEB composition and attempting to convert IEB to the BSG composition would require additions of substantial B{sub 2}0{sub 3}, Na, and SiO{sub 2} (glass frit). IEB requires processing temperatures of 1400 to 1600{degrees}C, depending upon the waste composition. Production of the IEB waste form, using Joule heated melters, has proved difficult in the past because of electrode and refractory corrosion problems associated with the high temperature melts. Higher temperature electric melters (arc and plasma) are available to produce this final waste form. Past research focused on extensive slag property measurements, waste form leachability tests, mechanical, composition, and microstructure evaluations, as well as a host of experiments to improve production of the waste form. Past INEL studies indicated that the IEB glass-ceramic is a material that will accommodate and stabilize a wide range of heterogeneous waste materials, including long lived radionuclides and scrap metals, while maintaining a superior level of chemical and physical performance characteristics. Controlled cooling of the molten IEB and subsequent heat treatment will produce a glass-ceramic waste form with superior leach resistance.

Reimann, G.A.; Grandy, J.D.; Eddy, T.L.; Anderson, G.L.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

239

Summary of INEL research on the iron-enriched basalt waste form  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report summarizes the knowledge base on the iron-enriched basalt (IEB) waste form developed at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) during 1979--1982. The results presented discuss the applicability of IEB in converting retrieved transuranic (TRU) waste from INEL's Radioactive Waste Management Complex (RWMC) into a vitreous/ceramic (glassy/rock) stable waste form suitable for permanent disposal in an appropriate repository, such as the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) in New Mexico. Borosilicate glass (BSG), the approved high-level waste form, appears unsuited for this application. Melting the average waste-soil mix from the RWMC produces the IEB composition and attempting to convert IEB to the BSG composition would require additions of substantial B{sub 2}0{sub 3}, Na, and SiO{sub 2} (glass frit). IEB requires processing temperatures of 1400 to 1600{degrees}C, depending upon the waste composition. Production of the IEB waste form, using Joule heated melters, has proved difficult in the past because of electrode and refractory corrosion problems associated with the high temperature melts. Higher temperature electric melters (arc and plasma) are available to produce this final waste form. Past research focused on extensive slag property measurements, waste form leachability tests, mechanical, composition, and microstructure evaluations, as well as a host of experiments to improve production of the waste form. Past INEL studies indicated that the IEB glass-ceramic is a material that will accommodate and stabilize a wide range of heterogeneous waste materials, including long lived radionuclides and scrap metals, while maintaining a superior level of chemical and physical performance characteristics. Controlled cooling of the molten IEB and subsequent heat treatment will produce a glass-ceramic waste form with superior leach resistance.

Reimann, G.A.; Grandy, J.D.; Eddy, T.L.; Anderson, G.L.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

240

The Consumer Market for Beef.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. It is believed that the preferences expressed have general application to other cities of Texas and the Southwest. Corresponding studies were made I $I Phoenix, Arizona, and Denver, Colorado. i ( FOR BEEF PRODUCERS 1 I Irrespective of price, beef... preference away from beef and to- ward chicken instead of veal. Preference for veal is low among both low and high-income families. Veal preference also is low 1 1 mang Phoenix and Denver families. I , U. S. Good grade beef is preferred by most consumers...

Branson, Robert E.

1957-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "1979-1982 phoenix 1976-1982" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

A Decade of On-road Emissions Measurements  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A Decade of On-road Emissions Measurements G A R Y A . B I S H O P * A N D D O N A L D H . S T E D. A multiyear, on-road emission measurement program carried outinthecitiesofChicago,Illinois;Denver,Colorado;LosAngeles (LA), California; and Phoenix, Arizona shows large, fuel- specific tailpipe emissions reductions

Denver, University of

242

Introduction Global demand for drinking water  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of water quality perceptions, consumption behavior, and demographics, adapted from Decision Center.bridgeandtunnelclub.com/bigmap/outoftown/arizona/phoenix/publicmarket/index.htm The urban social-ecological system contains both drivers and responses to these environmental changes and Bottled Water Consumption Discussion We found that non-whites report lower water quality, which supports

Hall, Sharon J.

243

Who's Going to Get the Goodies Globally?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

resources in the U.S., coupled with exploding economies in India and China, are straining energy and mineral a chilling presentation about our dwindling mineral resources. After the presentation, Phoenix artist MatthewWho's Going to Get the Goodies Globally? Tuesday, May 7, 2013 12:00 ­ 1:30 p.m. ASU Art Museum

Hall, Sharon J.

244

Reducing Water Use In Buildings  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, Texas Nov. 18-20 Los Angeles Dallas Houston Phoenix 2014 Outreach In Key Regions Denver © 2014 AT&T Intellectual Property. All rights reserved. AT&T and the AT&T logo are trademarks of AT&T Intellectual Property. 11 U.S. Drought Conditions - June 2014...

Schulz,J.

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

245

Deep Energy Retrofits: A Southwestern Case Study  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to a carbon-neutral environment, but we can remodel our way there. Over the course of seven years, green-buildingDeep Energy Retrofits: A Southwestern Case Study Heading Toward Net Zero Thursday, December 2, 2010 ASU Project Manager, Energize Phoenix Greg L. Brown Principal, Ecosense, LLC We cannot build our way

Zhang, Junshan

246

P3s Public-Private Partnerships? Or Peripatetic Pain in the Pants  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Vegas to Phoenix ! I-69 Texas to Indiana Rebuild with tolls + added capacity: ! Key long-haul truck"/shift in short-haul setting. ! Greater payloads in long-haul setting. ! Keys to trucking industry support Investment Need Is Improved Goods Movement ! Two types of toll truckway project: ! Short-haul port

Minnesota, University of

247

TEMPE CAMPUS OFFICE OF THE VICE PRESIDENT FOR RESEARCH AND ECONOMIC AFFAIRS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Arizona-Phoenix Long-Term Ecological Research: Phase 2) I. REU; III. International Collaborative Research; IV. Other; Trends in Long- term Ecological Data I. RESEARCH EXPERIENCE FOR UNDERGRADUATES (REU- graduate research in environmental biology (REU-EB), supported by multiple NSF-REU supple- ments

Hall, Sharon J.

248

16 Sunday, May 30, 2010 www.thenational.ae TheNational  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

,RUSSIA// Scientists have identified four new strains of a wheat-killing fungus that could endanger the global food on wheat conta- gions. ­ AFP Wheatfungus onthemarch Diddinosaurs hoptoEurope? PARIS// Three skull bones replicating. ­ Reuters Photograph by Nasa ThisPhoenix isnotrising LOS ANGELES// NASA has of- ficially called

Grether, Gregory

249

Prepared in cooperation with the National Park Service, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, Bureau of Reclamation, Nevada Department of Wildlife, Southern Nevada Water Authority,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

--the Federal source for science about the Earth, its natural and living resources, natural hazards drinking water and the hydropower to provide electricity for major cities including Las Vegas, Phoenix, Los to the importance of Lake Mead, multiple agencies are actively involved in its monitoring and research

250

Balancing Energy and Water Consumption in an Urban Desert Environment: A Case  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Balancing Energy and Water Consumption in an Urban Desert Environment: A Case Study on Phoenix, AZ effect, water scarcity, and energy consumption. The transformation of native landscapes into built to cool homes. Identifying Direct and Indirect Costs of Water and Energy Consumption Study Area Although

Hall, Sharon J.

251

Re-examining the De nition of Urban Open Space using Fuzzy SetTheory Introduction  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, there is no standard de nition for urban open space.Various factors, such as size, shape, diversity, greenness/cultural and vacant lands. Sample site in Phoenix, Arizona is empirically investigated to test new theoretical concept the theoretical perspective developed in this study allows for detailed and appropriate analyses for urban open

Hall, Sharon J.

252

The Ecology of Risk in a Sunbelt City: A Multi-Hazard Analysis Amy Nelson, Bob Bolin, Ed Hackett, David Pijawka, Ed Sadalla, Diane Sicotte, Eric Matranga  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Toxic Release Inventory (TRI) 2. Large Quantity Generator 3. CERCLA (Superfund) 4. Transfer, Storage 1996 EPA data for four types of technological hazards and 1995 Special Census data for Maricopa County the patterns of environmental in/equity in the Phoenix metropolitan area (Maricopa County). Using geographic

Hall, Sharon J.

253

CRADA Final Report: Process development for hybrid solar cells  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

TCF funding of a CRADA between LBNL and RSLE leveraged RSLE's original $1M investment in LBNL research and led to development of a solar cell fabrication process that will bring the high efficiency, high voltage hybrid tandem solar cell closer to commercialization. RSLE has already built a pilot line at its Phoenix, Arizona site.

Ager, Joel W

2011-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

254

SANDIA REPORT SAND 2011-3446  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

SANDIA REPORT SAND 2011- 3446 Unlimited Release Printed October 2011 Phoenix: Complex Adaptive for the United States Department of Energy by Sandia Corporation. NOTICE: This report was prepared as an account of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under Contract DE-AC04-94AL85000. Approved for public

255

Fire and Ice Issue 2  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

^ $$% i&l /P^ \\0 rffej FIRE AND ICE AVAILABLE FROM Kathleen Resch PO Box 1766 Temple City, CA 91780 FIRE AND ICE II TABLE OF CONTENTS COVER by Phoenix FRONTISPIECE by Gayle Feyrer "Flashpoint" by Rachel Duncan 1 PEDESTAL by Thomas 2 "A Damn Fine...

Multiple Contributors

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

256

First International Symposium on Cold Cathodes Dielectric Science and Technology/Electronics/Luminescent and Display Materials  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

/Electronics/Luminescent and Display Materials 198th Meeting of the Electrochemical Society Date: October 22­27, 2000 Location: Phoenix Noise (flicker, shot), ffl Emitters (e.g., Spindt­type field emitters, Negative electron affinity abstract to the ECS headquarters and also to K. L. Jensen at the address below. #12; Electrochemical

Cahay, Marc

257

Real-Time Optimization of Dead Time for Motor Control Inverters 0-7803-3840-5/97/$10.000 1997 IEEE 597  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

597 JonathanKimball Motorola, Inc. Semiconductor Products Sector Phoenix. Arizona Abstract current either to each leg or to the inverter bridge as a whole. This in turn minimizes switching loss power semiconductor device in an inverter or synchronous rectifier application, the objective of dead

Kimball, Jonathan W.

258

PET Analysis Challenging Problems in PET Imaging  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

PET Analysis Challenging Problems in PET Imaging Estimating the Input Function for a Human Brain FDG-PET Study A Feasibility Study Dr. Hongbin Guo, Prof. Rosemary A. Renaut Department of Mathematics and Statistics,Arizona State Univerisity Dr. Kewei Chen Banner Good Samaritan PET center, Phoenix Supported by

Renaut, Rosemary

259

Steve Jobs' creations simplified life, Apple enthusiasts say in mourning his death  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Steve Jobs' creations simplified life, Apple enthusiasts say in mourning his death By ADAM PLAYFORD as soon as they got confirmation." Word of the Apple co-founder's death of pancreatic cancer hit hard live without a computer," said Joerg von Veltar, the founder of the Palm Beach Phoenix Apple User Group

Belogay, Eugene A.

260

AHSC in the News Wednesday, October 26, 2011  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

at the University of Arizona's teaching hospital in Phoenix) 10/25/2011 eNotAlone.com View Clip Valley Fever topic Valley News View Clip Construction workers think pink for breast cancer awareness (University of Arizona meds this Saturday (University of Arizona College of Pharmacy) 10/26/2011 Explorer News View Clip New

Arizona, University of

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "1979-1982 phoenix 1976-1982" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

In The News Monday, May 2, 2011  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in health-care industry Arizona Republic 05/01/2011 View Clip Their View: Valley fever: The zebra among Smart lecture series at the University of Arizona College of Medicine ­ Phoenix) East Valley Living 04 vetoed Yuma Sun 04/29/2011 View Clip For doctors, job rewards offset school bills Arizona Republic 05

Arizona, University of

262

Copper CMP Planarization Length -MRS 2001 -April 19th , 2001 Paul Lefevre Page 1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Copper CMP Planarization Length - MRS 2001 - April 19th , 2001 ­ Paul Lefevre ­ Page 1 DIRECT MEASUREMENT OF PLANARIZATION LENGTH FOR COPPER CHEMICAL MECHANICAL POLISHING (CMP) PROCESSES USING A LARGE; Michael Gostein, Philips Analytical, Natick, MA; John Nguyen, SpeedFam-IPEC, Phoenix, AZ. #12;Copper CMP

Boning, Duane S.

263

What causes the large extensions of red-supergiant atmospheres? Comparisons of interferometric observations with 1-D hydrostatic, 3-D convection, and 1-D pulsating model atmospheres  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present the atmospheric structure and the fundamental parameters of three red supergiants, increasing the sample of RSGs observed by near-infrared spectro-interferometry. Additionally, we test possible mechanisms that may explain the large observed atmospheric extensions of RSGs. We carried out spectro-interferometric observations of 3 RSGs in the near-infrared K-band with the VLTI/AMBER instrument at medium spectral resolution. To comprehend the extended atmospheres, we compared our observational results to predictions by available hydrostatic PHOENIX, available 3-D convection, and new 1-D self-excited pulsation models of RSGs. Our near-infrared flux spectra are well reproduced by the PHOENIX model atmospheres. The continuum visibility values are consistent with a limb-darkened disk as predicted by the PHOENIX models, allowing us to determine the angular diameter and the fundamental parameters of our sources. Nonetheless, in the case of V602 Car and HD 95686, the PHOENIX model visibilities do not predict ...

Arroyo-Torres, B; Chiavassa, A; Scholz, M; Freytag, B; Marcaide, J M; Hauschildt, P H; Wood, P R; Abellan, F J

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

264

An Analysis of Off-grid, Off-pipe Housing in Six U.S. Climates  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

as the base case. The six U.S. climate locations included: Minneapolis, MN, Boulder, CO, Atlanta, GA, Houston, TX, Phoenix, AZ, and Los Angeles, CA. The renewable resources considered for this study included: solar radiation, wind, biomass for building energy...

Malhotra, Mini

2010-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

265

Atmos. Chem. Phys., 14, 99259939, 2014 www.atmos-chem-phys.net/14/9925/2014/  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and HOx in Community Earth System Model (CESM) A. Khodayari1, S. Tilmes3, S. C. Olsen2, D. B. Phoenix2, D System Model (CESM), Community Atmosphere Model with Chemistry, Version 4 (CAM4) and Version 5 (CAM5 of aviation on climate. In this study, two configura- tions of the atmospheric model from the Community Earth

Pierce, Jeffrey

266

Secure Group-based Information Sharing in Mobile Ad Hoc Networks  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

efforts such as joint intrusion detection. As an example, Phoenix Joint Terrorism Task Forces have information. Therefore, in an integrated ad hoc network, group-based data access must be controlled through. First, even with Elliptic Curve Cryptography, symmetric encryption still has its unique advantages

Wang, Yu

267

PII S0361-9230(01)00704-3 Forebrain AVT and courtship in a fish with male  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

* 1 Life Sciences, Arizona State University West, Phoenix, AZ, USA; and 2 Unidade de Investigac¸ a~o em Eco-Etologia, Instituto Superior de Psicologia Aplicada, Lisboa, Portugal ABSTRACT: In this paper that it is correlated with sex morphotype, rather than with mating be- havior. © 2002 Elsevier Science Inc. KEY WORDS

268

Proceediigsof the 38' Conferenceon Decision & Control  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Proceediigsof the 38' Conferenceon Decision & Control Phoenix,Arizona USA December 1999 TuAO2 10 Introduction Performance optimization of stochastic discrete event zystems (e.g., queueing syst,ems- formation Systems Inc., Nippon Telegraph and Telephone Corp. (WTT), Nippon Steel Information

Ishizaki, Fumio

269

EastPeltasonDrive SouthCircleView  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ENGINEERING CAL (IT2 ) CS PHYSICAL SCIENCES BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES HUMANITIES STUDENT SERVICES SCHOOL OF THE ARTS LIBRARY BIO SCI DSC ICS SOCIAL SCIENCES SOCIAL SCIENCES PHOENIX GRILL SOCIAL ECOLOGYI ENGINEERING AND POLICE DEPARTMENT = SUMMER SESSION OFFICE FLAG POLE SOCIAL SCIENCE PARKING STRUCTURE ENGINEERING GATEWAY

Barrett, Jeffrey A.

270

Living on and Under the Wing: A Biography of 1st Lt. Joaquin Castro.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of Public Resolution No. 18, 76 th Congress, April 3, 1941, and under the provisions of paragraph 4, Personnel Orders No. 256, dated October 31, 1942, each of the following named Aviation Cadets, now at Luke Field, Phoenix, Arizona, upon acceptance... Preparing for War 54 Hawaii in 1942 (January-April) 59 On Captain Hall?s Crew 66 Midway...

Guerrero, Arnold

2009-05-27T23:59:59.000Z

271

Watering the Sun Corridor  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Watering the Sun Corridor Managing Choices in Arizona's Megapolitan Area #12;#12;Managing ChoicesSored by Printing generously provided by SRP. Watering the Sun Corridor Tom Buschatzke, City of Phoenix Peter Culp i C y | 5 Introduction............................................7 I. The Sun Corridor

Hall, Sharon J.

272

National Commission on Forensic Science (NCFS)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

National Commission on Forensic Science (NCFS) and Organization of Scientific Area Committees (OSAC to the Director for Forensic Science Vice-Chair, National Commission on Forensic Science 25th International Symposium on Human Identification Phoenix, AZ October 1, 2014 #12;Forensic Science Realignment · NAS report

273

-We sampled three replicated chambers with floating collars  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, such as nitrous oxide (N2O), methane (CH4), and carbon dioxide (CO2). - Constructed treatment wetland systems (CWS 2003, Holland et al. 1999). Trace gas fluxes from The Tres Rios Wetlands Project in Phoenix, AZ Introduction Site Description Jorge Ramos Jr.1, Eric J. Chapman1, Nicholas A. Weller2, Dan L. Childers2 Wetland

Hall, Sharon J.

274

Improving haul truck productivity  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The paper reviews developments in payload management and cycle times. These were discussed at a roundtable held at the Haulage and Loading 2007 conference held in May in Phoenix, AZ, USA. Several original equipment manufacturers (OEMs) explaind what their companies were doing to improve cycle times for trucks, shovels and excavators used in surface coal mining. Quotations are given from Dion Domaschenz of Liebherr and Steve Plott of Cat Global Mining. 4 figs.

Fiscor, S.

2007-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

275

1990 fuel cell seminar: Program and abstracts  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This volume contains author prepared short resumes of the presentations at the 1990 Fuel Cell Seminar held November 25-28, 1990 in Phoenix, Arizona. Contained herein are 134 short descriptions organized into topic areas entitled An Environmental Overview, Transportation Applications, Technology Advancements for Molten Carbonate Fuel Cells, Technology Advancements for Solid Fuel Cells, Component Technologies and Systems Analysis, Stationary Power Applications, Marine and Space Applications, Technology Advancements for Acid Type Fuel Cells, and Technology Advancement for Solid Oxide Fuel Cells.

Not Available

1990-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

276

Expert Meeting Report: Advanced Envelope Research for Factory Built Housing  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report provides information about the expert meeting on advanced envelope research for factory built housing, hosted by the ARIES Collaborative on October 11, 2011, in Phoenix, Arizona. The goals of this meeting were to provide a comprehensive solution to the use of three previously selected advanced alternatives for factory-built wall construction, assess each option focusing on major issues relating to viability and commercial potential, and determine additional steps are required to reach this potential.

Levy, E.; Mullens, M.; Tompos, E.; Kessler, B.; Rath, P.

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

277

EIS-0301: NRG Energy Services, Inc., Arizona-Baja California 500 kV Transmission Line  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This EIS analyzes DOE's decision to approve NRG Energy, Inc. (NRG) for a Presidential permit to construct a 500,000-volt transmission line originating at the switchyard of the Palo Verde Nuclear Generating Station near Phoenix, Arizona, and extending approximately 177 miles to the southwest, where it would cross the United States (U.S.) border with Mexico in the vicinity of Calexico, California.

