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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "1977-1980 albuquerque ct" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
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We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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1

The NNSA Albuquerque Complex  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites

Albuquerque Complex Transition Site Albuquerque Complex Transition Site National Nuclear Security Administration - Service Center Internet Site Skip to Content Click to make text smaller Click to make text larger Viewing Options-Click to increase or decrease page font size. NNSA Home Page Office of Public Affairs Employee Concerns Program Whistleblower Home Page Office of Civil Rights Federal Asian Pacific American Council - New Mexico Chapter Current Management and Operating Contracts Freedom of Information Privacy Act NEPA Contractor Human Resources Office of Field Financial Management The NNSA Albuquerque Complex Transition Site We are incorporating the web pages on this site into the NNSA HQ site, located at http://www.nnsa.energy.gov. We now provide links to the current locations of all our previous pages and hosted Field Office sites.

2

Albuquerque Operations Office  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

%r © J~4 %r © J~4 aDepartment of Energy Albuquerque Operations Office P.O. Box 5400 Albuquerue. New Mexico 87118 JUIl 0 198 Vicinity Property No. CA-401 _ U l Address; Mayer Street Bridgeville, Pennsylvania Cyclops Corporation 650 Washington Road Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 15228 Dear Sir: Under the Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act of 1978, Public Law 95-604, the Department of Energy (DOE) is authorized to conduct remedial action at properties contaminated with residual radioactive material from inactive uranium mill sites. Evaluation of your property identified above has revealed the presence of residual radioactive material in excess of standards established by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). Therefore, your property has been formally included by DOE for remedial action in the Uranium Mill Tailings

3

Category:Albuquerque, NM | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Albuquerque, NM Albuquerque, NM Jump to: navigation, search Go Back to PV Economics By Location Media in category "Albuquerque, NM" The following 16 files are in this category, out of 16 total. SVFullServiceRestaurant Albuquerque NM Public Service Co of NM.png SVFullServiceRestauran... 66 KB SVQuickServiceRestaurant Albuquerque NM Public Service Co of NM.png SVQuickServiceRestaura... 65 KB SVHospital Albuquerque NM Public Service Co of NM.png SVHospital Albuquerque... 80 KB SVLargeHotel Albuquerque NM Public Service Co of NM.png SVLargeHotel Albuquerq... 64 KB SVLargeOffice Albuquerque NM Public Service Co of NM.png SVLargeOffice Albuquer... 82 KB SVMediumOffice Albuquerque NM Public Service Co of NM.png SVMediumOffice Albuque... 69 KB SVMidriseApartment Albuquerque NM Public Service Co of NM.png

4

Microsoft Word - Albuquerque20020730.doc  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Tuesday, July 30, 2002 Tuesday, July 30, 2002 Department of Energy Awards $300,000 to Albuquerque's Next Generation Economy Community Reuse Organization WASHINGTON, D.C. - The Department of Energy (DOE) today announced that it will award $300,000 to the Next Generation Economy Community Reuse Organization (NextGen) located in Albuquerque, New Mexico. This block grant will enable NextGen to continue to work for a strong, export-based private sector to include a Microsystems Fabrication Facility, and a web- based database for workforce development in the Albuquerque area. "The Energy Department is a good neighbor to the communities surrounding our sites," Secretary of Energy Spencer Abraham said. "Working with NextGen and other community reuse organizations around the country, the Department has retained, expanded or created over

5

MagViz Bottled Liquid Scanner at Albuquerque International Sunport  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

The next-generation bottled liquid scanner, MagViz BLS, is demonstrated at the Albuquerque International Sunport, New Mexico

Surko, Stephen; Dennis, Steve; Espy, Michelle

2014-08-12T23:59:59.000Z

6

Tiger Team assessment of the Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque  

SciTech Connect

This report documents the Tiger Team Assessment of Sandia National Laboratories (SNL), Albuquerque, located in Albuquerque, New Mexico. SNL, Albuquerque, is operated by the Sandia Corporation (a wholly owned subsidiary of the American Telephone and Telegraph Company) for the US Department of Energy (DOE). The environmental assessment also included DOE tenant facilities at Ross Aviation, Albuquerque Microelectronics Operation, and the Central Training Academy. The assessment was conducted from April 15 to May 24, 1991, under the auspices of DOE's Office of Special Projects under the Assistant Secretary for Environment, Safety and Health (ES H). The assessment was comprehensive, encompassing ES H disciplines, management, self-assessments, and quality assurance; transportation; and waste management operations. Compliance with applicable federal, state, and local regulations; applicable DOE Orders; best management practices; and internal SNL, Albuquerque, requirements were assessed. In addition, an evaluation of the adequacy and effectiveness of DOE and SNL, Albuquerque management of ES H programs was conducted.

Not Available

1991-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

7

APM hosts contracting officers in Albuquerque | National Nuclear...  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

APM hosts contracting officers in Albuquerque | National Nuclear Security Administration Facebook Twitter Youtube Flickr RSS People Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing...

8

1991 Environmental monitoring report Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico  

SciTech Connect

This 1991 report contains monitoring data from routine radiological and nonradiological environmental surveillance activities. Summaries of significant environmental compliance programs in progress such as National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) documentation, environmental permits, environmental restoration (ER), and various waste management programs for Sandia National Laboratories in Albuquerque (SNL, Albuquerque) are included. The maximum offsite dose impact was calculated to be 1.3 {times} 10{sup {minus}3} mrem. The total population within a 50-mile radius of SNL, Albuquerque, received a collective dose of 0.53 person-rem during 1991 from SNL, Albuquerque, operations. As in the previous year, the 1991 operations at SNL, Albuquerque, had no discernible impact on the general public or on the environment.

Culp, T.; Cox, W.; Hwang, S.; Jones, A.; Longley, S.; Parsons, A.; Wolff, T.; Fish, J.; Ward, S.

1992-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

9

1989 Environmental monitoring report, Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico  

SciTech Connect

This 1989 report contains monitoring data from routine radiological and nonradiological environmental surveillance activities. Summaries of significant environmental compliance programs in progress such as National Environmental Policy Act documentation, environmental permits, environmental restoration, and various waste management programs for Sandia National Laboratories in Albuquerque (SNL, Albuquerque) are included. The maximum offsite dose impact was calculated to be 8.8 {times} 10{sup {minus}4} mrem. The total Albuquerque population received a collective dose of 0.097 person-rem during 1989 from SNL, Albuquerque, operations. As in the previous year, SNL, Albuquerque, operations in 1989 had no adverse impact on the general public or on the environment. 46 refs., 20 figs., 31 tabs.

Hwang, S.; Chavez, G.; Phelan, J.; Parsons, A.; Yeager, G.; Dionne, D.; Schwartz, B.; Wolff, T.; Fish, J.; Gray, C.; Thompson, D.

1990-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

10

E-Print Network 3.0 - albuquerque nm usa Sample Search Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

the following locations: Wingate, Crowne Point Ojo Encino, NM; Wide Ruins, and Hunters Point AZ. The Albuquerque... U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Albuquerque District Bureau of...

11

E-Print Network 3.0 - albuquerque nm 08mar01 Sample Search Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

the following locations: Wingate, Crowne Point Ojo Encino, NM; Wide Ruins, and Hunters Point AZ. The Albuquerque... U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Albuquerque District Bureau of...

12

E-Print Network 3.0 - albuquerque nm measurement Sample Search...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

the following locations: Wingate, Crowne Point Ojo Encino, NM; Wide Ruins, and Hunters Point AZ. The Albuquerque... U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Albuquerque District Bureau of...

13

E-Print Network 3.0 - albuquerque nm 1st Sample Search Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

the following locations: Wingate, Crowne Point Ojo Encino, NM; Wide Ruins, and Hunters Point AZ. The Albuquerque... U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Albuquerque District Bureau of...

14

Federal Asian Pacific American Council - New Mexico Chapter Albuquerque, NM  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Asian Pacific American Council - New Mexico Chapter Albuquerque, NM Asian Pacific American Council - New Mexico Chapter Albuquerque, NM | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Federal Asian Pacific American Council - New Mexico Chapter Albuquerque, NM Home > About Us > Our Locations > Albuquerque Complex > Federal Asian Pacific American Council - New ...

15

Flooding and conservation in the Albuquerque bosque  

SciTech Connect

Interest in the conservation of the Middle Rio Grande bosque has grown rapidly in the last decade. During that period, private organizations as well as governmental agencies have sharpened their focus on the issue, and in doing so have contributed to the development of a bosque biological management plan for the river reach between Cochiti Dam and Elephant Butte Reservoir. This increased regional attention reflects a growing national and international concern about human impacts on fluvial processes in large floodplain rivers. Because they impound large amounts of a river`s discharge and interfere with its natural flooding regime, dams can seriously disrupt the relationship between river basin hydrology and riparian zone functioning. In western North America, this interference reduces cottonwood germination and survival and, as will be discussed, negatively affects key ecological processes in riparian communities. In this paper the authors first review how the decoupling of basin hydrology from riparian forest processes has begun to affect the integrity of the Middle Rio Grande bosque ecosystem. Then they propose an alternative management scheme, with emphasis on the Albuquerque bosque, that centers on restoring its ecosystem functioning.

Crawford, C.S.; Molles, M.C. Jr.; Valett, H.M. [Univ. of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM (United States). Dept. of Biology

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

16

Ir L (I.~ DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY ALBUQUERQUE OPERATIONS OFFICE  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Ir Ir L (I.~ DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY ALBUQUERQUE OPERATIONS OFFICE I.: ~ CONTRACT NO. DE-AC04-83AL18796 1. Vicinity Property i: Completion Report i , . Remedial Actions , cContractor 4,. -~'~ ~for the Uranium Mill Tailings ~~~z ~ Remedial Actions Project - MK-FEROUSON COMPANY *C~Ad PEE *CMIWN>tfIOW VICINITY PROPERTY COMPLETION REPORT AT CA-401 MAYERS STREET BRIDGEVILLE, PA 15017 JUNE 30, 1987 FOR URANIUM MILL TAILINGS REMEDIAL ACTION PROJECT OFFICE ALBUQUERQUE OPERATIONS OFFICE U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY ALBUQUERQUE, NM BY MK-FERGUSON CC IPANY AND CHEM-NUCLEAR SYSTEMS, INC. MK-Ferguson Company has been granted authorization to perform remedial action under the Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act of 1978, Public Law 95-604. Remedial action was done in accordance to the EPA Standards for

17

1990 Environmental Monitoring Report, Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico  

SciTech Connect

This 1990 report contains monitoring data from routine radiological and nonradiological environmental surveillance activities. Summaries of significant environmental compliance programs in progress such as National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) documentation, environmental permits, environmental restoration, and various waste management programs for Sandia National Laboratories in Albuquerque (SNL, Albuquerque) are included. The maximum offsite dose impact was calculated to be 2.0 {times} 10{sup {minus}3} mrem. The total 50-mile population received a collective dose of 0.82 person-rem during 1990 from SNL, Albuquerque, operations. As in the previous year, the 1990 SNL operations had no adverse impact on the general public or on the environment. This report is prepared for the US Department of Energy in compliance with DOE Order 5400.1. 97 refs., 30 figs., 137 tabs.

Hwang, S.; Yeager, G.; Wolff, T.; Parsons, A.; Dionne, D.; Massey, C.; Schwartz, B.; Fish, J.; Thompson, D. (Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)); Goodrich, M. (GRAM, Inc., Albuquerque, NM (United States))

1991-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

18

DOE Zero Energy Ready Home Case Study: Palo Duro Homes, Albuquerque...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Study: Palo Duro Homes, Albuquerque, NM DOE Zero Energy Ready Home Case Study: Palo Duro Homes, Albuquerque, NM Case study of a New Mexico-based home builder who has built more DOE...

19

1995 Site environmental report Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico  

SciTech Connect

This 1995 report contains data from routine radiological and non-radiological environmental monitoring activities. Summaries of significant environmental compliance programs in progress, such as National Environmental Policy Act documentation, environmental permits, environmental restoration and various waste management programs at Sandia National Laboratories in Albuquerque, New Mexico, are included.

Shyr, L.J.; Duncan, D. [eds.] [eds.; Sanchez, R.

1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

20

Los Ranchos de Albuquerque, New Mexico: Energy Resources | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Ranchos de Albuquerque, New Mexico: Energy Resources Ranchos de Albuquerque, New Mexico: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 35.1619885°, -106.6428038° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":35.1619885,"lon":-106.6428038,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "1977-1980 albuquerque ct" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Archive Reference Buildings by Climate Zone: 4B Albuquerque, New Mexico |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

B Albuquerque, New B Albuquerque, New Mexico Archive Reference Buildings by Climate Zone: 4B Albuquerque, New Mexico Here you will find past versions of the reference buildings for new construction commercial buildings, organized by building type and location. A summary of building types and climate zones is available for reference. Current versions are also available. You can download ZIP files that contain the following: An EnergyPlus software input file (.idf) An html file showing the results from the EnergyPlus simulation (.html) A spreadsheet that summarizes the inputs and results for each location (.xls) The EnergyPlus TMY2 weather file (.epw). benchmark-v1.0_3.0-4b_nm_albuquerque.zip benchmark-v1.1_3.1-4b_usa_nm_albuquerque.zip benchmark-new-v1.2_4.0-4b_usa_nm_albuquerque.zip

22

Office of Civil Rights, NNSA, NA 1.2, Albuquerque Complex  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Albuquerque, NM 87185 (505) 845-5517 Fax (505) 845-4963 TTY 866-872-1011 http:nnsa.energy.govaboutusouroperationsmanagementandbudgetcivrights Fiscal Year 2011 Year-End...

23

1993 Site environmental report Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico  

SciTech Connect

This 1993 report contains monitoring data from routine radiological and nonradiological environmental surveillance activities. Summaries of significant environmental compliance programs in progress, such as National Environmental Policy Act documentation, environmental permits, environmental restoration, and various waste management programs for Sandia National Laboratories in Albuquerque, New Mexico, are included. The maximum offsite dose impact was calculated to be 0.0016 millirem. The total population within a 50-mile (80 kilometer) radius of Sandia National Laboratories/New Mexico received an estimated collective dose of 0.027 person-rem during 1993 from the laboratories operations, As in the previous year, the 1993 operations at Sandia National Laboratories/New Mexico had no discernible impact on the general public or on the environment. This report is prepared for the U.S. Department of Energy in compliance with DOE Order 5400.1.

Culp, T.A.; Cheng, C.F.; Cox, W.; Durand, N.; Irwin, M.; Jones, A.; Lauffer, F.; Lincoln, M.; McClellan, Y.; Molley, K. [and others] [and others

1994-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

24

1992 Environmental monitoring report, Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico  

SciTech Connect

This 1992 report contains monitoring data from routine radiological and nonradiological environmental surveillance activities. summaries of significant environmental compliance programs in progress, such as National Environmental Policy Act documentation, environmental permits, envirorunental restoration, and various waste management programs for Sandia National Laboratories in Albuquerque, New Mexico, are included. The maximum offsite dose impact was calculated to be 0.0034 millirem. The total population within a 50-mile radius of Sandia National Laboratories/New Mexico received an estimated collective dose of 0.019 person-rem during 1992 from the laboratories` operations. As in the previous year, the 1992 operations at Sandia National Laboratories/New Mexico had no discernible impact on the general public or on the environment.

Culp, T.; Cox, W.; Hwang, H.; Irwin, M.; Jones, A.; Matz, B.; Molley, K.; Rhodes, W.; Stermer, D.; Wolff, T.

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

25

Photo of the Week: A Storm in Albuquerque, New Mexico | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

A Storm in Albuquerque, New Mexico A Storm in Albuquerque, New Mexico Photo of the Week: A Storm in Albuquerque, New Mexico July 31, 2013 - 10:32am Addthis Did you know: a typical bolt of lightning is about 3 miles long and heats the air immediately surrounding the bolt to over 20,000 degrees Celsius? That's three times hotter than the surface of the sun. For many Americans, summer isn't complete without an exciting thunderstorm to break up the heat. This electrifying photo was taken by Sandia Labs photographer Randy Montoya during a summer storm on July 21, 2013. The lightning illuminated the Redstone rocket that stands in front of the National Museum of Nuclear Science & History in Albuquerque, New Mexico. | Photo courtesy of Randy Montoya, Sandia National Laboratory. Did you know: a typical bolt of lightning is about 3 miles long and heats

26

2010 DOE National Science Bowl® Photos - Albuquerque Academy | U.S. DOE  

Office of Science (SC) Website

Albuquerque Academy Albuquerque Academy National Science Bowl® (NSB) NSB Home About National Science Bowl Contacts Regional Science Bowl Coordinators National Science Bowl FAQ's Alumni Past National Science Bowl Winners Past National Science Bowl Photos National Science Bowl Logos High School Middle School Attending National Event Volunteers 2013 Competition Results News Media WDTS Home Contact Information National Science Bowl® U.S. Department of Energy SC-27/ Forrestal Building 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 P: 202-586-6702 E: National.Science.Bowl@science.doe.gov 2010 National Science Bowl Photos 2010 DOE National Science Bowl® Photos - Albuquerque Academy Print Text Size: A A A RSS Feeds FeedbackShare Page Albuquerque Academy team member Ben Zolyomi competes at the National

27

2010 DOE National Science Bowl® Photos - Albuquerque Academy | U.S. DOE  

Office of Science (SC) Website

Albuquerque Academy Albuquerque Academy National Science Bowl® (NSB) NSB Home About National Science Bowl Contacts Regional Science Bowl Coordinators National Science Bowl FAQ's Alumni Past National Science Bowl Winners Past National Science Bowl Photos National Science Bowl Logos High School Middle School Attending National Event Volunteers 2013 Competition Results News Media WDTS Home Contact Information National Science Bowl® U.S. Department of Energy SC-27/ Forrestal Building 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 P: 202-586-6702 E: National.Science.Bowl@science.doe.gov 2010 National Science Bowl Photos 2010 DOE National Science Bowl® Photos - Albuquerque Academy Print Text Size: A A A RSS Feeds FeedbackShare Page Two of the Albuquerque Academy Team members preparing their car as they

28

2010 DOE National Science Bowl® Photos - Albuquerque Acadaemy During  

Office of Science (SC) Website

Acadaemy During Finals Acadaemy During Finals National Science Bowl® (NSB) NSB Home About National Science Bowl Contacts Regional Science Bowl Coordinators National Science Bowl FAQ's Alumni Past National Science Bowl Winners Past National Science Bowl Photos National Science Bowl Logos High School Middle School Attending National Event Volunteers 2013 Competition Results News Media WDTS Home Contact Information National Science Bowl® U.S. Department of Energy SC-27/ Forrestal Building 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 P: 202-586-6702 E: National.Science.Bowl@science.doe.gov 2010 National Science Bowl Photos 2010 DOE National Science Bowl® Photos - Albuquerque Acadaemy During Finals Print Text Size: A A A RSS Feeds FeedbackShare Page The members of the Albuquerque Academy team work on the answer to a

29

Commentaries and Rejoinder to Measuring the Impact of Negative Demand Shocks on Car Dealer Networks by Paulo Albuquerque and Bart J. Bronnenberg  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This series of discussions presents commentaries and a rejoinder on strategic and managerial issues arising from Albuquerque and Bronnenberg [Albuquerque, P., B. J. Bronnenberg. 2012. Measuring the impact of negative demand shocks on car dealer networks. ... Keywords: choice modeling, spatial modeling, structural models

Dominique M. Hanssens; Devavrat Purohit; Richard Staelin; Paulo Albuquerque; Bart J. Bronnenberg

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

30

The University of New Mexico is located in Albuquerque, the largest city in New Mexico. Albuquerque is an ethnically diverse city of half a million residents that has been listed among the smartest U.S. cities and best  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The University of New Mexico is located in Albuquerque, the largest city in New Mexico for hiking, biking, rock climbing and skiing. Photo credit: Tom Brahl Photo The University of New Mexico is the premier research university in the state of New Mexico. UNM is a Carnegie Very High Research Activity

Maccabe, Barney

31

DOE Challenge Home Case Study, Palo Duro Homes, Inc., Albuquerque, NM, Production  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Palo Duro Palo Duro Homes, Inc. Albuquerque, NM BUILDING TECHNOLOGIES OFFICE DOE Challenge Home builders are in the top 1% of builders in the country meeting the extraordinary levels of excellence and quality specifi ed by the U.S. Department of Energy. Every DOE Challenge Home starts with ENERGY STAR for Homes Version 3 for an energy-effi cient home built on a solid foundation of building science research. Then, even more advanced technologies are designed in for a home that goes above and beyond current code to give you the superior quality construction, HVAC, appliances, indoor air quality, safety, durability, comfort, and solar-ready components along with ultra-low or no utility bills. This provides homeowners with a quality home that will last for generations to come.