278

Helper's Network Gazette September 1995  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Such a Sweet Pain" by Peggy Garvin "Below" by Peggy McNabb "Clothes Minded" by Peggy McNabb Best Anthology: 1 BondStories 8 ed. by Joyce Fuller Kleikamp and Leslie Hunten 2 Embrace the Night ed. by Debbie Ristick and Anita... 3 When the Phoenix Sings by Sue Glasgow Beginnings by Pauline Marshall Circles by Adele Turner Detours by M. Sue Waugh and Teri Milliman Parallel Worlds Within the City by Peggy Garvin Best Cover Art: 1 Rosemarie...

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

279

This is your stream. This is your stream on drugs: Scientists' expanding research and technologies show that traces of pharmaceuticals in water may threaten aquatic health.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

about effects these substances could have on public health? According to the current body of research, the answer is no. Should they be concerned about the impact on the fish, turtles, and aquatic life in those waterbodies? Maybe so. From... of wastewater treatment plants in Chicago, Dallas, Orlando, Fla., Phoenix, and West Chester, Pa., near Philadelphia. Isolated from human sources of con- tamination, the Gila River Wilderness Area in New Mexico was the study?s refer- ence site...

Jordan, Leslie

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

280

Solar Roof Cooling by Evaporation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

SOLAR ROOF COOLING BY EVAPORATION Fanjet Evaporative Roof Cooling Windsor Lake Landing #1 Windsor Point Road Columbia, S.C. 29206 G. V. Patterson National Sales Manager Evaporation is nature's way of cooling. By the The American Society... penetration through will include current engineering techniques, sys out the course of the day. tem designs and documented cases of 20% to 30% reduction in air-conditioning run time. Dr. John Yellott of the Yellott Solar Energy Labo ratories in Phoenix...

Patterson, G. V.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "1979-1982 phoenix 1976-1982" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

EIS-0307: Presidential Permit Application, Public Service Company of New Mexico, AZ  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This EIS analyzes DOE's decision to approve the Public Service Company of New Mexico (PNM) for a Presidential permit to construct two transmission lines originating at the switchyard of the Palo Verde Nuclear Generating Station (PVNGS) near Phoenix, Arizona, and extending approximately 160 miles to the south along one of three alternative routes, where they would cross the United States (U.S.) border with Mexico in the vicinity of Nogales, Arizona.

282

Photon Energy AS | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia: Energy ResourcesLoadingPenobscot County, Maine: Energy Resources2003) |FacilityPhoenix Silicon1907029°Photon

283

Photon Energy Services Photon | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia: Energy ResourcesLoadingPenobscot County, Maine: Energy Resources2003) |FacilityPhoenix

284

Photon Energy Systems Ltd | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia: Energy ResourcesLoadingPenobscot County, Maine: Energy Resources2003) |FacilityPhoenixPhoton Energy Systems Ltd

285

Photonic Power Systems Inc | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia: Energy ResourcesLoadingPenobscot County, Maine: Energy Resources2003) |FacilityPhoenixPhoton Energy Systems

286

Photosol | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia: Energy ResourcesLoadingPenobscot County, Maine: Energy Resources2003) |FacilityPhoenixPhoton Energy

287

Phototaxis Solar | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia: Energy ResourcesLoadingPenobscot County, Maine: Energy Resources2003) |FacilityPhoenixPhoton EnergyPhototaxis

288

Photovoltaics | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia: Energy ResourcesLoadingPenobscot County, Maine: Energy Resources2003) |FacilityPhoenixPhoton

289

Phycal LLC | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia: Energy ResourcesLoadingPenobscot County, Maine: Energy Resources2003) |FacilityPhoenixPhotonPhycal LLC Jump to:

290

Phylion Battery | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia: Energy ResourcesLoadingPenobscot County, Maine: Energy Resources2003) |FacilityPhoenixPhotonPhycal LLC Jump

291

Pianacce Geothermal Power Station | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia: Energy ResourcesLoadingPenobscot County, Maine: Energy Resources2003) |FacilityPhoenixPhotonPhycal LLC

292

Piancastagnaio 2 Geothermal Power Station | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia: Energy ResourcesLoadingPenobscot County, Maine: Energy Resources2003) |FacilityPhoenixPhotonPhycal

293

Piancastagnaio 3 Geothermal Power Station | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia: Energy ResourcesLoadingPenobscot County, Maine: Energy Resources2003) |FacilityPhoenixPhotonPhycal3 Geothermal

294

Piancastagnaio 4 Geothermal Power Station | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia: Energy ResourcesLoadingPenobscot County, Maine: Energy Resources2003) |FacilityPhoenixPhotonPhycal3

295

Piancastagnaio 5 Geothermal Power Station | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia: Energy ResourcesLoadingPenobscot County, Maine: Energy Resources2003) |FacilityPhoenixPhotonPhycal3Geothermal

296

Climate Models from the Joint Global Change Research Institute  

DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

Staff at the Joint Institute develop and use models to simulate the economic and physical impacts of global change policy options. The GCAM, for example, gives analysts insight into how regional and national economies might respond to climate change mitigation policies including carbon taxes, carbon trading, and accelerated deployment of energy technology. Three available models are Phoenix, GCAM, and EPIC. Phoenix is a global, dynamic recursive, computable general equilibrium model that is solved in five-year time steps from 2005 through 2100 and divides the world into twenty-four regions. Each region includes twenty-six industrial sectors. Particular attention is paid to energy production in Phoenix. There are nine electricity-generating technologies (coal, natural gas, oil, biomass, nuclear, hydro, wind, solar, and geothermal) and four additional energy commodities: crude oil, refined oil products, coal, and natural gas. Phoenix is designed to answer economic questions related to international climate and energy policy and international trade. Phoenix replaces the Second Generation Model (SGM) that was formerly used for general equilibrium analysis at JGCRI. GCAM is the Global Change Assessment Model, a partial equilibrium model of the world with 14 regions. GCAM operates in 5 year time steps from 1990 to 2095 and is designed to examine long-term changes in the coupled energy, agriculture/land-use, and climate system. GCAM includes a 151-region agriculture land-use module and a reduced form carbon cycle and climate module in addition to its incorporation of demographics, resources, energy production and consumption. The model has been used extensively in a number of assessment and modeling activities such as the Energy Modeling Forum (EMF), the U.S. Climate Change Technology Program, and the U.S. Climate Change Science Program and IPCC assessment reports. GCAM is now freely available as a community model. The Environmental Policy Integrated Climate (EPIC) Model is a process-based agricultural systems model composed of simulation components for weather, hydrology, nutrient cycling, pesticide fate, tillage, crop growth, soil erosion, crop and soil management and economics. Staff at PNNL have been involved in the development of this model by integrating new sub-models for soil carbon dynamics and nitrogen cycling.

297

Existing climate data sources and Their Use in Heat IslandResearch  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Existing climate data sources can be used in two general types of analysis for the detection of urban heat islands. Historical analyses use long-term data records-preferentially from several locations in and around an urban area-to trace the gradual influence of urban development on its climate. Primary sources of such data include the cooperative network, first-order National Weather Service stations, and military weather stations. Analyses of short-term data use information from a dense urban weather station network to discern the location, extent, and magnitude of urban heat islands. Such analyses may use the aforementioned national networks or regional networks such as agricultural, air quality monitoring, or utility networks. We demonstrate the use of existing data sources with a historical analysis of temperature trends in Los Angeles, California, and an analysis of short-term data of the urban temperature profile for Phoenix, Arizona. The Los Angeles climate was examined with eleven long-term data records from the cooperative network. Statistically significant trends of rising temperature were detected at Los Angeles Civic Center and other stations over some parts of the year, although timing of the increase varied from station to station. Observed increases in temperatures maybe due to long-term climate changes, microclimate influences, or local-scale heat islands. The analysis of short-term data was made for Phoenix using the PRISMS station network. Mean diurnal temperature profiles for a month were examined and compared with those for adjacent rural areas. Data fi-om stations in the center of Phoenix showed clear and significant nighttime and daytime temperature differences of 1- 2K (3 - 4"F). These temperature increases maybe attributable to a local-scale heat island.

Akbari, Hashem; Pon, Brian; Smith, Craig Kenton; Stamper-Kurn, Dan Moses

1998-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

298

2011 Alkaline Membrane Fuel Cell Workshop Final Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A workshop addressing the current state-of-the-art in alkaline membrane fuel cells (AMFCs) was held May 8-9, 2011, at the Crystal Gateway Marriott in Arlington, Virginia. This workshop was the second of its kind, with the first being held December 11-13, 2006, in Phoenix, Arizona. The 2011 workshop and associated workshop report were created to assess the current state of AMFC technology (taking into account recent advances), investigate the performance potential of AMFC systems across all possible power ranges and applications, and identify the key research needs for commercial competitiveness in a variety of areas.

Pivovar, B.

2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

299

Storage opportunities in Arizona bedded evaporites  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Arizona is endowed with incredibly diverse natural beauty, and has also been blessed with at least seven discrete deposits of bedded salt. These deposits are dispersed around the state and cover some 2, 500 square miles; they currently contain 14 LPG storage caverns, with preliminary plans for more in the future. The areal extent and thickness of the deposits creates the opportunity for greatly expanded storage of LPG, natural gas, and compressed air energy storage (CAES). The location of salt deposits near Tucson and Phoenix may make CAES an attractive prospect in the future. The diversity of both locations and evaporate characteristics allows for much tailoring of individual operations to meet specific requirements.

Neal, J.T. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Rauzi, S.L. [Arizona Geological Survey, Tucson, AZ (United States)

1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

300

ACOUSTIC DETECTING AND LOCATING GAS PIPE LINE INFRINGEMENT  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The power point presentation for the Natural Gas Technologies II Conference held on February 8-11, 2004 in Phoenix AZ, published the presentations made at the conference, therefore required all presenters to submit their presentation prior to November 2003. However in the remainder of year, significant new test data became available which were incorporated in the actual presentation made at the Natural Gas Technologies II Conference. The 6th progress report presents the updated actual slide show used during the paper presentation by Richard Guiler.

John L. LOTH; GARY J. MORRIS; GEORGE M. PALMER; RICHARD GUILER

2004-01-05T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "1979-1982 phoenix 1976-1982" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Examples of reference material data needed for LBB analysis derived from WGCS-EC-DGXI studies  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Mechanical data collected through the sponsorship of the Activity Group 3 <> of the Working Group Codes and Standards of DG XI European Commission are pointed out to illustrate their potential use for Leak Before Break analyses. Most of the tensile, fatigue, creep and fracture toughness data have been generated for stainless steels, mainly on modified type 316 L (N), selected for the Super Phoenix LMFBR. Trends for ongoing programs and future works on C-Mn and MnNiMo low alloy steels are provided.

Petrequin, P.; Houssin, B.; Guinovart, J.

1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

302

A novel, single-isomer, sulfated cyclodextrin for use as a chiral resolving agent in capillary electrophoresis: the sodium salt of octakis(2,3-di-O-methyl-6-O-sulfo)-?-cyclodextrin  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Crystal structure of (2) 8 Assigned Hand "C-NMRof(3)inCDCI, . 9 A section of MALDI-TOF mass spectrum of (3). 10 Crystal structure of (3) 11 Assigned 'H and "C-NMR of (4) in D, O. 12 A section of the MALDI-TOF mass spectrum of (4) . . 28 29 30 13... long, 25@m i. d. bare fused silica capillary (injector to detector length 19 cm) (Polymicro Technologies, Phoenix, AZ), at 20kV separation potential and (-) to (+) polanty. The BGE used was 30mM tetramethylethylenediamine titrated to pH 8. 1...

Busby, Michael Brent

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

303

Descent Into Darkness  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

by the time our warp drive is repaired. Until then, the ship is his." "Aye, sir." Shortly after that, she turbolift doors open behind her. heard the "What the devil is going on here?" demanded Captain Scott. "And what are vou doing here?" His gesture...." "I'd rather see this through, Mr. Scott, if you don't mind. You might need my knowledge of the multiplex, and with the PHOENIX warp drive in shambles, and most of my crew on extended leave, I'm not needed anywhere in the near future." Scott...

Vreba, Joan Marie

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

304

The Efficacy of SEER as a Seasonal Performance Measure for Different Climates  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

: Difference Between Detailed Simulation and: Detailed Simulation Bin Calculations Bin-Calc SEER Nominal SEER Buffalo 11.94 12.13 1.6% -1.7% Portland 11.75 12.03 2.4% -0.1% Madison 11.68 11.95 2.3% 0.5% Chicago 11.63 11.93 2.6% 0.9% Detroit 11... - Buffalo 2 - Portland 3 - Madison 4 - Chicago 5 - Detroit 6 - Wilmington 7 - New_York_City 8 - San_Francisco 9 - Fresno 10 - Pittsburgh 11 - Memphis 12 - Atlanta 13 - Phoenix...

Henderson, H. I.; Sachs, H. M.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

305

Photo of the Week: Pi + NASA + Supercomputing | Department of Energy  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "of Energy Power.pdf11-161-LNG |September 15, 2010Energy6 Frontera STAT.Paul L.3PhoenixBoosting13,Photo of

306

Transportation and Stationary Power Integration Workshop Agenda, October  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankCombustion |Energy Usage »of EnergyThe EnergyDepartment7 thFuel27, 2008, Phoenix, Arizonia |

307

Transportation and Stationary Power Integration Workshop Attendees List |  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankCombustion |Energy Usage »of EnergyThe EnergyDepartment7 thFuel27, 2008, Phoenix, Arizonia

308

Transportation and Stationary Power Integration Workshop Session II: State  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankCombustion |Energy Usage »of EnergyThe EnergyDepartment7 thFuel27, 2008, Phoenix, Arizoniaand

309

Transportation and Stationary Power Integration Workshop: ""An Automaker's  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankCombustion |Energy Usage »of EnergyThe EnergyDepartment7 thFuel27, 2008, Phoenix, ArizoniaandViews

310

Transportation and Stationary Power Integration Workshop: A California  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankCombustion |Energy Usage »of EnergyThe EnergyDepartment7 thFuel27, 2008, Phoenix,

311

Transportation and Stationary Power Integration with Hydrogen and Fuel Cell  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankCombustion |Energy Usage »of EnergyThe EnergyDepartment7 thFuel27, 2008, Phoenix,Technology in

312

Transportation and Stationary Power Integration: Workshop Proceedings |  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankCombustion |Energy Usage »of EnergyThe EnergyDepartment7 thFuel27, 2008, Phoenix,Technology

313

Supplement 24, Part 4, Parasite-Subject Catalogue, Parasites: Nematoda and Acanthocephala  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

by The Oryx Press 2214 North Central at Encanto Phoenix, AZ 85004 ISSN 0094-4556 /w I VETT 667 4 USI tv 0.4 ISBN 0-89774-051-3 (Set) ISBN 0-89774-055-6 (Part 4) PREFACE The Index-Catalogue of Medical and Veterinary Zoology is an index... of the following parts: Parti, Authors: A-Z Part 2, Parasite-Subject Catalogue: Parasites: Protozoa Part3, Parasite-Subject Catalogue: Parasites: Trematoda and Cestoda Part 4, Parasite-Subject Catalogue: Parasites: Nematoda and Acanthocephala Part 5...

Edwards, Shirley J.; Hood, Martha W.; Shaw, Judith H.; Rayburn, Jane D.; Kirby, Margie D.; Hanfman, Deborah T.; Zidar, Judith A.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

314

Energizing American Competitiveness in Solar Technologies  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:YearRound-UpHeat PumpRecord ofESPC ENABLE:2009 DOE Hydrogen ProgramEnergize Phoenix

315

Energy Conservation: Did I remember to...? Activity Type: Craft and Game  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:YearRound-UpHeat PumpRecord ofESPC ENABLE:2009 DOE Hydrogen ProgramEnergize PhoenixVOLUNTEER

316

Thinking About Buying a Car this Summer? Read This First! | Department of  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "ofEarlyEnergyDepartment of EnergyProgram (Alabama)TechnologyPhoenix,Further readingDRAFT -Department

317

Thinking Outside the (Tool) Box with the Building America Solution Center |  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "ofEarlyEnergyDepartment of EnergyProgram (Alabama)TechnologyPhoenix,Further readingDRAFT

318

This Month on Energy Savers: August 2011 | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "ofEarlyEnergyDepartment of EnergyProgram (Alabama)TechnologyPhoenix,Further Third Report toApril

319

This Month on Energy Savers: February 2011 | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "ofEarlyEnergyDepartment of EnergyProgram (Alabama)TechnologyPhoenix,Further Third Report

320

This Month on Energy Savers: November 2010 | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "ofEarlyEnergyDepartment of EnergyProgram (Alabama)TechnologyPhoenix,Further Third ReportIn theMay

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "1979-1982 phoenix 1976-1982" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Three NETL-Developed Technologies Recognized by R&D Magazine as Among 100  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "ofEarlyEnergyDepartment of EnergyProgram (Alabama)TechnologyPhoenix,Further ThirdDOE ENERGY62P.2657Most

322

Three Rivers Builders The Three Rivers House 2015 Race to Zero Student Design Competition  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "ofEarlyEnergyDepartment of EnergyProgram (Alabama)TechnologyPhoenix,Further ThirdDOE

323

Three Rivers Builders The Three Rivers House Project Summary  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "ofEarlyEnergyDepartment of EnergyProgram (Alabama)TechnologyPhoenix,Further ThirdDOEThree Rivers

324

Title IX: More than Just Sports | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "ofEarlyEnergyDepartment of EnergyProgram (Alabama)TechnologyPhoenix,FurtherThisEnergy Title

325

Complex Adaptive Systems of Systems (CASoS) engineering and foundations for global design.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Complex Adaptive Systems of Systems, or CASoS, are vastly complex ecological, sociological, economic and/or technical systems which must be recognized and reckoned with to design a secure future for the nation and the world. Design within CASoS requires the fostering of a new discipline, CASoS Engineering, and the building of capability to support it. Towards this primary objective, we created the Phoenix Pilot as a crucible from which systemization of the new discipline could emerge. Using a wide range of applications, Phoenix has begun building both theoretical foundations and capability for: the integration of Applications to continuously build common understanding and capability; a Framework for defining problems, designing and testing solutions, and actualizing these solutions within the CASoS of interest; and an engineering Environment required for 'the doing' of CASoS Engineering. In a secondary objective, we applied CASoS Engineering principles to begin to build a foundation for design in context of Global CASoS

Brodsky, Nancy S.; Finley, Patrick D.; Beyeler, Walter Eugene; Brown, Theresa Jean; Linebarger, John Michael; Moore, Thomas W.; Glass, Robert John, Jr.; Maffitt, S. Louise; Mitchell, Michael David; Ames, Arlo Leroy

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

326

Complex Adaptive System of Systems (CASoS) Engineering Applications. Version 1.0.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Complex Adaptive Systems of Systems, or CASoS, are vastly complex eco-socio-economic-technical systems which we must understand to design a secure future for the nation and the world. Perturbations/disruptions in CASoS have the potential for far-reaching effects due to highly-saturated interdependencies and allied vulnerabilities to cascades in associated systems. The Phoenix initiative approaches this high-impact problem space as engineers, devising interventions (problem solutions) that influence CASoS to achieve specific aspirations. CASoS embody the world's biggest problems and greatest opportunities: applications to real world problems are the driving force of our effort. We are developing engineering theory and practice together to create a discipline that is grounded in reality, extends our understanding of how CASoS behave, and allows us to better control those behaviors. Through application to real-world problems, Phoenix is evolving CASoS Engineering principles while growing a community of practice and the CASoS engineers to populate it.