32

2010 DOE National Science Bowl® Photos - Albuquerque Academy | U.S. DOE  

Office of Science (SC) Website

Academy Academy National Science Bowl® (NSB) NSB Home About National Science Bowl Contacts Regional Science Bowl Coordinators National Science Bowl FAQ's Alumni Past National Science Bowl Winners Past National Science Bowl Photos National Science Bowl Logos High School Middle School Attending National Event Volunteers 2013 Competition Results News Media WDTS Home Contact Information National Science Bowl® U.S. Department of Energy SC-27/ Forrestal Building 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 P: 202-586-6702 E: National.Science.Bowl@science.doe.gov 2010 National Science Bowl Photos 2010 DOE National Science Bowl® Photos - Albuquerque Academy Print Text Size: A A A RSS Feeds FeedbackShare Page First Lady Michelle Obama and Secretary of The Department of Energy Steven

33

Issued by Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico, USA for the  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

9-4908 P 9-4908 P Issued by Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico, USA for the US National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) Office of Research & Development for National Security Science & Technology, NA-121. Sandia is a multiprogram laboratory operated by Sandia Corporation, a Lockheed Martin Company, for the United States Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000. ON THE COVER: Peridynamics simulation of uniaxial pull test of fiber-reinforced, laminate composite plates with initial central notches and having varying fiber orientations in the lamina (the "lay-ups"). The resulting damage and fracture emerge spontaneously in an unguided manner, and the cracking modes are consistent with those seen in laboratory

34

Surface-wave and refraction tomography at the FACT Site, Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico.  

SciTech Connect

We present a technique that allows for the simultaneous acquisition and interpretation of both shear-wave and compressive-wave 3-D velocities. The technique requires no special seismic sources or array geometries, and is suited to studies with small source-receiver offsets. The method also effectively deals with unwanted seismic arrivals by using the statistical properties of the data itself to discriminate against spurious picks. We demonstrate the technique with a field experiment at the Facility for Analysis, Calibration, and Testing at Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico. The resulting 3-D shear-velocity and compressive-velocity distributions are consistent with surface geologic mapping. The averaged velocities and V{sub p}/V{sub s} ratio in the upper 30 meters are also consistent with examples found in the scientific literature.

Abbott, Robert E.; Bartel, Lewis Clark; Pullammanappallil, Satish (Optim, Inc., Reno, NV); Engler, Bruce Phillip

2006-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

35

Calendar year 2004 annual site environmental report:Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico.  

SciTech Connect

Sandia National Laboratories, New Mexico (SNL/NM) is a government-owned, contractor-operated facility owned by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) and managed by the Sandia Site Office (SSO), Albuquerque, New Mexico. Sandia Corporation, a wholly-owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, operates SNL/NM. This annual report summarizes data and the compliance status of Sandia Corporation's environmental protection and monitoring programs through December 31, 2004. Major environmental programs include air quality, water quality, groundwater protection, terrestrial surveillance, waste management, pollution prevention (P2), environmental restoration (ER), oil and chemical spill prevention, and the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA). Environmental monitoring and surveillance programs are required by DOE Order 450.1, Environmental Protection Program (DOE 2005) and DOE Order 231.1A, Environment, Safety, and Health Reporting (DOE 2004a). (DOE 2004a).

Montoya, Amber L.; Goering, Teresa Lynn; Wagner, Katrina; Koss, Susan I.; Salinas, Stephanie A.

2005-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

36

2820 Inorg. Chem. 1988, 27, 2820-2825 Contribution from the Fuel Sciences Division, Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87185,  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and in connection with the utilization of solar energy.2 One of the most popular schemes for the visible light Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87185, and Institut de Chimie Physique, Ecole Polytechnique Federale de

Shelnutt, John A.

37

Proximal potentially seismogenic sources for Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico  

SciTech Connect

Recent geologic and geophysical investigations within the Albuquerque Basin have shed light on the potentially seismogenic sources that might affect Sandia National Laboratories, New Mexico (SNL/NM), a multi-disciplinary research and engineering facility of the US Department of Energy (DOE). This paper presents a summary of potentially seismogenic sources for SNL/NM, emphasizing those sources within approximately 8 kilometers (km) of the site. Several significant faults of the central Rio Grande rift transect SNL/NM. Although progress has been made on understanding the geometry and interactions of these faults, little is known of the timing of most recent movement or on recurrent intervals for these faults. Therefore, whether particular faults or fault sections have been active during the Holocene or even the late Pleistocene is undocumented. Although the overall subdued surface expression of many of these faults suggests that they have low to moderate slip rates, the proximity of these faults to critical (e.g., nuclear) and non-critical (e.g., high-occupancy, multistory office/light lab) facilities at SNL/NM requires their careful examination for evaluation of potential seismic hazard.

Gibson, J.D.

1995-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

38

NETL CT Imaging Facility  

SciTech Connect

NETL's CT Scanner laboratory is equipped with three CT scanners and a mobile core logging unit that work together to provide characteristic geologic and geophysical information at different scales, non-destructively.

None

2013-09-04T23:59:59.000Z

39

NETL CT Imaging Facility  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

NETL's CT Scanner laboratory is equipped with three CT scanners and a mobile core logging unit that work together to provide characteristic geologic and geophysical information at different scales, non-destructively.

None

2014-05-21T23:59:59.000Z

40

Nuclear Medicine CT Angiography  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Nuclear Medicine CT Angiography Stress Testing Rotation The Nuclear Medicine/CT angiography. Understand the indications for exercise treadmill testing and specific nuclear cardiology tests, safe use Level 2 proficiency in performing and interpreting cardiac nuclear imaging tests. Progression

Ford, James

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "1977-1980 albuquerque ct" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Sandia/New Mexico's host, the City of Albuquerque, has a long-term goal of Zer  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Sandia/New Mexico's host, the City of Albuquerque, has a long-term goal of Zero Waste to the Landfill by 2030. Sandia/New Mexico's host, the City of Albuquerque, has a long-term goal of Zero Waste to the Landfill by 2030. Zero Waste is generally accepted to mean greater than 90% of waste generation is diverted for an alternate purpose. In the last five years, SNL/NM has reduced its commercial solid waste by 23% and increased its recycling and composting from 46% to 67%. Building upon this recent success in waste diversion, SNL/NM is seeking to achieve Zero Waste to the Landfill by 2025. Reduce - Reuse - Recycle - Compost It all works together to achieve Zero Waste Waste Minimization is an alternate term for reduce. Practical examples of this concept are: refining your process to be more efficient, and therefore needing fewer inputs; to buy only what you need for the near future; to not stock up on bulk materials that you have no current

42

Microsoft PowerPoint - How To Do Business with DOE Albuquerque SB Summit Feb 1 2012.pptx  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Small Business Networking Event Small Business Networking Event Albuquerque, New Mexico February 1, 2012 Office of Small and Disadvantaged Business Utilization (OSDBU) Office of Small and Disadvantaged Business Utilization (OSDBU) Office of Small and Disadvantaged Business Utilization (OSDBU) Office of Small and Disadvantaged Business Utilization (OSDBU) Presenter: Nickolas A. Demer Acquisition Team Leader February 1, 2012 DOE'S BUSINESS MODEL Consist of 85% of our procurement base, we retain only 15% DOE has approximately 15,000 FTEs and 100,000 contractor workforce Not bundled (ref. FAR 2.1). They are sanctioned by FAR 17.6 Site and Facility Management Contractors (FMCs) Not bundled (ref. FAR 2.1). They are sanctioned by FAR 17.6 Limited Liability Corporations (LLC) -

43

-CT CT)Computed Tomography(. ,. , -100 ,  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

· . · , , , , . · , " , , . · , . , . : · . ·2-4 . ·2-3 -. ·) D,DMAIC, SPC, FMEA, Control Plan, Lean) 8(-. · -. ·. ·. NPI ·. · , , .' , ·" . " * . : ·) B.A ,(-. ·4-6. ·) QFD, CtQ breakdown, DfSS, SPC, AQP, FMEA, Control Plan.( ·Six Sigma GB

Pinsky, Ross

44

CT Solar Loan  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Clean Energy Finance and Investment Authority is offering a pilot loan program, CT Solar Loan, to provide homeowners with 15-year loans for solar PV equipment. The loans are administered...

45

Vegetation study in support of the design and optimization of vegetative soil covers, Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico.  

SciTech Connect

A vegetation study was conducted in Technical Area 3 at Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico in 2003 to assist in the design and optimization of vegetative soil covers for hazardous, radioactive, and mixed waste landfills at Sandia National Laboratories/New Mexico and Kirtland Air Force Base. The objective of the study was to obtain site-specific, vegetative input parameters for the one-dimensional code UNSAT-H and to identify suitable, diverse native plant species for use on vegetative soil covers that will persist indefinitely as a climax ecological community with little or no maintenance. The identification and selection of appropriate native plant species is critical to the proper design and long-term performance of vegetative soil covers. Major emphasis was placed on the acquisition of representative, site-specific vegetation data. Vegetative input parameters measured in the field during this study include root depth, root length density, and percent bare area. Site-specific leaf area index was not obtained in the area because there was no suitable platform to measure leaf area during the 2003 growing season due to severe drought that has persisted in New Mexico since 1999. Regional LAI data was obtained from two unique desert biomes in New Mexico, Sevilletta Wildlife Refuge and Jornada Research Station.

Peace, Gerald (Jerry) L.; Goering, Timothy James (GRAM inc., Albuquerque, NM); Knight, Paul J. (Marron and Associates, Albuquerque, NM); Ashton, Thomas S. (Marron and Associates, Albuquerque, NM)

2004-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

46

Low-flow appliances and household water demand: An evaluation of demand-side management policy in Albuquerque, New Mexico  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Residential rebate programs for low-flow water devices have become increasingly popular as a means of reducing urban water demand. Although program specifics vary, low-flow rebates are available in most U.S. metropolitan areas, as well as in many smaller municipalities. Despite their popularity, few statistical analyses have been conducted regarding the effects of low-flow rebates on household water use. In this paper, we consider the effects of rebates from the Albuquerque Bernalillo County Water Utility Authority (ABCWUA). Using panel regression techniques with a database of rebate recipients, we estimate the marginal effects of various low-flow devices on household water demand. Results indicate a negative correlation between household water use and the presence of most low-flow devices, after controlling for water price and weather conditions. Low-flow toilets have the greatest impact on water use, while low-flow washing machines, dishwashers, showerheads, and xeriscape have smaller but significant effects. In contrast, air conditioning systems, hot water recirculators, and rain barrels have no significant impact on water use. We also test for possible rebound effects (i.e. whether low-flow appliances become less-effective over time due to poor rates of retention or behavioral changes) and compare the cost effectiveness of each rebate using levelised-costs. We find no evidence of rebound effects and substantial variation in levelised-costs, with low-flow showerheads being the most cost-effective device under the current ABCWUA rebate program. The latter result suggests that water providers can improve the efficiency of rebate programs by targeting the most cost-effective devices.

James I. Price; Janie M. Chermak; Jeff Felardo

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

47

ZERH Training: Albuquerque, NM  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The DOE Zero Energy Ready Home is a high performance home which is so energy efficient, that a renewable energy system can offset all or most of its annual energy Consumption.US DOE Zero Energy...

48

CT NC0  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

x-L* d! x-L* d! CT NC0 - i , ,. i, .' i :.:(e.!' ,A\~, L.,t, - (iI :i' , . y- 2 .L i ._ 1 c\ :- i;! Ii $ 4. Ci:lc:i.nnati. 39, t>:::i.f> (J&l3 q-1 -3 sui3 Jrn T3 FRCM .I iirz 1 ?j ~ 1.3 bL1 T:' IP !REFOI?T TC 5YC?CZCiC~ :EWllIFl;j",tsSS L' I"JIsIc:;. .:;xli3;. iCAN !fA(=;-fL,yg-j L' sc,, E. $.iCLX:i?, -iIJ,x:q()Is. ON hL4X 24 - 25 ) 1.9tic ;i. A. Quiglel;, A.3, 3, M. ChenauEt gpxrIvB OF TP.~ The purpose of t3is trip was tc observe a proposed method for the dchy- dratim of green salt md to determine that all health and safety measures were being xrried out, SurveiU.ance of this nature provided protection against excessi3z personnel exposure, insured compliance with ICC shipping regulaticns, tion of the equ'~ and determined when adequate decontamira-

49

Category:Bridgeport, CT | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Bridgeport, CT Bridgeport, CT Jump to: navigation, search Go Back to PV Economics By Location Media in category "Bridgeport, CT" The following 16 files are in this category, out of 16 total. SVFullServiceRestaurant Bridgeport CT Connecticut Light & Power Co.png SVFullServiceRestauran... 64 KB SVQuickServiceRestaurant Bridgeport CT Connecticut Light & Power Co.png SVQuickServiceRestaura... 63 KB SVHospital Bridgeport CT Connecticut Light & Power Co.png SVHospital Bridgeport ... 71 KB SVLargeHotel Bridgeport CT Connecticut Light & Power Co.png SVLargeHotel Bridgepor... 67 KB SVLargeOffice Bridgeport CT Connecticut Light & Power Co.png SVLargeOffice Bridgepo... 72 KB SVMediumOffice Bridgeport CT Connecticut Light & Power Co.png SVMediumOffice Bridgep...

50

DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Torrington Co - CT 09  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Alternate Name: Torrington Co. - Specialties Division CT.09-1 Location: Torrington , Connecticut CT.09-1 Evaluation Year: 1987 CT.09-1 Site Operations: Performed swaging...

51

Radiation Exposure from CT Examinations in Japan  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Computed tomography (CT) is the largest source of medical radiation exposure to the general population, and is ... assess the current situation of CT use in Japan, and to investigate variations in radiation expos...

Yoshito Tsushima; Ayako Taketomi-Takahashi; Hiroyuki Takei

2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

52

CT Offshore | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

CT Offshore CT Offshore Place Otterup, Denmark Zip 5450 Sector Wind energy Product Denmark-based consultancy which provides assistance for project management, damage assessment and stabilization as well as other activities related to wind farms and subsea maintenance. Coordinates 55.543228°, 10.40294° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":55.543228,"lon":10.40294,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

53

Dental CT: A New Diagnostic Tool in Dental Radiology Based on Double Spiral CT  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In the beginning of 1990, dental computed tomography (CT) software program was developed which offers the possibility of reconstructing panoramic and transaxial images of the maxilla and the mandible from CT d...

U. Hirschfelder; H. Hirschfelder; J. Regn

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

54

"Sue Martindale","Meeting Coordinator","20201 Century Blvd","Germantown","MD","20874","NTP Albuquerque","301 353-8319","301 42  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

1 1 TEC Attendees.doc 1 ATTENDEES TEC WINTER 2001 MEETING HILTON PORTLAND HOTEL, PORTLAND, OREGON FEBRUARY 6-7, 2001 John C. Allen, Chairman Transportation Research Board Hazmat Transportation Committee c/o Battelle 901 D Street, S.W. Washington, DC 20024 202-646-5225 Fax: 202-646-5271 allenj@battelle.org Mona Aragon Transportation Programs Sandia National Laboratories P.O. Box 5800-0718 Albuquerque, NM 87185-0718 505-844-2541 Fax: 505-844-0244 mlrage@sandia.gov Patricia M. Armijo, Program Analyst U.S. Department of Energy/NTP Albuquerque Operations Office P.O. Box 5400 Albuquerque, NM 87185 505-845-5241 Fax: 505-845-5508 parmijo@doeal.gov Richard Arnold, Executive Director Las Vegas Indian Center Native American Program/YMSCO 2300 W. Bonanza Road Las Vegas, NV 89106 702-647-5842 Fax: 702-646-0254

55

Limited View Angle Iterative CT Reconstruction  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

;Some Prior Literature in Limited View Tomography CT with limited-angle data and few views IRR algorithm Iterative Reconstruction-Reprojection (IRR) : An Algorithm for Limited Data Cardiac- Computed-views and limited-angle data in divergent-beam CT by E. Y. Sidky, CM Kao, and X. Pan (2006) Few-View Projection

56

CT Solar Loan | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

CT Solar Loan CT Solar Loan CT Solar Loan < Back Eligibility Multi-Family Residential Residential Savings Category Solar Buying & Making Electricity Program Info State Connecticut Program Type State Loan Program Provider Sungage, Inc. The Clean Energy Finance and Investment Authority is offering a pilot loan program, CT Solar Loan, to provide homeowners with 15-year loans for solar PV equipment. The loans are administered through Sungage. Interested residents must apply online to be pre-qualified for the loan. Once the loan is in place, an approved installer files permits, order equipment, and installs the system on behalf of the resident. See the program web site for application materials. Source http://www.dsireusa.org/incentives/incentive.cfm?Incentive_Code=CT101F

57

DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- New England Lime Co - CT...  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

consideration under FUSRAP Designated Name: Not Designated Alternate Name: NELCO (Magnesium Division) CT.10-1 Location: Canaan , Connecticut CT.10-2 Evaluation Year: 1987...

58

Northeast - NY NJ CT PA Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Northeast - NY NJ CT PA Area Northeast - NY NJ CT PA Area (Redirected from New York Area - NY NJ CT PA) Jump to: navigation, search Contents 1 Clean Energy Clusters in the Northeast - NY NJ CT PA Area 1.1 Products and Services in the Northeast - NY NJ CT PA Area 1.2 Research and Development Institutions in the Northeast - NY NJ CT PA Area 1.3 Networking Organizations in the Northeast - NY NJ CT PA Area 1.4 Investors and Financial Organizations in the Northeast - NY NJ CT PA Area 1.5 Policy Organizations in the Northeast - NY NJ CT PA Area Clean Energy Clusters in the Northeast - NY NJ CT PA Area Products and Services in the Northeast - NY NJ CT PA Area Loading map... {"format":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"limit":500,"offset":0,"link":"all","sort":[""],"order":[],"headers":"show","mainlabel":"","intro":"","outro":"","searchlabel":"\u2026

59

DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- American Brass Co - CT 01  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Brass Co - CT 01 Brass Co - CT 01 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: American Brass Co (CT.01 ) Eliminated from consideration under FUSRAP Designated Name: Not Designated Alternate Name: Anaconda Company Brass Division CT.01-1 Location: 414 Meadow Street , Waterbury , Connecticut CT.01-1 Evaluation Year: 1986 CT.01-2 Site Operations: Limited work with copper clad uranium billets during the 1950s. CT.01-1 Site Disposition: Eliminated - Potential for contamination considered remote based upon the limited scope of activities at the site CT.01-2 Radioactive Materials Handled: Yes Primary Radioactive Materials Handled: Uranium CT.01-3 Radiological Survey(s): Yes - health and safety monitoring during operations only CT.01-3 Site Status: Eliminated from consideration under FUSRAP

60

DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Fenn Machinery Co - CT 11  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Fenn Machinery Co - CT 11 Fenn Machinery Co - CT 11 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: Fenn Machinery Co. (CT.11 ) Eliminated from consideration under FUSRAP Designated Name: Not Designated Alternate Name: None Location: New Britain , Connecticut CT.11-1 Evaluation Year: 1987 CT.11-1 Site Operations: Performed short-term tests on small quantities of uranium metal to explore potential for swaging, circa mid-1950 CT.11-1 CT.11-3 Site Disposition: Eliminated - Potential for contamination considered remote due to limited scope of activities and relatively small quantities of radioactive material used CT.11-1 Radioactive Materials Handled: Yes Primary Radioactive Materials Handled: Uranium CT.11-3 Radiological Survey(s): None Indicated Site Status: Eliminated from consideration under FUSRAP CT.11-2

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "1977-1980 albuquerque ct" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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61

Northeast - NY NJ CT PA Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Northeast - NY NJ CT PA Area Northeast - NY NJ CT PA Area Jump to: navigation, search Contents 1 Clean Energy Clusters in the Northeast - NY NJ CT PA Area 1.1 Products and Services in the Northeast - NY NJ CT PA Area 1.2 Research and Development Institutions in the Northeast - NY NJ CT PA Area 1.3 Networking Organizations in the Northeast - NY NJ CT PA Area 1.4 Investors and Financial Organizations in the Northeast - NY NJ CT PA Area 1.5 Policy Organizations in the Northeast - NY NJ CT PA Area Clean Energy Clusters in the Northeast - NY NJ CT PA Area Products and Services in the Northeast - NY NJ CT PA Area Loading map... {"format":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"limit":500,"offset":0,"link":"all","sort":[""],"order":[],"headers":"show","mainlabel":"","intro":"","outro":"","searchlabel":"\u2026

62

DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Sperry Products Inc - CT 07  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Sperry Products Inc - CT 07 Sperry Products Inc - CT 07 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: SPERRY PRODUCTS, INC. (CT.07) Eliminated from consideration under FUSRAP Designated Name: Not Designated Alternate Name: None Location: Danbury , Connecticut CT.07-1 Evaluation Year: 1994 CT.07-2 Site Operations: Performed tests involving non-destructive inspection techniques in the 1950s. CT.07-3 Site Disposition: Eliminated - Potential for contamination considered remote based on the limited scope of activities performed at the site CT.07-2 Radioactive Materials Handled: Yes Primary Radioactive Materials Handled: Uranium CT.07-3 Radiological Survey(s): No Site Status: Eliminated from consideration under FUSRAP Also see Documents Related to SPERRY PRODUCTS, INC. CT.07-1 - Sperry Products Letter; VanValkenburg to DeRenzis;

63

DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- American Cyanamid Co - CT 13  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Cyanamid Co - CT 13 Cyanamid Co - CT 13 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: American Cyanamid Co (CT.13 ) Eliminated from consideration under FUSRAP Designated Name: Not Designated Alternate Name: None Location: Stamford , Connecticut CT.13-1 Evaluation Year: 1987 CT.13-1 Site Operations: Produced boron and possibly handled small amounts of refined radioactive source material circa 1940's. Also possibly performed research work on irradiated "J" slugs in 1952 and 1953. CT.13-1 CT.13-3 Site Disposition: Eliminated - Potential for contamination considered remote due to the limited scope of activities involving radioactive material performed at this site CT.13-2 Radioactive Materials Handled: Yes Primary Radioactive Materials Handled: Uranium CT.13-1 Radiological Survey(s): No

64

Trapping volumetric measurement by multidetector CT in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease: Effect of CT threshold  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of various computed tomography (CT) thresholds on trapping volumetric measurements by multidetector CT in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD).Methods: Twenty-three COPD patients were scanned with a 64-slice CT scanner in both the inspiratory and expiratory phase. CT thresholds of ?950 Hu in inspiration and ?950 to ?890 Hu in expiration were used, after which trapping volumetric measurements were made using computer software. Trapping volume percentage (Vtrap%) under the different CT thresholds in the expiratory phase and below ?950 Hu in the inspiratory phase was compared and correlated with lung function.Results: Mean Vtrap% was similar under ?930 Hu in the expiratory phase and below ?950 Hu in the inspiratory phase, being 13.18 9.66 and 13.95 6.72 (both lungs), respectively; this difference was not significant (P= 0.240). Vtrap% under ?950 Hu in the inspiratory phase and below the ?950 to ?890 Hu threshold in the expiratory phase was moderately negatively correlated with the ratio of forced expiratory volume in one second to forced vital capacity and the measured value of forced expiratory volume in one second as a percentage of the predicted value.Conclusions: Trapping volumetric measurement with multidetector CT is a promising method for the quantification of COPD. It is important to know the effect of various CT thresholds on trapping volumetric measurements.

Wang, Xiaohua; Yuan, Huishu [Department of Radiology, Peking University Third Hospital, Beijing 100191 (China)] [Department of Radiology, Peking University Third Hospital, Beijing 100191 (China); Duan, Jianghui [Medical School, Peking University, Beijing 100191 (China)] [Medical School, Peking University, Beijing 100191 (China); Du, Yipeng; Shen, Ning; He, Bei [Department of Respiration Internal Medicine, Peking University Third Hospital, Beijing 100191 (China)] [Department of Respiration Internal Medicine, Peking University Third Hospital, Beijing 100191 (China)

2013-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

65

DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Wesleyan University - CT 12  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Wesleyan University - CT 12 Wesleyan University - CT 12 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: Wesleyan University (CT.12 ) Eliminated from consideration under FUSRAP Designated Name: Not Designated Alternate Name: None Location: Middletown , Connecticut CT.12-1 Evaluation Year: 1995 CT.12-2 Site Operations: Spectrographic research on small quantities of uranium wire (several inches in length) in Physics Department circa late 1950. CT.12-1 Site Disposition: Eliminated - Potential for contamination considered remote due to the limited scope of activities performed CT.12-2 Radioactive Materials Handled: Yes Primary Radioactive Materials Handled: Uranium CT.12-1 Radiological Survey(s): No Site Status: Eliminated from consideration under FUSRAP Also see Documents Related to Wesleyan University

66

Effect of magnetic reconnection on CT penetration into magnetized plasmas  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

To understand the fuelling process in a fusion device by a compact toroid (CT) injection method, three dimensional MHD numerical simulations, where a spheromak-like CT (SCT) is injected into...

Yoshio Suzuki; Takaya Hayashi; Yasuaki Kishimoto

2001-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

67

DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- New Canaan Site - CT 08  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

FUSRAP Designated Name: Not Designated Alternate Name: None Location: New Canaan , Connecticut CT.08-1 Evaluation Year: 1985 CT.08-2 Site Operations: None; Investigation of area...

68

General Geometry CT Reconstruction Alexei Ramotar  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, reconstruction, Filtered Back Projection Submitted to IPCV'06 Abstract We present an efficient and accurate acquired by a parallel-beam CT scanner. Once in that form, Filtered Back Projection can be used to perform technology that uses many small x-ray images to reconstruct a view of the internal structures of an object

Orchard, Jeffery J.

69

RADIATION EXPOSURE DURING PAEDIATRIC CT IN SUDAN: CT DOSE, ORGAN AND EFFECTIVE DOSES  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......research-article Paper RADIATION EXPOSURE DURING PAEDIATRIC...Energy Commission, Radiation Safety Institute, PO Box 3001...assess the magnitude of radiation exposure during paediatric...CT-Expo 2.1 dosimetry software. Doses were evaluated......

I. I. Suliman; H. M. Khamis; T. H. Ombada; K. Alzimami; M. Alkhorayef; A. Sulieman

2014-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

70

Implications of CT noise and artifacts for quantitative {sup 99m}Tc SPECT/CT imaging  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: This paper evaluates the effects of computed tomography (CT) image noise and artifacts on quantitative single-photon emission computed-tomography (SPECT) imaging, with the aim of establishing an appropriate range of CT acquisition parameters for low-dose protocols with respect to accurate SPECT attenuation correction (AC). Methods: SPECT images of two geometric and one anthropomorphic phantom were reconstructed iteratively using CT scans acquired at a range of dose levels (CTDI{sub vol} = 0.4 to 46 mGy). Resultant SPECT image quality was evaluated by comparing mean signal, background noise, and artifacts to SPECT images reconstructed using the highest dose CT for AC. Noise injection was performed on linear-attenuation (?) maps to determine the CT noise threshold for accurate AC. Results: High levels of CT noise (? ? 200400 HU) resulted in low ?-maps noise (? ? 1%3%). Noise levels greater than ?10% in 140 keV ?-maps were required to produce visibly perceptible increases of ?15% in {sup 99m}Tc SPECT images. These noise levels would be achieved at low CT dose levels (CTDI{sub vol} = 4 ?Gy) that are over 2 orders of magnitude lower than the minimum dose for diagnostic CT scanners. CT noise could also lower (bias) the expected ? values. The relative error in reconstructed SPECT signal trended linearly with the relative shift in ?. SPECT signal was, on average, underestimated in regions corresponding with beam-hardening artifacts in CT images. Any process that has the potential to change the CT number of a region by ?100 HU (e.g., misregistration between CT images and SPECT images due to motion, the presence of contrast in CT images) could introduce errors in ?{sub 140} {sub keV} on the order of 10%, that in turn, could introduce errors on the order of ?10% into the reconstructed {sup 99m}Tc SPECT image. Conclusions: The impact of CT noise on SPECT noise was demonstrated to be negligible for clinically achievable CT parameters. Because CT dose levels that affect SPECT quantification is low (CTDI{sub vol} ? 4 ?Gy), the low dose limit for the CT exam as part of SPECT/CT will be guided by CT image quality requirements for anatomical localization and artifact reduction. A CT technique with higher kVp in combination with lower mAs is recommended when low-dose CT images are used for AC to minimize beam-hardening artifacts.

Hulme, K. W.; Kappadath, S. C., E-mail: skappadath@mdanderson.org [Department of Imaging Physics, The University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas 77030 and The University of Texas Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences, Houston, Texas 77030 (United States)

2014-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

71

CT volumetry of the skeletal tissues  

SciTech Connect

Computed tomography (CT) is an important and widely used modality in the diagnosis and treatment of various cancers. In the field of molecular radiotherapy, the use of spongiosa volume (combined tissues of the bone marrow and bone trabeculae) has been suggested as a means to improve the patient-specificity of bone marrow dose estimates. The noninvasive estimation of an organ volume comes with some degree of error or variation from the true organ volume. The present study explores the ability to obtain estimates of spongiosa volume or its surrogate via manual image segmentation. The variation among different segmentation raters was explored and found not to be statistically significant (p value >0.05). Accuracy was assessed by having several raters manually segment a polyvinyl chloride (PVC) pipe with known volumes. Segmentation of the outer region of the PVC pipe resulted in mean percent errors as great as 15% while segmentation of the pipe's inner region resulted in mean percent errors within {approx}5%. Differences between volumes estimated with the high-resolution CT data set (typical of ex vivo skeletal scans) and the low-resolution CT data set (typical of in vivo skeletal scans) were also explored using both patient CT images and a PVC pipe phantom. While a statistically significant difference (p value <0.002) between the high-resolution and low-resolution data sets was observed with excised femoral heads obtained following total hip arthroplasty, the mean difference between high-resolution and low-resolution data sets was found to be only 1.24 and 2.18 cm{sup 3} for spongiosa and cortical bone, respectively. With respect to differences observed with the PVC pipe, the variation between the high-resolution and low-resolution mean percent errors was a high as {approx}20% for the outer region volume estimates and only as high as {approx}6% for the inner region volume estimates. The findings from this study suggest that manual segmentation is a reasonably accurate and reliable means for the in vivo estimation of spongiosa volume. This work also provides a foundation for future studies where spongiosa volumes are estimated by various raters in more comprehensive CT data sets.

Brindle, James M.; Alexandre Trindade, A.; Pichardo, Jose C.; Myers, Scott L.; Shah, Amish P.; Bolch, Wesley E. [Department of Nuclear and Radiological Engineering, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 32611 (United States); Department of Statistics, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 32611 (United States); Department of Nuclear and Radiological Engineering, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 32611 (United States); Department of Orthopaedics and Rehabilitation, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 32611 (United States); MD Anderson Cancer Center Orlando, Orlando, Florida 32806 (United States); Department of Nuclear and Radiological and Department of Biomedical Engineering, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 32611 (United States)

2006-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

72

DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Dorr Corp - CT 14  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Site Operations: Conducted heat treatment tests of source material using depleted uranium in an enclosed calciner CT.14-2 Site Disposition: Eliminated - No Authority - AEC...

73

Computed Tomography (CT) Scanning For Petrophysical Applications  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

R&D Fac R&D Fac ts Carbon Sequestration ContaCtS David Wildman Division Director Geosciences Division National Energy Technology Laboratory 626 Cochrans Mill Road P.O. Box 10940 Pittsburgh, PA 15236 412-386-4913 david.wildman@netl.doe.gov T. Robert McLendon Geosciences Division National Energy Technology Laboratory 3610 Collins Ferry Road P.O. Box 880 Morgantown, WV 26507 304-285-2008 t.mclen@netl.doe.gov Duane H. Smith Geosciences Division

74

CT-121_cover.p65  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

INNOVATIVE APPLICATIONS INNOVATIVE APPLICATIONS OF TECHNOLOGY FOR THE CT-121 FGD PROCESS PROJECT PERFORMANCE SUMMARY CLEAN COAL TECHNOLOGY DEMONSTRATION PROGRAM AUGUST 2002 SOUTHERN COMPANY SERVICES, INC. DOE/FE-0449 Disclaimer This report was prepared using publicly available information, including the Final Technical Report and other reports prepared pursuant to a cooperative agreement partially funded by the U.S. Department of Energy. Neither the United States Government nor any agency, employee, contractor, or representative thereof, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe upon privately

75

Explosive Detection in Aviation Applications Using CT  

SciTech Connect

CT scanners are deployed world-wide to detect explosives in checked and carry-on baggage. Though very similar to single- and dual-energy multi-slice CT scanners used today in medical imaging, some recently developed explosives detection scanners employ multiple sources and detector arrays to eliminate mechanical rotation of a gantry, photon counting detectors for spectral imaging, and limited number of views to reduce cost. For each bag scanned, the resulting reconstructed images are first processed by automated threat recognition algorithms to screen for explosives and other threats. Human operators review the images only when these automated algorithms report the presence of possible threats. The US Department of Homeland Security (DHS) has requirements for future scanners that include dealing with a larger number of threats, higher probability of detection, lower false alarm rates and lower operating costs. One tactic that DHS is pursuing to achieve these requirements is to augment the capabilities of the established security vendors with third-party algorithm developers. A third-party in this context refers to academics and companies other than the established vendors. DHS is particularly interested in exploring the model that has been used very successfully by the medical imaging industry, in which university researchers develop algorithms that are eventually deployed in commercial medical imaging equipment. The purpose of this paper is to discuss opportunities for third-parties to develop advanced reconstruction and threat detection algorithms.

Martz, H E; Crawford, C R

2011-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

76

Trends of CT Utilization in North America Over the Last Decade  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Given the improvements in technology and usefulness of CT for diagnosis and therapeutic-planning, the growth in CT utilization is not surprising. Current estimates are that more than 85 million CT scans are pe...

Lauren M. B. Burke; Richard C. Semelka; Rebecca Smith-Bindman

2014-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

77

Radiation Protection in Newer Medical Imaging Technologies: PET/CT  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......58 timely. Safety Report Series...challenging topic of Radiation Exposure of...of various software packages is...and age. To Safety Report Series...CT dosimetry software site impactscan...its June 2006 software version fade...Management of Radiation Dose in CT...Section 5 of Safety Report Series......

Dawn Banghart

2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

78

CT Poison Control Center 2014 Video Contest Rules  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

entry form (found on posioncontrol.uchc.edu) b. Include a link to your video from your You Tube account and community partners. Judges will consider: length of video, appropriate format, accuracy of information poison center means to you, value of the CT Poison Control Center · Programming your phone with the CT

Kim, Duck O.

79

On recent claims concerning the Rh=ct Universe  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......density rho. One-on-one comparative tests between R h-=-ct and lambdaCDM have...corollary (see also Weinberg 1972). To test whether in fact the EOS p-=-rho/3...carried out an extensive suite of comparative tests using lambdaCDM and R h-=-ct, together......

Fulvio Melia

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

80

Measuring and segmentation in CT data using deformable Vclav Krajcek  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

tomography (CT). We take advantage of long-time research in the area of deformable models. We have developed Snakes, CT, Medical Segmentation, Volume Measurement. 1 INTRODUCTION Computed tomography is a common tool, that temperature of healthy body is about 36,5 C. Higher temperature means that body is fighting with an illness

Pelikan, Josef

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "1977-1980 albuquerque ct" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

MicroCT: Semi-Automated Analysis of CT Reconstructed Data of Home Made Explosive Materials Using the Matlab MicroCT Analysis GUI  

SciTech Connect

This Standard Operating Procedure (SOP) provides the specific procedural steps for analyzing reconstructed CT images obtained under the IDD Standard Operating Procedures for data acquisition [1] and MicroCT image reconstruction [2], per the IDD Quality Assurance Plan for MicroCT Scanning [3]. Although intended to apply primarily to MicroCT data acquired in the HEAFCAT Facility at LLNL, these procedures may also be applied to data acquired at Tyndall from the YXLON cabinet and at TSL from the HEXCAT system. This SOP also provides the procedural steps for preparing the tables and graphs to be used in the reporting of analytical results. This SOP applies to R and D work - for production applications, use [4].

Seetho, I M; Brown, W D; Kallman, J S; Martz, H E; White, W T

2011-09-22T23:59:59.000Z

82

MicroCT: Automated Analysis of CT Reconstructed Data of Home Made Explosive Materials Using the Matlab MicroCT Analysis GUI  

SciTech Connect

This Standard Operating Procedure (SOP) provides the specific procedural steps for analyzing reconstructed CT images obtained under the IDD Standard Operating Procedures for data acquisition [1] and MicroCT image reconstruction [2], per the IDD Quality Assurance Plan for MicroCT Scanning [3]. Although intended to apply primarily to MicroCT data acquired in the HEAFCAT Facility at LLNL, these procedures may also be applied to data acquired at Tyndall from the YXLON cabinet and at TSL from the HEXCAT system. This SOP also provides the procedural steps for preparing the tables and graphs to be used in the reporting of analytical results. This SOP applies to production work - for R and D there are two other semi-automated methods as given in [4, 5].

Seetho, I M; Brown, W D; Kallman, J S; Martz, H E; White, W T

2011-09-22T23:59:59.000Z

83

Pediatric CT scan usage in Japan: results of a hospital survey  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

CT radiation dose settings are adjusted for children based on guidelines issued by the Japan Radiological Society, with few limitations. CT...

Nader Ghotbi; Akira Ohtsuru; Yoji Ogawa; Mariko Morishita

2006-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

84

E-Print Network 3.0 - angiographic cone-beam ct Sample Search...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Summary: medical multi-slicecone-beam CT scanners typically use equiangular projection data, our new formula may... : Computed tomography (CT), cone-beam geometry, Feldkamp-type...

85

Microsoft Word - Ct121R1.doc  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Innovative Applications Innovative Applications of Technology for the CT-121 FGD Process A DOE Assessment DOE/NETL-2002/1177 September 2002 U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory P.O. Box 880, 3610 Collins Ferry Road Morgantown, WV 26507-0880 P.O. Box 10940, 626 Cochrans Mill Road Pittsburgh, PA 15236-0940 West Third Street, Suite 1400 Tulsa, OK 74103-3519 website: www.netl.doe.gov 2 Disclaimer This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United States Government nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents

86

CT113-53 Cape Wind Report_  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

M M Report of the Effect on Radar Performance of the Proposed Cape Wind Project and Advance Copy of USCG Findings and Mitigation U.S. Department of the Interior Minerals Management Service MMS Cape Wind Energy Project January 2009 Final EIS Appendix M Report of the Effect on Radar Performance of the Proposed Cape Wind Project and Advance Copy of USCG Findings and Mitigation Technology Service Corporation an employee-owned company 55 Corporate Drive 3rd Floor, Trumbull, Connecticut 06611 Phone: (203) 268-1249 Fax: (203) 452-0260 www.tsc.com Ref: TSC-CT113-53 Report of the Effect on Radar Performance of the Proposed Cape Wind Project Submitted to the United States Coast Guard December 16, 2008 USCG Order #HSCG24-08-F-16A248

87

CT Solar Loan | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Solar Loan Solar Loan No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Summary Last modified on March 29, 2013. Financial Incentive Program Place Connecticut Name CT Solar Loan Incentive Type State Loan Program Applicable Sector Multi-Family Residential, Residential Eligible Technologies Photovoltaics Active Incentive Yes Implementing Sector State/Territory Energy Category Renewable Energy Incentive Programs Terms 15 years Program Administrator The Clean Energy Finance and Investment Authority Website http://www.energizect.com/residents/programs/ctsolarloan Last DSIRE Review 03/29/2013 References Database of State Incentives for Renewables and Efficiency[1] Summary The Clean Energy Finance and Investment Authority is offering a pilot loan

88

Multi-atlas segmentation in head and neck CT scans  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We investigate automating the task of segmenting structures in head and neck CT scans, to minimize time spent on manual contouring of structures of interest. We focus on the brainstem and left and right parotids. To generate ...

Arbisser, Amelia M

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

89

Obscure pulmonary masses: bronchial impaction revealed by CT  

SciTech Connect

Dilated bronchi impacted with mucus or tumor are recognized on standard chest radiographs because they are surrounded by aerated pulmonary parenchyma. When imaged in different projections, these lesions produce a variety of appearances that are generally familiar. This report characterizes less familiar computed tomographic (CT) findings in eight patients with pathologic bronchial distension of congenital, neoplastic, or infectious etiologies and correlates them with chest films. In seven patients, CT readily revealed dilated bronchi and/or regional lung hypodensity. In four of these cases, CT led to the initial suspicion of dilated bronchi. CT should be used early in the evaluation of atypical pulmonary mass lesions or to confirm suspected bronchial impaction because of the high probability it will reveal diagnostic features.

Pugatch, R.D.; Gale, M.E.

1983-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

90

DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Olin Mathieson - CT 0-02  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Olin Mathieson - CT 0-02 Olin Mathieson - CT 0-02 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: OLIN MATHIESON (CT.0-02 ) Eliminated from consideration under FUSRAP Designated Name: Not Designated Alternate Name: United Nuclear Corporation CT.0-02-1 Location: New Haven , Connecticut CT.0-02-1 Evaluation Year: 1987 CT.0-02-1 Site Operations: Began fabrication of nuclear reactor fuel elements for AEC circa late-1950s. Later became part of a group forming United Nuclear Corp. and were then licensed by AEC. Performed work for U.S. Navy and commercial applications. CT.0-02-1 Site Disposition: Eliminated - No Authority - AEC licensed CT.0-02-1 Radioactive Materials Handled: Yes CT.0-02-1 Primary Radioactive Materials Handled: Uranium CT.0-02-1 Radiological Survey(s): None Indicated

91

X-ray MicroCT Training Presentation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

X-ray MicroCT Training Presentation T. Fettah Kosar, PhD Center for Nanoscale Systems Harvard) Model: HMXST225 (max. 225 kV) #12;Overview 3 Introduction to X-ray imaging and Computed Tomography (CT) · What are X-rays and how do we generate and image them? · How do we magnify X-ray images and keep them

92

A Compact Torus Fusion Reactor Utilizing a Continuously Generated String of CTs. The CT String Reactor, CTSR  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A fusion reactor is described in which a moving string ... conducting cylinder where the plasma is heated to fusion-producing temperature. The CT then passes into a blanketed region where fusion energy is produce...

Charles W. Hartman; David B. Reisman; Harry S. McLean

2008-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

93

Radiation Dose Metrics in CT: Assessing Dose Using the National Quality Forum CT Patient Safety Measure  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Purpose The National Quality Forum (NQF) is a nonprofit consensus organization that recently endorsed a measure focused on CT radiation doses. To comply, facilities must summarize the doses from consecutive scans within age and anatomic area strata and report the data in the medical record. Our purpose was to assess the time needed to assemble the data and to demonstrate how review of such data permits a facility to understand doses. Methods and Materials To assemble the data we used for analysis, we used the dose monitoring softwareeXposure to automatically export dose metrics from consecutive scans in 2010 and 2012. For a subset of 50exams, we also collected dose metrics manually, copying data directly from the PACS into an excel spreadsheet. Results Manual data collection for 50 scans required 2 hours and 15 minutes. eXposure compiled the data in under an hour. All dose metrics demonstrated a 30% to 50% reduction between 2010 and 2012. There was also a significant decline and a reduction in the variability of the doses over time. Conclusion The NQF measure facilitates an institution's capacity to assess the doses they are using for CT as part of routine practice. The necessary data can be collected within a reasonable amount of time either with automatic software or manually. The collection and review of these data will allow facilities to compare their radiation dose distributions with national distributions and allow assessment of temporal trends in the doses they are using.