Linebarger, John Michael; Maffitt, S. Louise (New Mexico Institute of Mining and Technology, Albuquerque, NM); Glass, Robert John, Jr.; Beyeler, Walter Eugene; Brown, Theresa Jean; Ames, Arlo Leroy

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

327

Exposure to methyl tert-butyl ether and benzene among service station attendants and operators  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Concerns for atmospheric pollution from auto exhaust have led to the blending of {open_quotes}oxygenates{close_quotes} with motor fuels. The most common oxygenate, methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE) is currently required within several metropolitan areas (Denver and Phoenix) in the range of 12% of the motor fuel. Amendments to the Clean Air Act may expand this requirement to as many as 44 other areas of the United States in the near future. In consideration of the magnitude of potential uncontrolled exposures from its extensive use and a related concern involving the potential influence of MTBE blending on exposures to other constituents of gasoline (particularly benzene), an evaluation of exposures among service station attendants and operators was undertaken at the request, and in cooperation with, the American Petroleum Institute during the latter part of 1990. For application of the survey results to a broad audience, three categories or types of service stations were identified with regard to MTBE use and exposure potential: (a) service stations that do not use MTBE or use it only as an octane enhancer, (b) service stations with seasonal requirements to use 12-15% MTBE (the Denver, Colorado, and Phoenix, Arizona, metropolitan areas), and (c) service stations equipped with stage II (active) vapor recovery systems (several coastal areas, most notably Southern California). 4 refs., 4 tabs.

Hartle, R. [National Inst. for Occupational Safety and Health, Cincinnati, OH (United States)

1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

328

An overview of building morphological characteristics derived from 3D building databases.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Varying levels of urban canopy parameterizations are frequently employed in atmospheric transport and dispersion codes in order to better account for the urban effect on the meteorology and diffusion. Many of these urban parameterizations need building-related parameters as input. Derivation of these building parameters has often relied on in situ 'measurements', a time-consuming and expensive process. Recently, 3D building databases have become more common for major cities worldwide and provide the hope of a more efficient route to obtaining building statistics. In this paper, we give an overview of computations we have performed for obtaining building morphological characteristics from 3D building databases for several southwestern US cities, including Los Angeles, Salt Lake City, and Phoenix.

Brown, M. J. (Michael J.); Burian, S. J. (Steven J.); Linger, S. P. (Steve P.); Velugubantla, S. P. (Srinivas, P.); Ratti, Carlo

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

329

Degradation in Solid Oxide Cells During High Temperature Electrolysis  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Idaho National Laboratory has an ongoing project to generate hydrogen from steam using solid oxide electrolysis cells. One goal of that project is to address the technical and degradation issues associated with solid oxide electrolysis cells. This report covers a variety of these degradation issues, which were discussed during a workshop on “Degradation in Solid Oxide Electrolysis Cells and Strategies for its Mitigation,” held in Phoenix, AZ on October 27, 2008. Three major degradation issues related to solid oxide electrolysis cells discussed at the workshop are: • Delamination of O2-electrode and bond layer on steam/O2-electrode side • Contaminants (Ni, Cr, Si, etc.) on reaction sites (triple-phase boundary) • Loss of electrical/ionic conductivity of electrolyte. This list is not all inclusive, but the workshop summary can be useful in providing a direction for future research related to the degradation of solid oxide electrolysis cells.

Manohar Sohal

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

330

Slow speed object detection for haul trucks  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Caterpillar integrates radar technology with its current camera based system. Caterpillar has developed the Integrated Object Detection System, a slow speed object detection system for mining haul trucks. Object detection is a system that aids the truck operator's awareness of their surroundings. The system consists of a color touch screen display along with medium- and short-range radar as well as cameras, harnesses and mounting hardware. It is integrated into the truck's Work Area Vision System (WAVS). After field testing in 2007, system commercialization began in 2008. Prototype systems are in operation in Australia, Utah and Arizona and the Integrated Object Detection System will be available in the fourth quarter of 2009 and on production trucks 785C, 789C, 793D and 797B. The article is adapted from a presentation by Mark Richards of Caterpillar to the Haulage & Loading 2009 conference, May, held in Phoenix, AZ. 1 fig., 5 photos.

NONE

2009-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

331

Carbon stars in local group dwarf galaxies: C and O abundances  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present abundances of carbon and oxygen as well as abundance ratios 12C/13C for a sample of carbon stars in the LMC, SMC, Carina, Sculptor and Fornax dwarf galaxies. The overall metallicities in these dwarf galaxies are lower than in the galactic disc. The observations cover most of the AGB and we discuss the abundance patterns in different regions along the AGB. The abundances are determined from infrared spectra obtained with the ISAAC spectrometer on VLT (R=1500) and the Phoenix Spectrometer on Gemini South (R=50000). The synthetic spectra used in the analysis were computed with MARCS model atmospheres. We find that the oxygen abundance is decreasing with decreasing overall metallicity of the system while the C/O ratio at a given evolutionary phase is increasing with decreasing oxygen abundance. keywords Stars: abundances -- Stars: carbon -- Stars: AGB and post-AGB -- Galaxies: dwarf -- Local Group -- Infrared: stars

R. Wahlin; K. Eriksson; B. Gustafsson; K. H. Hinkle; D. L. Lambert; N. Ryde; B. Westerlund

2006-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

332

Ionisation in atmospheres of brown dwarfs and extrasolar planets VI: Properties of large-scale discharge events  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Mineral clouds in substellar atmospheres play a special role as a catalyst for a variety of charge processes. If clouds are charged, the surrounding environment becomes electrically activated, and ensembles of charged grains are electrically discharging (e.g. by lightning), which significantly infuences the local chemistry creating conditions similar to those thought responsible for life in early planetary atmospheres. We note that such lightning discharges contribute also to the ionisation state of the atmosphere. We apply scaling laws for electrical discharge processes from laboratory measurements and numerical experiments to Drift-Phoenix model atmosphere results to model the discharge's propagation downwards (as lightning) and upwards (as sprites) through the atmospheric clouds. We evaluate the spatial extent and energetics of lightning discharges. The atmospheric volume affected (e.g. by increase of temperature or electron number) is larger in a brown dwarf atmosphere ($10^8 -~10^{10}$m$^3$) than in a gi...

Bailey, R L; Hodos, G; Bilger, C; Stark, C R

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

333

Dynamic Analysis of Electrical Power Grid Delivery: Using Prime Mover Engines to Balance Dynamic Wind Turbine Output  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper presents an investigation into integrated wind + combustion engine high penetration electrical generation systems. Renewable generation systems are now a reality of electrical transmission. Unfortunately, many of these renewable energy supplies are stochastic and highly dynamic. Conversely, the existing national grid has been designed for steady state operation. The research team has developed an algorithm to investigate the feasibility and relative capability of a reciprocating internal combustion engine to directly integrate with wind generation in a tightly coupled Hybrid Energy System. Utilizing the Idaho National Laboratory developed Phoenix Model Integration Platform, the research team has coupled demand data with wind turbine generation data and the Aspen Custom Modeler reciprocating engine electrical generator model to investigate the capability of reciprocating engine electrical generation to balance stochastic renewable energy.

Diana K. Grauer

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

334

The safe, economical operation of a slightly subcritical reactor and transmutor with a small proton accelerator  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes methods in which an accelerator can be used to increase the safety and neutron economy of a power reactor and transmutor of long-lived radioactive wastes, such as minor actinides and fission products, by providing neutrons for its subcritical operation. Instead of the rather large subcriticality of k=0.9--0.95 which we originally proposed for such a transmutor, we propose to use a slightly subcritical reactor, such as k=0.99, which will avoid many of the technical difficulties that are associated with large subcriticality, such as localized power peaking, radiation damage due to the injection of medium-energy protons, the high current accelerator, and the requirement for a long beam-expansion section. We analyzed the power drop that occurred in Phoenix reactor, and show that the operating this reactor in subcritical condition improves its safety.

Takahashi, Hiroshi

1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

335

Comparisons of HVAC Simulations between EnergyPlus and DOE-2.2 for Data Centers  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper compares HVAC simulations between EnergyPlus and DOE-2.2 for data centers. The HVAC systems studied in the paper are packaged direct expansion air-cooled single zone systems with and without air economizer. Four climate zones are chosen for the study - San Francisco, Miami, Chicago, and Phoenix. EnergyPlus version 2.1 and DOE-2.2 version 45 are used in the annual energy simulations. The annual cooling electric consumption calculated by EnergyPlus and DOE-2.2 are reasonablely matched within a range of -0.4percent to 8.6percent. The paper also discusses sources of differences beween EnergyPlus and DOE-2.2 runs including cooling coil algorithm, performance curves, and important energy model inputs.

Hong, Tianzhen; Sartor, Dale; Mathew, Paul; Yazdanian, Mehry

2008-08-13T23:59:59.000Z

336

Native Americans and Yucca Mountain: A revised and updated summary report on research undertaken between 1987 and 1991; Volume 2  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report consists of Yucca Mountain Project bibliographies. It is the appendix to a report that summarizes data collected between September 1986 and September 1988 relative to Native American concerns involving the potential siting of a high-level nuclear waste repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. The data were collected from Western Shoshone and Southern Paiute people upon whose aboriginal lands the repository potentially is to be located. Western Shoshone people involved in the study were those resident or affiliated with reservation communities at Yomba and Duckwater, Nevada, and Death Valley, California. Southern Paiute people were at reservation communities at Moapa and Las Vegas. Additional persons of Western Shoshone and Southern Paiute descent were interviewed at Beatty, Tonopah, Caliente, Pahrump, and Las Vegas, Nevada. The work was part of a larger project of socioeconomic studies for the State of Nevada`s Nuclear Waste Projects office, conducted by Mountain West of Phoenix, Arizona.

Fowler, C.S. [Cultural Resources Consultants Ltd., Reno, NV (United States)

1991-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

337

M o d e l i n g o f P a t t e r n D e p e n d e n c i e s i n A b r a s i v e -F r e e C o p p e r C M P P r o c e s s e s T. Tugbawa et al.-VMIC 01 1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

M o d e l i n g o f P a t t e r n D e p e n d e n c i e s i n A b r a s i v e - F r e e C o p p e r C M P P r o c e s s e s T. Tugbawa et al.- VMIC 01 1 Modeling of Pattern Dependencies in AbrasiveFam-IPEC, Phoenix, AZ #12;M o d e l i n g o f P a t t e r n D e p e n d e n c i e s i n A b r a s i v e - F r e e C

Boning, Duane S.

338

Native Americans and Yucca Mountain: A revised and updated summary report on research undertaken between 1987 and 1991; Volume 1  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report summarizes data collected between September 1986 and September 1988 relative to Native American concerns involving the potential siting of a high-level nuclear waste repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. The data were collected from Western Shoshone and Southern Paiute people upon whose aboriginal lands the repository potentially is to be located. Western Shoshone people involved in the study were those resident or affiliated with reservation communities at Yomba and Duckwater, Nevada, and Death Valley, California. Southern Paiute people were at reservation communities at Moapa and Las Vegas. Additional persons of Western Shoshone and Southern Paiute descent were interviewed at Beatty, Tonopah, Caliente, Pahrump, and Las Vegas, Nevada. The work was part of a larger project of socioeconomic studies for the State of Nevada`s Nuclear Waste Projects office, conducted by Mountain West of Phoenix, Arizona.

Fowler, C.S. [Cultural Resources Consultants Ltd., Reno, NV (United States)

1991-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

339

Electrical Power Grid Delivery Dynamic Analysis: Using Prime Mover Engines to Balance Dynamic Wind Turbine Output  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper presents an investigation into integrated wind + combustion engine high penetration electrical generation systems. Renewable generation systems are now a reality of electrical transmission. Unfortunately, many of these renewable energy supplies are stochastic and highly dynamic. Conversely, the existing national grid has been designed for steady state operation. The research team has developed an algorithm to investigate the feasibility and relative capability of a reciprocating internal combustion engine to directly integrate with wind generation in a tightly coupled Hybrid Energy System. Utilizing the Idaho National Laboratory developed Phoenix Model Integration Platform, the research team has coupled demand data with wind turbine generation data and the Aspen Custom Modeler reciprocating engine electrical generator model to investigate the capability of reciprocating engine electrical generation to balance stochastic renewable energy.

Diana K. Grauer; Michael E. Reed

2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

340

The theoretical instability strip of M dwarf stars  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The overstability of the fundamental radial mode in M dwarf models was theoretically predicted by Rodr\\'iguez-L\\'opez et al. (2012). The periods were found to be in the ranges ~25-40 min and ~4-8 h, depending on stellar age and excitation mechanism. We have extended our initial M dwarf model grid in mass, metallicity, and mixing length parameter. We have also considered models with boundary conditions from PHOENIX NextGen atmospheres to test their influence on the pulsation spectra. We find instability of non-radial modes with radial orders up to k=3, degree l=0-3, including p and g modes, with the period range extending from 20 min up to 11 h. Furthermore, we find theoretical evidence of the potential of M dwarfs as solar-like oscillators.

Rodríguez-López, C; Amado, P J; Moya, A; Mullan, D

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "1979-1982 phoenix 1976-1982" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

AN ULTRA-STEEP-SPECTRUM RADIO RELIC IN THE GALAXY CLUSTER A2443  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We present newly discovered radio emission in the galaxy cluster A2443 which (1) is diffuse, (2) has an extremely steep spectrum, (3) is offset from the cluster center, (4) is of irregular morphology, and (5) is not clearly associated with any of the galaxies within the cluster. The most likely explanation is that this emission is a cluster radio relic associated with a cluster merger. We present deep observations of A2443 at multiple low frequencies (1425, 325, and 74 MHz) which help characterize the spectrum and morphology of this relic. Based on the curved spectral shape of the relic emission and the presence of small-scale structure, we suggest that this new source is likely a member of the radio phoenix class of radio relics.

Cohen, A. S.; Clarke, T. E., E-mail: aaron_cohen@alum.mit.edu [Naval Research Laboratory, Code 7213, Washington, DC 20375 (United States)

2011-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

342

3500-hour durability testing of commercial ceramic materials. Interim report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A two-year durability testing program was performed by AiResearch Phoenix to evaluate four commercially available ceramic materials under simulated automotive gas turbine combustor discharge conditions. These conditions included extended cyclic thermal exposures up to 2500/sup 0/F and 3500 h. The four materials selected for evaluation were Norton NCX-34 hot pressed silicon nitride, AiResearch RBN 101 reaction bonded silicon nitride, Carborundum pressureless sintered ..cap alpha..-SiC and British Nuclear Fuels, Ltd. Refel reaction sintered silicon carbide marketed by Pure Carbon Co. These materials initially were exposed to 350 h/1750 cycles at 1200 and 1370/sup 0/C (2200 and 2500/sup 0/F). Subsequent exposures to 1050, 2100, and 3500 h were performed on the materials maintaining 50% of baseline strength after the initial exposure. Additional evaluations of exposed bars included dimension changes, weight changes, dye penetrant, specific damping capacity changes, Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) fractography and x-ray diffraction.

Carruthers, W.D.; Richerson, D.W.; Benn, K.W.

1980-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

343

Evaluation of alternative designs for engine-driven supermarket refrigeration. Final report, January-October 1990  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An assessment of several designs for gas engine-driven refrigeration systems for supermarkets is summarized. The objectives were to select the most viable alternative for a refrigeration system, to identify the potential market acceptance, and to define a feasible development and commercialization path for the most attractive system. The project included a telephone survey of supermarket engineering management to characterize current practices and equipment selection criteria, the development of preliminary designs for four principal system alternatives, and an evaluation of the economics of the system alternatives based on climate and energy rate data for Atlanta, Chicago, Los Angeles, and Phoenix. Of the four alternatives, one was unintegrated straight cogeneration and three were integrated cogeneration/refrigeration designs.

Griffiths, D.; Darrow, K.; Parkhurst, B.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

344

Modeled and metered energy savings from exterior wall insulation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Millions of single-family masonry (block) houses with slab foundations exist in the southern United States. In fact, approximately 50% of Florida`s six million residences are of concrete block construction. The block walls in these homes are usually uninsulated, and the technology for retrofitting wall insulation is not well developed. Two field tests were performed--one near Phoenix, Arizona and one in Cocoa, Florida--to measure the air-conditioning energy savings and demand reduction impact of applying an exterior insulation and finish system (EEFS) to the exterior of the block wall, and gain practical experience with retrofit application techniques and costs. One field test used a {open_quotes}site-fabricated{close_quotes} insulation system, while the other field test used a commercially available system. The field tests measured a savings of 9% in Arizona and less savings in Florida, and emphasized the impact indoor temperature settings have on cooling energy savings: exterior wall insulation on block homes will produce energy savings in Florida houses only if a low cooling thermostat setting is desirable. The field tests also highlighted an improved comfort benefit from the retrofit - namely, elimination of overheating in rooms with south and west exposures. The DOE-2. ID program was used to analyze the energy savings (air-conditioning and heating) and electric demand impact of applying an EIFS. Air-conditioning energy savings were estimated to be in the range of 8% to 10% in many southern U.S. regions. A 12% savings was predicted for Phoenix, Arizona and a savings of 1% to 4% was predicted for seacoast regions, particularly in Florida. These predictions were in good agreement with the measured values. Peak hour cooling energy savings were predicted to be more uniform throughout the country, generally in the range of %8 to %12.

Ternes, M.; Parker, D.; McLain, H.; Barkaszi, S. Jr.

1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

345

Impact of urban heat island on cooling and environment: A demonstration project  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Landscaping has been shown in simulation and field studies to reduce building cooling loads by affecting microclimatic factors such as solar radiation, wind speed and air temperature. A demonstration project was undertaken to determine the magnitude of landscape induced changes in microclimate on building cooling loads and water use on four typical residences in Phoenix, Arizona. The energy use and microclimate of three unlandscaped (bare soil, rock mulch) and one landscaped (turf) home were monitored during summer 1990. In the fall, turf was placed around one of the unlandscaped houses, and shade trees planted on the west and south sides of another. Measurements continued during the summer of 1991. Total house air conditioning and selected appliance electrical data were collected, as well as inside and outside air temperatures. Detailed microclimate measurements were obtained for one to two week periods during both summers. Maximum reductions of hourly outside air temperatures of 1 to 1.5{degrees}C, and of daily average air temperatures of up to 1{degrees}C, resulted from the addition of turf landscaping. Addition of small trees to the south and west sides of another treatment did not have a noticeable effect on air temperature. Cooling load reductions of 10% to 17% were observed between years when well-watered turf landscaping was added to a house previously surrounded by bare soil. Addition of small trees to another bare landscape did not produce a detectable change in cooling load. The results of the study are used as input to a standard building energy use simulation model to predict landscape effects on cooling load and water usage for three typical houses, and to develop guidelines for use of energy efficient residential landscapes in Phoenix, Arizona.

Not Available

1993-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

346

Development of a Hydrogasification Process for Co-Production of Substitute Natural Gas (SNG) and Electric Power from Western Coals  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report presents the results of the research and development conducted on an Advanced Hydrogasification Process (AHP) conceived and developed by Arizona Public Service Company (APS) under U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) contract: DE-FC26-06NT42759 for Substitute Natural Gas (SNG) production from western coal. A double-wall (i.e., a hydrogasification contained within a pressure shell) down-flow hydrogasification reactor was designed, engineered, constructed, commissioned and operated by APS, Phoenix, AZ. The reactor is ASME-certified under Section VIII with a rating of 1150 pounds per square inch gage (psig) maximum allowable working pressure at 1950 degrees Fahrenheit ({degrees}F). The reaction zone had a 1.75 inch inner diameter and 13 feet length. The initial testing of a sub-bituminous coal demonstrated ~ 50% carbon conversion and ~10% methane yield in the product gas under 1625{degrees}F, 1000 psig pressure, with a 11 seconds (s) residence time, and 0.4 hydrogen-to-coal mass ratio. Liquid by-products mainly contained Benzene, Toluene, Xylene (BTX) and tar. Char collected from the bottom of the reactor had 9000-British thermal units per pound (Btu/lb) heating value. A three-dimensional (3D) computational fluid dynamic model simulation of the hydrodynamics around the reactor head was utilized to design the nozzles for injecting the hydrogen into the gasifier to optimize gas-solid mixing to achieve improved carbon conversion. The report also presents the evaluation of using algae for carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) management and biofuel production. Nannochloropsis, Selenastrum and Scenedesmus were determined to be the best algae strains for the project purpose and were studied in an outdoor system which included a 6-meter (6M) radius cultivator with a total surface area of 113 square meters (m{sup 2}) and a total culture volume between 10,000 to 15,000 liters (L); a CO{sub 2} on-demand feeding system; an on-line data collection system for temperature, pH, Photosynthetically Activate Radiation (PAR) and dissolved oxygen (DO); and a ~2 gallons per minute (gpm) algae culture dewatering system. Among the three algae strains, Scenedesmus showed the most tolerance to temperature and irradiance conditions in Phoenix and the best self-settling characteristics. Experimental findings and operational strategies determined through these tests guided the operation of the algae cultivation system for the scale-up study. Effect of power plant flue gas, especially heavy metals, on algae growth and biomass adsorption were evaluated as well.

Sun, Xiaolei; Rink, Nancy

2011-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

347

Clinical Outcome of Patients Treated With 3D Conformal Radiation Therapy (3D-CRT) for Prostate Cancer on RTOG 9406  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: Report of clinical cancer control outcomes on Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) 9406, a three-dimensional conformal radiation therapy (3D-CRT) dose escalation trial for localized adenocarcinoma of the prostate. Methods and Materials: RTOG 9406 is a Phase I/II multi-institutional dose escalation study of 3D-CRT for men with localized prostate cancer. Patients were registered on five sequential dose levels: 68.4 Gy, 73.8 Gy, 79.2 Gy, 74 Gy, and 78 Gy with 1.8 Gy/day (levels I-III) or 2.0 Gy/day (levels IV and V). Neoadjuvant hormone therapy (NHT) from 2 to 6 months was allowed. Protocol-specific, American Society for Therapeutic Radiation Oncology (ASTRO), and Phoenix biochemical failure definitions are reported. Results: Thirty-four institutions enrolled 1,084 patients and 1,051 patients are analyzable. Median follow-up for levels I, II, III, IV, and V was 11.7, 10.4, 11.8, 10.4, and 9.2 years, respectively. Thirty-six percent of patients received NHT. The 5-year overall survival was 90%, 87%, 88%, 89%, and 88% for dose levels I-V, respectively. The 5-year clinical disease-free survival (excluding protocol prostate-specific antigen definition) for levels I-V is 84%, 78%, 81%, 82%, and 82%, respectively. By ASTRO definition, the 5-year disease-free survivals were 57%, 59%, 52%, 64% and 75% (low risk); 46%, 52%, 54%, 56%, and 63% (intermediate risk); and 50%, 34%, 46%, 34%, and 61% (high risk) for levels I-V, respectively. By the Phoenix definition, the 5-year disease-free survivals were 68%, 73%, 67%, 84%, and 80% (low risk); 70%, 62%, 70%, 74%, and 69% (intermediate risk); and 42%, 62%, 68%, 54%, and 67% (high risk) for levels I-V, respectively. Conclusion: Dose-escalated 3D-CRT yields favorable outcomes for localized prostate cancer. This multi-institutional experience allows comparison to other experiences with modern radiation therapy.

Michalski, Jeff, E-mail: michalski@wustl.edu [Radiation Oncology, Washington University Medical School, St. Louis, Missouri (United States); Image-guided Therapy Center, St. Louis, Missouri (United States); Winter, Kathryn [Department of Statistics, Radiation Therapy Oncology Group, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Roach, Mack [Radiation Oncology, University of California-San Francisco, San Francisco, California (United States); Markoe, Arnold [University of Miami, Miami, Florida (United States); Sandler, Howard M. [University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Cedars-Sinai Medical Center, Los Angeles, California (United States); Ryu, Janice [Radiation Oncology, University of California-Davis, Davis, California (United States); Radiation Oncology Associates, Sacramento, California (United States); Parliament, Matthew [Radiation Oncology, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta (Canada); Purdy, James A. [Radiation Oncology, University of California-Davis, Davis, California (United States); Image-guided Therapy Center, St. Louis, Missouri (United States); Valicenti, Richard K. [Radiation Oncology, University of California-Davis, Davis, California (United States); Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Cox, James D. [Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States)

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

348

HOW THE LEED VENTILATION CREDIT IMPACTS ENERGY CONSUMPTION OF GSHP SYSTEMS A CASE STUDY FOR PRIMARY SCHOOLS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper presents a study on the impacts of increased outdoor air (OA) ventilation on the performance of ground-source heat pump (GSHP) systems that heat and cool typical primary schools. Four locations Phoenix, Miami, Seattle, and Chicago are selected in this study to represent different climate zones in the United States. eQUEST, an integrated building and HVAC system energy analysis program, is used to simulate a typical primary school and the GSHP system at the four locations with minimum and 30% more than minimum OA ventilation. The simulation results show that, without an energy recovery ventilator, the 30% more OA ventilation results in an 8.0 13.3% increase in total GSHP system energy consumption at the four locations. The peak heating and cooling loads increase by 20.2 30% and 14.9 18.4%, respectively, at the four locations. The load imbalance of the ground heat exchanger is increased in hot climates but reduced in mild and cold climates.

Liu, Xiaobing [ORNL] [ORNL

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

349

Advanced Microturbine Systems  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Dept. of Energy (DOE) Cooperative Agreement DE-FC02-00-CH11061 was originally awarded to Honeywell International, Inc. â?? Honeywell Power Systems Inc. (HPSI) division located in Albuquerque, NM in October 2000 to conduct a program titled Advanced Microturbine Systems (AMS). The DOE Advanced Microturbines Systems Program was originally proposed as a five-year program to design and develop a high efficiency, low emissions, durable microturbine system. The period of performance was to be October 2000 through September 2005. Program efforts were underway, when one year into the program Honeywell sold the intellectual property of Honeywell Power Systems Inc. and HPSI ceased business operations. Honeywell made an internal decision to restructure the existing program due to the HPSI shutdown and submitted a formal request to DOE on September 24, 2001 to transfer the Cooperative Agreement to Honeywell Engines, Systems and Services (HES&S) in Phoenix, AZ in order to continue to offer support for DOE's Advanced Microturbine Program. Work continued on the descoped program under Cooperative Agreement No. DE-FC26-00-CH11061 and has been completed.

None

2005-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

350

Fluorine Abundance Variations in Red Giants of the Globular Cluster M4 and Early-Cluster Chemical Pollution  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present fluorine abundances in seven red-giant members of the globular cluster M4 (NGC 6121). These abundances were derived from the HF (1--0) R9 line at 2.3357 microns in high-resolution infrared spectra obtained with the Phoenix spectrograph on Gemini-South. Many abundances in the target stars have been studied previously, so that their overall abundance distributions are well-mapped. The abundance of fluorine is found to vary by more than a factor of 6, with the F-19 variations being correlated with the already established oxygen variations, and anti-correlated with the sodium and aluminium variations. In this paper we thus add fluorine to the list of elements known to vary in globular cluster stars, and this provides further evidence that H-burning is the root cause of the chemical inhomegeneities. The fact that F-19 is found to decrease in the M4 stars, as the signature of H-burning appears, indicates that the polluting stars must have masses greater than about 3.5 solar masses, as less massive stars than this should produce, not destroy, fluorine.

V. V. Smith; K. Cunha; I. I. Ivans; J. C. Lattanzio; K. H. Hinkle

2005-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

351

Gyrokinetic Particle Simulation of Compressible Electromagnetic Turbulence in High-? Plasmas  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Supported by this award, the PI and his research group at the University of California, Irvine (UCI) have carried out computational and theoretical studies of instability, turbulence, and transport in laboratory and space plasmas. Several massively parallel, gyrokinetic particle simulation codes have been developed to study electromagnetic turbulence in space and laboratory plasmas. In space plasma projects, the simulation codes have been successfully applied to study the spectral cascade and plasma heating in kinetic Alfven wave turbulence, the linear and nonlinear properties of compressible modes including mirror instability and drift compressional mode, and the stability of the current sheet instabilities with finite guide field in the context of collisionless magnetic reconnection. The research results have been published in 25 journal papers and presented at many national and international conferences. Reprints of publications, source codes, and other research-related information are also available to general public on the PI’s webpage (http://phoenix.ps.uci.edu/zlin/). Two PhD theses in space plasma physics are highlighted in this report.

Lin, Zhihong

2014-03-13T23:59:59.000Z

352

Potential Energy Savings Due to Phase Change Material in a Building Wall Assembly: An Examination of Two Climates  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Phase change material (PCM), placed in an exterior wall, alters the temperature profile within the wall and thus influences the heat transport through the wall. This may reduce the net energy transport through the wall via interactions with diurnal temperature swings in the external environment or reduce the electricity needed to meet the net load through the wall by shifting the time of the peak load to a time when the cooling system operates more efficiently. This study covers a broad range of parameters that can influence the effectiveness of such a merged thermal storage-thermal insulation system. These parameters included climate, PCM location within the wall, amount of PCM, midpoint of the PCM melting and freezing range relative to the indoor setpoint temperature, temperature range over which phase change occurs, and the wall orientation. Two climates are investigated using finite difference and optimization analyses: Phoenix and Baltimore, with two utility rate schedules. Although potential savings for a PCM with optimized properties were greater when the PCM was concentrated near the inside wall surface, other considerations described here lead to a recommendation for a full-thickness application. An examination of the temperature distribution within the walls also revealed the potential for this system to reduce the amount of energy transported through the wall framing. Finally, economic benefits can exceed energy savings when time-of-day utility rates are in effect, reflecting the value of peak load reductions for the utility grid.

Childs, Kenneth W [ORNL; Stovall, Therese K [ORNL

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

353

Model year 2010 Honda insight level-1 testing report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

As a part of the US Department of Energy's Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity (AVTA), a model year 2010 Honda Insight was procured by eTec (Phoenix, AZ) and sent to ANL's Advanced Powertrain Research Facility for the purposes of vehicle-level testing in support of the Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity (AVTA). Data was acquired during testing using non-intrusive sensors, vehicle network information, and facilities equipment (emissions and dynamometer data). Standard drive cycles, performance cycles, steady-state cycles and A/C usage cycles were tested. Much of this data is openly available for download in ANL's Downloadable Dynamometer Database (D3). The major results are shown here in this report. Given the preliminary nature of this assessment, the majority of the testing was done over standard regulatory cycles and seeks to obtain a general overview of how the vehicle performs. These cycles include the US FTP cycle (Urban) and Highway Fuel Economy Test cycle as well as the US06, a more aggressive supplemental regulatory cycle. Data collection for this testing was kept at a fairly high level and includes emissions and fuel measurements from an exhaust emissions bench, high-voltage and accessory current and voltage from a DC power analyzer, and CAN bus data such as engine speed, engine load, and electric machine operation when available. The following sections will seek to explain some of the basic operating characteristics of the MY2010 Insight and provide insight into unique features of its operation and design.

Rask, E.; Bocci, D.; Duoba, M.; Lohse-Busch, H. (Energy Systems)

2011-03-22T23:59:59.000Z

354

Model year 2010 (Gen 3) Toyota Prius level 1 testing report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

As a part of the US Department of Energy's Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity (AVTA), a model year 2010 Toyota Prius (Generation 3) was procured by eTec (Phoenix, AZ) and sent to ANL's Advanced Powertrain Research Facility for the purposes of 'Level 1' testing in support of the Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity (AVTA). Data was acquired during testing using non-intrusive sensors, vehicle network connection, and facilities equipment (emissions and dynamometer data). Standard drive cycles, performance cycles, steady-state cycles and A/C usage cycles were conducted. Much of this data is openly available for download in ANL's Downloadable Dynamometer Database (D{sup 3}). The major results are shown here in this report. Given the preliminary nature of this assessment, the majority of the testing was done over standard regulatory cycles and seeks to obtain a general overview of how the vehicle performs. These cycles include the US FTP cycle (Urban) and Highway Fuel Economy Test cycle as well as the US06, a more aggressive supplemental regulatory cycle. Data collection for this testing was kept at a fairly high level and includes emissions and fuel measurements from the exhaust emissions bench, high-voltage and accessory current and voltage from a DC power analyzer, and minimal CAN bus data such as engine speed and pedal position. The following sections will seek to explain some of the basic operating characteristics of the MY2010 Prius over standard regulatory cycles.

Rask, E.; Duoba, M.; Lohse-Busch, H.; Bocci, D.; Energy Systems

2010-06-24T23:59:59.000Z

355

Chemical Abundances of the Highly Obscured Galactic Globular Clusters 2MASS GC02 and Mercer 5  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present the first high spectral resolution abundance analysis of two newly discovered Galactic globular clusters, namely Mercer 5 and 2MASS GC02 residing in regions of high interstellar reddening in the direction of the Galactic center. The data were acquired with the Phoenix high-resolution near-infrared echelle spectrograph at Gemini South (R~50000) in the 15500.0 A - 15575.0 A spectral region. Iron, Oxygen, Silicon, Titanium and Nickel abundances were derived for two red giant stars, in each cluster, by comparing the entire observed spectrum with a grid of synthetic spectra generated with MOOG. We found [Fe/H] values of -0.86 +/- 0.12 and -1.08 +/- 0.13 for Mercer 5 and 2MASS GC02 respectively. The [O/Fe], [Si/Fe] and [Ti/Fe] ratios of the measured stars of Mercer 5 follow the general trend of both bulge field and cluster stars at this metallicity, and are enhanced by > +0.3. The 2MASS GC02 stars have relatively lower ratios, but still compatible with other bulge clusters. Based on metallicity and abund...

Penaloza, Francisco; Vasquez, Sergio; Borissova, Jura; Kurtev, Radostin; Zoccali, Manuela

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

356

Complex Adaptive Systems of Systems (CASOS) engineering environment.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Complex Adaptive Systems of Systems, or CASoS, are vastly complex physical-socio-technical systems which we must understand to design a secure future for the nation. The Phoenix initiative implements CASoS Engineering principles combining the bottom up Complex Systems and Complex Adaptive Systems view with the top down Systems Engineering and System-of-Systems view. CASoS Engineering theory and practice must be conducted together to develop a discipline that is grounded in reality, extends our understanding of how CASoS behave and allows us to better control the outcomes. The pull of applications (real world problems) is critical to this effort, as is the articulation of a CASoS Engineering Framework that grounds an engineering approach in the theory of complex adaptive systems of systems. Successful application of the CASoS Engineering Framework requires modeling, simulation and analysis (MS and A) capabilities and the cultivation of a CASoS Engineering Community of Practice through knowledge sharing and facilitation. The CASoS Engineering Environment, itself a complex adaptive system of systems, constitutes the two platforms that provide these capabilities.

Detry, Richard Joseph; Linebarger, John Michael; Finley, Patrick D.; Maffitt, S. Louise; Glass, Robert John, Jr.; Beyeler, Walter Eugene; Ames, Arlo Leroy

2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

357

The Systemic Velocity of Eta Carinae  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

High-resolution spectra of molecular hydrogen in the Homunculus nebula allow for the first direct measurement of the systemic velocity of Eta Carinae. Near-infrared long-slit data for H2 1-0 S(1) lambda 21218 obtained with the Phoenix spectrometer on the Gemini South telescope give Vsys=-8.1pm1 km/s (heliocentric), or VLSR=-19.7pm1 km/s, from the average of the near and far sides of the Homunculus. This measurement considerably improves the precision for the value of -7pm10 km/s inferred from neighboring O-type stars in the Carina nebula. New near-infrared spectra also provide a high-resolution line profile of [Fe II] lambda 16435 emission from gas condensations known as the Weigelt objects without contamination from the central star, revealing a line shape with complex kinematic structure. Previously, uncertainty in the Weigelt knots' kinematics was dominated by the adopted systemic velocity of Eta Car.

Nathan Smith

2004-06-23T23:59:59.000Z

358

Wind turbine trailing-edge aerodynamic brake design  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes the design of a centrifugally actuated aerodynamic-overspeed device for a horizontal-axis wind turbine. The device will meet the following criteria; (1) It will be effective for airfoil angles of attack 0{degrees} to 45{degrees}. (2) It will be stowed inside the blade profile prior to deployment. (3) It will be capable of offsetting the positive torque produced by the overall blade. (4) Hinge moments will be minimized to lower actuator loads and cost. (5) It will be evaluated as a potential power modulating active rotor-control system. A literature review of aerodynamic braking devices was conducted. Information from the literature review was used to conceptualize the most effective devices for subsequent testing and design. Wind-tunnel test data for several braking devices are presented in this report. Using the data for the most promising configuration, a preliminary design was developed for a MICON 65/13 wind turbine with Phoenix 7.9-m rotor blades.

Quandt, G.

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

359

Electric vehicle fleet operations in the United States  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The United States Department of Energy (DOE) is actively supporting the development and commercialization of advanced electric vehicles, and advanced batteries and propulsion systems. As part of this effort, the DOE Field Operations Program is performing commercial validation of electric vehicles. These efforts have included on-board data acquisition of electric vehicle operations and baseline performance testing. The baseline performance tests focus on parameters such as range, acceleration, and battery charging. This testing, performed in conjunction with EV America, has included the baseline performance testing of 14 electric vehicles will also be baseline performance tested. The baseline performance testing has documented annual improvements in performance. This and additional information is made available to the public via the internet homepage (http://ev.inel.gov). The Field Operations Program continues to support the development of electric vehicles and infrastructure in conjunction with its new qualified vehicle test partners: Electric Transportation Application of Phoenix, and Southern California Edison. The Field Operations Program is managed by the Lockheed Martin Idaho Technologies Company, at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. 4 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs.

Francfort, J.E. [Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Lab., Idaho Falls, ID (United States); O`Hara, D. [Dept. of Energy, Washington, DC (United States)

1997-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

360

Identification of the feature that causes the I-band secondary maximum of a type Ia supernova  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We obtained a time series of spectra covering the secondary maximum in the I-band of the bright Type Ia supernova 2014J in M82 with the TIGRE telescope. Comparing the observations with theoretical models calculated with the time dependent extension of the PHOENIX code, we identify the feature that causes the secondary maximum in the I-band light curve. Fe II 3d6(3D)4s-3d6(5D)4p and similar high excitation transitions produce a blended feature at 7500 {\\AA}, which causes the rise of the light curve towards the secondary maximum. The series of observed spectra of SN 2014J and archival data of SN 2011fe confirm this conclusion. We further studied the plateau phase of the Rband light curve of SN 2014J and searched for features which contribute to the flux. The theoretical models do not clearly indicate a new feature that may cause the Rband plateau phase. However, Co II features in the range of 6500 - 7000 {\\AA} and the Fe II feature of the I-band are clearly seen in the theoretical spectra, but do not appear to ...

Jack, D; Hauschildt, P H

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

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361

Comparison of Battery Life Across Real-World Automotive Drive-Cycles (Presentation)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Laboratories run around-the-clock aging tests to try to understand as quickly as possible how long new Li-ion battery designs will last under certain duty cycles. These tests may include factors such as duty cycles, climate, battery power profiles, and battery stress statistics. Such tests are generally accelerated and do not consider possible dwell time at high temperatures and states-of-charge. Battery life-predictive models provide guidance as to how long Li-ion batteries may last under real-world electric-drive vehicle applications. Worst-case aging scenarios are extracted from hundreds of real-world duty cycles developed from vehicle travel surveys. Vehicles examined included PHEV10 and PHEV40 EDVs under fixed (28 degrees C), limited cooling (forced ambient temperature), and aggressive cooling (20 degrees C chilled liquid) scenarios using either nightly charging or opportunity charging. The results show that battery life expectancy is 7.8 - 13.2 years for the PHEV10 using a nightly charge in Phoenix, AZ (hot climate), and that the 'aggressive' cooling scenario can extend battery life by 1-3 years, while the 'limited' cooling scenario shortens battery life by 1-2 years. Frequent (opportunity) charging can reduce battery life by 1 year for the PHEV10, while frequent charging can extend battery life by one-half year.