Jillian Keegan; Diana L. Miglioretti; Robert Gould; Lane F. Donnelly; Nicole D. Wilson; Rebecca Smith-Bindman

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

94

Low-Dose Spiral CT Scans for Early Lung Cancer Detection | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Low-Dose Spiral CT Scans for Early Lung Cancer Detection Low-Dose Spiral CT Scans for Early Lung Cancer Detection Low-Dose Spiral CT Scans for Early Lung Cancer Detection Low-dose spiral computed tomography (CT) scanning is a noninvasive medical imaging test that has been used for the early detection of lung cancer for over 16 years (Sone et al. 1998; Henschke et.al. 1999). A low-dose spiral chest CT differs from a full-dose conventional chest CT scan primarily in the amount of radiation emitted during CT scans. Chest CT, in general, requires less radiation exposure than other CT procedures because the air-filled tissues of the lungs are not as dense as the tissues of other organs (i.e., less x-ray radiation is needed to penetrate the lung). Radiation dose can be further reduced with lung cancer screening due to the

95

Characteristics of modified CT injector for JFT-2M  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The HIT-CTI mark II compact toroid (CT) injector employed for the JFT-2M tokamak facility at the Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI) has been upgraded to improve injection performance. The nozzle of the mark III injector now has a linear tube in place of the original focus cone to avoid rapid focus and deceleration, and the tapered outer electrode has been replaced with more gentle taper in the compression section in order to facilitate gradual compression. The dependence of CT velocity and electron density on poloidal bias flux and trigger time of CT acceleration have been investigated in the operable range of 70230km/s average CT velocity and electron density of 0.11.0 1022m?3 at an accelerator bank voltage of 25kV. The operation window is broader than that of the mark II injector. Emission of a CT plasmoid from the injector, and transport to the flux conserver as a high-density spheromak magnetic structure have also been confirmed.

N. Fukumoto; H. Ogawa; M. Nagata; T. Uyama; T. Shibata; Y. Kashiwa; Y. Kusama

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

96

A Compact Torus Fusion Reactor Utilizing a Continuously Generated Strings of CT's. The CT String Reactor, CTSR.  

SciTech Connect

A fusion reactor is described in which a moving string of mutually repelling compact toruses (alternating helicity, unidirectional Btheta) is generated by repetitive injection using a magnetized coaxial gun driven by continuous gun current with alternating poloidal field. An injected CT relaxes to a minimum magnetic energy equilibrium, moves into a compression cone, and enters a conducting cylinder where the plasma is heated to fusion-producing temperature. The CT then passes into a blanketed region where fusion energy is produced and, on emergence from the fusion region, the CT undergoes controlled expansion in an exit cone where an alternating poloidal field opens the flux surfaces to directly recover the CT magnetic energy as current which is returned to the formation gun. The CT String Reactor (CTSTR) reactor satisfies all the necessary MHD stability requirements and is based on extrapolation of experimentally achieved formation, stability, and plasma confinement. It is supported by extensive 2D, MHD calculations. CTSTR employs minimal external fields supplied by normal conductors, and can produce high fusion power density with uniform wall loading. The geometric simplicity of CTSTR acts to minimize initial and maintenance costs, including periodic replacement of the reactor first wall.

Hartman, C W; Reisman, D B; McLean, H S; Thomas, J

2007-05-30T23:59:59.000Z

97

PET/CT-guided Interventions: Personnel Radiation Dose  

SciTech Connect

PurposeTo quantify radiation exposure to the primary operator and staff during PET/CT-guided interventional procedures.MethodsIn this prospective study, 12 patients underwent PET/CT-guided interventions over a 6 month period. Radiation exposure was measured for the primary operator, the radiology technologist, and the nurse anesthetist by means of optically stimulated luminescence dosimeters. Radiation exposure was correlated with the procedure time and the use of in-room image guidance (CT fluoroscopy or ultrasound).ResultsThe median effective dose was 0.02 (range 0-0.13) mSv for the primary operator, 0.01 (range 0-0.05) mSv for the nurse anesthetist, and 0.02 (range 0-0.05) mSv for the radiology technologist. The median extremity dose equivalent for the operator was 0.05 (range 0-0.62) mSv. Radiation exposure correlated with procedure duration and with the use of in-room image guidance. The median operator effective dose for the procedure was 0.015 mSv when conventional biopsy mode CT was used, compared to 0.06 mSv for in-room image guidance, although this did not achieve statistical significance as a result of the small sample size (p = 0.06).ConclusionThe operator dose from PET/CT-guided procedures is not significantly different than typical doses from fluoroscopically guided procedures. The major determinant of radiation exposure to the operator from PET/CT-guided interventional procedures is time spent in close proximity to the patient.

Ryan, E. Ronan, E-mail: ronan@ronanryan.com; Thornton, Raymond; Sofocleous, Constantinos T.; Erinjeri, Joseph P. [Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, Department of Radiology (United States); Hsu, Meier [Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics (United States); Quinn, Brian; Dauer, Lawrence T. [Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, Department of Medical Physics (United States); Solomon, Stephen B. [Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, Department of Radiology (United States)

2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

98

On Recent Claims Concerning the R_h=ct Universe  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The R_h=ct Universe is a Friedmann-Robertson-Walker (FRW) cosmology which, like LCDM, assumes the presence of dark energy in addition to (baryonic and non-luminous) matter and radiation. Unlike LCDM, however, it is also constrained by the equation of state (EOS) p=-rho/3, in terms of the total pressure p and energy density rho. One-on-one comparative tests between R_h=ct and LCDM have been carried out using over 14 different cosmological measurements and observations. In every case, the data have favoured R_h=ct over the standard model, with model selection tools yielding a likelihood ~90-95% that the former is correct, versus only ~5-10% for the latter. In other words, the standard model without the EOS p=-rho/3 does not appear to be the optimal description of nature. Yet in spite of these successes---or perhaps because of them---several concerns have been published recently regarding the fundamental basis of the theory itself. The latest paper on this subject even claims---quite remarkably---that R_h=ct is a vacuum solution, though quite evidently rho is not 0. Here, we address these concerns and demonstrate that all criticisms leveled thus far against R_h=ct, including the supposed vacuum condition, are unwarranted. They all appear to be based on incorrect assumptions or basic theoretical errors. Nevertheless, continued scrutiny such as this will be critical to establishing R_h=ct as the correct description of nature.

Fulvio Melia

2014-10-17T23:59:59.000Z

99

Evaluation of the robustness of the preprocessing technique improving reversible compressibility of CT images: Tested on various CT examinations  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: To modify the preprocessing technique, which was previously proposed, improving compressibility of computed tomography (CT) images to cover the diversity of three dimensional configurations of different body parts and to evaluate the robustness of the technique in terms of segmentation correctness and increase in reversible compression ratio (CR) for various CT examinations.Methods: This study had institutional review board approval with waiver of informed patient consent. A preprocessing technique was previously proposed to improve the compressibility of CT images by replacing pixel values outside the body region with a constant value resulting in maximizing data redundancy. Since the technique was developed aiming at only chest CT images, the authors modified the segmentation method to cover the diversity of three dimensional configurations of different body parts. The modified version was evaluated as follows. In randomly selected 368 CT examinations (352 787 images), each image was preprocessed by using the modified preprocessing technique. Radiologists visually confirmed whether the segmented region covers the body region or not. The images with and without the preprocessing were reversibly compressed using Joint Photographic Experts Group (JPEG), JPEG2000 two-dimensional (2D), and JPEG2000 three-dimensional (3D) compressions. The percentage increase in CR per examination (CR{sub I}) was measured.Results: The rate of correct segmentation was 100.0% (95% CI: 99.9%, 100.0%) for all the examinations. The median of CR{sub I} were 26.1% (95% CI: 24.9%, 27.1%), 40.2% (38.5%, 41.1%), and 34.5% (32.7%, 36.2%) in JPEG, JPEG2000 2D, and JPEG2000 3D, respectively.Conclusions: In various CT examinations, the modified preprocessing technique can increase in the CR by 25% or more without concerning about degradation of diagnostic information.

Jeon, Chang Ho; Kim, Bohyoung; Gu, Bon Seung; Lee, Jong Min [Department of Radiology, Seoul National University Bundang Hospital, Seoul National University College of Medicine, 300 Gumi-ro, Bundang-gu, Seongnam-si, Gyeonggi-do 463-707 (Korea, Republic of)] [Department of Radiology, Seoul National University Bundang Hospital, Seoul National University College of Medicine, 300 Gumi-ro, Bundang-gu, Seongnam-si, Gyeonggi-do 463-707 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Kil Joong [Department of Radiology, Seoul National University Bundang Hospital, Seoul National University College of Medicine, 300 Gumi-ro, Bundang-gu, Seongnam-si, Gyeonggi-do 463-707, South Korea and Department of Radiation Applied Life Science, Seoul National University College of Medicine, 103 Daehak-ro, Jongno-gu, Seoul 110-799 (Korea, Republic of)] [Department of Radiology, Seoul National University Bundang Hospital, Seoul National University College of Medicine, 300 Gumi-ro, Bundang-gu, Seongnam-si, Gyeonggi-do 463-707, South Korea and Department of Radiation Applied Life Science, Seoul National University College of Medicine, 103 Daehak-ro, Jongno-gu, Seoul 110-799 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Kyoung Ho [Department of Radiology, Seoul National University Bundang Hospital, Seoul National University College of Medicine, 300 Gumi-ro, Bundang-gu, Seongnam-si, Gyeonggi-do 463-707, South Korea and Institute of Radiation Medicine, Seoul National University Medical Research Center, and Clinical Research Institute, Seoul National University Hospital, 101 Daehak-ro, Jongno-gu, Seoul 110-744 (Korea, Republic of)] [Department of Radiology, Seoul National University Bundang Hospital, Seoul National University College of Medicine, 300 Gumi-ro, Bundang-gu, Seongnam-si, Gyeonggi-do 463-707, South Korea and Institute of Radiation Medicine, Seoul National University Medical Research Center, and Clinical Research Institute, Seoul National University Hospital, 101 Daehak-ro, Jongno-gu, Seoul 110-744 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Tae Ki [Medical Information Center, Seoul National University Bundang Hospital, Seoul National University College of Medicine, 300 Gumi-ro, Bundang-gu, Seongnam-si, Gyeonggi-do 463-707 (Korea, Republic of)] [Medical Information Center, Seoul National University Bundang Hospital, Seoul National University College of Medicine, 300 Gumi-ro, Bundang-gu, Seongnam-si, Gyeonggi-do 463-707 (Korea, Republic of)

2013-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

100

DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Metals Selling Corp - CT 0-01  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Selling Corp - CT 0-01 Selling Corp - CT 0-01 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: METALS SELLING CORP. (CT.0-01 ) Eliminated from consideration under FUSRAP Designated Name: Not Designated Alternate Name: None Location: Putnam , Connecticut CT.0-01-1 Evaluation Year: 1986 CT.0-01-1 Site Operations: Performed grinding of (non-radioactive) magnesium circa 1950 -1952 as a sub-contractor to Mallinckrodt Corp. CT.0-01-1 Site Disposition: Eliminated - No indication that radioactive materials were handled at this location CT.0-01-1 Radioactive Materials Handled: No Primary Radioactive Materials Handled: None Radiological Survey(s): No Site Status: Eliminated from consideration under FUSRAP Also see Documents Related to METALS SELLING CORP. CT.0-01-1 - DOE Memorandum/Checklist D. Levine to File; Subject -

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "1977-1980 albuquerque ct" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Yale Heavy Ion Linear Accelerator - CT  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Yale Heavy Ion Linear Accelerator - Yale Heavy Ion Linear Accelerator - CT 05 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: Yale Heavy Ion Linear Accelerator (CT.05) Eliminated from consideration under FUSRAP Designated Name: Not Designated Alternate Name: None Location: New Haven , Connecticut CT.05-1 Evaluation Year: 1987 CT.05-3 Site Operations: Research and development with solvents. CT.05-1 Site Disposition: Eliminated - Potential for contamination remote based on limited amount of materials handled CT.05-3 Radioactive Materials Handled: Yes Primary Radioactive Materials Handled: Uranium, Radium CT.05-1 Radiological Survey(s): No Site Status: Eliminated from consideration under FUSRAP Also see Documents Related to Yale Heavy Ion Linear Accelerator CT.05-1 - MED Memorandum; To the Files, Thru Ruhoff, et. al.;

102

Patient-size-dependent radiation dose optimisation technique for abdominal CT examinations  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......CT dosimetry and radiation safety. Radiol. Soc...Notification. Reducing radiation risk from computed...gov/cdrh/safety/110201-ct...McCollough C. H. Radiation dose in computed...region of interest software available in both......

J. E. Ngaile; P. Msaki; R. Kazema

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

103

E-Print Network 3.0 - abnormal brain ct Sample Search Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Powered by Explorit Topic List Advanced Search Sample search results for: abnormal brain ct Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 Hemorrhage Slices Detection in Brain CT Images Ruizhe...

104

VACT: Visualization-Aware CT Reconstruction Ziyi Zheng and Klaus Mueller, Senior Member, IEEE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abstract-- Computed tomography (CT) reconstruction methods are often unaware of the requirements Medical routine frequently utilizes 3D visualization tools for diagnosis. Computed tomography (CT between the raw projection data and their visualization via vol- ume rendering. Our framework can

Mueller, Klaus

105

Detektion von Phochromozytomen und rekurrenten medullren Schilddrsenkarzinomen mit F18 DOPA PET/CT.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Evaluating [18F]dihydroxyphenylalanine (DOPA) in patients with clinical suspicion for a primary or recurrent pheochromocytoma (pheo) by means of whole body PET/CT. In pheos PET/CT detects (more)

Zeich, Katrin

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

106

Assessment of paediatric CT exposure in a Portuguese hospital  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......paediatric CT exposure in a Portuguese hospital A. Neves 1 * A. Nunes 1 M. Rufino...2 Centro Hospitalar Lisboa Central, Hospital de S. Jose, Rua Jose Antonio Serrano...procedures was performed for a Portuguese hospital. Dosimetric data and technical parameters......

A. Neves; A. Nunes; M. Rufino; P. Madeira; P. Vaz; A. Pascoal

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

107

Status and Promise CT's and Magnetized Target Fusion  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. Hill (LLNL) #12;CT's: Spheromaks & Field Reversed Configurations At LLNL, the SSPX experiment is investigating spheromak formation, sustainment, and confinement issues. (Hill, Mclean, Wood, Ryutov). At UC-Davis, formation and acceleration of spheromaks. (Hwang) At the U of Washington, field reversed configuration

108

A geometric calibration method for cone beam CT systems  

SciTech Connect

Cone beam CT systems are being deployed in large numbers for small animal imaging, dental imaging, and other specialty applications. A new high-precision method for cone beam CT system calibration is presented in this paper. It uses multiple projection images acquired from rotating point-like objects (metal ball bearings) and the angle information generated from the rotating gantry system is also used. It is assumed that the whole system has a mechanically stable rotation center and that the detector does not have severe out-of-plane rotation (<2 deg.). Simple geometrical relationships between the orbital paths of individual BBs and five system parameters were derived. Computer simulations were employed to validate the accuracy of this method in the presence of noise. Equal or higher accuracy was achieved compared with previous methods. This method was implemented for the geometrical calibration of both a micro CT scanner and a breast CT scanner. The reconstructed tomographic images demonstrated that the proposed method is robust and easy to implement with high precision.

Yang, Kai; Kwan, Alexander L. C.; Miller, DeWitt F.; Boone, John M. [Department of Radiology, University of California, Davis Medical Center, 4701 X Street, Sacramento, California 95817 and Department of Biomedical Engineering, University of California, Davis, California 95616 (United States); Department of Radiology, University of California, Davis Medical Center, 4701 X Street, Sacramento, California 95817 (United States); Department of Radiology, University of California, Davis Medical Center, 4701 X Street, Sacramento, California 95817 and Department of Biomedical Engineering, University of California, Davis, California 95616 (United States)

2006-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

109

On Recent Claims Concerning the R_h=ct Universe  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The R_h=ct Universe is a Friedmann-Robertson-Walker (FRW) cosmology which, like LCDM, assumes the presence of dark energy in addition to (baryonic and non-luminous) matter and radiation. Unlike LCDM, however, it is also constrained by the equation of state (EOS) p=-rho/3, in terms of the total pressure p and energy density rho. One-on-one comparative tests between R_h=ct and LCDM have been carried out using over 14 different cosmological measurements and observations. In every case, the data have favoured R_h=ct over the standard model, with model selection tools yielding a likelihood ~90-95% that the former is correct, versus only ~5-10% for the latter. In other words, the standard model without the EOS p=-rho/3 does not appear to be the optimal description of nature. Yet in spite of these successes---or perhaps because of them---several concerns have been published recently regarding the fundamental basis of the theory itself. The latest paper on this subject even claims---quite remarkably---that R_h=ct is ...

Melia, Fulvio

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

110

AUTOCORRECTING RECONSTRUCTION FOR FLEXIBLE CT SCANNERS Jeff Orchard  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

revolutionize the world of computed tomography (CT). Tiny x-ray emitters and detectors could be embedded scanners. Index Terms: computed tomography, image reconstruction, entropy, nanotechnology, autofocus 1. An automatic (data-driven) motion-correction method for SPECT (single photon emission computed tomog- raphy

Orchard, Jeffery J.

111

Saturday Workshop 2/7/2009 RS: Molly Burke CT's: Roy Center & Lee Kelly  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Saturday Workshop 2/7/2009 RS: Molly Burke CT's: Roy Center & Lee Kelly Drosophila Handbook page 1 2/7/2009 RS: Molly Burke CT's: Roy Center & Lee Kelly Drosophila Handbook page 2 Table of Contents Standards 22 #12;Saturday Workshop 2/7/2009 RS: Molly Burke CT's: Roy Center & Lee Kelly Drosophila Handbook

Rose, Michael R.

112

X-Ray CT Image Reconstruction via Wavelet Frame Based Regularization and Radon Domain  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to reconstruct high quality CT images from limited and noisy projection data. One of the common CT systems Bin Dong Jia Li Zuowei Shen December 22, 2011 Abstract X-ray computed tomography (CT) has been,8]. Numerical simulations and comparisons will be presented at the end. Keywords: Computed tomography, wavelet

Zakharov, Vladimir

113

Quantitative cone-beam CT imaging in radiation therapy using planning CT as a prior: First patient studies  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: Quantitative cone-beam CT (CBCT) imaging is on increasing demand for high-performance image guided radiation therapy (IGRT). However, the current CBCT has poor image qualities mainly due to scatter contamination. Its current clinical application is therefore limited to patient setup based on only bony structures. To improve CBCT imaging for quantitative use, we recently proposed a correction method using planning CT (pCT) as the prior knowledge. Promising phantom results have been obtained on a tabletop CBCT system, using a correction scheme with rigid registration and without iterations. More challenges arise in clinical implementations of our method, especially because patients have large organ deformation in different scans. In this paper, we propose an improved framework to extend our method from bench to bedside by including several new components. Methods: The basic principle of our correction algorithm is to estimate the primary signals of CBCT projections via forward projection on the pCT image, and then to obtain the low-frequency errors in CBCT raw projections by subtracting the estimated primary signals and low-pass filtering. We improve the algorithm by using deformable registration to minimize the geometry difference between the pCT and the CBCT images. Since the registration performance relies on the accuracy of the CBCT image, we design an optional iterative scheme to update the CBCT image used in the registration. Large correction errors result from the mismatched objects in the pCT and the CBCT scans. Another optional step of gas pocket and couch matching is added into the framework to reduce these effects. Results: The proposed method is evaluated on four prostate patients, of which two cases are presented in detail to investigate the method performance for a large variety of patient geometry in clinical practice. The first patient has small anatomical changes from the planning to the treatment room. Our algorithm works well even without the optional iterations and the gas pocket and couch matching. The image correction on the second patient is more challenging due to the effects of gas pockets and attenuating couch. The improved framework with all new components is used to fully evaluate the correction performance. The enhanced image quality has been evaluated using mean CT number and spatial nonuniformity (SNU) error as well as contrast improvement factor. If the pCT image is considered as the ground truth, on the four patients, the overall mean CT number error is reduced from over 300 HU to below 16 HU in the selected regions of interest (ROIs), and the SNU error is suppressed from over 18% to below 2%. The average soft-tissue contrast is improved by an average factor of 2.6. Conclusions: We further improve our pCT-based CBCT correction algorithm for clinical use. Superior correction performance has been demonstrated on four patient studies. By providing quantitative CBCT images, our approach significantly increases the accuracy of advanced CBCT-based clinical applications for IGRT.