Smith, K.; Earleywine, M.; Wood, E.; Pesaran, A.

2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

362

Development of imaging bolometers for magnetic fusion reactors (invited)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Imaging bolometers utilize an infrared (IR) video camera to measure the change in temperature of a thin foil exposed to the plasma radiation, thereby avoiding the risks of conventional resistive bolometers related to electric cabling and vacuum feedthroughs in a reactor environment. A prototype of the IR imaging video bolometer (IRVB) has been installed and operated on the JT-60U tokamak demonstrating its applicability to a reactor environment and its ability to provide two-dimensional measurements of the radiation emissivity in a poloidal cross section. In this paper we review this development and present the first results of an upgraded version of this IRVB on JT-60U. This upgrade utilizes a state-of-the-art IR camera (FLIR/Indigo Phoenix-InSb) (3-5 {mu}m, 256x360 pixels, 345 Hz, 11 mK) mounted in a neutron/gamma/magnetic shield behind a 3.6 m IR periscope consisting of CaF{sub 2} optics and an aluminum mirror. The IRVB foil is 7 cmx9 cmx5 {mu}m tantalum. A noise equivalent power density of 300 {mu}W/cm{sup 2} is achieved with 40x24 channels and a time response of 10 ms or 23 {mu}W/cm{sup 2} for 16x12 channels and a time response of 33 ms, which is 30 times better than the previous version of the IRVB on JT-60U.

Peterson, Byron J.; Parchamy, Homaira; Ashikawa, Naoko [National Institute for Fusion Science, Toki 509-5292 (Japan); Kawashima, Hisato; Konoshima, Shigeru [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Naka 311-0193 (Japan); Kostryukov, Artem Yu.; Miroshnikov, Igor V. [St. Petersburg State Technical University, St. Petersburg 195251 (Russian Federation); Seo, Dongcheol [National Fusion Research Institute, Daejeon 305-333 (Korea, Republic of); Omori, T. [Graduate University for Advanced Studies, Toki 509-5292 (Japan)

2008-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

363

Thirty-Six Month Evaluation of UPS Diesel Hybrid-Electric Delivery Vans  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This evaluation compared six hybrids and six standard diesels in UPS facilities in Phoenix, Arizona. Dispatch and maintenance practices are the same at both facilities. GPS logging, fueling, and maintenance records are used to evaluate the performance of these step delivery vans. The hybrids' average monthly mileage rate was 18% less than the diesel vans. The hybrids consistently were driven a fewer number of miles throughout the evaluation period. The hybrids idled more and operating at slower speeds than the diesels, and the diesels spent slightly more time operating at greater speeds, accounting for much of the hybrids fewer monthly miles. The average fuel economy for the hybrid vans is 13.0 mpg, 23% greater than the diesel vans 10.6 mpg. Total hybrid maintenance cost/mile of $0.141 was 9% more than the $0.130 for the diesel vans. Propulsion-related maintenance cost/mile of $0.037 for the hybrid vans was 25% more than the $0.029 for the diesel vans. Neither difference was found to be statistically significant. The hybrid group had a cumulative average of 96.3% uptime, less than the diesel group's 99.0% uptime. The hybrids experienced troubleshooting and recalibration issues related to prototype components that were primarily responsible for the lower uptime figures.

Lammert, M.; Walkowicz, K.

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

364

Trial-Run of a Junction-Box Attachment Test for Use in Photovoltaic Module Qualification: Preprint  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Engineering robust adhesion of the junction box (j-box) is a hurdle typically encountered by photovoltaic module manufacturers during product development and manufacturing process control. There are historical incidences of adverse effects (e.g., fires) caused when the j-box/adhesive/module system has failed in the field. The addition of a weight to the j-box during the 'damp-heat,' 'thermal-cycle,' or 'creep' tests within the IEC qualification protocol is proposed to verify the basic robustness of the adhesion system. The details of the proposed test are described, in addition to a trial-run of the test procedure. The described experiments examine four moisture-cured silicones, four foam tapes, and a hot-melt adhesive used in conjunction with glass, KPE, THV, and TPE substrates. For the purpose of validating the experiment, j-boxes were adhered to a substrate, loaded with a prescribed weight, and then subjected to aging. The replicate mock-modules were aged in an environmental chamber (at 85 degrees C/85% relative humidity for 1000 hours; then 100 degrees C/<10% relative humidity for 200 hours) or fielded in Golden (CO), Miami (FL), and Phoenix (AZ) for one year. Attachment strength tests, including pluck and shear test geometries, were also performed on smaller component specimens.

Miller, D. C.; Deibert, S. L.; Wohlgemuth, J. H.

2014-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

365

McCullough to Liberty fiber optics project  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The US Department of Energy, Western Area Power Administration (Western) proposes to replace an existing overhead static wire with a shield wire that contains optical fibers (OPGW) on transmission lines from McCullough Substation, south of Las Vegas, Nevada, to Liberty Substation near Phoenix, Arizona. The replacement will occur on the McCullough-Davis, Davis-Parker No. 2, and Parker-Liberty No. 1 230-kV transmission lines. Western is responsible for the operation and maintenance of the lines. Western prepared an Environmental Assessment (EA) entitled ``McCullough to Liberty Fiber Optics Project`` (DOE/EA-1202). The EA contains the analysis of the proposed construction, operation, and maintenance of the OPGW. Based on the analysis in the EA, Western finds that the proposed action is not a major Federal action significantly affecting the quality of the human environment, within the meaning of the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) of 1969. The preparation of an environmental impact statement (EIS) is not required, and therefore, Western is issuing this Findings of No Significant Impact (FONSI).

NONE

1997-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

366

SPECTRAL TYPING OF LATE-TYPE STELLAR COMPANIONS TO YOUNG STARS FROM LOW-DISPERSION NEAR-INFRARED INTEGRAL FIELD UNIT DATA  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We used the Project 1640 near-infrared coronagraph and integral field spectrograph to observe 19 young solar-type stars. Five of these stars are known binary stars and we detected the late-type secondaries and were able to measure their JH spectra with a resolution of R {approx} 30. The reduced, extracted, and calibrated spectra were compared to template spectra from the IRTF spectral library. With this comparison, we test the accuracy and consistency of spectral-type determination with the low-resolution near-infrared spectra from P1640. Additionally, we determine effective temperature and surface gravity of the companions by fitting synthetic spectra calculated with the PHOENIX model atmosphere code. We also present several new epochs of astrometry of each of the systems. Together, these data increase our knowledge and understanding of the stellar make up of these systems. In addition to the astronomical results, the analysis presented helps validate the Project 1640 data reduction and spectral extraction processes and the utility of low-resolution, near-infrared spectra for characterizing late-type companions in multiple systems.

Roberts, Lewis C.; Beichman, Charles A.; Burruss, Rick; Ligon, E. Robert; Lockhart, Thomas G.; Roberts, Jennifer E.; Shao, Michael [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, 4800 Oak Grove Drive, Pasadena, CA 91109 (United States); Rice, Emily L.; Brenner, Douglas; Oppenheimer, Ben R. [American Museum of Natural History, Central Park West at 79th Street, New York, NY 10024 (United States); Crepp, Justin R.; Dekany, Richard G.; Hillenbrand, Lynne A.; Hinkley, Sasha [California Institute of Technology, 1200 East California Boulevard, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); King, David; Parry, Ian R. [Institute of Astronomy, University of Cambridge, Madingley Road, Cambridge CB3 OHA (United Kingdom); Metchev, Stanimir [Department of Physics and Astronomy, State University of New York, Stony Brook, NY 11794-3800 (United States); Pueyo, Laurent; Sivaramakrishnan, Anand; Soummer, Remi, E-mail: lewis.c.roberts@jpl.nasa.gov [Space Telescope Science Institute, 3700 San Martin Drive, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); and others

2012-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

367

Monte Carlo depletion calculations using VESTA 2.1 new features and perspectives  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

VESTA is a Monte Carlo depletion interface code that is currently under development at IRSN. With VESTA, the emphasis lies on both accuracy and performance, so that the code will be capable of providing accurate and complete answers in an acceptable amount of time compared to other Monte Carlo depletion codes. From its inception, VESTA is intended to be a generic interface code so that it will ultimately be capable of using any Monte-Carlo code or depletion module and that can be tailored to the users needs. A new version of the code (version 2.1.x) will be released in 2012. The most important additions to the code are a burn up dependent isomeric branching ratio treatment to improve the prediction of metastable nuclides such as {sup 242m}Am and the integration of the PHOENIX point depletion module (also developed at IRSN) to overcome some of the limitations of the ORIGEN 2.2 module. The task of extracting and visualising the basic results and also the calculation of physical quantities or other data that can be derived from the basic output provided by VESTA will be the task of the AURORA depletion analysis tool which will be released at the same time as VESTA 2.1.x. The experimental validation database was also extended for this new version and it now contains a total of 35 samples with chemical assay data and 34 assembly decay heat measurements. (authors)

Haeck, W.; Cochet, B.; Aguiar, L. [Institut de Radioprotection et de Surete Nucleaire IRSN, BP 17, 92262 Fontenay-aux-Roses Cedex (France)

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

368

Characterization of Low-mass, Wide-separation Substellar Companions to Stars in Upper Scorpius: Near-infrared Photometry and Spectroscopy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present new 0.9-2.45 $\\mu$m spectroscopy ($R \\sim 1000$), and $Y$, $J$, $H$, $K_s$, $L^\\prime$ photometry, obtained at Gemini North, of three low-mass brown dwarf companions on wide orbits around young stars of the Upper Scorpius OB association: HIP 78530 B, [PGZ2001] J161031.9-191305 B, and GSC 06214-00210 B. We use these data to assess the companions' spectral type, temperature, surface gravity and mass, as well as the ability of the BT-Settl and Drift-Phoenix atmosphere models to reproduce the spectral features of young substellar objects. For completeness, we also analyze the archival spectroscopy and photometry of the Upper Scorpius planetary mass companion 1RXS J160929.1-210524 b. Based on a comparison with model spectra we find that the companions, in the above order, have effective temperatures of 2700, 2500, 2300 and 1700 K. These temperatures are consistent with our inferred spectral types, respectively M7 $\\beta$, M9 $\\gamma$, M9 $\\gamma$, and L4 $\\gamma$. From bolometric luminosities estimated ...

Lachapelle, François-René; Gagné, Jonathan; Jayawardhana, Ray; Janson, Markus; Helling, Christiane; Witte, Soeren

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

369

A new endstation at the Swiss Light Source for ultraviolet photoelectron spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and X-ray absorption spectroscopy measurements of liquid solutions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A new liquid microjet endstation designed for ultraviolet (UPS) and X-ray (XPS) photoelectron, and partial electron yield X-ray absorption (XAS) spectroscopies at the Swiss Light Source is presented. The new endstation, which is based on a Scienta HiPP-2 R4000 electron spectrometer, is the first liquid microjet endstation capable of operating in vacuum and in ambient pressures up to the equilibrium vapor pressure of liquid water at room temperature. In addition, the Scienta HiPP-2 R4000 energy analyzer of this new endstation allows for XPS measurements up to 7000 eV electron kinetic energy that will enable electronic structure measurements of bulk solutions and buried interfaces from liquid microjet samples. The endstation is designed to operate at the soft X-ray SIM beamline and at the tender X-ray Phoenix beamline. The endstation can also be operated using a Scienta 5 K ultraviolet helium lamp for dedicated UPS measurements at the vapor-liquid interface using either He I or He II ? lines. The design concept, first results from UPS, soft X-ray XPS, and partial electron yield XAS measurements, and an outlook to the potential of this endstation are presented.

Brown, Matthew A.; Redondo, Amaia Beloqui; Duyckaerts, Nicolas; Mächler, Jean-Pierre [Institute for Chemical and Bioengineering, ETH Zürich, CH-8093 Zürich (Switzerland)] [Institute for Chemical and Bioengineering, ETH Zürich, CH-8093 Zürich (Switzerland); Jordan, Inga; Wörner, Hans Jakob [Laboratory of Physical Chemistry, ETH Zürich, CH-8093 Zürich (Switzerland)] [Laboratory of Physical Chemistry, ETH Zürich, CH-8093 Zürich (Switzerland); Lee, Ming-Tao; Ammann, Markus; Nolting, Frithjof; Kleibert, Armin; Huthwelker, Thomas; Birrer, Mario; Honegger, Juri; Wetter, Reto [Paul Scherrer Institute, CH-5232 Villigen PSI (Switzerland)] [Paul Scherrer Institute, CH-5232 Villigen PSI (Switzerland); Bokhoven, Jeroen A. van [Institute for Chemical and Bioengineering, ETH Zürich, CH-8093 Zürich (Switzerland) [Institute for Chemical and Bioengineering, ETH Zürich, CH-8093 Zürich (Switzerland); Paul Scherrer Institute, CH-5232 Villigen PSI (Switzerland)

2013-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

370

Postoperative Nomogram Predicting the 9-Year Probability of Prostate Cancer Recurrence After Permanent Prostate Brachytherapy Using Radiation Dose as a Prognostic Variable  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: To report a multi-institutional outcomes study on permanent prostate brachytherapy (PPB) to 9 years that includes postimplant dosimetry, to develop a postimplant nomogram predicting biochemical freedom from recurrence. Methods and Materials: Cox regression analysis was used to model the clinical information for 5,931 patients who underwent PPB for clinically localized prostate cancer from six centers. The model was validated against the dataset using bootstrapping. Disease progression was determined using the Phoenix definition. The biological equivalent dose was calculated from the minimum dose to 90% of the prostate volume (D90) and external-beam radiotherapy dose using an alpha/beta of 2. Results: The 9-year biochemical freedom from recurrence probability for the modeling set was 77% (95% confidence interval, 73-81%). In the model, prostate-specific antigen, Gleason sum, isotope, external beam radiation, year of treatment, and D90 were associated with recurrence (each p < 0.05), whereas clinical stage was not. The concordance index of the model was 0.710. Conclusion: A predictive model for a postimplant nomogram for prostate cancer recurrence at 9-years after PPB has been developed and validated from a large multi-institutional database. This study also demonstrates the significance of implant dosimetry for predicting outcome. Unique to predictive models, these nomograms may be used a priori to calculate a D90 that likely achieves a desired outcome with further validation. Thus, a personalized dose prescription can potentially be calculated for each patient.

Potters, Louis, E-mail: LPotters@nshs.ed [Department of Radiation Medicine, North Shore Long Island Jewish Health System, New Hyde Park, NY (United States); Roach, Mack [Departments of Radiation Oncology and Urology, University of California at San Francisco, San Francisco, CA (United States); Davis, Brian J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN (United States); Stock, Richard G. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Mount Sinai School of Medicine, New York, NY (United States); Ciezki, Jay P. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, OH (United States); Zelefsky, Michael J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY (United States); Stone, Nelson N. [Department of Urology, Mount Sinai School of Medicine, New York, NY (United States); Fearn, Paul A. [Department of Urology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY (United States); Yu Changhong [Glickman Urological Institute and the Department of Quantitative Health Sciences, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, OH (United States); Shinohara, Katsuto [Departments of Radiation Oncology and Urology, University of California at San Francisco, San Francisco, CA (United States); Kattan, Michael W. [Glickman Urological Institute and the Department of Quantitative Health Sciences, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, OH (United States)

2010-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

371

$\\alpha$ Centauri A in the far infrared  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Chromospheres and coronae are common phenomena on solar-type stars. Understanding the energy transfer to these heated atmospheric layers requires direct access to the relevant empirical data. Study of these structures has, by and large, been limited to the Sun thus far. The region of the temperature reversal can be directly observed only in the far infrared and submm. We aim at the determination of the characteristics of the atmosphere in the region of the temperature minimum of the solar sister star alpha Cen A. For the nearby binary system alpha Centauri, stellar parameters are known with high accuracy from measurements. For the basic model parameters Teff, log g and [Fe/H], we interpolate in the grid of GAIA/PHOENIX stellar model atmospheres and compute the corresponding model for the G2 V star alpha Cen A. Comparison with photometric measurements shows excellent agreement between observed photospheric data in the optical and infrared. For longer wavelengths, the modelled spectral energy distribution is co...

Liseau, R; Olofsson, G; Bryden, G; Marshall, J P; Ardila, D; Aran, A Bayo; Danchi, W C; del Burgo, C; Eiroa, C; Ertel, S; Fridlund, M C W; Krivov, A V; Pilbratt, G L; Roberge, A; Thébault, P; Wiegert, J; White, G J

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

372

THEY MIGHT BE GIANTS: LUMINOSITY CLASS, PLANET OCCURRENCE, AND PLANET-METALLICITY RELATION OF THE COOLEST KEPLER TARGET STARS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We estimate the stellar parameters of late K- and early M-type Kepler target stars. We obtain medium-resolution visible spectra of 382 stars with K{sub P} - J > 2 ({approx_equal}K5 and later spectral type). We determine luminosity class by comparing the strength of gravity-sensitive indices (CaH, K I, Ca II, and Na I) to their strength in a sample of stars of known luminosity class. We find that giants constitute 96% {+-} 1% of the bright (K{sub P} < 14) Kepler target stars, and 7% {+-} 3% of dim (K{sub P} > 14) stars, significantly higher than fractions based on the stellar parameters quoted in the Kepler Input Catalog (KIC). The KIC effective temperatures are systematically (110{sup +15}{sub -35} K) higher than temperatures we determine from fitting our spectra to PHOENIX stellar models. Through Monte Carlo simulations of the Kepler exoplanet candidate population, we find a planet occurrence of 0.36 {+-} 0.08 when giant stars are properly removed, somewhat higher than when a KIC log g > 4 criterion is used (0.27 {+-} 0.05). Last, we show that there is no significant difference in g - r color (a probe of metallicity) between late-type Kepler stars with transiting Earth-to-Neptune-size exoplanet candidates and dwarf stars with no detected transits. We show that a previous claimed offset between these two populations is most likely an artifact of including a large number of misidentified giants.

Mann, Andrew W.; Hilton, Eric J. [Institute for Astronomy, University of Hawaii, Honolulu, HI 96822 (United States); Gaidos, Eric [Department of Geology and Geophysics, University of Hawaii, Honolulu, HI 96822 (United States); Lepine, Sebastien, E-mail: amann@ifa.hawaii.edu [Department of Astrophysics, American Museum of Natural History, New York, NY 10024 (United States)

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

373

Trial Run of a Junction-Box Attachment Test for Use in Photovoltaic Module Qualification (Presentation)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Engineering robust adhesion of the junction-box (j-box) is a hurdle typically encountered by photovoltaic (PV) module manufacturers during product development and manufacturing process control. There are historical incidences of adverse effects (e.g., fires), caused when the j-box/adhesive/module system has failed in the field. The addition of a weight to the j-box during the 'damp-heat', 'thermal-cycle', or 'creep' tests within the IEC qualification protocol is proposed to verify the basic robustness of the adhesion system. The details of the proposed test are described, in addition to a trial run of the test procedure. The described experiments examine 4 moisture-cured silicones, 4 foam tapes, and a hot-melt adhesive used in conjunction with glass, KPE, THV, and TPE substrates. For the purpose of validating the experiment, j-boxes were adhered to a substrate, loaded with a prescribed weight, and then subjected to aging. The replicate mock-modules were aged in an environmental chamber (at 85 deg C/85% relative humidity for 1000 hours; then 100 degrees C/<10% relative humidity for 200 hours) or fielded in Golden, Miami, and Phoenix for 1 year. Attachment strength tests, including pluck and shear test geometries, were also performed on smaller component specimens.

Miller, D.; Deibert, S.; Wohlgemuth, J.