Niu Tianye; Al-Basheer, Ahmad; Zhu Lei [Nuclear and Radiological Engineering and Medical Physics Programs, George W. Woodruff School of Mechanical Engineering, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, Georgia 30332 (United States); Georgia Radiation Therapy Center, Department of Radiology, Georgia Health Sciences University, Augusta, Georgia 30912 (United States); Nuclear and Radiological Engineering and Medical Physics Programs, George W. Woodruff School of Mechanical Engineering, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, Georgia 30332 (United States)

2012-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

114

Initial experience with single-source dual-energy CT abdominal angiography and comparison with single-energy CT angiography: image quality, enhancement, diagnosis and radiation dose  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

To assess image quality of virtual monochromatic spectral (VMS) images, compared to single-energy (SE) CT, and to evaluate the...

Daniella F. Pinho; Naveen M. Kulkarni; Arun Krishnaraj

2013-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

115

Assessment of Summer RBOB Supply for NY & CT  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Update of Summer Reformulated Gasoline Supply Update of Summer Reformulated Gasoline Supply Assessment for New York and Connecticut May 5, 2004 In October 2003, EIA published a review of the status of the methyl tertiary butyl ether (MTBE) ban transition in New York (NY) and Connecticut (CT) 1 that noted significant uncertainties in gasoline supply for those States for the summer of 2004. To obtain updated information, EIA spoke to major suppliers to the two States over the past several months as the petroleum industry began the switch from winter- to summer-grade gasoline. As discussed on our earlier report, the NY and CT bans on MTBE mainly affect reformulated gasoline (RFG), which in recent years has been provided by domestic refineries on the East Coast (PADD 1) and imports. Our recent findings indicate that

116

Effective dose estimation during conventional and CT urography  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Intravenous urography (IVU) and CT urography (CTU) are efficient radiological examinations for the evaluation of the urinary system disorders. However patients are exposed to a significant radiation dose. The objectives of this study are to: (i) measure and compare patient radiation dose by computed tomography urography (CTU) and conventional intravenous urography (IVU) and (ii) evaluate organ equivalent dose and cancer risks from CTU and IVU imaging procedures. A total of 141 patients were investigated. A calibrated CT machine (Siemens-Somatom Emotion duo) was used for CTU, while a Shimadzu X ray machine was used for IVU. Thermoluminescence dosimeters (TLD-GR200A) were used to measure patients' entrance surface doses (ESD). \\{TLDs\\} were calibrated under reproducible reference conditions. Patients radiation dose values (DLP) for CTU were 17261mGycm, \\{CTDIvol\\} 4.752mGy and effective dose 2.581mSv. Patient cancer probabilities were estimated to be 1.4 per million per CTU examination. Patients \\{ESDs\\} values for IVU were 21.625mGy, effective dose 1.791mSv. CT involves a higher effective dose than IVU. In this study the radiation dose is considered low compared to previous studies. The effective dose from CTU procedures was 30% higher compared to IVU procedures. Wide dose variation between patient doses suggests that optimization is not fulfilled yet.

K. Alzimami; A. Sulieman; E. Omer; I.I. Suliman; K. Alsafi

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

117

Non-medical Uses of Computed Tomography (CT) and Nuclear Magnetic Resonance  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Non-medical Uses of Computed Tomography (CT) Non-medical Uses of Computed Tomography (CT) and Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) Resources with Additional Information Computed Tomography (CT) Scanner CT Scanner - Courtesy Stanford University Department of Energy Resources Engineering Computed tomography (CT) and Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) have been used to resolve industrial problems, for materials characterizations, and to provide non-destructive evaluations for discovering flaws in parts before their use, resulting in greater reliability and greater safety for workers; to identify the presence and facilitate the recovery/extraction of oil, water, coal, and/or gas; and to provide non-destructive testing and quality control of fresh fruits and vegetables, enhancing the safety of food. These benefits of non-medical uses of CT and NMR contribute to the economy and improve people's lives.

118

A Fossilized Opal A To Opal C-T Transformation On The Northeast...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Fossilized Opal A To Opal C-T Transformation On The Northeast Atlantic Margin- Support For A Significantly Elevated Palaeogeothermal Gradient During The Neogene? Jump to:...

119

Quantification of liver iron content with CTadded value of dual-energy  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

To evaluate the value of dual-energy CT (DECT) with use of an ... decomposition algorithm for the quantification of liver iron content (LIC).

Michael A. Fischer; Caecilia S. Reiner; Dimitri Raptis; Olivio Donati

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

120

MIEDER, WOLFGANG. Proverbs: A Handbook. Westport, CT: Greenwood, 2004. 304 pp.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

selecta bibliografa, Proverbs: A Handbook interesado en unWOLFGANG. Proverbs: A Handbook. Westport, CT: Greenwood,libros de referencia de Handbooks" publicado en el nueva la

Lee, Alejandro

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "1977-1980 albuquerque ct" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

E-Print Network 3.0 - aided ct image Sample Search Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

10 ARTICLE IN PRESS Computer-Aided Design ( ) Summary: a limited number of computed tomography (CT) images. The three-dimensional template geometry of a healthy... contour shown...

122

Simultaneous CT and SPECT tomography using CZT detectors  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method for simultaneous transmission x-ray computed tomography (CT) and single photon emission tomography (SPECT) comprises the steps of: injecting a subject with a tracer compound tagged with a .gamma.-ray emitting nuclide; directing an x-ray source toward the subject; rotating the x-ray source around the subject; emitting x-rays during the rotating step; rotating a cadmium zinc telluride (CZT) two-sided detector on an opposite side of the subject from the source; simultaneously detecting the position and energy of each pulsed x-ray and each emitted .gamma.-ray captured by the CZT detector; recording data for each position and each energy of each the captured x-ray and .gamma.-ray; and, creating CT and SPECT images from the recorded data. The transmitted energy levels of the x-rays lower are biased lower than energy levels of the .gamma.-rays. The x-ray source is operated in a continuous mode. The method can be implemented at ambient temperatures.

Paulus, Michael J. (Knoxville, TN); Sari-Sarraf, Hamed (Lubbock, TX); Simpson, Michael L. (Knoxville, TN); Britton, Jr., Charles L. (Alcoa, TN)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

123

Validation of Plaster Endocast Morphology Through 3D CT Image Analysis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Validation of Plaster Endocast Morphology Through 3D CT Image Analysis P. Thomas Schoenemann,1 by creating endo- casts out of rubber latex shells filled with plaster. The extent to which the method questions. Pairs of virtual endocasts (VEs) created from high-resolution CT scans of corresponding latex/plaster

Schoenemann, P. Thomas

124

Bone Surface Reconstruction From CT/MR Images Using Fast Marching and Level Set Methods1)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Bone Surface Reconstruction From CT/MR Images Using Fast Marching and Level Set Methods1) Istv surfaces reconstructed from MR volumes are shown. 1 Outline of the project One of our current projects steps of bone surface reconstruction from CT/MR slice images. 2 Main steps of reconstruction 2.1

Chetverikov, Dmitry

125

Multi-atlas Segmentation in Head and Neck CT Scans Amelia M. Arbisser  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Multi-atlas Segmentation in Head and Neck CT Scans by Amelia M. Arbisser B.S., Computer Science of Engineering Thesis Committee #12;2 #12;Multi-atlas Segmentation in Head and Neck CT Scans by Amelia M, we employ an atlas of labeled training images. We register each of these images to the unlabeled

Golland, Polina

126

Accurate model-based high resolution cardiac image reconstruction in dual source CT  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Cardiac imaging represents one of the most challenging imaging problems, requiring high spatial and temporal resolutions along with good tissue contrast. One of the newest clinical cardiac CT scanners incorporates two source-detector pairs in order to ... Keywords: cardiac, dual source CT, iterative method, model-based imaging

Synho Do; Sanghee Cho; W. Clem Karl; Mannudeep K. Kalra; Thomas J. Brady; Homer Pien

2009-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

127

Hemorrhage Slices Detection in Brain CT Images Ruizhe Liu, Chew Lim Tan, Tze Yun Leong  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Hemorrhage Slices Detection in Brain CT Images Ruizhe Liu, Chew Lim Tan, Tze Yun Leong Department) scans are widely used in today's diagnosis of head traumas. It is effective to disclose the bleeding Tomography (CT) scans are widely used in today's diagnosis of head traumas. It is effective to disclose

Tan, Chew Lim

128

AUTOMATIC HEART ISOLATION FOR CT CORONARY VISUALIZATION USING G. Funka-Lea1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

AUTOMATIC HEART ISOLATION FOR CT CORONARY VISUALIZATION USING GRAPH-CUTS G. Funka-Lea1 , Y. Boykov3 isolate the outer surface of the entire heart in Computer Tomogra- phy (CT) cardiac scans. Isolating the entire heart allows the coronary vessels on the surface of the heart to be easily visu- alized despite

Boykov, Yuri

129

GPU IMPLEMENTATION OF A 3D BAYESIAN CT ALGORITHM AND ITS APPLICATION ON REAL FOAM RECONSTRUCTION  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Tomography (CT) [1, 3]. The limits of these meth- ods appear when the number of projections is small, and as well as any iterative algebraic meth- ods is the computation time and especially for projection solve is to reconstruct the object f from the projection data g collected by a cone beam 3D CT. The link

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

130

Searching Effective Parameters for Low-Dose CT Reconstruction by Ant Colony Optimization  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, Eric Papenhausen and Klaus Mueller Abstract-- Low-dose Computed Tomography (CT) has been gaining. To cope with the limited data collected at 30% of standard radiation, low-dose CT reconstruction algorithms generally require several iterations of forward projection, back-projection and regularization

Mueller, Klaus

131

Locating the Eyes in CT Brain Scan Data Kostis Kaggelides, Peter J. Elliott  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, a technique for locating the eyes in Computed Tomography brain scan data, is described. The objective and implemented an algorithm which automaticallyidenti es and locates the eyes in a Computed Tomography(CT) brainLocating the Eyes in CT Brain Scan Data Kostis Kaggelides, Peter J. Elliott IBM UK Scienti c Centre

Fisher, Bob

132

A direct method for air kermalength product measurement in CT for verification of dose display calibrations  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......kerma-length product measurement in CT for verification of dose display calibrations...kerma-length product measurement in CT for verification of dose display calibrations...practice, this means doing measurements in the standard phantoms......

Katja Merimaa; Hannu Jrvinen; Mika Kortesniemi; Juhani Karppinen

2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

133

Non-medical Uses of Computed Tomography (CT) and Nuclear Magnetic Resonance  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Non-medical Uses of Computed Tomography (CT) and Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) Resources with Additional Information Computed Tomography (CT) Scanner CT Scanner - Courtesy Stanford University Department of Energy Resources Engineering Computed tomography (CT) and Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) have been used to resolve industrial problems, for materials characterizations, and to provide non-destructive evaluations for discovering flaws in parts before their use, resulting in greater reliability and greater safety for workers; to identify the presence and facilitate the recovery/extraction of oil, water, coal, and/or gas; and to provide non-destructive testing and quality control of fresh fruits and vegetables, enhancing the safety of food. These benefits of non-medical uses of CT and NMR contribute to the economy and improve people's lives.

134

Albuquerque, New Mexico: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

NM) NM) Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 35.0844909°, -106.6511367° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":35.0844909,"lon":-106.6511367,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

135

Albuquerque, New Mexico: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

844909°, -106.6511367° 844909°, -106.6511367° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":35.0844909,"lon":-106.6511367,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

136

University of New Mexico, Albuquerque Department of Electrical & Computer Engineering  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of MATLAB Location ECE-132 Lectures TR: 9:30 - 10:45 PM Textbook A. V. Oppenheim and R. W. Schafer TBA GRADING SCHEME: Problem Sets/Computer Projects : 40% Midterm : 30% Final Exam : TBA : 30 MATLAB 5.0," Prentice Hall Inc., Upper Saddle River, New Jersey, 1998 (very highly recommended). · A. V

Santhanam, Balu

137

Archived Reference Climate Zone: 4B Albuquerque, New Mexico  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Here you will find past versions of the commercial reference building models for existing buildings constructed before 1980, organized by building type and location. A summary ofbuilding types and climate zonesis available for reference.Current versionsare also available.

138

2030 Metropolitan Transportation Plan for the Albuquerque Metropolitan Planning Area  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

#0;#19;#0;#17;#0;#20;#0;#17;#0;#1;#0;.#0;F#0;U#0;S#0;P#0;Q#0;P#0;M#0;J#0;U#0;B#0;O#0;#1;#0;5#0;S#0;B#0;O#0;T#0;Q#0;P#0;S#0;U#0;B#0;U#0;J#0;P#0;O#0;#1;#0;1#0;M#0;B#0;O#0;#1;#0; #0;.#0;5#0;1#0; #0;#1; #0;G#0;P#0;S#0;#1;#0;U#0;I#0;F#0;#1;#0;"#0;M#0;C#0...;V#0;R#0;V#0;F#0;S#0;R#0;V#0;F#0;#1;#0;.#0;F#0;U#0;S#0;P#0;Q#0;P#0;M#0;J#0;U#0;B#0;O#0;#1;#0;1#0;M#0;B#0;O#0;O#0;J#0;O#0;H#0;#1;#0;"#0;S#0;F#0;B#0;#1;#0; #0;"#0;.#0;1#0;"#0; #0;#1; #0;#1; #0;#1; #0;#1; #0;#1; #0;#1; #0;#1; #0;#1; #0;"#0;E#0;P#0;Q#0;U...

Mid-Region Metropolitan Planning Organization

2007-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

139

1996 Site environmental report Sandia National Laboratories Albuquerque, New Mexico  

SciTech Connect

Sandia National Laboratories/New Mexico (SNL/NM) is operated in support of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) mission to provide weapon component technology and hardware for national security needs, and to conduct fundamental research and development (R&D) to advance technology in energy research, computer science, waste management, electronics, materials science, and transportation safety for hazardous and nuclear components. In support of this mission, the Environmental Safety and Health (ES&H) Center at SNL/NM conducts extensive environmental monitoring, surveillance, and compliance activities to assist SNL`s line organizations in meeting all applicable environmental regulations applicable to the site including those regulating radiological and nonradiological effluents and emissions. Also herein are included, the status of environmental programs that direct and manage activities such as terrestrial surveillance; ambient air and meteorological monitoring; hazardous, radioactive, and solid waste management; pollution prevention and waste minimization; environmental restoration (ER); oil and chemical spill prevention; and National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) documentation. This report has been prepared in compliance with DOE order 5400.1, General Environmental Protection.

Fink, C.H. [ed.] [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Duncan, D. [ed.] [GRAM, Inc., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Sanchez, R. [Jobs Plus, Albuquerque, NM (United States)

1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

140

New Whole-House Solutions Case Study: Artistic Homes, Albuquerque...  

Energy Savers (EERE)

homebuyers can compare," said Wade. * Techniques like the location of the air handler and furnace in the home's conditioned space, timed ventilation with a fresh air intake,...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "1977-1980 albuquerque ct" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

CT effective dose per dose length product using ICRP 103 weighting factors  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: To generate effective dose per unit dose length product (E/DLP) conversion factors incorporating ICRP Publication 103 tissue weighting factors. Methods: Effective doses for CT examinations were obtained using the IMPACT Dosimetry Calculator using all 23 dose data sets that are offered by this spreadsheet. CT examinations were simulated for scans performed along the patient long axis for each dosimetry data set using a 4 cm beam width ranging from the upper thighs to top of the head. Five basic body regions (head, neck, chest, abdomen, and pelvis), as well as combinations of the regions (head/neck, chest/abdomen, abdomen/pelvis, and chest/abdomen/pelvis) and whole body CT scans were investigated. Correction factors were generated that can be applied to convert E/DLP conversion factors based on ICRP 60 data to conversion factors that are valid for ICRP 103 data (i.e., E{sub 103}/E{sub 60}). Results: Use of ICRP 103 weighting factors increase effective doses for head scans by {approx}11%, for chest scans by {approx}20%, and decrease effective doses for pelvis scans by {approx}25%. Current E/DLP conversion factors are estimated to be 2.4 {mu}Sv/mGy cm for head CT examinations and range between 14 and 20 {mu}Sv/mGy cm for body CT examinations. Conclusions: Factors that enable patient CT doses to be adjusted to account for ICRP 103 tissue weighting factors are provided, which result in E/DLP factors that were increased in head and chest CT, reduced in pelvis CT, and showed no marked change in neck and abdomen CT.

Huda, Walter; Magill, Dennise; He Wenjun [Department of Radiology and Radiological Science, Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, South Carolina 29425 (United States); Department of Bioengineering, Clemson-MUSC Bioengineering Program, Clemson University, Charleston, South Carolina 29425 (United States)

2011-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

142

10 A.M. CT TODAY: On-the Record Conference Call for Obama Administration to  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

A.M. CT TODAY: On-the Record Conference Call for Obama A.M. CT TODAY: On-the Record Conference Call for Obama Administration to Announce Major Initiative to Enhance America's Energy Security 10 A.M. CT TODAY: On-the Record Conference Call for Obama Administration to Announce Major Initiative to Enhance America's Energy Security August 16, 2011 - 9:52am Addthis White House Rural Economic Council Promotes Production of Next Generation Biofuels, Job Creation and Economic Opportunity WASHINGTON, Aug. 16, 2011 - Today at 10 a.m. CT (11 a.m. ET), the Obama Administration will advance a major initiative to produce next generation aviation and marine biofuels to power military and commercial transportation. The initiative responds to a directive from President Obama issued in March as part of his Blueprint for a Secure Energy Future, the

143

A Fossilized Opal A To Opal C-T Transformation On The Northeast Atlantic  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Fossilized Opal A To Opal C-T Transformation On The Northeast Atlantic Fossilized Opal A To Opal C-T Transformation On The Northeast Atlantic Margin- Support For A Significantly Elevated Palaeogeothermal Gradient During The Neogene? Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: A Fossilized Opal A To Opal C-T Transformation On The Northeast Atlantic Margin- Support For A Significantly Elevated Palaeogeothermal Gradient During The Neogene? Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0) Abstract: Rock samples-collected from a recent deep-water exploration well drilled in the Faeroe-Shetland Channel, northwest of the UK-confirm that a distinctive high-amplitude seismic reflector that crosscuts the Upper Palaeogene and Neogene succession and covers an area of 10 000 km(2) is an example of a fossilized Opal A to Opal C/T (Cristobalite/Tridymite)

144

American Ref-Fuel of SE CT Biomass Facility | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

American Ref-Fuel of SE CT Biomass Facility American Ref-Fuel of SE CT Biomass Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name American Ref-Fuel of SE CT Biomass Facility Facility American Ref-Fuel of SE CT Sector Biomass Facility Type Municipal Solid Waste Location New London County, Connecticut Coordinates 41.5185189°, -72.0468164° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":41.5185189,"lon":-72.0468164,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

145

Low-Dose Spiral CT Scans for Early Lung Cancer Detection  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Low-dose spiral computed tomography (CT) scanning is a noninvasive medical imaging test that has been used for the early detection of lung cancer for over 16 years (Sone et al. 1998; Henschke et.al. 1999).

146

DOE Zero Energy Ready Home Case Study: BPC Green Builders, Danbury, CT  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Case study of a DOE Zero Energy Ready home in Danbury, CT, that scored HERS 35 without PV. This 2-story, 1,650-ft2 cabin built by a custom home builder for his own family meets Passive House...

147

RIS-M-2586 ELASTIC-PLASTIC FRACTURE MECHANICS ANALYSIS OF A CT-SPECIMEN  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

RIS?-M-2586 ELASTIC-PLASTIC FRACTURE MECHANICS ANALYSIS OF A CT-SPECIMEN - A TWO-DIMENSIONAL APPROACH Gunner C. Larsen Abstract. This report documents the results obtained from an elastic-plastic

148

Dental CT: imaging technique, anatomy, and pathologic conditions of the jaws  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In addition to conventional imaging methods, dental CT has become an established method for anatomic imaging of the jaws prior to dental implant placement. More recently, this high- ... resolution imaging techni...

Andr Gahleitner; G. Watzek; H. Imhof

2003-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

149

Finite Element Analysis of Ballistic Penetration of Plain Weave Twaron CT709 Fabrics: A Parametric Study  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The ballistic impact of Twaron CT709 plain weave fabrics is studied using an explicit finite element method. Many existing approximations pertaining to woven fabrics cannot adequately represent strain rate-dependent behavior exhibited by the Twaron...

Gogineni, Sireesha

2011-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

150

The effects of mapping CT images to Monte Carlo materials on GEANT4 proton simulation accuracy  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: Monte Carlo simulations of radiation therapy require conversion from Hounsfield units (HU) in CT images to an exact tissue composition and density. The number of discrete densities (or density bins) used in this mapping affects the simulation accuracy, execution time, and memory usage in GEANT4 and other Monte Carlo code. The relationship between the number of density bins and CT noise was examined in general for all simulations that use HU conversion to density. Additionally, the effect of this on simulation accuracy was examined for proton radiation. Methods: Relative uncertainty from CT noise was compared with uncertainty from density binning to determine an upper limit on the number of density bins required in the presence of CT noise. Error propagation analysis was also performed on continuously slowing down approximation range calculations to determine the proton range uncertainty caused by density binning. These results were verified with Monte Carlo simulations. Results: In the presence of even modest CT noise (5 HU or 0.5%) 450 density bins were found to only cause a 5% increase in the density uncertainty (i.e., 95% of density uncertainty from CT noise, 5% from binning). Larger numbers of density bins are not required as CT noise will prevent increased density accuracy; this applies across all types of Monte Carlo simulations. Examining uncertainty in proton range, only 127 density bins are required for a proton range error of <0.1 mm in most tissue and <0.5 mm in low density tissue (e.g., lung). Conclusions: By considering CT noise and actual range uncertainty, the number of required density bins can be restricted to a very modest 127 depending on the application. Reducing the number of density bins provides large memory and execution time savings in GEANT4 and other Monte Carlo packages.