2014-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

374

Feasibility of MR Imaging/MR Spectroscopy-Planned Focal Partial Salvage Permanent Prostate Implant (PPI) for Localized Recurrence After Initial PPI for Prostate Cancer  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: To assess the feasibility of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-planned partial salvage permanent prostate implant (psPPI) among patients with biopsy-proven local recurrence after initial PPI without evidence of distant disease. Methods and Materials: From 2003-2009, 15 patients underwent MRI/magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) planning for salvage brachytherapy (psPPI, I-125 [n=14; 144 Gy]; Pd-103 [n=1; 125 Gy]) without hormone therapy. Full dose was prescribed to areas of recurrence and underdosage, without entire prostate implantation. Limiting urethral and rectal toxicity was prioritized. Follow-up was from salvage date to prostate-specific antigen (PSA) concentration failure (Phoenix criteria = nadir + 2.0; ASTRO = 3 consecutive rises), recurrence, distant metastases, or last follow-up PSA level. Progression-free survival (PFS) was defined as no PSA failure or biopsy-proven recurrence without all-cause mortality. Toxicity was scored using Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events version 4.0. Results: At salvage, median age was 68 years, and PSA concentration was 3.5 ng/mL (range, 0.9-5.6 ng/mL). Abnormal MRI/MRS findings were evident in 40% of patients. Biopsy-proven recurrences consisted of a single focus (80%) or 2 foci (20%). At recurrence, Gleason score was 6 (67%) or {>=}7 (27%). Median interval between initial and salvage implantation was 69 months (range, 28-132 months). psPPI planning characteristics limited doses to the rectum (mean V100 = 0.5% [0.07 cc]) and urethra (V100 = 12% [0.3 cc]). At median follow-up (23.3 months; range, 8-88 months), treatment failure (n=2) resulted only in localized recurrence; both patients underwent second psPPI with follow-up PSA tests at 12 and 26 months, resulting in 0.6 and 0.7 ng/mL, respectively. American Society for Radiation Oncology PFS rates at 1, 2, and 3 years were 86.7%, 78.4%, and 62.7%, respectively, with 5 patients for whom treatment failed (n=3 with negative transrectal ultrasound-guided biopsy results). Phoenix PFS rates at 1, 2, and 3 years were 100%, 100%, and 71.4%. 73%, respectively; achieved PSA nadir of <0.5 ng/mL; and 47% of patients had a nadir of <0.1 ng/mL. Treatment-related toxicity was minimal, with no operative interventions, fistulas, or other grade {>=}3 gastrointestinal (GI)/genitourinary (GU) toxicity. Thirteen percent had grade 1 GI and 33% had grade 2 GU toxicities. Postsalvage, 20% of patients had no erectile dysfunction, 67% of patients had medication-responsive erectile dysfunction, and 13% of patients had erectile dysfunction refractory to medication. Conclusions: Focal psPPI with MR-planning in highly selected patients is feasible with short-term control comparable to conventional salvage, with less toxicity. Longer follow-up is needed to confirm its impact on quality of life and treatment.

Hsu, Charles C., E-mail: hsucc@radonc.ucsf.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California, San Francisco Helen Diller Family Comprehensive Cancer Center, San Francisco, California (United States); Hsu, Howard [Department of Radiation Oncology, New York University, New York, New York (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, New York University, New York, New York (United States); Pickett, Barby [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California, San Francisco Helen Diller Family Comprehensive Cancer Center, San Francisco, California (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California, San Francisco Helen Diller Family Comprehensive Cancer Center, San Francisco, California (United States); Crehange, Gilles [Department of Radiation Oncology, Dijon University, Dijon (France)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Dijon University, Dijon (France); Hsu, I-Chow Joe; Dea, Ryan [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California, San Francisco Helen Diller Family Comprehensive Cancer Center, San Francisco, California (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California, San Francisco Helen Diller Family Comprehensive Cancer Center, San Francisco, California (United States); Weinberg, Vivian [Biostatistics and Computational Biology Core, University of California, San Francisco Helen Diller Family Comprehensive Cancer Center, San Francisco, California (United States)] [Biostatistics and Computational Biology Core, University of California, San Francisco Helen Diller Family Comprehensive Cancer Center, San Francisco, California (United States); Gottschalk, Alexander R. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California, San Francisco Helen Diller Family Comprehensive Cancer Center, San Francisco, California (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California, San Francisco Helen Diller Family Comprehensive Cancer Center, San Francisco, California (United States); Kurhanewicz, John [Department of Radiology, University of California, San Francisco Helen Diller Family Comprehensive Cancer Center, San Francisco, California (United States)] [Department of Radiology, University of California, San Francisco Helen Diller Family Comprehensive Cancer Center, San Francisco, California (United States); Shinohara, Katsuto [Department of Urology, University of California, San Francisco Helen Diller Family Comprehensive Cancer Center, San Francisco, California (United States)] [Department of Urology, University of California, San Francisco Helen Diller Family Comprehensive Cancer Center, San Francisco, California (United States); Roach, Mack [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California, San Francisco Helen Diller Family Comprehensive Cancer Center, San Francisco, California (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California, San Francisco Helen Diller Family Comprehensive Cancer Center, San Francisco, California (United States)

2013-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

375

Customized Dose Prescription for Permanent Prostate Brachytherapy: Insights From a Multicenter Analysis of Dosimetry Outcomes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: To investigate the biochemical control rate in patients undergoing permanent prostate brachytherapy as a function of the biologically effective dose (BED) and risk group. Methods and Materials: Six centers provided data on 3,928 permanent brachytherapy patients with postimplant dosimetry results. The mean prostate-specific antigen level was 8.9 ng/mL. {sup 125}I was used in 2,293 (58%), {sup 103}Pd in 1,635, and supplemental external beam radiotherapy in 882 (22.5%) patients. The patients were stratified into low- (n = 2,188), intermediate- (n = 1,188), and high- (n = 552) risk groups and into three BED groups of < 140 Gy (n = 524), 140-200 Gy (n = 2284), and >200 Gy (n = 1,115). Freedom from biochemical disease progression (biochemical freedom from failure [bFFF]) was determined using the American Society for Therapeutic Radiology Oncology and Phoenix definitions and calculated using the Kaplan-Meier method, with factors compared using the log-rank test. Results: The 10-year prostate-specific antigen bFFF rate for the American Society for Therapeutic Radiology Oncology and Phoenix definitions was 79.2% and 70%, respectively. The corresponding bFFF rates for the low-, intermediate-, and high-risk groups was 84.1% and 78.1%, 76.8% and 63.6%, and 64.4% and 58.2%, respectively (p < 0.0001). The corresponding bFFF rate for the three BED groups was 56.1% and 41.4%, 80% and 77.9%, and 91.1% and 82.9% (p < 0.0001). The corresponding bFFF rate for the low-risk patients by dose group was 69.8% and 49.8%, 86% and 85.2%, and 88.1% and 88.3% for the low-, intermediate, and high-dose group, respectively (p <0.0001). The corresponding bFFF rate for the intermediate-risk patients by dose group was 52.9% and 23.1%, 74.1% and 77.7%, and 94.3% and 88.8% for the low-, intermediate-, and high-dose group, respectively (p < 0.0001). The corresponding bFFF rate for high-risk patients by dose group was 19.2% and 41.7%, 61.8% and 53.2%, and 90% and 69.6% for the low-, intermediate-, and high-dose group, respectively (p < 0.0001). Conclusions: These data suggest that permanent brachytherapy dose prescriptions can be customized to risk status. In low-risk patients, achieving a BED of {>=}140 Gy might be adequate for prostate-specific antigen control. However, high-risk disease might require a BED dose of {>=}200 Gy.

Stone, Nelson N. [Mount Sinai School of Medicine, New York, NY (United States)], E-mail: nelsonstone@optonline.net; Potters, Louis [New York Prostate Institute at South Nassau Communities Hospital, Oceanside, NY (United States); Davis, Brian J. [Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN (United States); Ciezki, Jay P. [Cleveland Clinic Foundation, Cleveland, OH (United States); Zelefsky, Michael J. [Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY (United States); Roach, Mack [University of California, San Francisco, School of Medicine, San Francisco, CA (United States); Fearn, Paul A. B.A. [Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY (United States); Kattan, Michael W. [Cleveland Clinic Foundation, Cleveland, OH (United States); Stock, Richard G. [Mount Sinai School of Medicine, New York, NY (United States)

2007-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

376

The Structure of the Homunculus: I. Shape and Latitude Dependence from H2 and [Fe II] Velocity Maps of Eta Carinae  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

High resolution long-slit spectra obtained with the Phoenix spectrograph on Gemini South provide our most accurate probe of the three dimensional structure of the Homunculus around eta Car. The new near-infrared spectra dramatically confirm the double-shell structure inferred previously from thermal dust emission, resolving the nebula into a very thin outer shell seen in H2 21218, and a warmer, thicker inner layer seen in [Fe II] 16435. The thin H2 skin hints that the most important mass loss during the 19th century eruption had a very short duration of less than 5 yr. H2 emission traces the majority of the mass in the nebula, and has an average density of order 10^6.5 cm-3. This emission, in turn, yields our first definitive picture of the exact shape of the nebula, plus a distance of 2350pm50 pc and an inclination angle of 41deg (the polar axis is tilted 49deg from the plane of the sky). The distribution of the H2 emission provides the first measure of the latitude dependence of the speed, mass loss, and kinetic energy associated with eta Car's 19th century explosion. Almost 75 percent of the total mass and more than 90 percent of the kinetic energy in the ejecta were released at high latitudes. This rules out a model for the bipolar shape wherein an otherwise spherical explosion was pinched at the waist by a circumstellar torus. Also, the ejecta could not have been deflected toward polar trajectories by a companion star, since the kinetic energy of the polar ejecta is greater than the binding energy of the putative binary system. Instead, most of the mass appears to have been directed poleward by the explosion itself. [abridged

Nathan Smith

2006-02-21T23:59:59.000Z

377

THE RADIUS DISCREPANCY IN LOW-MASS STARS: SINGLE VERSUS BINARIES  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A long-standing issue in the theory of low-mass stars is the discrepancy between predicted and observed radii and effective temperatures. In spite of the increasing availability of very precise radius determinations from eclipsing binaries and interferometric measurements of radii of single stars, there is no unanimous consensus on the extent (or even the existence) of the discrepancy and on its connection with other stellar properties (e.g., metallicity, magnetic activity). We investigate the radius discrepancy phenomenon using the best data currently available (accuracy ?< 5%). We have constructed a grid of stellar models covering the entire range of low-mass stars (0.1-1.25 M{sub ?}) and various choices of the metallicity and mixing length parameter, ?. We used an improved version of the Yale Rotational stellar Evolution Code, implementing surface boundary conditions based on the most up-to-date PHOENIX atmosphere models. Our models are in good agreement with others in the literature and improve and extend the low mass end of the Yale-Yonsei isochrones. Our calculations include rotation-related quantities, such as moments of inertia and convective turnover timescales, useful in studies of magnetic activity and rotational evolution of solar-like stars. Consistent with previous works, we find that both binaries and single stars have radii inflated by about 3% with respect to the theoretical models; among binaries, the components of short orbital period systems are found to be the most deviant. We conclude that both binaries and single stars are comparably affected by the radius discrepancy phenomenon.

Spada, F. [Leibniz-Institut für Astrophysik Potsdam (AIP), An der Sternwarte 16, D-14482, Potsdam (Germany); Demarque, P. [Department of Astronomy, Yale University, New Haven, CT 06520-8101 (United States); Kim, Y.-C. [Yonsei University Observatory and Astronomy Department, Yonsei University, Seoul 120-749 (Korea, Republic of); Sills, A., E-mail: fspada@aip.de [Department of Physics and Astronomy, McMaster University, Hamilton, ON, L8S 4M1 (Canada)

2013-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

378

IONIZATION IN ATMOSPHERES OF BROWN DWARFS AND EXTRASOLAR PLANETS. III. BREAKDOWN CONDITIONS FOR MINERAL CLOUDS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Electric discharges were detected directly in the cloudy atmospheres of Earth, Jupiter, and Saturn, are debatable for Venus, and indirectly inferred for Neptune and Uranus in our solar system. Sprites (and other types of transient luminous events) have been detected only on Earth, and are theoretically predicted for Jupiter, Saturn, and Venus. Cloud formation is a common phenomenon in ultra-cool atmospheres such as in brown dwarf and extrasolar planetary atmospheres. Cloud particles can be expected to carry considerable charges which may trigger discharge events via small-scale processes between individual cloud particles (intra-cloud discharges) or large-scale processes between clouds (inter-cloud discharges). We investigate electrostatic breakdown characteristics, like critical field strengths and critical charge densities per surface, to demonstrate under which conditions mineral clouds undergo electric discharge events which may trigger or be responsible for sporadic X-ray emission. We apply results from our kinetic dust cloud formation model that is part of the DRIFT-PHOENIX model atmosphere simulations. We present a first investigation of the dependence of the breakdown conditions in brown dwarf and giant gas exoplanets on the local gas-phase chemistry, the effective temperature, and primordial gas-phase metallicity. Our results suggest that different intra-cloud discharge processes dominate at different heights inside mineral clouds: local coronal (point discharges) and small-scale sparks at the bottom region of the cloud where the gas density is high, and flow discharges and large-scale sparks near, and maybe above, the cloud top. The comparison of the thermal degree of ionization and the number density of cloud particles allows us to suggest the efficiency with which discharges will occur in planetary atmospheres.

Helling, Ch.; Jardine, M.; Stark, C. [SUPA, School of Physics and Astronomy, University of St. Andrews, St. Andrews KY16 9SS (United Kingdom); Diver, D., E-mail: ch@leap2010.eu [SUPA, School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Glasgow, Glasgow G12 8QQ (United Kingdom)

2013-04-20T23:59:59.000Z

379

Novel Nonflammable Electrolytes for Secondary Magnesium Batteries and High Voltage Electrolytes for Electrochemcial Supercapacitors  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Magnesium has been used successfully in primary batteries, but its use in rechargeable cells has been stymied by the lack of suitable non-aqueous electrolyte that can conduct Mg+2 species, combined with poor stripping and plating properties. The development of a suitable cathode material for rechargeable magnesium batteries has also been a roadblock, but a nonflammable electrolyte is key. Likewise, the development of safe high voltage electrochemical supercapaitors has been stymied by the use of flammable solvents in the liquid electrolyte; to wit, acetonitrile. The purpose of the research conducted in this effort was to identify useful compositions of magnesium salts and polyphosphate solvents that would enable magnesium ions to be cycled within a secondary battery design. The polyphosphate solvents would provide the solvent for the magnesium salts while preventing the electrolyte from being flammable. This would enable these novel electrolytes to be considered as an alternative to THF-based electrolytes. In addition, we explored several of these solvents together with lithium slats for use as high voltage electrolytes for carbon-based electrochemical supercapacitors. The research was successful in that: 1) Magnesium imide dissolved in a phosphate ester solvent that contains a halogented phosphate ester appears to be the preferred electrolyte for a rechargeable Mg cell. 2) A combination of B-doped CNTs and vanadium phosphate appear to be the cathode of choice for a rechargeable Mg cell by virtue of higher voltage and better reversibility. 3) Magnesium alloys appear to perform better than pure magnesium when used in combination with the novel polyphosphate electrolytes. Also, this effort has established that Phoenix Innovationâ??s family of phosphonate/phosphate electrolytes together with specific lithium slats can be used in supercapacitor systems at voltages of greater than 10V.

Dr. Brian Dixon

2008-12-30T23:59:59.000Z

380

High-Dose-Rate Interstitial Brachytherapy as Monotherapy for Clinically Localized Prostate Cancer: Treatment Evolution and Mature Results  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: To report the clinical outcome of high-dose-rate (HDR) interstitial (IRT) brachytherapy (BRT) as sole treatment (monotherapy) for clinically localized prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: Between January 2002 and December 2009, 718 consecutive patients with clinically localized prostate cancer were treated with transrectal ultrasound (TRUS)-guided HDR monotherapy. Three treatment protocols were applied; 141 patients received 38.0 Gy using one implant in 4 fractions of 9.5 Gy with computed tomography-based treatment planning; 351 patients received 38.0 Gy in 4 fractions of 9.5 Gy, using 2 implants (2 weeks apart) and intraoperative TRUS real-time treatment planning; and 226 patients received 34.5 Gy, using 3 single-fraction implants of 11.5 Gy (3 weeks apart) and intraoperative TRUS real-time treatment planning. Biochemical failure was defined according to the Phoenix consensus, and toxicity was evaluated using Common Toxicity Criteria for Adverse Events version 3. Results: The median follow-up time was 52.8 months. The 36-, 60-, and 96-month biochemical control and metastasis-free survival rates for the entire cohort were 97%, 94%, and 90% and 99%, 98%, and 97%, respectively. Toxicity was scored per event, with 5.4% acute grade 3 genitourinary and 0.2% acute grade 3 gastrointestinal toxicity. Late grade 3 genitourinary and gastrointestinal toxicities were 3.5% and 1.6%, respectively. Two patients developed grade 4 incontinence. No other instance of grade 4 or greater acute or late toxicity was reported. Conclusion: Our results confirm IRT-HDR-BRT is safe and effective as monotherapy for clinically localized prostate cancer.

Zamboglou, Nikolaos [Department of Radiation Oncology, Klinikum Offenbach, Offenbach (Germany)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Klinikum Offenbach, Offenbach (Germany); Tselis, Nikolaos, E-mail: ntselis@hotmail.com [Department of Radiation Oncology, Klinikum Offenbach, Offenbach (Germany)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Klinikum Offenbach, Offenbach (Germany); Baltas, Dimos [Department of Medical Physics and Engineering, Klinikum Offenbach, Offenbach (Germany)] [Department of Medical Physics and Engineering, Klinikum Offenbach, Offenbach (Germany); Buhleier, Thomas [Department of Radiation Oncology, Klinikum Offenbach, Offenbach (Germany)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Klinikum Offenbach, Offenbach (Germany); Martin, Thomas [Department of Radiation Oncology, Klinikum Bremen-Mitte, Bremen (Germany)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Klinikum Bremen-Mitte, Bremen (Germany); Milickovic, Natasa; Papaioannou, Sokratis [Department of Medical Physics and Engineering, Klinikum Offenbach, Offenbach (Germany)] [Department of Medical Physics and Engineering, Klinikum Offenbach, Offenbach (Germany); Ackermann, Hanns [Institute of Biostatistics, J.W. Goethe University of Frankfurt, Frankfurt (Germany)] [Institute of Biostatistics, J.W. Goethe University of Frankfurt, Frankfurt (Germany); Tunn, Ulf W. [Department of Urology, Klinikum Offenbach, Offenbach (Germany)] [Department of Urology, Klinikum Offenbach, Offenbach (Germany)

2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

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381

Prognostic Utility of Cell Cycle Progression Score in Men With Prostate Cancer After Primary External Beam Radiation Therapy  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: To evaluate the prognostic utility of the cell cycle progression (CCP) score, a RNA signature based on the average expression level of 31 CCP genes, for predicting biochemical recurrence (BCR) in men with prostate cancer treated with external beam radiation therapy (EBRT) as their primary curative therapy. Methods and Materials: The CCP score was derived retrospectively from diagnostic biopsy specimens of men diagnosed with prostate cancer from 1991 to 2006 (n=141). All patients were treated with definitive EBRT; approximately half of the cohort was African American. Outcome was time from EBRT to BCR using the Phoenix definition. Median follow-up for patients without BCR was 4.8 years. Association with outcome was evaluated by Cox proportional hazards survival analysis and likelihood ratio tests. Results: Of 141 patients, 19 (13%) had BCR. The median CCP score for patient samples was 0.12. In univariable analysis, CCP score significantly predicted BCR (P=.0017). The hazard ratio for BCR was 2.55 for 1-unit increase in CCP score (equivalent to a doubling of gene expression). In a multivariable analysis that included Gleason score, prostate-specific antigen, percent positive cores, and androgen deprivation therapy, the hazard ratio for CCP changed only marginally and remained significant (P=.034), indicating that CCP provides prognostic information that is not provided by standard clinical parameters. With 10-year censoring, the CCP score was associated with prostate cancer-specific mortality (P=.013). There was no evidence for interaction between CCP and any clinical variable, including ethnicity. Conclusions: Among men treated with EBRT, the CCP score significantly predicted outcome and provided greater prognostic information than was available with clinical parameters. If validated in a larger cohort, CCP score could identify high-risk men undergoing EBRT who may need more aggressive therapy.