Barnes, Samuel; McAuley, Grant; Slater, James [Department of Radiation Medicine, Loma Linda University, Loma Linda, California 92350 (United States); Wroe, Andrew [Department of Radiation Medicine, Loma Linda University Medical Center, Loma Linda, California 92350 (United States)

2013-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

151

Auto calibration of a cone-beam-CT  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: This paper introduces a novel autocalibration method for cone-beam-CTs (CBCT) or flat-panel CTs, assuming a perfect rotation. The method is based on ellipse-fitting. Autocalibration refers to accurate recovery of the geometric alignment of a CBCT device from projection images alone, without any manual measurements. Methods: The authors use test objects containing small arbitrarily positioned radio-opaque markers. No information regarding the relative positions of the markers is used. In practice, the authors use three to eight metal ball bearings (diameter of 1 mm), e.g., positioned roughly in a vertical line such that their projection image curves on the detector preferably form large ellipses over the circular orbit. From this ellipse-to-curve mapping and also from its inversion the authors derive an explicit formula. Nonlinear optimization based on this mapping enables them to determine the six relevant parameters of the system up to the device rotation angle, which is sufficient to define the geometry of a CBCT-machine assuming a perfect rotational movement. These parameters also include out-of-plane rotations. The authors evaluate their method by simulation based on data used in two similar approaches [L. Smekal, M. Kachelriess, S. E, and K. Wa, 'Geometric misalignment and calibration in cone-beam tomography,' Med. Phys. 31(12), 3242-3266 (2004); K. Yang, A. L. C. Kwan, D. F. Miller, and J. M. Boone, 'A geometric calibration method for cone beam CT systems,' Med. Phys. 33(6), 1695-1706 (2006)]. This allows a direct comparison of accuracy. Furthermore, the authors present real-world 3D reconstructions of a dry human spine segment and an electronic device. The reconstructions were computed from projections taken with a commercial dental CBCT device having two different focus-to-detector distances that were both calibrated with their method. The authors compare their reconstruction with a reconstruction computed by the manufacturer of the CBCT device to demonstrate the achievable spatial resolution of their calibration procedure. Results: Compared to the results published in the most closely related work [K. Yang, A. L. C. Kwan, D. F. Miller, and J. M. Boone, 'A geometric calibration method for cone beam CT systems,' Med. Phys. 33(6), 1695-1706 (2006)], the simulation proved the greater accuracy of their method, as well as a lower standard deviation of roughly 1 order of magnitude. When compared to another similar approach [L. Smekal, M. Kachelriess, S. E, and K. Wa, 'Geometric misalignment and calibration in cone-beam tomography,' Med. Phys. 31(12), 3242-3266 (2004)], their results were roughly of the same order of accuracy. Their analysis revealed that the method is capable of sufficiently calibrating out-of-plane angles in cases of larger cone angles when neglecting these angles negatively affects the reconstruction. Fine details in the 3D reconstruction of the spine segment and an electronic device indicate a high geometric calibration accuracy and the capability to produce state-of-the-art reconstructions. Conclusions: The method introduced here makes no requirements on the accuracy of the test object. In contrast to many previous autocalibration methods their approach also includes out-of-plane rotations of the detector. Although assuming a perfect rotation, the method seems to be sufficiently accurate for a commercial CBCT scanner. For devices which require higher dimensional geometry models, the method could be used as a initial calibration procedure.

Gross, Daniel; Heil, Ulrich; Schulze, Ralf; Schoemer, Elmar; Schwanecke, Ulrich [Department of Design, Computer Science and Media, RheinMain University of Applied Sciences, 65195 Wiesbaden, Germany and Institute of Computer Science, Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz, 55128 Mainz (Germany); Department of Oral Surgery (and Oral Radiology), University Medical Center of the Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz, 55131 Mainz (Germany); Institute of Computer Science, Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz, 55128 Mainz (Germany); Department of Design, Computer Science and Media, RheinMain University of Applied Sciences, 65195 Wiesbaden (Germany)

2012-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

152

Conversion of the energy-subtracted CT number to electron density based on a single linear relationship: an experimental verification using a clinical dual-source CT scanner  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In radiotherapy treatment planning, the conversion of the computed tomography (CT) number to electron density is one of the main processes that determine the accuracy of patient dose calculations. However, in general, the CT number and electron density of tissues cannot be interrelated using a simple one-to-one correspondence. This study aims to experimentally verify the clinical feasibility of an existing novel conversion method proposed by the author of this note, which converts the energy-subtracted CT number (?HU) to the relative electron density (?e) via a single linear relationship by using a dual-energy CT (DECT). The ?HU?econversion was performed using a clinical second-generation dual-source CT scanner operated in the dual-energy mode with tube potentials of 80kV and 140kV with and without an additional tin filter. The ?HU?ecalibration line was obtained from the DECT image acquisition for tissue substitutes in an electron density phantom. In addition, the effect of object size on ?HU?econversion was also experimentally investigated. The plot of the measured ?HU versus nominal ?evalues exhibited a single linear relationship over a wide ?erange from 0.00 (air) to 2.35 (aluminum). The ?HU?econversion performed with the tin filter yielded a lower dose and more reliable ?evalues that were less affected by the object-size variation when compared to the corresponding values obtained for the case without the tin filter.

Masayoshi Tsukihara; Yoshiyuki Noto; Takahide Hayakawa; Masatoshi Saito

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

153

First pass cable artefact correction for cardiac C-arm CT imaging  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Cardiac C-arm CT imaging delivers a tomographic region-of-interest reconstruction of the patient's heart during image guided catheter interventions. Due to the limited size of the flat detector a volume image is reconstructed, which is truncated in the cone-beam (along the patient axis) and the fan-beam (in the transaxial plane) direction. To practically address this local tomography problem correction methods, like projection extension, are available for first pass image reconstruction. For second pass correction methods, like metal artefact reduction, alternative correction schemes are required when the field of view is limited to a region-of-interest of the patient. In classical CT imaging metal artefacts are corrected by metal identification in a first volume reconstruction and generation of a corrected projection data set followed by a second reconstruction. This approach fails when the metal structures are located outside the reconstruction field of view. When a C-arm CT is performed during a cardiac intervention pacing leads and other cables are frequently positioned on the patients skin, which results in propagating streak artefacts in the reconstruction volume. A first pass approach to reduce this type of artefact is introduced and evaluated here. It makes use of the fact that the projected position of objects outside the reconstruction volume changes with the projection perspective. It is shown that projection based identification, tracking and removal of high contrast structures like cables, only detected in a subset of the projections, delivers a more consistent reconstruction volume with reduced artefact level. The method is quantitatively evaluated based on 50 simulations using cardiac CT data sets with variable cable positioning. These data sets are forward projected using a C-arm CT system geometry and generate artefacts comparable to those observed in clinical cardiac C-arm CT acquisitions. A C-arm CT simulation of every cardiac CT data set without cables served as a ground truth. The 3D root mean square deviation between the simulated data set with and without cables could be reduced for 96% of the simulated cases by an average of 37% (min ?9%, max 73%) when using the first pass correction method. In addition, image quality improvement is demonstrated for clinical whole heart C-arm CT data sets when the cable removal algorithm was applied.

C Haase; D Schfer; M Kim; S J Chen; J D Carroll; P Eshuis; O Dssel; M Grass

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

154

Adaptive mean filtering for noise reduction in CT polymer gel dosimetry  

SciTech Connect

X-ray computed tomography (CT) as a method of extracting 3D dose information from irradiated polymer gel dosimeters is showing potential as a practical means to implement gel dosimetry in a radiation therapy clinic. However, the response of CT contrast to dose is weak and noise reduction is critical in order to achieve adequate dose resolutions with this method. Phantom design and CT imaging technique have both been shown to decrease image noise. In addition, image postprocessing using noise reduction filtering techniques have been proposed. This work evaluates in detail the use of the adaptive mean filter for reducing noise in CT gel dosimetry. Filter performance is systematically tested using both synthetic patterns mimicking a range of clinical dose distribution features as well as actual clinical dose distributions. Both low and high signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) situations are examined. For all cases, the effects of filter kernel size and the number of iterations are investigated. Results indicate that adaptive mean filtering is a highly effective tool for noise reduction CT gel dosimetry. The optimum filtering strategy depends on characteristics of the dose distributions and image noise level. For low noise images (SNR {approx}20), the filtered results are excellent and use of adaptive mean filtering is recommended as a standard processing tool. For high noise images (SNR {approx}5) adaptive mean filtering can also produce excellent results, but filtering must be approached with more caution as spatial and dose distortions of the original dose distribution can occur.

Hilts, Michelle; Jirasek, Andrew [Medical Physics, BC Cancer Agency-Vancouver Island Centre, Victoria, British Columbia, V8R6V5 (Canada); Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Victoria, Victoria, British Columbia, V8W2Y2 (Canada)

2008-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

155

Malignant pleural mesothelioma: value of CT and MR imaging in predicting resectability  

SciTech Connect

OBJECTIVE. The objective was to determine if CT or MR imaging findings could be used to accurately predict resectability in patients with biopsy-proved malignant pleural mesotheliomas. SUBJECTS AND METHODS. CT and MR findings in 41 consecutive patients with malignant mesotheliomas who were referred to the thoracic surgery clinic for extrapleural pneumonectomy were studied by thoracic radiologists before surgery. Review of radiologic studies focused on local invasion of three separate regions: the diaphragm, chest wall, and mediastinum. Results of all imaging examinations were carefully correlated with intraoperative, gross, and microscopic pathologic findings. RESULTS. After radiologic and clinical evaluation, 34 patients (83%) had thoracotomy; 24 of these had tumors that were resectable. The sensitivity was high (> 90%) for both CT and MR in each region. Specificity, however, was low, probably because of the small number of patients with unresectable tumors. CONCLUSION. CT and MR provided similar information on resectability in most cases. Sensitivity was high for both procedures. Because CT is more widely available and used, the authors suggest it as the initial study when determining resectability. In difficult cases, important complementary anatomic information can be derived from MR images obtained before surgical intervention.

Patz, E.F. Jr.; Shaffer, K.; Piwnica-Worms, D.R.; Jochelson, M.; Sarin, M.; Sugarbaker, D.J.; Pugatch, R.D. (Department of Radiology, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Boston, MA (United States))

1992-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

156

3D Dose Verification Using Tomotherapy CT Detector Array  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: To evaluate a three-dimensional dose verification method based on the exit dose using the onboard detector of tomotherapy. Methods and Materials: The study included 347 treatment fractions from 24 patients, including 10 prostate, 5 head and neck (HN), and 9 spinal stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) cases. Detector sonograms were retrieved and back-projected to calculate entrance fluence, which was then forward-projected on the CT images to calculate the verification dose, which was compared with ion chamber and film measurement in the QA plans and with the planning dose in patient plans. Results: Root mean square (RMS) errors of 2.0%, 2.2%, and 2.0% were observed comparing the dose verification (DV) and the ion chamber measured point dose in the phantom plans for HN, prostate, and spinal SBRT patients, respectively. When cumulative dose in the entire treatment is considered, for HN patients, the error of the mean dose to the planning target volume (PTV) varied from 1.47% to 5.62% with a RMS error of 3.55%. For prostate patients, the error of the mean dose to the prostate target volume varied from -5.11% to 3.29%, with a RMS error of 2.49%. The RMS error of maximum doses to the bladder and the rectum were 2.34% (-4.17% to 2.61%) and 2.64% (-4.54% to 3.94%), respectively. For the nine spinal SBRT patients, the RMS error of the minimum dose to the PTV was 2.43% (-5.39% to 2.48%). The RMS error of maximum dose to the spinal cord was 1.05% (-2.86% to 0.89%). Conclusions: An excellent agreement was observed between the measurement and the verification dose. In the patient treatments, the agreement in doses to the majority of PTVs and organs at risk is within 5% for the cumulative treatment course doses. The dosimetric error strongly depends on the error in multileaf collimator leaf opening time with a sensitivity correlating to the gantry rotation period.

Sheng Ke, E-mail: ks2mc@virginia.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA (United States); Jones, Ryan; Yang Wensha; Saraiya, Siddharth; Schneider, Bernard [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA (United States); Chen Quan; Sobering, Geoff; Olivera, Gustavo [TomoTherapy, Inc., Madison, WI (United States); Read, Paul [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA (United States)

2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

157

Application of the optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) technique for mouse dosimetry in micro-CT imaging  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: Micro-CT is considered to be a powerful tool to investigate various models of disease on anesthetized animals. In longitudinal studies, the radiation dose delivered by the micro-CT to the same animal is a major concern as it could potentially induce spurious effects in experimental results. Optically stimulated luminescence dosimeters (OSLDs) are a relatively new kind of detector used in radiation dosimetry for medical applications. The aim of this work was to assess the dose delivered by the CT component of a micro-SPECT (single-photon emission computed tomography)/CT camera during a typical whole-body mouse study, using commercially available OSLDs based on Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}:C crystals.Methods: CTDI (computed tomography dose index) was measured in micro-CT with a properly calibrated pencil ionization chamber using a rat-like phantom (60 mm in diameter) and a mouse-like phantom (30 mm in diameter). OSLDs were checked for reproducibility and linearity in the range of doses delivered by the micro-CT. Dose measurements obtained with OSLDs were compared to those of the ionization chamber to correct for the radiation quality dependence of OSLDs in the low-kV range. Doses to tissue were then investigated in phantoms and cadavers. A 30 mm diameter phantom, specifically designed to insert OSLDs, was used to assess radiation dose over a typical whole-body mouse imaging study. Eighteen healthy female BALB/c mice weighing 27.1 0.8 g (1 SD) were euthanized for small animal measurements. OLSDs were placed externally or implanted internally in nine different locations by an experienced animal technician. Five commonly used micro-CT protocols were investigated.Results: CTDI measurements were between 78.0 2.1 and 110.7 3.0 mGy for the rat-like phantom and between 169.3 4.6 and 203.6 5.5 mGy for the mouse-like phantom. On average, the displayed CTDI at the operator console was underestimated by 1.19 for the rat-like phantom and 2.36 for the mouse-like phantom. OSLDs exhibited a reproducibility of 2.4% and good linearity was found between 60 and 450 mGy. The energy scaling factor was calculated to be between 1.80 0.16 and 1.86 0.16, depending on protocol used. In phantoms, mean doses to tissue over a whole-body CT examination were ranging from 186.4 7.6 to 234.9 7.1 mGy. In mice, mean doses to tissue in the mouse trunk (thorax, abdomen, pelvis, and flanks) were between 213.0 17.0 and 251.2 13.4 mGy. Skin doses (3 OSLDs) were much higher with average doses between 350.6 25.3 and 432.5 34.1 mGy. The dose delivered during a topogram was found to be below 10 mGy. Use of the multimouse bed of the system gave a significantly 20%40% lower dose per animal (p < 0.05).Conclusions: Absorbed doses in micro-CT were found to be relatively high. In micro-SPECT/CT imaging, the micro-CT unit is mainly used to produce a localization frame. As a result, users should pay attention to adjustable CT parameters so as to minimize the radiation dose and avoid any adverse radiation effects which may interfere with biological parameters studied.

Vrigneaud, Jean-Marc; Courteau, Alan; Oudot, Alexandra; Collin, Bertrand [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Centre Georges-Franois Leclerc, 1 rue Professeur Marion, Dijon 21079 Cedex (France)] [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Centre Georges-Franois Leclerc, 1 rue Professeur Marion, Dijon 21079 Cedex (France); Ranouil, Julien [Landauer Europe, 33 avenue du Gnral Leclerc, Fontenay-aux-Roses 92266 Cedex (France)] [Landauer Europe, 33 avenue du Gnral Leclerc, Fontenay-aux-Roses 92266 Cedex (France); Morgand, Loc; Raguin, Olivier [Oncodesign, 20 rue Jean Mazen, Dijon 21076 Cedex (France)] [Oncodesign, 20 rue Jean Mazen, Dijon 21076 Cedex (France); Walker, Paul [LE2i CNRS UMR 5158, Faculty of Medicine, BP 87900, 21079 Dijon Cedex (France)] [LE2i CNRS UMR 5158, Faculty of Medicine, BP 87900, 21079 Dijon Cedex (France); Brunotte, Franois [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Centre Georges-Franois Leclerc, 1 rue Professeur Marion, Dijon 21079 Cedex, France and LE2i CNRS UMR 5158, Faculty of Medicine, BP 87900, 21079 Dijon Cedex (France)] [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Centre Georges-Franois Leclerc, 1 rue Professeur Marion, Dijon 21079 Cedex, France and LE2i CNRS UMR 5158, Faculty of Medicine, BP 87900, 21079 Dijon Cedex (France)

2013-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

158

Dynamic cone beam CT angiography of carotid and cerebral arteries using canine model  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: This research is designed to develop and evaluate a flat-panel detector-based dynamic cone beam CT system for dynamic angiography imaging, which is able to provide both dynamic functional information and dynamic anatomic information from one multirevolution cone beam CT scan. Methods: A dynamic cone beam CT scan acquired projections over four revolutions within a time window of 40 s after contrast agent injection through a femoral vein to cover the entire wash-in and wash-out phases. A dynamic cone beam CT reconstruction algorithm was utilized and a novel recovery method was developed to correct the time-enhancement curve of contrast flow. From the same data set, both projection-based subtraction and reconstruction-based subtraction approaches were utilized and compared to remove the background tissues and visualize the 3D vascular structure to provide the dynamic anatomic information. Results: Through computer simulations, the new recovery algorithm for dynamic time-enhancement curves was optimized and showed excellent accuracy to recover the actual contrast flow. Canine model experiments also indicated that the recovered time-enhancement curves from dynamic cone beam CT imaging agreed well with that of an IV-digital subtraction angiography (DSA) study. The dynamic vascular structures reconstructed using both projection-based subtraction and reconstruction-based subtraction were almost identical as the differences between them were comparable to the background noise level. At the enhancement peak, all the major carotid and cerebral arteries and the Circle of Willis could be clearly observed. Conclusions: The proposed dynamic cone beam CT approach can accurately recover the actual contrast flow, and dynamic anatomic imaging can be obtained with high isotropic 3D resolution. This approach is promising for diagnosis and treatment planning of vascular diseases and strokes.

Cai Weixing; Zhao Binghui; Conover, David; Liu Jiangkun; Ning Ruola [Department of Imaging Sciences, University of Rochester, 601 Elmwood Avenue, Rochester, New York 14642 (United States); Department of Radiology, Shanghai 6th People's Hospital, 600 Yishan Road, Xuhui, Shanghai (China); Koning Corporation, Lennox Tech Enterprise Center, 150 Lucius Gordon Drive Suite 112, West Henrietta, New York 14586 (United States); Department of Imaging Sciences, University of Rochester, 601 Elmwood Avenue, Rochester, New York 14642 (United States); Department of Imaging Sciences, University of Rochester, 601 Elmwood Avenue, Rochester, New York 14642 (United States) and Koning Corporation, Lennox Tech Enterprise Center, 150 Lucius Gordon Drive Suite 112, West Henrietta, New York 14586 (United States)

2012-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

159

Correction of CT artifacts and its influence on Monte Carlo dose calculations  

SciTech Connect

Computed tomography (CT) images of patients having metallic implants or dental fillings exhibit severe streaking artifacts. These artifacts may disallow tumor and organ delineation and compromise dose calculation outcomes in radiotherapy. We used a sinogram interpolation metal streaking artifact correction algorithm on several phantoms of exact-known compositions and on a prostate patient with two hip prostheses. We compared original CT images and artifact-corrected images of both. To evaluate the effect of the artifact correction on dose calculations, we performed Monte Carlo dose calculation in the EGSnrc/DOSXYZnrc code. For the phantoms, we performed calculations in the exact geometry, in the original CT geometry and in the artifact-corrected geometry for photon and electron beams. The maximum errors in 6 MV photon beam dose calculation were found to exceed 25% in original CT images when the standard DOSXYZnrc/CTCREATE calibration is used but less than 2% in artifact-corrected images when an extended calibration is used. The extended calibration includes an extra calibration point for a metal. The patient dose volume histograms of a hypothetical target irradiated by five 18 MV photon beams in a hypothetical treatment differ significantly in the original CT geometry and in the artifact-corrected geometry. This was found to be mostly due to miss-assignment of tissue voxels to air due to metal artifacts. We also developed a simple Monte Carlo model for a CT scanner and we simulated the contribution of scatter and beam hardening to metal streaking artifacts. We found that whereas beam hardening has a minor effect on metal artifacts, scatter is an important cause of these artifacts.