Freedland, Stephen J., E-mail: steve.freedland@duke.edu [Department of Surgery, Durham VA Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina (United States); Department of Surgery (Urology), Duke University School of Medicine, Durham, North Carolina (United States); Department of Pathology, Duke University School of Medicine, Durham, North Carolina (United States); Gerber, Leah [Department of Surgery, Durham VA Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina (United States); Department of Surgery (Urology), Duke University School of Medicine, Durham, North Carolina (United States); Department of Pathology, Duke University School of Medicine, Durham, North Carolina (United States); Reid, Julia; Welbourn, William; Tikishvili, Eliso; Park, Jimmy; Younus, Adib; Gutin, Alexander; Sangale, Zaina; Lanchbury, Jerry S. [Myriad Genetics, Inc, Salt Lake City, Utah (United States); Salama, Joseph K. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Durham VA Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, Duke University School of Medicine, Durham, North Carolina (United States); Stone, Steven [Myriad Genetics, Inc, Salt Lake City, Utah (United States)

2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

382

Soiling of building envelope surfaces and its effect on solar reflectance - Part II: Development of an accelerate aging method for roofing materials  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Highly reflective roofs can decrease the energy required for building air conditioning, help mitigate the urban heat island effect, and slow global warming. However, these benefits are diminished by soiling and weathering processes that reduce the solar reflectance of most roofing materials. Soiling results from the deposition of atmospheric particulate matter and the growth of microorganisms, each of which absorb sunlight. Weathering of materials occurs with exposure to water, sunlight, and high temperatures. This study developed an accelerated aging method that incorporates features of soiling and weathering. The method sprays a calibrated aqueous soiling mixture of dust minerals, black carbon, humic acid, and salts onto preconditioned coupons of roofing materials, then subjects the soiled coupons to cycles of ultraviolet radiation, heat and water in a commercial weatherometer. Three soiling mixtures were optimized to reproduce the site-specific solar spectral reflectance features of roofing products exposed for 3 years in a hot and humid climate (Miami, Florida); a hot and dry climate (Phoenix, Arizona); and a polluted atmosphere in a temperate climate (Cleveland, Ohio). A fourth mixture was designed to reproduce the three-site average values of solar reflectance and thermal emittance attained after 3 years of natural exposure, which the Cool Roof Rating Council (CRRC) uses to rate roofing products sold in the US. This accelerated aging method was applied to 25 products?single ply membranes, factory and field applied coatings, tiles, modified bitumen cap sheets, and asphalt shingles?and reproduced in 3 days the CRRC's 3-year aged values of solar reflectance. This accelerated aging method can be used to speed the evaluation and rating of new cool roofing materials.

Sleiman, Mohamad; Kirchstetter, Thomas W.; Berdahl, Paul; Gilbert, Haley; Quelen, Sarah; Marlot, Lea; Preble, Chelsea; Chen, Sharon; Montalbano, Amadine; Rosseler, Olivier; Akbari, Hashem; Levinson, Ronnen; Destaillats, Hugo

2013-11-18T23:59:59.000Z

383

A grid of MARCS model atmospheres for late-type stars I. Methods and general properties  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We have constructed a grid of about 10,000 spherically symmetric and plane-parallel models with the MARCS program, and make it available for public use. Parameter ranges are: Teff=2500 to 8000 K, log g =log(GM/R2)= -1 to 5 (cgs) with various masses and radii, [Me/H]=-5 to +1, with [Alpha/Fe] = 0.0 and 0.4 and different choices of C and N abundances to also represent stars of types R, S and N, and with microturbulence parameters from 1 to 5 km/s. We also list fluxes in approximately 108,000 wavelength points. Underlying assumptions in addition to 1D stratification include hydrostatic equilibrium, MLT convection and LTE. A number of general properties of the models are discussed, in relation to the effects of changing blanketing and sphericity. Models are compared with other available grids and excellent agreement is found with plane-parallel models of Castelli and Kurucz within the overlapping parameter range. Although there are departures from the spherically symmetric NextGen models, the agreement with more recent PHOENIX models is gratifying. The models of the grid show regularities, but some interesting departures from general patterns occur for the coolest models due to the molecular opacities. We have tested rules of thumb concerning effects of blanketing and sphericity and found them to often be astonishingly accurate. Some interesting new phenomena have been discovered, such as the intricate coupling between blanketing and sphericity, and the strong effects of carbon enhancement on metal-poor models. We give further details of models and comparisons with observations in subsequent papers.

Bengt Gustafsson; Bengt Edvardsson; Kjell Eriksson; Uffe Graae Jorgensen; Aake Nordlund; Bertrand Plez

2008-05-05T23:59:59.000Z

384

Salvage HDR Brachytherapy for Recurrent Prostate Cancer After Previous Definitive Radiation Therapy: 5-Year Outcomes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: Evaluate efficacy and toxicity of salvage high-dose-rate brachytherapy (HDRB) for locally recurrent prostate cancer after definitive radiation therapy (RT). Methods and Materials: We retrospectively analyzed 52 consecutively accrued patients undergoing salvage HDRB between 1998 and 2009 for locally recurrent prostate cancer after previous definitive RT. After pathologic confirmation of locally recurrent disease, patients received 36 Gy in 6 fractions. Twenty-four patients received neoadjuvant hormonal therapy before salvage, and no patients received adjuvant hormonal therapy. Determination of biochemical failure after salvage HDRB was based on the Phoenix definition. Overall survival (OS) and bF distributions were calculated using the Kaplan-Meier method. Univariate analyses were performed to identify predictors of biochemical control. Acute and late genitourinary (GU) and gastrointestinal (GI) toxicities, based on Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events (version 4), were documented. Results: Median follow-up after salvage HDRB was 59.6 months. The 5-year OS estimate was 92% (95% confidence interval [CI]: 80%-97%) with median survival not yet reached. Five-year biochemical control after salvage was 51% (95% CI: 34%-66%). Median PSA nadir postsalvage was 0.1 (range: 0-7.2) reached at a median of 10.2 months after completing HDRB. As for complications, acute and late grade 3 GU toxicities were observed in only 2% and 2%, respectively. No grade 2 or higher acute GI events and 4% grade 2 GI late events were observed. On univariate analysis, disease-free interval after initial definitive RT (P=.07), percent of positive cores at the time of diagnosis (P=.08), interval from first recurrence to salvage HDRB (P=.09), and pre-HDRB prostate-specific antigen (P=.07) were each of borderline significance in predicting biochemical control after salvage HDRB. Conclusions: Prostate HDRB is an effective salvage modality with relatively few long-term toxicities. We provide potential predictors of biochemical control for prostate salvage HDRB.

Chen, Chien Peter [Department of Radiation Oncology, Scripps Clinic, San Diego, California (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Scripps Clinic, San Diego, California (United States); Weinberg, Vivian [Comprehensive Cancer Center Biostatistics Core, University of California—San Francisco, San Francisco, California (United States)] [Comprehensive Cancer Center Biostatistics Core, University of California—San Francisco, San Francisco, California (United States); Shinohara, Katsuto [Department of Urology, University of California—San Francisco, San Francisco, California (United States)] [Department of Urology, University of California—San Francisco, San Francisco, California (United States); Roach, Mack; Nash, Marc; Gottschalk, Alexander; Chang, Albert J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California—San Francisco, San Francisco, California (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California—San Francisco, San Francisco, California (United States); Hsu, I-Chow, E-mail: IHsu@radonc.ucsf.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California—San Francisco, San Francisco, California (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California—San Francisco, San Francisco, California (United States)

2013-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

385

CONSTRAINTS ON DARK MATTER ANNIHILATION IN CLUSTERS OF GALAXIES FROM DIFFUSE RADIO EMISSION  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Annihilation of dark matter can result in the production of stable Standard Model particles including electrons and positrons that, in the presence of magnetic fields, lose energy via synchrotron radiation, observable as radio emission. Galaxy clusters are excellent targets to search for or to constrain the rate of dark matter annihilation, as they are both massive and dark matter dominated. In this study, we place limits on dark matter annihilation in a sample of nearby clusters using upper limits on the diffuse radio emission, low levels of observed diffuse emission, or detections of radio mini-halos. We find that the strongest limits on the annihilation cross section are better than limits derived from the non-detection of clusters in the gamma-ray band by a factor of {approx}3 or more when the same annihilation channel and substructure model, but different best-case clusters, are compared. The limits on the cross section depend on the assumed amount of substructure, varying by as much as two orders of magnitude for increasingly optimistic substructure models as compared to a smooth Navarro-Frenk-White profile. In our most optimistic case, using the results of the Phoenix Project, we find that the derived limits reach below the thermal relic cross section of 3 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -26} cm{sup 3} s{sup -1} for dark matter masses as large as 400 GeV, for the b b-bar annihilation channel. We discuss uncertainties due to the limited available data on the magnetic field structure of individual clusters. We also report the discovery of diffuse radio emission from the central 30-40 kpc regions of the groups M49 and NGC 4636.

Storm, Emma; Jeltema, Tesla E.; Profumo, Stefano [Department of Physics, University of California, 1156 High St., Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States); Rudnick, Lawrence [Minnesota Institute for Astrophysics, School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Minnesota, 116 Church Street SE, Minneapolis, MN 55455 (United States)

2013-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

386

NREL's Energy-Saving Technology for Air Conditioning Cuts Peak Power Loads Without Using Harmful Refrigerants (Fact Sheet)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This fact sheet describes how the DEVAP air conditioner was invented, explains how the technology works, and why it won an R&D 100 Award. Desiccant-enhanced evaporative (DEVAP) air-conditioning will provide superior comfort for commercial buildings in any climate at a small fraction of the electricity costs of conventional air-conditioning equipment, releasing far less carbon dioxide and cutting costly peak electrical demand by an estimated 80%. Air conditioning currently consumes about 15% of the electricity generated in the United States and is a major contributor to peak electrical demand on hot summer days, which can lead to escalating power costs, brownouts, and rolling blackouts. DEVAP employs an innovative combination of air-cooling technologies to reduce energy use by up to 81%. DEVAP also shifts most of the energy needs to thermal energy sources, reducing annual electricity use by up to 90%. In doing so, DEVAP is estimated to cut peak electrical demand by nearly 80% in all climates. Widespread use of this cooling cycle would dramatically cut peak electrical loads throughout the country, saving billions of dollars in investments and operating costs for our nation's electrical utilities. Water is already used as a refrigerant in evaporative coolers, a common and widely used energy-saving technology for arid regions. The technology cools incoming hot, dry air by evaporating water into it. The energy absorbed by the water as it evaporates, known as the latent heat of vaporization, cools the air while humidifying it. However, evaporative coolers only function when the air is dry, and they deliver humid air that can lower the comfort level for building occupants. And even many dry climates like Phoenix, Arizona, have a humid season when evaporative cooling won't work well. DEVAP extends the applicability of evaporative cooling by first using a liquid desiccant-a water-absorbing material-to dry the air. The dry air is then passed to an indirect evaporative cooling stage, in which the incoming air is in thermal contact with a moistened surface that evaporates the water into a separate air stream. As the evaporation cools the moistened surface, it draws heat from the incoming air without adding humidity to it. A number of cooling cycles have been developed that employ indirect evaporative cooling, but DEVAP achieves a superior efficiency relative to its technological siblings.

Not Available

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

387

Contributing to Net Zero Building: High Energy Efficient EIFS Wall Systems  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The team led by Dow Corning collaborated to increase the thermal performance of exterior insulation and finishing systems (EIFS) to reach R-40 performance meeting the needs for high efficiency insulated walls. Additionally, the project helped remove barriers to using EIFS on retrofit commercial buildings desiring high insulated walls. The three wall systems developed within the scope of this project provide the thermal performance of R-24 to R-40 by incorporating vacuum insulation panels (VIPs) into an expanded polystyrene (EPS) encapsulated vacuum insulated sandwich element (VISE). The VISE was incorporated into an EIFS as pre-engineered insulation boards. The VISE is installed using typical EIFS details and network of trained installers. These three wall systems were tested and engineered to be fully code compliant as an EIFS and meet all of the International Building Code structural, durability and fire test requirements for a code compliant exterior wall cladding system. This system is being commercialized under the trade name Dryvit® Outsulation® HE system. Full details, specifications, and application guidelines have been developed for the system. The system has been modeled both thermally and hygrothermally to predict condensation potential. Based on weather models for Baltimore, MD; Boston, MA; Miami, FL; Minneapolis, MN; Phoenix, AZ; and Seattle, WA; condensation and water build up in the wall system is not a concern. Finally, the team conducted a field trial of the system on a building at the former Brunswick Naval Air Station which is being redeveloped by the Midcoast Regional Redevelopment Authority (Brunswick, Maine). The field trial provided a retrofit R-30 wall onto a wood frame construction, slab on grade, 1800 ft2 building, that was monitored over the course of a year. Simultaneous with the façade retrofit, the building’s windows were upgraded at no charge to this program. The retrofit building used 49% less natural gas during the winter of 2012 compared to previous winters. This project achieved its goal of developing a system that is constructible, offers protection to the VIPs, and meets all performance targets established for the project.

Carbary, Lawrence D. [Dow Corning Corporation] [Dow Corning Corporation; Perkins, Laura L. [Dow Corning Corporation] [Dow Corning Corporation; Serino, Roland [Dryvit Systems, Inc] [Dryvit Systems, Inc; Preston, Bill [Dryvit Systems, Inc] [Dryvit Systems, Inc; Kosny, Jan [Fraunhofer USA, Inc. CSE] [Fraunhofer USA, Inc. CSE

2014-01-29T23:59:59.000Z

388

Opportunities for Saving Energy and Improving Air Quality in Urban Heat Islands  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

World energy use is the main contributor to atmospheric CO2. In 2002, about 7.0 giga metric tons of carbon (GtC) were emitted internationally by combustion of gas, liquid, and solid fuels (CDIAC, 2006), 2 to 5 times the amount contributed by deforestation (Brown et al., 1988). The share of atmospheric carbon emissions for the United States from fossil fuel combustion was 1.6 GtC. Increasing use of fossil fuel and deforestation together have raised atmospheric CO{sub 2} concentration some 25% over the last 150 years. According to global climate models and preliminary measurements, these changes in the composition of the atmosphere have already begun raising the Earth's average temperature. If current energy trends continue, these changes could drastically alter the Earth's temperature, with unknown but potentially catastrophic physical and political consequences. During the last three decades, increased energy awareness has led to conservation efforts and leveling of energy consumption in the industrialized countries. An important byproduct of this reduced energy use is the lowering of CO{sub 2} emissions. Of all electricity generated in the United States, about one-sixth is used to air-condition buildings. The air-conditioning use is about 400 tera-watt-hours (TWh), equivalent to about 80 million metric tons of carbon (MtC) emissions, and translating to about $40 billion (B) per year. Of this $40 B/year, about half is used in cities that have pronounced 'heat islands'. The contribution of the urban heat island to the air-conditioning demand has increased over the last 40 years and it is currently at about 10%. Metropolitan areas in the United States (e.g., Los Angeles, Phoenix, Houston, Atlanta, and New York City) have typically pronounced heat islands that warrant special attention by anyone concerned with broad-scale energy efficiency (HIG, 2006). The ambient air is primarily heated through three processes: direct absorption of solar radiation, convection of heat from hot surfaces, and man-made heat (exhaust from cars, buildings, etc.). Air is fairly transparent to light--the direct absorption of solar radiation in atmospheric air only raises the air temperature by a small amount. Typically about 90% of solar radiation reaches the Earth's surface and then is either absorbed or reflected. The absorbed radiation on the surface increases the surface temperature. And in turn the hot surfaces heat the air. This convective heating is responsible for the majority of the diurnal temperature range. The contribution of man-made heat (e.g., air conditioning, cars) is very small, compared to the heating of air by hot surfaces, except for the downtown high-rise areas.

Akbari, Hashem

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

389

Multicenter Analysis of Effect of High Biologic Effective Dose on Biochemical Failure and Survival Outcomes in Patients With Gleason Score 7-10 Prostate Cancer Treated With Permanent Prostate Brachytherapy  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: To investigate the biochemical control rates and survival for Gleason score 7-10 prostate cancer patients undergoing permanent prostate brachytherapy as a function of the biologic effective dose (BED). Methods and Materials: Six centers provided data on 5,889 permanent prostate brachytherapy patients, of whom 1,078 had Gleason score 7 (n = 845) or Gleason score 8-10 (n = 233) prostate cancer and postimplant dosimetry results available. The median prostate-specific antigen level was 7.5 ng/mL (range, 0.4-300). The median follow-up for censored patients was 46 months (range, 5-130). Short-term hormonal therapy (median duration, 3.9 months) was used in 666 patients (61.8%) and supplemental external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) in 620 (57.5%). The patients were stratified into three BED groups: <200 Gy (n = 645), 200-220 Gy (n = 199), and >220 Gy (n = 234). Biochemical freedom from failure (bFFF) was determined using the Phoenix definition. Results: The 5-year bFFF rate was 80%. The bFFF rate stratified by the three BED groups was 76.4%, 83.5%, and 88.3% (p < 0.001), respectively. Cox regression analysis revealed Gleason score, prostate-specific antigen level, use of hormonal therapy, EBRT, and BED were associated with bFFF (p < 0.001). Freedom from metastasis improved from 92% to 99% with the greatest doses. The overall survival rate at 5 years for the three BED groups for Gleason score 8-10 cancer was 86.6%, 89.4%, and 94.6%, respectively (p = 0.048). Conclusion: These data suggest that permanent prostate brachytherapy combined with EBRT and hormonal therapy yields excellent bFFF and survival results in Gleason score 7-10 patients when the delivered BEDs are >220 Gy. These doses can be achieved by a combination of 45-Gy EBRT with a minimal dose received by 90% of the target volume of 120 Gy of {sup 103}Pd or 130 Gy of {sup 125}I.

Stone, Nelson N. [Mount Sinai School of Medicine, New York, NY (United States)], E-mail: nelsonstone@optonline.net; Potters, Louis [North Shore Long Island Jewish Health System, New Hyde Park, NY (United States); Davis, Brian J. [Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN (United States); Ciezki, Jay P. [Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, OH (United States); Zelefsky, Michael J. [Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY (United States); Roach, Mack; Shinohara, Katsuto [University of California, San Francisco, San Francisco, CA (United States); Fearn, Paul A. [Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY (United States); Kattan, Michael W. [Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, OH (United States); Stock, Richard G. [Mount Sinai School of Medicine, New York, NY (United States)

2009-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

390

Integrated Energy System with Beneficial Carbon Dioxide (CO2) Use - Final Scientific/Technical Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report presents an integrated energy system that combines the production of substitute natural gas through coal hydrogasification with an algae process for beneficial carbon dioxide (CO2) use and biofuel production (funded under Department of Energy (DOE) contract DE-FE0001099). The project planned to develop, test, operate and evaluate a 2 ton-per-day coal hydrogasification plant and 25-acre algae farm at the Arizona Public Service (APS) 1000 Megawatt (MW) Cholla coal-fired power plant in Joseph City, Arizona. Conceptual design of the integrated system was undertaken with APS partners Air Liquide (AL) and Parsons. The process engineering was separated into five major areas: flue gas preparation and CO2 delivery, algae farming, water management, hydrogasification, and biofuel production. The process flow diagrams, energy and material balances, and preliminary major equipment needs for each major area were prepared to reflect integrated process considerations and site infrastructure design basis. The total project also included research and development on a bench-scale hydrogasifier, one-dimensional (1-D) kinetic-model simulation, extensive algae stressing, oil extraction, lipid analysis and a half-acre algae farm demonstration at APS?s Redhawk testing facility. During the project, a two-acre algae testing facility with a half-acre algae cultivation area was built at the APS Redhawk 1000 MW natural gas combined cycle power plant located 55 miles west of Phoenix. The test site integrated flue gas delivery, CO2 capture and distribution, algae cultivation, algae nursery, algae harvesting, dewatering and onsite storage as well as water treatment. The site environmental, engineering, and biological parameters for the cultivators were monitored remotely. Direct biodiesel production from biomass through an acid-catalyzed transesterification reaction and a supercritical methanol transesterification reaction were evaluated. The highest oil-to-biodiesel conversion of 79.9% was achieved with a stressed algae sample containing 40% algae oil. The effort concluded that producing biodiesel directly from the algae biomass could be an efficient, cost-effective and readily scalable way to produce biodiesel by eliminating the oil extraction process.

Sun, Xiaolei; Rink, Nancy T

2011-04-29T23:59:59.000Z

391

Nitrogen Oxides in the Nocturnal Boundary Layer: Chemistry of Nitrous Acid (HONO) and the Nitrate Radical (N03)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Summary Chemical processes occurring at night in the lowest part of the urban atmosphere, the so called nocturnal boundary layer (NBL), can influence the composition of the atmosphere during the night as well as the following day. They may impact the budgets of some of the most important pollutants, such as ozone and nitrogen oxides, as well as influence size and composition of particular matter. Few studies have thus far concentrated on the nocturnal chemistry of the urban NBL, most likely due to the strong influence of vertical transport and mixing, which requires the measurement of trace gas profiles instead of simple point observations. Motivated by our lack of observations and understanding of nocturnal chemistry, the focus of this project was the study of the vertical distribution of trace gases and the altitude dependence of nocturnal chemistry under polluted conditions through field observations and modeling studies. The analysis of three field experiments (TEXAQS, Houston, 2000; Phoenix Sunrise Ozone Experiment, 2001; NAPOX, Boston, 2002), two of which were performed in this project, showed that ozone concentrations typically increase with height in the lowest 150m, while NO2 typically decreases. NO3, the dominant nocturnal radical species, showed much higher concentrations in the upper part of the NBL, and was often not present at the ground. With the help of a one-dimensional chemical transport model, developed in this project, we found that the interaction of ground emissions of NOx and hydrocarbons, together with their vertical transport, is responsible for the vertical profiles. The dominant chemical reactions influencing ozone, NO2 and NO3 are the reaction of ozone and NO3 with freshly emitted NO. Sensitivity studies with our model showed that the magnitude of the trace gas gradients depend both on the emission rates and the vertical stability of the NBL. Observations and model analysis clearly show that nocturnal chemistry in urban areas is altitude dependent. Measurements at one altitude, for example at the ground, where most air quality monitoring stations are located, are not representative for the rest of the NBL. Our model also revealed that radical chemistry is, in general, altitude dependent at night. We distinguish three regions: an unreactive, NO rich, ground layer; an upper, O3 and NO3 dominated layer, and a reactive mixing layer, where RO2 radicals are mixed from aloft with NO from the ground. In this reactive layer an active radical chemistry and elevated OH radical levels can be found. The downward transport of N2O5 and HO2NO2, followed by their thermal decay, was also identified as a radical source in this layer. Our observations also gave insight into the formation of HONO in the NBL. Based on our field experiments we were able to show that the NO2 to HONO conversion was relative humidity dependent. While this fact was well known, we found that it is most likely the uptake of HONO onto surfaces which is R.H. dependent, rather than the NO2 to HONO conversion. This finding led to the proposal of a new NO2 to HONO conversion mechanism, which is based on solid physical chemical principles. Noteworthy is also the observation of enhanced NO2 to HONO conversion during a dust storm event in Phoenix. The final activity in our project investigated the influence of the urban canopy, i.e. building walls and surfaces, on nocturnal chemistry. For the first time the surface area of a city was determined based on a Geographical Information System database of the city of Santa Monica. The surface to volume areas found in this study showed that, in the 2 lower part of the NBL, buildings provide a much larger surface area than the aerosol. In addition, buildings take up a considerable amount of the volume near the ground. The expansion of our model and sensitivity studies based on the Santa Monica data revealed that the surface area of buildings considerably influences HONO levels in urban areas. The volume reduction leads to a decrease of O3 and an increase of NO2 near the ground due to the stronger impact o

Jochen Stutz

2005-05-24T23:59:59.000Z

392

Expediting Groundwater Sampling at Hanford and Making It Safer - 13158  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The CH2M HILL Plateau Remediation Company (CHPRC) manages the groundwater monitoring programs at the Department of Energy's 586-square-mile Hanford site in southeastern Washington state. These programs are regulated by the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA), the Comprehensive Environmental Response Compensation and Liability Act (CERCLA), and the Atomic Energy Act (AEA). The purpose of monitoring is to track existing groundwater contamination from past practices, as well as other potential contamination that might originate from RCRA treatment, storage, and disposal (TSD) facilities. An integral part of the groundwater-monitoring program involves taking samples of the groundwater and measuring the water levels in wells scattered across the site. Each year, more than 1,500 wells are accessed for a variety of reasons. Historically, the monitoring activities have been very 'people intensive'. Field personnel or 'samplers' have been issued pre-printed forms showing information about the well(s) for a particular sampling evolution. This information is taken from two official electronic databases: the Hanford Well Information System (HWIS) and the Hanford Environmental Information System (HEIS). The samplers traditionally used these hardcopy forms to document the groundwater samples and well water-levels. After recording the entries in the field, the samplers turned the forms in at the end of the day and other personnel posted the collected information. In Automating Groundwater Sampling at Hanford (HNF-38542-FP Revision 0, Presented at Waste Management 2009 Conference, March 1 - March 5, 2009, Phoenix, AZ), we described the methods, tools, and techniques that would be used in automating the activities associated with measuring water levels. The Field Logging and Electronic Data Gathering (FLEDG) application/database that automates collecting the water-level measurement data has now been implemented at Hanford. In addition to eliminating the need to print out documents, the system saves three-to-four man days each month for the field personnel taking the measurements and the scientists and administrators managing the data and the documentation. After the information has received technical review, FLEDG automatically updates the database for water-level measurements and loads the document management system with the completed sampling report. Due to safety considerations, access to wells is conditional. A spreadsheet with appropriate data not only lists the wells that are cleared for work, but also the safety personnel who must be present before work can start. This spreadsheet is used in planning daily activities. Daily plans are structured to ensure that the wells to be sampled are cleared for work and the appropriate safety personnel have been assigned and are present before the work starts. Historically, the spreadsheets have been prepared manually, and as a result, are potentially subject to human error. However, a companion database application has been developed to work with FLEDG - making the entire sampling process more efficient and safer for personnel. The Well Access List - Electronic, WAL-E, is a database that contains much the same information that was previously manually loaded into the spread sheet. In addition, WAL-E contains a managed work-flow application that shows the access requirements and allows for appropriate reviews of the compiled well. Various CHPRC organizations, including Industrial Hygiene, RADCON, and Well Maintenance and Sample Administration are able to enter and review the wells added or deleted from the WAL-E database. The FLEDG system then accesses this database information to identify appropriate support personnel and provide safety requirements to field personnel. In addition, WAL-E offers the assurance that wells have appropriate locks and are correctly labeled and electrically grounded as required, before well activities begin. This feature is an extremely important aspect of the FLEDG/WAL-E system because it adds another safety check to the work evolution and reduces the pote

Connell, Carl W. Jr.; Conley, S.F.; Carr, Jennifer S.; Schatz, Aaron L. [CH2M HILL Plateau Remediation Company, P.O. Box 1600, Richland, WA 99352 (United States)] [CH2M HILL Plateau Remediation Company, P.O. Box 1600, Richland, WA 99352 (United States); Brown, W.L. [Lockheed Martin Systems Information, P.O. Box 950, Richland, WA 99352 (United States)] [Lockheed Martin Systems Information, P.O. Box 950, Richland, WA 99352 (United States); Hildebrand, R. Douglas [Department of Energy - Richland Operations Office, 825 Jadwin Ave., Richland, WA 99352 (United States)] [Department of Energy - Richland Operations Office, 825 Jadwin Ave., Richland, WA 99352 (United States)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

393

Lemnos Interoperable Security Program  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The manner in which the control systems are being designed and operated in the energy sector is undergoing some of the most significant changes in history due to the evolution of technology and the increasing number of interconnections to other system. With these changes however come two significant challenges that the energy sector must face; 1) Cyber security is more important than ever before, and 2) Cyber security is more complicated than ever before. A key requirement in helping utilities and vendors alike in meeting these challenges is interoperability. While interoperability has been present in much of the discussions relating to technology utilized within the energy sector and especially the Smart Grid, it has been absent in the context of cyber security. The Lemnos project addresses these challenges by focusing on the interoperability of devices utilized within utility control systems which support critical cyber security functions. In theory, interoperability is possible with many of the cyber security solutions available to utilities today. The reality is that the effort required to achieve cyber security interoperability is often a barrier for utilities. For example, consider IPSec, a widely-used Internet Protocol to define Virtual Private Networks, or â?? tunnelsâ?, to communicate securely through untrusted public and private networks. The IPSec protocol suite has a significant number of configuration options and encryption parameters to choose from, which must be agreed upon and adopted by both parties establishing the tunnel. The exercise in getting software or devices from different vendors to interoperate is labor intensive and requires a significant amount of security expertise by the end user. Scale this effort to a significant number of devices operating over a large geographical area and the challenge becomes so overwhelming that it often leads utilities to pursue solutions from a single vendor. These single vendor solutions may inadvertently lock utilities into proprietary and closed systems Lemnos is built on the successes of Open PCS Security Architecture for Interoperable Design (OPSAID), a previous DOE National SCADA Test Bed (NSTB) project. It enhances security interoperability by identifying basic cyber security functions based on utility requirements and then selecting open source solutions, namely Internet Engineering Task Force (IETF) RFCs, to support these functions. Once identified, specific configuration parameters for each RFC suitable for the electric utility control system environment are identified and documented. These configuration parameters are referred to as Interoperable Configuration Profiles (ICP) and their effectiveness within the utility control systems environment is verified with comprehensive testing as the final step in the process. The project focused on development of ICPs for four security protocols (IPsec, SSH, LDAP, and Syslog) which represent fundamental building blocks which can be utilized for securing utility control systems. These ICPs are product agnostic and can be applied modularly to any device (router, substation gateway, intelligent electronic device, etc.) within the utility control system as the end user deems necessary for their unique system architecture. The Lemnos Interoperable Security Program is a public-private partnership under the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability's Cybersecurity for Energy Delivery Systems (CEDS) program and supports The Roadmap to Secure Energy Delivery Systems. In addition to EnerNex, the core team supporting the effort includes Tennessee Valley Authority, Sandia National Laboratories, and Schweitzer Engineering Laboratories. Adding to the core team effort is collaboration from additional industry participants in the project including the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI), Alien Vault, Cisco, Encore Networks, GarrettCom, Industrial Defender, N-Dimension Solutions, Phoenix Contact, RuggedCom, and Siemens.

John Stewart; Ron Halbgewachs; Adrian Chavez; Rhett Smith; David Teumim

2012-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

394

In-Situ Measurements of Low Enrichment Uranium Holdup Process Gas Piping at K-25 - Paper for Waste Management Symposia 2010 East Tennessee Technology Park Oak Ridge, Tennessee  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document is the final version of a paper submitted to the Waste Management Symposia, Phoenix, 2010, abstract BJC/OR-3280. The primary document from which this paper was condensed is In-Situ Measurement of Low Enrichment Uranium Holdup in Process Gas Piping at K-25 Using NaI/HMS4 Gamma Detection Systems, BJC/OR-3355. This work explores the sufficiency and limitations of the Holdup Measurement System 4 (HJVIS4) software algorithms applied to measurements of low enriched uranium holdup in gaseous diffusion process gas piping. HMS4 has been used extensively during the decommissioning and demolition project of the K-25 building for U-235 holdup quantification. The HMS4 software is an integral part of one of the primary nondestructive assay (NDA) systems which was successfully tested and qualified for holdup deposit quantification in the process gas piping of the K-25 building. The initial qualification focused on the measurement of highly enriched UO{sub 2}F{sub 2} deposits. The purpose of this work was to determine if that qualification could be extended to include the quantification of holdup in UO{sub 2}F{sub 2} deposits of lower enrichment. Sample field data are presented to provide evidence in support of the theoretical foundation. The HMS4 algorithms were investigated in detail and found to sufficiently compensate for UO{sub 2}F{sub 2} source self-attenuation effects, over the range of expected enrichment (4-40%), in the North and East Wings of the K-25 building. The limitations of the HMS4 algorithms were explored for a described set of conditions with respect to area source measurements of low enriched UO{sub 2}F{sub 2} deposits when used in conjunction with a 1 inch by 1/2 inch sodium iodide (NaI) scintillation detector. The theoretical limitations of HMS4, based on the expected conditions in the process gas system of the K-25 building, are related back to the required data quality objectives (DQO) for the NBA measurement system established for the K-25 demolition project. The combined review of the HMS software algorithms and supporting field measurements lead to the conclusion that the majority of process gas pipe measurements are adequately corrected for source self-attenuation using HMS4. While there will be instances where the UO{sub 2}F{sub 2} holdup mass presents an infinitely thick deposit to the NaI-HMS4 system these situations are expected to be infrequent. This work confirms that the HMS4 system can quantify UO{sub 2}F{sub 2} holdup, in its current configuration (deposition, enrichment, and geometry), below the DQO levels for the K-25 building decommissioning and demolition project. For an area measurement of process gas pipe in the K-25 building, if an infinitely thick UO{sub 2}F{sub 2} deposit is identified in the range of enrichment of {approx}4-40%, the holdup quantity exceeds the corresponding DQO established for the K-25 building demolition project.

Rasmussen B.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

395

Shipping Remote Handled Transuranic Waste to the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant - An Operational Experience  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

On January 18, 2007, the first ever shipment of Remote Handled Transuranic (RH TRU) waste left the gate at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL), headed toward the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) for disposal, thus concluding one of the most stressful, yet rewarding, periods the authors have ever experienced. The race began in earnest on October 16, 2006, with signature of the New Mexico Environment Department Secretary's Final Order, ruling that the '..draft permit as changed is hereby approved in its entirety.' This established the effective date of the approved permit as November 16, 2006. The permit modification was a consolidation of several Class 3 modification requests, one of which included incorporation of RH TRU requirements and another of which incorporated the requirements of Section 311 of Public Law 108-137. The obvious goal was to complete the first shipment by November 17. While many had anticipated its approval, the time had finally come to actually implement, and time seemed to be the main item lacking. At that point, even the most aggressive schedule that could be seriously documented showed a first ship date in March 2007. Even though planning for this eventuality had started in May 2005 with the arrival of the current Idaho Cleanup Project (ICP) contractor (and even before that), there were many facility and system modifications to complete, startup authorizations to fulfill, and many regulatory audits and approvals to obtain before the first drum could be loaded. Through the dedicated efforts of the ICP workers, the partnership with Department of Energy (DOE) - Idaho, the coordinated integration with the Central Characterization Project (CCP), the flexibility and understanding of the regulatory community, and the added encouragement of DOE - Carlsbad Field Office and at Headquarters, the first RH TRU canister was loaded on December 22, 2006. Following final regulatory approval on January 17, 2007, the historic event finally occurred the following day. While some of the success of this endeavor can be attributed to the sheer will and determination of the individuals involved, the fact that it was established and managed as a separate sub-project under the ICP, accounts for a majority of the success. Utilizing a structured project management approach, including development of, and management to, a performance baseline, allowed for timely decision making and the flexibility to adapt to changing conditions as the various aspects of the project matured. This paper provides some insight into how this was achieved, in a relatively short time, and provides an overview of the experience of start-up of a new retrieval, characterization, loading, and transportation operation in the midst of an aggressive cleanup project. Additionally, as one might expect, everything within the project did not go as planned, which provides a great opportunity to discuss some lessons learned. Finally, the first shipment was just the beginning. There are 224 additional shipments scheduled. In keeping with the theme of WM 2008, Phoenix Rising: Moving Forward in Waste Management, this paper will address the future opportunities and challenges of RH TRU waste management at the INL. (authors)

Anderson, S.; Bradford, J.; Clements, T.; Crisp, D.; Sherick, M. [CH2M-WG Idaho, Idaho Falls, ID (United States); D'Amico, E. [Washington TRU Solutions, Denver, CO (United States); Lattin, W. [United States Department of Energy, Idaho Operations Office, Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Watson, K. [United States Department of Energy, Carlsbad Field Office, Carlsbad, NM (United States)

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

396

A SPECTROSCOPIC CATALOG OF THE BRIGHTEST (J < 9) M DWARFS IN THE NORTHERN SKY{sup ,}  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We present a spectroscopic catalog of the 1564 brightest (J < 9) M dwarf candidates in the northern sky, as selected from the SUPERBLINK proper motion catalog. Observations confirm 1408 of the candidates to be late-K and M dwarfs with spectral subtypes K7-M6. From the low ({mu} > 40 mas yr{sup -1}) proper motion limit and high level of completeness of the SUPERBLINK catalog in that magnitude range, we estimate that our spectroscopic census most likely includes >90% of all existing, northern-sky M dwarfs with apparent magnitude J < 9. Only 682 stars in our sample are listed in the Third Catalog of Nearby Stars (CNS3); most others are relative unknowns and have spectroscopic data presented here for the first time. Spectral subtypes are assigned based on spectral index measurements of CaH and TiO molecular bands; a comparison of spectra from the same stars obtained at different observatories, however, reveals that spectral band index measurements are dependent on spectral resolution, spectrophotometric calibration, and other instrumental factors. As a result, we find that a consistent classification scheme requires that spectral indices be calibrated and corrected for each observatory/instrument used. After systematic corrections and a recalibration of the subtype-index relationships for the CaH2, CaH3, TiO5, and TiO6 spectral indices, we find that we can consistently and reliably classify all our stars to a half-subtype precision. The use of corrected spectral indices further requires us to recalibrate the {zeta} parameter, a metallicity indicator based on the ratio of TiO and CaH optical bandheads. However, we find that our {zeta} values are not sensitive enough to diagnose metallicity variations in dwarfs of subtypes M2 and earlier ({+-}0.5 dex accuracy) and are only marginally useful at later M3-M5 subtypes ({+-}0.2 dex accuracy). Fits of our spectra to the Phoenix atmospheric model grid are used to estimate effective temperatures. These suggest the existence of a plateau in the M1-M3 subtype range, in agreement with model fits of infrared spectra but at odds with photometric determinations of T{sub eff}. Existing geometric parallax measurements are extracted from the literature for 624 stars, and are used to determine spectroscopic and photometric distances for all the other stars. Active dwarfs are identified from measurements of H{alpha} equivalent widths, and we find a strong correlation between H{alpha} emission in M dwarfs and detected X-ray emission from ROSAT and/or a large UV excess in the GALEX point source catalog. We combine proper motion data and photometric distances to evaluate the (U, V, W) distribution in velocity space, which is found to correlate tightly with the velocity distribution of G dwarfs in the solar neighborhood. However, active stars show a smaller dispersion in their space velocities, which is consistent with those stars being younger on average. Our catalog will be most useful to guide the selection of the best M dwarf targets for exoplanet searches, in particular those using high-precision radial velocity measurements.

Lepine, Sebastien; Wilde, Matthew; Rojas-Ayala, Barbara; Cruz, Kelle L. [Department of Astrophysics, American Museum of Natural History, Central Park West at 79th Street, New York, NY 10024 (United States); Hilton, Eric J.; Mann, Andrew W. [Institute for Astrophysics, University of Hawaii, Honolulu, HI 96822 (United States); Gaidos, Eric, E-mail: lepine@amnh.org, E-mail: brojas-ayala@amnh.org, E-mail: mwilde@amnh.org, E-mail: mshara@amnh.org, E-mail: hilton@ifa.hawaii.edu, E-mail: amann@ifa.hawaii.edu, E-mail: gaidos@hawaii.edu, E-mail: kellecruz@gmail.com [Department of Geology and Geophysics, University of Hawaii, 1680 East-West Road, Honolulu, HI 96822 (United States)

2013-04-15T23:59:59.000Z