Bazalova, Magdalena; Beaulieu, Luc; Palefsky, Steven; Verhaegen, Frank [Medical Physics Department, McGill University, Montreal General Hospital, 1650 Cedar Avenue, Montreal, Quebec, H3G1A4 (Canada); Department de Physique, de Genie Physique et d'Optique, Universite Laval, Quebec City, Quebec, G1K7P4 (Canada) and Department de Radio-Oncologie, Hotel Dieu de Quebec, Centre Hospitalier Universitaire de Quebec, Quebec City, Quebec, G1R2J6 (Canada); Medical Physics Department, McGill University, Montreal General Hospital, 1650 Cedar Avenue, Montreal, Quebec, H3G1A4 (Canada)

2007-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

160

Resolution enhancement of lung 4D-CT data using multiscale interphase iterative nonlocal means  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: Four-dimensional computer tomography (4D-CT) has been widely used in lung cancer radiotherapy due to its capability in providing important tumor motion information. However, the prolonged scanning duration required by 4D-CT causes considerable increase in radiation dose. To minimize the radiation-related health risk, radiation dose is often reduced at the expense of interslice spatial resolution. However, inadequate resolution in 4D-CT causes artifacts and increases uncertainty in tumor localization, which eventually results in extra damages of healthy tissues during radiotherapy. In this paper, the authors propose a novel postprocessing algorithm to enhance the resolution of lung 4D-CT data. Methods: The authors' premise is that anatomical information missing in one phase can be recovered from the complementary information embedded in other phases. The authors employ a patch-based mechanism to propagate information across phases for the reconstruction of intermediate slices in the longitudinal direction, where resolution is normally the lowest. Specifically, the structurally matching and spatially nearby patches are combined for reconstruction of each patch. For greater sensitivity to anatomical details, the authors employ a quad-tree technique to adaptively partition the image for more fine-grained refinement. The authors further devise an iterative strategy for significant enhancement of anatomical details. Results: The authors evaluated their algorithm using a publicly available lung data that consist of 10 4D-CT cases. The authors' algorithm gives very promising results with significantly enhanced image structures and much less artifacts. Quantitative analysis shows that the authors' algorithm increases peak signal-to-noise ratio by 3-4 dB and the structural similarity index by 3%-5% when compared with the standard interpolation-based algorithms. Conclusions: The authors have developed a new algorithm to improve the resolution of 4D-CT. It outperforms the conventional interpolation-based approaches by producing images with the markedly improved structural clarity and greatly reduced artifacts.

Zhang Yu [School of Biomedical Engineering, Southern Medical University, Guangzhou 510515, China and Department of Radiology and BRIC, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, North Carolina 27599 (United States); Yap, Pew-Thian; Wu Guorong [Department of Radiology and BRIC, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, North Carolina 27599 (United States); Feng Qianjin; Chen Wufan [School of Biomedical Engineering, Southern Medical University, Guangzhou 510515 (China); Lian Jun [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, North Carolina 27599 (United States); Shen Dinggang [Department of Radiology and BRIC, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, North Carolina 27599 (United States); Department of Brain and Cognitive Engineering, Korea University, Seoul 136-713 (Korea, Republic of)

2013-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

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161

Resolution enhancement of lung 4D-CT via group-sparsity  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: 4D-CT typically delivers more accurate information about anatomical structures in the lung, over 3D-CT, due to its ability to capture visual information of the lung motion across different respiratory phases. This helps to better determine the dose during radiation therapy for lung cancer. However, a critical concern with 4D-CT that substantially compromises this advantage is the low superior-inferior resolution due to less number of acquired slices, in order to control the CT radiation dose. To address this limitation, the authors propose an approach to reconstruct missing intermediate slices, so as to improve the superior-inferior resolution.Methods: In this method the authors exploit the observation that sampling information across respiratory phases in 4D-CT can be complimentary due to lung motion. The authors approach uses this locally complimentary information across phases in a patch-based sparse-representation framework. Moreover, unlike some recent approaches that treat local patches independently, the authors approach employs the group-sparsity framework that imposes neighborhood and similarity constraints between patches. This helps in mitigating the trade-off between noise robustness and structure preservation, which is an important consideration in resolution enhancement. The authors discuss the regularizing ability of group-sparsity, which helps in reducing the effect of noise and enables better structural localization and enhancement.Results: The authors perform extensive experiments on the publicly available DIR-Lab Lung 4D-CT dataset [R. Castillo, E. Castillo, R. Guerra, V. Johnson, T. McPhail, A. Garg, and T. Guerrero, A framework for evaluation of deformable image registration spatial accuracy using large landmark point sets, Phys. Med. Biol. 54, 18491870 (2009)]. First, the authors carry out empirical parametric analysis of some important parameters in their approach. The authors then demonstrate, qualitatively as well as quantitatively, the ability of their approach to achieve more accurate and better localized results over bicubic interpolation as well as a related state-of-the-art approach. The authors also show results on some datasets with tumor, to further emphasize the clinical importance of their method.Conclusions: The authors have proposed to improve the superior-inferior resolution of 4D-CT by estimating intermediate slices. The authors approach exploits neighboring constraints in the group-sparsity framework, toward the goal of achieving better localization and noise robustness. The authors results are encouraging, and positively demonstrate the role of group-sparsity for 4D-CT resolution enhancement.

Bhavsar, Arnav; Wu, Guorong; Shen, Dinggang [Department of Radiology and BRIC, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, North Carolina 27599 (United States)] [Department of Radiology and BRIC, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, North Carolina 27599 (United States); Lian, Jun [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, North Carolina 27599 (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, North Carolina 27599 (United States)

2013-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

162

Phase I and Pharmacokinetic Study of CT-322 (BMS-844203), a Targeted Adnectin Inhibitor of VEGFR-2 Based on a Domain of Human Fibronectin  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Bristol-Myers Squibb, Princeton, New Jersey Note: Supplementary...or biweekly (q2w). Plasma samples were assayed for CT-322 concentrations, plasma VEGF-A concentrations...kg qw or q2w. CT-322 plasma concentrations increased...

Anthony W. Tolcher; Christopher J. Sweeney; Kyri Papadopoulos; Amita Patnaik; Elena G. Chiorean; Alain C. Mita; Kamalesh Sankhala; Eric Furfine; Jochem Gokemeijer; Lisa Iacono; Cheryl Eaton; Bruce A. Silver; and Monica Mita

2011-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

163

Patterns of Colorectal Cancer Test Use, Including CT Colonography, in the 2010 National Health Interview Survey  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Trial of the American College of Radiology Imaging Network (ACRIN), CT...for one type of service such as dental care, vision care, or prescriptions...Cancer, and American College of Radiology.Radiology 2008;248:717-20. 9. Johnson...

Jean A. Shapiro; Carrie N. Klabunde; Trevor D. Thompson; Marion R. Nadel; Laura C. Seeff; and Arica White

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

164

DOE Zero Energy Ready Home Case Study: Brookside Development, Derby, CT  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Case study of a DOE Zero Energy Ready home in Derby, CT, that achieves a HERS score of 45 without PV or HERS 26 with PV. The production home is one of a development of 7 two-story, 4,000+-ft2...

165

A semi-automatic semantic method for mapping SNOMED CT concepts to VCM icons  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A semi-automatic semantic method for mapping SNOMED CT concepts to VCM icons Jean-Baptiste Lamya of Concept in Medicine) is an iconic lan- guage for representing key medical concepts by icons. How- ever icons to the terms of these terminologies. Here, we present and evaluate a semi-automatic semantic

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

166

DAWN: A JOURNEY TO THE BEGINNING OF THE SOLAR SYSTEM C.T. Russell(1)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-ray/neutron spectrometer, a magnetometer and a gravity investigation. Dawn uses solar arrays to power its xenon ion engine solar panels roughly 21 m tip-to-tip, a 5 m magnetometer boom and three ion thrusters, one of whichDAWN: A JOURNEY TO THE BEGINNING OF THE SOLAR SYSTEM C.T. Russell(1) , A. Coradini(2) , W

Zuber, Maria

167

Multi-energy CT Based on a Prior Rank, Intensity and Sparsity Model (PRISM)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Multi-energy CT Based on a Prior Rank, Intensity and Sparsity Model (PRISM) Hao Gao1 , Hengyong Yu2 spectrum. Besides, the energy-dependent intensity information can be incorporated into the PRISM in terms on the generalized rank and sparsity of a multi-energy image, and intensity/spectral characteristics of base

Soatto, Stefano

168

Investigation of energy weighting using an energy discriminating photon counting detector for breast CT  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: Breast CT is an emerging imaging technique that can portray the breast in 3D and improve visualization of important diagnostic features. Early clinical studies have suggested that breast CT has sufficient spatial and contrast resolution for accurate detection of masses and microcalcifications in the breast, reducing structural overlap that is often a limiting factor in reading mammographic images. For a number of reasons, image quality in breast CT may be improved by use of an energy resolving photon counting detector. In this study, the authors investigate the improvements in image quality obtained when using energy weighting with an energy resolving photon counting detector as compared to that with a conventional energy integrating detector.Methods: Using computer simulation, realistic CT images of multiple breast phantoms were generated. The simulation modeled a prototype breast CT system using an amorphous silicon (a-Si), CsI based energy integrating detector with different x-ray spectra, and a hypothetical, ideal CZT based photon counting detector with capability of energy discrimination. Three biological signals of interest were modeled as spherical lesions and inserted into breast phantoms; hydroxyapatite (HA) to represent microcalcification, infiltrating ductal carcinoma (IDC), and iodine enhanced infiltrating ductal carcinoma (IIDC). Signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of these three lesions was measured from the CT reconstructions. In addition, a psychophysical study was conducted to evaluate observer performance in detecting microcalcifications embedded into a realistic anthropomorphic breast phantom.Results: In the energy range tested, improvements in SNR with a photon counting detector using energy weighting was higher (than the energy integrating detector method) by 30%63% and 4%34%, for HA and IDC lesions and 12%30% (with Al filtration) and 32%38% (with Ce filtration) for the IIDC lesion, respectively. The average area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC) for detection of microcalcifications was higher by greater than 19% (for the different energy weighting methods tested) as compared to the AUC obtained with an energy integrating detector.Conclusions: This study showed that breast CT with a CZT photon counting detector using energy weighting can provide improvements in pixel SNR, and detectability of microcalcifications as compared to that with a conventional energy integrating detector. Since a number of degrading physical factors were not modeled into the photon counting detector, this improvement should be considered as an upper bound on achievable performance.

Kalluri, Kesava S. [Department of Radiology, University of Massachusetts Medical School, Worcester, Massachusetts 01655 and Biomedical Engineering and Biotechnology Program, University of Massachusetts, Lowell, One University Avenue, Lowell, Massachusetts 01854 (United States)] [Department of Radiology, University of Massachusetts Medical School, Worcester, Massachusetts 01655 and Biomedical Engineering and Biotechnology Program, University of Massachusetts, Lowell, One University Avenue, Lowell, Massachusetts 01854 (United States); Mahd, Mufeed [Biomedical Engineering and Biotechnology Program, University of Massachusetts, Lowell, One University Avenue, Lowell, Massachusetts 01854 (United States)] [Biomedical Engineering and Biotechnology Program, University of Massachusetts, Lowell, One University Avenue, Lowell, Massachusetts 01854 (United States); Glick, Stephen J. [Department of Radiology, University of Massachusetts Medical School, Worcester, Massachusetts 01655 (United States)] [Department of Radiology, University of Massachusetts Medical School, Worcester, Massachusetts 01655 (United States)

2013-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

169

Comparison of blood flow models and acquisitions for quantitative myocardial perfusion estimation from dynamic CT  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Myocardial blood flow (MBF) can be estimated from dynamic contrast enhanced (DCE) cardiac CT acquisitions, leading to quantitative assessment of regional perfusion. The need for low radiation dose and the lack of consensus on MBF estimation methods motivates this study to refine the selection of acquisition protocols and models for CT-derived MBF. DCE cardiac CT acquisitions were simulated for a range of flow states (MBF = 0.5, 1, 2, 3ml (min g)?1, cardiac output = 3, 5, 8 L min?1). Patient kinetics were generated by a mathematical model of iodine exchange incorporating numerous physiological features including heterogenenous microvascular flow, permeability and capillary contrast gradients. CT acquisitions were simulated for multiple realizations of realistic x-ray flux levels. CT acquisitions that reduce radiation exposure were implemented by varying both temporal sampling (1, 2, and 3s sampling intervals) and tube currents (140, 70, and 25 mAs). For all acquisitions, we compared three quantitative MBF estimation methods (two-compartment model, an axially-distributed model, and the adiabatic approximation to the tissue homogeneous model) and a qualitative slope-based method. In total, over 11000 time attenuation curves were used to evaluate MBF estimation in multiple patient and imaging scenarios. After iodine-based beam hardening correction, the slope method consistently underestimated flow by on average 47.5% and the quantitative models provided estimates with less than 6.5% average bias and increasing variance with increasing dose reductions. The three quantitative models performed equally well, offering estimates with essentially identical root mean squared error (RMSE) for matched acquisitions. MBF estimates using the qualitative slope method were inferior in terms of bias and RMSE compared to the quantitative methods. MBF estimate error was equal at matched dose reductions for all quantitative methods and range of techniques evaluated. This suggests that there is no particular advantage between quantitative estimation methods nor to performing dose reduction via tube current reduction compared to temporal sampling reduction. These data are important for optimizing implementation of cardiac dynamic CT in clinical practice and in prospective CT MBF trials.

Michael Bindschadler; Dimple Modgil; Kelley R Branch; Patrick J La Riviere; Adam M Alessio

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

170

Lack of Correlation Between External Fiducial Positions and Internal Tumor Positions During Breath-Hold CT  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: For thoracic tumors, if four-dimensional computed tomography (4DCT) is unavailable, the internal margin can be estimated by use of breath-hold (BH) CT scans acquired at end inspiration (EI) and end expiration (EE). By use of external surrogates for tumor position, BH accuracy is estimated by minimizing the difference between respiratory extrema BH and mean equivalent-phase free breathing (FB) positions. We tested the assumption that an external surrogate for BH accuracy correlates with internal tumor positional accuracy during BH CT. Methods and Materials: In 16 lung cancer patients, 4DCT images, as well as BH CT images at EI and EE, were acquired. Absolute differences between BH and mean equivalent-phase (FB) positions were calculated for both external fiducials and gross tumor volume (GTV) centroids as metrics of external and internal BH accuracy, respectively, and the results were correlated. Results: At EI, the absolute difference between mean FB and BH fiducial displacement correlated poorly with the absolute difference between FB and BH GTV centroid positions on CT images (R{sup 2} = 0.11). Similarly, at EE, the absolute difference between mean FB and BH fiducial displacements correlated poorly with the absolute difference between FB and BH GTV centroid positions on CT images (R{sup 2} = 0.18). Conclusions: External surrogates for tumor position are not an accurate metric of BH accuracy for lung cancer patients. This implies that care should be taken when using such an approach because an incorrect internal margin could be generated.

Hunjan, Sandeep, E-mail: shunjan@mdanderson.or [Department of Radiation Physics, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Starkschall, George; Prado, Karl; Dong Lei; Balter, Peter [Department of Radiation Physics, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States)

2010-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

171

Interfractional Prostate Shifts: Review of 1870 Computed Tomography (CT) Scans Obtained During Image-Guided Radiotherapy Using CT-on-Rails for the Treatment of Prostate Cancer  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: To review 1870 CT scans of interfractional prostate shift obtained during image-guided radiotherapy. Methods and Materials: A total of 1870 pretreatment CT scans were acquired with CT-on-rails, and the corresponding shift data for 329 patients with prostate cancer were analyzed. Results: Of the 1870 scans reviewed, 44% required no setup adjustments in the anterior-posterior (AP) direction, 14% had shifts of 3-5 mm, 29% had shifts of 6-10 mm, and 13% had shifts of >10 mm. In the superior-inferior direction, 81% had no adjustments, 2% had shifts of 3-5 mm, 15% had shifts of 6-10 mm, and 2% had shifts of >10 mm. In the left-right direction, 65% had no adjustment, 13% had shifts of 3-5 mm, 17% had shifts of 6-10 mm, and 5% had shifts of >10 mm. Further analysis of the first 66 consecutive patients divided into three groups according to body mass index indicates that the shift in the AP direction for the overweight subgroup was statistically larger than those for the control and obese subgroups (p < 0.05). The interfractional shift in the lateral direction for the obese group (1 SD, 5.5 mm) was significantly larger than those for the overweight and control groups (4.1 and 2.9 mm, respectively) (p < 0.001). Conclusions: These data demonstrate that there is a significantly greater shift in the AP direction than in the lateral and superior-inferior directions for the entire patient group. Overweight and obese patient groups show a significant difference from the control group in terms of prostate shift.

Wong, James R. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Carol G. Simon Cancer Center, Morristown Memorial Hospital, Morristown, NJ (United States)], E-mail: james.wong@atlantichealth.org; Gao Zhanrong [Department of Radiation Oncology, Carol G. Simon Cancer Center, Morristown Memorial Hospital, Morristown, NJ (United States); Uematsu, Minoru [Department of Radiation Oncology, UAS Oncology Center, Kagoshima (Japan); Merrick, Scott; Machernis, Nolan P.; Chen, Timothy; Cheng, C.W. [Department of Radiation Oncology, The Carol G. Simon Cancer Center, Morristown Memorial Hospital, Morristown, NJ (United States)

2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

172

Reference dosimetry during diagnostic CT examination using XR-QA radiochromic film model  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: The authors applied 2D reference dosimetry protocol for dose measurements using XR-QA radiochromic film model during diagnostic computed tomography (CT) examinations carried out on patients and humanoid Rando phantom. Methods: Response of XR-QA model GAFCHROMIC film reference dosimetry system was calibrated in terms of Air-Kerma in air. Four most commonly used CT protocols were selected on their CT scanner (GE Lightspeed VCT 64), covering three anatomical sites (head, chest, and abdomen). For each protocol, 25 patients ongoing planned diagnostic CT examination were recruited. Surface dose was measured using four or eight film strips taped on patients' skin and on Rando phantom. Film pieces were scanned prior to and after irradiation using Epson Expression 10000XL document scanner. Optical reflectance of the unexposed film piece was subtracted from exposed one to obtain final net reflectance change, which is subsequently converted to dose using previously established calibration curves. Results: The authors' measurements show that body skin dose variation has a sinusoidal pattern along the scanning axis due to the helical movement of the x-ray tube, and a comb pattern for head dose measurements due to its axial movement. Results show that the mean skin dose at anterior position for patients is (51 {+-} 6) mGy, (29 {+-} 11) mGy, (45 {+-} 13) mGy and (38 {+-} 20) mGy for head, abdomen, angio Abdomen, and chest and abdomen protocol (UP position), respectively. The obtained experimental dose length products (DLP) show higher values than CT based DLP taken from the scanner console for body protocols, but lower values for the head protocol. Internal dose measurements inside the phantom's head indicate nonuniformity of dose distribution within scanned volume. Conclusions: In this work, the authors applied an Air-Kerma in air based radiochromic film reference dosimetry protocol for in vivo skin dose measurements. In this work, they employed green channel extracted from the scanned RGB image for dose measurements in the range from 0 to 200 mGy. Measured skin doses and corresponding DLPs were higher than DLPs provided by the CT scanner manufacturer as they were measured on patients' skin.

Boivin, Jonathan; Tomic, Nada; Fadlallah, Bassam; DeBlois, Francois; Devic, Slobodan [Institut de Genie Biomedical, Universite de Montreal, Montreal, Quebec H3C 3J7 (Canada); Medical Physics Unit, McGill University, Montral, Quebec H3G 1A4, Canada and Department of Radiation Oncology, SMBD Jewish General Hospital, McGill University, 3755 chemin de la Cote-Sainte-Catherine, Montreal, Quebec H3T 1E2 (Canada); Department of Biomedical Engineering, SMBD Jewish General Hospital, McGill University, Montreal, Quebec H3T 1E2 (Canada); Medical Physics Unit, McGill University, Montreal, Quebec H3G 1A4, Canada and Department of Radiation Oncology, SMBD Jewish General Hospital, McGill University, Montreal, Quebec H3T 1E2 (Canada)

2011-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

173

Graystone Group Advertising, 2710 North Ave, Suite 200 Bridgeport, CT 06604 Phone: 8005440005 or 2035490060 Fax: 2035490061  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Graystone Group Advertising, 2710 North Ave, Suite 200 Bridgeport, CT 06604 Phone: 8005440005 or 2035490060 Fax: 2035490061 Email: ads@graystoneadv.com Placing Recruitment Advertising To assist University departments with all recruitment and advertising needs, Clemson is now partnered

Bolding, M. Chad

174

Supplementary testing is not required on the cobas 4800 CT/NG test for Neisseria gonorrhoeae weak positive urogenital samples.  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...not required on the cobas 4800 CT/NG test for Neisseria gonorrhoeae weak positive...gonorrhoeae (NG) nucleic acid amplification test (NAAT) results are difficult to interpret...treatment should be based on clinical pre-test probability.

Collette Bromhead; Nadika Liyanarachchy; Julia Mayes; Arlo Upton; Michelle Balm

2014-11-12T23:59:59.000Z

175

A method for measuring joint kinematics designed for accurate registration of kinematic data to models constructed from CT data  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A method for measuring three-dimensional kinematics that incorporates the direct cross-registration of experimental kinematics with anatomic geometry from Computed Tomography (CT) data has been developed. Plexiglas ...

Fischer, Kenneth J.; Manson, T. T.; Pfaeffle, H. J.; Tomaino, M. M.; Woo, S. L-Y

2001-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

176

PET/CT com FDG-18 F em pacientes com suspeita de recidiva de carcinoma de ovrio.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??O exame PET/CT com FDG-18F um mtodo de diagnstico por imagem, til em oncologia. O cncer de ovrio o cncer ginecolgico de maior (more)

Sanja Dragosavac

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

177

Coronary artery wall imaging in mice using osmium tetroxide and micro-computed tomography (micro-CT)  

SciTech Connect

The high spatial resolution of micro-computed tomography (micro-CT) is ideal for 3D imaging of coronary arteries in intact mouse heart specimens. Previously, micro-CT of mouse heart specimens utilized intravascular contrast agents that hardened within the vessel lumen and allowed a vascular cast to be made. However, for mouse coronary artery disease models, it is highly desirable to image coronary artery walls and highlight plaques. For this purpose, we describe an ex vivo contrast-enhanced micro-CT imaging technique based on tissue staining with osmium tetroxide (OsO{sub 4}) solution. As a tissue-staining contrast agent, OsO{sub 4} is retained in the vessel wall and surrounding tissue during the fixation process and cleared from the vessel lumens. Its high X-ray attenuation makes the artery wall visible in CT. Additionally, since OsO{sub 4} preferentially binds to lipids, it highlights lipid deposition in the artery wall. We performed micro-CT of heart specimens of 5- to 25-week-old C57BL/6 wild-type mice and 5- to 13-week-old apolipoprotein E knockout (apoE{sup -/-}) mice at 10 {mu}m resolution. The results show that walls of coronary arteries as small as 45 {mu}m in diameter are visible using a table-top micro-CT scanner. Similar image clarity was achieved with 1/2000th the scan time using a synchrotron CT scanner. In 13-week-old apoE mice, lipid-rich plaques are visible in the aorta. Our study shows that the combination of OsO{sub 4} and micro-CT permits the visualization of the coronary artery wall in intact mouse hearts.

Pai, Vinay M.; Kozlowski, Megan; Donahue, Danielle; Miller, Elishiah; Xiao, Xianghui; Chen, Marcus Y.; Yu, Zu-Xi; Connelly, Patricia; Jeffries, Kenneth; Wen, Han (NIH)

2012-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

178

CT-Guided Interventions Using a Free-Hand, Optical Tracking System: Initial Clinical Experience  

SciTech Connect

PurposeThe present study was designed to evaluate the geometrical accuracy and clinical applicability of a new, free-hand, CT-guided, optical navigation system.MethodsFifteen procedures in 14 consecutive patients were retrospectively analyzed. The navigation system was applied for interventional procedures on small target lesions, in cases with long needle paths, narrow access windows, or when an out-of-plane access was expected. Mean lesion volume was 27.9 ml, and mean distance to target measured was 107.5 mm. Eleven of 15 needle trajectories were planned as out-of-plane approaches regarding the axial CT plane.ResultsNinety-one percent of the biopsies were diagnostic. All therapeutic interventions were technically successful. Targeting precision was high with a mean distance of the needle tip from planned target of 1.98 mm. Mean intervention time was 1:12 h. A statistically significant correlation between angular needle deviation and intervention time (p = 0.007), respiratory movement of the target (p = 0.008), and body mass index (p = 0.02) was detected. None of the evaluated parameters correlated significantly with the distance from the needle tip to the planned target.ConclusionsThe application of a navigation system for complex CT-guided procedures provided safe and effective targeting within a reasonable intervention time in our series.

Schubert, Tilman, E-mail: TSchubert@uhbs.ch; Jacob, Augustinus L.; Pansini, Michele [University Hospital Basel, Department of Radiology and Nuclear Medicine (Switzerland); Liu, David [Vancouver General Hospital, University of British Columbia, Department of Radiology (Canada); Gutzeit, Andreas [Winterthur Cantonal Hospital, Department of Radiology (Switzerland); Kos, Sebastian [University Hospital Basel, Department of Radiology and Nuclear Medicine (Switzerland)

2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

179

Development of a dynamic quality assurance testing protocol for multisite clinical trial DCE-CT accreditation  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: Credentialing can have an impact on whether or not a clinical trial produces useful quality data that is comparable between various institutions and scanners. With the recent increase of dynamic contrast enhanced-computed tomography (DCE-CT) usage as a companion biomarker in clinical trials, effective quality assurance, and control methods are required to ensure there is minimal deviation in the results between different scanners and protocols at various institutions. This paper attempts to address this problem by utilizing a dynamic flow imaging phantom to develop and evaluate a DCE-CT quality assurance (QA) protocol.Methods: A previously designed flow phantom, capable of producing predictable and reproducible time concentration curves from contrast injection was fully validated and then utilized to design a DCE-CT QA protocol. The QA protocol involved a set of quantitative metrics including injected and total mass error, as well as goodness of fit comparison to the known truth concentration curves. An additional region of interest (ROI) sensitivity analysis was also developed to provide additional details on intrascanner variability and determine appropriate ROI sizes for quantitative analysis. Both the QA protocol and ROI sensitivity analysis were utilized to test variations in DCE-CT results using different imaging parameters (tube voltage and current) as well as alternate reconstruction methods and imaging techniques. The developed QA protocol and ROI sensitivity analysis was then applied at three institutions that were part of clinical trial involving DCE-CT and results were compared.Results: The inherent specificity of robustness of the phantom was determined through calculation of the total intraday variability and determined to be less than 2.2 1.1% (total calculated output contrast mass error) with a goodness of fit (R{sup 2}) of greater than 0.99 0.0035 (n= 10). The DCE-CT QA protocol was capable of detecting significant deviations from the expected phantom result when scanning at low mAs and low kVp in terms of quantitative metrics (Injected Mass Error 15.4%), goodness of fit (R{sup 2}) of 0.91, and ROI sensitivity (increase in minimum input function ROI radius by 146 86%). These tests also confirmed that the ASIR reconstruction process was beneficial in reducing noise without substantially increasing partial volume effects and that vendor specific modes (e.g., axial shuttle) did not significantly affect the phantom results. The phantom and QA protocol were finally able to quickly (<90 min) and successfully validate the DCE-CT imaging protocol utilized at the three separate institutions of a multicenter clinical trial; thereby enhancing the confidence in the patient data collected.Conclusions: A DCE QA protocol was developed that, in combination with a dynamic multimodality flow phantom, allows the intrascanner variability to be separated from other sources of variability such as the impact of injection protocol and ROI selection. This provides a valuable resource that can be utilized at various clinical trial institutions to test conformance with imaging protocols and accuracy requirements as well as ensure that the scanners are performing as expected for dynamic scans.

Driscoll, B. [Department of Radiation Physics, Princess Margaret Cancer Center, 610 University Avenue, Toronto, Ontario M5G 2M9 (Canada)] [Department of Radiation Physics, Princess Margaret Cancer Center, 610 University Avenue, Toronto, Ontario M5G 2M9 (Canada); Keller, H. [Department of Radiation Physics, Princess Margaret Cancer Center, 610 University Avenue, Toronto, Ontario M5G 2M9, Canada and Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Toronto, 150 College Street, Toronto, Ontario M5S 3E2 (Canada)] [Department of Radiation Physics, Princess Margaret Cancer Center, 610 University Avenue, Toronto, Ontario M5G 2M9, Canada and Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Toronto, 150 College Street, Toronto, Ontario M5S 3E2 (Canada); Jaffray, D.; Coolens, C. [Department of Radiation Physics, Princess Margaret Cancer Center, 610 University Avenue, Toronto, Ontario M5G 2M9 (Canada) [Department of Radiation Physics, Princess Margaret Cancer Center, 610 University Avenue, Toronto, Ontario M5G 2M9 (Canada); Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Toronto, 150 College Street, Toronto, Ontario M5S 3E2 (Canada); Techna Institute, University Health Network, 124-100 College Street, Toronto, Ontario M5G 1L5 (Canada)

2013-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

180

PET/CT for Radiotherapy Treatment Planning in Patients With Soft Tissue Sarcomas  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: To study the possibility of incorporating positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) information into radiotherapy treatment planning in patients with high-grade soft tissue sarcomas (STS). Methods and Materials: We studied 17 patients treated with preoperative radiotherapy at our institution from 2005 to 2007. All patients had a high-grade STS and had had a staging PET/CT scan. For each patient, an MRI-based gross tumor volume (GTV), considered to be the contemporary standard for radiotherapy treatment planning, was outlined on a T1-gadolinium enhanced axial MRI (GTV{sub MRI}), and a second set of GTVs were outlined using different threshold values on PET images (GTV{sub PET}). PET-based target volumes were compared with the MRI-based GTV. Threshold values for target contouring were determined as a multiple (from 2 to 10 times) of the background soft tissue uptake values (B) sampled over healthy tissue. Results: PET-based GTVs contoured using a threshold value of 2 or 2.5 most closely resembled the GTV{sub MRI} volumes. Higher threshold values lead to PET volumes much smaller than the GTV{sub MRI}. The standard deviations between the average volumes of GTV{sub PET} and GTV{sub MRI} ratios for all thresholds were large, ranging from 36% for 2 xB up to 93% for 10 xB. Maximum uptake-to-background ratio correlated poorly with the maximum standardized uptake values. Conclusions: It is unlikely that PET/CT will make a significant contribution in GTV definition for radiotherapy treatment planning in patients with STS using threshold methods on PET images. Future studies will focus on molecular imaging and tumor physiology.

Karam, Irene [Department of Radiation Oncology, McGill University Health Centre, Montreal, Quebec (Canada); Devic, Slobodan [Department of Medical Physics, McGill University Health Centre, Montreal, Quebec (Canada); Hickeson, Marc [Department of Nuclear Medicine, McGill University Health Centre, Montreal, Quebec (Canada); Roberge, David [Department of Radiation Oncology, McGill University Health Centre, Montreal, Quebec (Canada); Turcotte, Robert E. [Department of Orthopedic Surgery, McGill University Health Centre, Montreal, Quebec (Canada); Freeman, Carolyn R., E-mail: carolyn.freeman@muhc.mcgill.c [Department of Radiation Oncology, McGill University Health Centre, Montreal, Quebec (Canada)

2009-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

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181

Reference-free ground truth metric for metal artifact evaluation in CT images  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: In computed tomography (CT), metal objects in the region of interest introduce data inconsistencies during acquisition. Reconstructing these data results in an image with star shaped artifacts induced by the metal inconsistencies. To enhance image quality, the influence of the metal objects can be reduced by different metal artifact reduction (MAR) strategies. For an adequate evaluation of new MAR approaches a ground truth reference data set is needed. In technical evaluations, where phantoms can be measured with and without metal inserts, ground truth data can easily be obtained by a second reference data acquisition. Obviously, this is not possible for clinical data. Here, an alternative evaluation method is presented without the need of an additionally acquired reference data set. Methods: The proposed metric is based on an inherent ground truth for metal artifacts as well as MAR methods comparison, where no reference information in terms of a second acquisition is needed. The method is based on the forward projection of a reconstructed image, which is compared to the actually measured projection data. Results: The new evaluation technique is performed on phantom and on clinical CT data with and without MAR. The metric results are then compared with methods using a reference data set as well as an expert-based classification. It is shown that the new approach is an adequate quantification technique for artifact strength in reconstructed metal or MAR CT images. Conclusions: The presented method works solely on the original projection data itself, which yields some advantages compared to distance measures in image domain using two data sets. Beside this, no parameters have to be manually chosen. The new metric is a useful evaluation alternative when no reference data are available.

Kratz, Baerbel; Ens, Svitlana; Mueller, Jan; Buzug, Thorsten M. [Institute of Medical Engineering, University of Luebeck, 23538 Luebeck (Germany)

2011-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

182

Cost-Effectiveness of CT Screening in the National Lung Screening Trial  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer-related deaths in the United States; however, until recently, no method of screening had been shown to reduce mortality from lung cancer. The National Lung Screening Trial (NLST) showed that screening with low-dose helical computed tomography (CT) of the... The screening of persons at risk for lung cancer may reduce lung-cancer mortality by 20%. Although cost-effectiveness estimates vary widely depending on assumptions, a careful analysis indicates that the cost is $81,000 per quality-adjusted life-year.

Black W.C.; Gareen I.F.; Soneji S.S.

2014-11-06T23:59:59.000Z

183

Probability of Cancer in Pulmonary Nodules Detected on First Screening CT  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...nodules; one-sided 97.5% CI, 0 to 0.006). The location of a nodule was evaluated according to lobar distribution. A larger number of nodules and a larger number of cancers were observed in the left upper and right upper lobes than in the left or right lower lobes or the right middle lobe (Table 1). For... Using data from two large data sets of lung-cancer screening by CT, the authors identified factors that increased the likelihood that a nodule was malignant, including older age, female sex, nodule location in the upper lobe, lower nodule count, and certain nodule features.

McWilliams A.; Tammemagi M.C.; Mayo J.R.

2013-09-05T23:59:59.000Z

184

Improving best-phase image quality in cardiac CT by motion correction with MAM optimization  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: Research in image reconstruction for cardiac CT aims at using motion correction algorithms to improve the image quality of the coronary arteries. The key to those algorithms is motion estimation, which is currently based on 3-D/3-D registration to align the structures of interest in images acquired in multiple heart phases. The need for an extended scan data range covering several heart phases is critical in terms of radiation dose to the patient and limits the clinical potential of the method. Furthermore, literature reports only slight quality improvements of the motion corrected images when compared to the most quiet phase (best-phase) that was actually used for motion estimation. In this paper a motion estimation algorithm is proposed which does not require an extended scan range but works with a short scan data interval, and which markedly improves the best-phase image quality. Methods: Motion estimation is based on the definition of motion artifact metrics (MAM) to quantify motion artifacts in a 3-D reconstructed image volume. The authors use two different MAMs, entropy, and positivity. By adjusting the motion field parameters, the MAM of the resulting motion-compensated reconstruction is optimized using a gradient descent procedure. In this way motion artifacts are minimized. For a fast and practical implementation, only analytical methods are used for motion estimation and compensation. Both the MAM-optimization and a 3-D/3-D registration-based motion estimation algorithm were investigated by means of a computer-simulated vessel with a cardiac motion profile. Image quality was evaluated using normalized cross-correlation (NCC) with the ground truth template and root-mean-square deviation (RMSD). Four coronary CT angiography patient cases were reconstructed to evaluate the clinical performance of the proposed method. Results: For the MAM-approach, the best-phase image quality could be improved for all investigated heart phases, with a maximum improvement of the NCC value by 100% and of the RMSD value by 81%. The corresponding maximum improvements for the registration-based approach were 20% and 40%. In phases with very rapid motion the registration-based algorithm obtained better image quality, while the image quality of the MAM algorithm was superior in phases with less motion. The image quality improvement of the MAM optimization was visually confirmed for the different clinical cases. Conclusions: The proposed method allows a software-based best-phase image quality improvement in coronary CT angiography. A short scan data interval at the target heart phase is sufficient, no additional scan data in other cardiac phases are required. The algorithm is therefore directly applicable to any standard cardiac CT acquisition protocol.

Rohkohl, Christopher; Bruder, Herbert; Stierstorfer, Karl [Siemens AG, Healthcare Sector, Siemensstrasse 1, 91301 Forchheim (Germany); Flohr, Thomas [Siemens AG, Healthcare Sector, Siemensstrasse 1, 91301 Forchheim (Germany); Institute of Diagnostic Radiology, Eberhard Karls University, Hoppe-Seyler-Str. 3, 72076 Tuebingen (Germany)

2013-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

185

DOE Zero Energy Ready Home Case Study, Preferred Builders, Old Greenwich, CT, Custom  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Case study of a DOE Zero Energy Ready Home in Old Greenwich CT, that scored HERS 42 without PV or HERS 20 with PV. This 2,700 ft2 custom home has advanced framed walls with R-24 blown cellulose plus R-7.5 EPS rigid foam, membrane-coated OSB, a close-cell spray foamed attic, R-13 closed-cell spray foam under the slab and on basement walls, an ERV, and a gas boiler for forced air and radiant floor heat.

186

MRI- Versus CT-Based Volume Delineation of Lumpectomy Cavity in Supine Position in Breast-Conserving Therapy: An Exploratory Study  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: To examine magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and computed tomography (CT) for lumpectomy cavity (LC) volume delineation in supine radiotherapy treatment position and to assess the interobserver variability. Methods and Materials: A total of 15 breast cancer patients underwent a planning CT and directly afterward MRI in supine radiotherapy treatment position. Then, 4 observers (2 radiation oncologists and 2 radiologists) delineated the LC on the CT and MRI scans and assessed the cavity visualization score (CVS). The CVS, LC volume, conformity index (CI), mean shift of the center of mass (COM), with the standard deviation, were quantified for both CT and MRI. Results: The CVS showed that MRI and CT provide about equal optimal visibility of the LC. If the CVS was high, magnetic resonance imaging provided more detail of the interfaces of the LC seroma with the unaffected GBT. MRI also pictured in more detail the interfaces of axillary seromas (if present) with their surroundings and their relationship to the LC. Three observers delineated smaller, and one observer larger, LC volumes comparing the MRI- and CT-derived delineations. The mean {+-} standard deviation CI was 32% {+-} 25% for MRI and 52% {+-} 21% for CT. The mean {+-} standard deviation COM shift was 11 {+-} 10 mm (range 1-36) for MRI and 4 {+-} 3 mm (range 1-10) for CT. Conclusions: MRI does not add additional information to CT in cases in which the CVS is assessed as low. The conformity (CI) is lower for MRI than for CT, especially at a low CVS owing to greater COM shifts for MRI, probably caused by inadequate visibility of the surgical clips on magnetic resonance (MR) images. The COM shifts seriously dictate a decline in the CI more than the variability of the LC volumes does. In cases in which MRI provides additional information, MRI must be combined with the CT/surgical clip data.

Giezen, Marina, E-mail: marinagiezen@zonnet.nl [Radiotherapy Center West, Medical Center Haaglanden, The Hague (Netherlands); Kouwenhoven, Erik [Radiotherapy Center West, Medical Center Haaglanden, The Hague (Netherlands); Scholten, Astrid N. [Department of Clinical Oncology, Leiden University Medical Center, Leiden (Netherlands); Coerkamp, Emile G.; Heijenbrok, Mark [Department of Radiology, Medical Center Haaglanden, The Hague (Netherlands); Jansen, Wim P.A. [Department of Clinical Oncology, Leiden University Medical Center, Leiden (Netherlands); Mast, Mirjam E.; Petoukhova, Anna L. [Radiotherapy Center West, Medical Center Haaglanden, The Hague (Netherlands); Struikmans, Henk [Radiotherapy Center West, Medical Center Haaglanden, The Hague (Netherlands); Department of Clinical Oncology, Leiden University Medical Center, Leiden (Netherlands)

2012-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

187

MRI and CT image indexing and retrieval using local mesh peak valley edge patterns  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract In this paper, a new pattern based feature, local mesh peak valley edge pattern (LMePVEP) is proposed for biomedical image indexing and retrieval. The standard LBP extracts the gray scale relationship between the center pixel and its surrounding neighbors in an image. Whereas the proposed method extracts the gray scale relationship among the neighbors for a given center pixel in an image. The relations among the neighbors are peak/valley edges which are obtained by performing the first-order derivative. The performance of the proposed method (LMePVEP) is tested by conducting two experiments on two benchmark biomedical databases. Further, it is mentioned that the databases used for experiments are OASIS?MRI database which is the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) database and VIA/IELCAP-CT database which includes region of interest computer tomography (CT) images. The results after being investigated show a significant improvement in terms average retrieval precision (ARP) and average retrieval rate (ARR) as compared to LBP and LBP variant features.

Subrahmanyam Murala; Q.M. Jonathan Wu

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

188

Comparative dosimetry of dental CBCT devices and 64-slice CT for oral and maxillofacial radiology  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Objectives This study compares 2 measures of effective dose, E1990 and E2007, for 8 dentoalveolar and maxillofacial cone-beam computerized tomography (CBCT) units and a 64-slice multidetector CT (MDCT) unit. Study design Average tissue-absorbed dose, equivalent dose, and effective dose were calculated using thermoluminescent dosimeter chips in a radiation analog dosimetry phantom. Effective doses were derived using 1990 and the superseding 2007 International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) recommendations. Results Large-field of view (FOV) CBCT E2007 ranged from 68 to 1,073 ?Sv. Medium-FOV CBCT E2007 ranged from 69 to 560 ?Sv, whereas a similar-FOV MDCT produced 860 ?Sv. The E2007 calculations were 23% to 224% greater than E1990. Conclusions The 2007 recommendations of the ICRP, which include salivary glands, extrathoracic region, and oral mucosa in the calculation of effective dose, result in an upward reassessment of fatal cancer risk from oral and maxillofacial radiographic examinations. Dental CBCT can be recommended as a dose-sparing technique in comparison with alternative medical CT scans for common oral and maxillofacial radiographic imaging tasks.

John B. Ludlow; Marija Ivanovic

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

189

Dose calculation software for helical tomotherapy, utilizing patient CT data to calculate an independent three-dimensional dose cube  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: Treatment plans for the TomoTherapy unit are produced with a planning system that is integral to the unit. The authors have produced an independent dose calculation system, to enable plans to be recalculated in three dimensions, using the patient's CT data. Methods: Software has been written using MATLAB. The DICOM-RT plan object is used to determine the treatment parameters used, including the treatment sinogram. Each projection of the sinogram is segmented and used to calculate dose at multiple calculation points in a three-dimensional grid using tables of measured beam data. A fast ray-trace algorithm is used to determine effective depth for each projection angle at each calculation point. Calculations were performed on a standard desktop personal computer, with a 2.6 GHz Pentium, running Windows XP. Results: The time to perform a calculation, for 3375 points averaged 1 min 23 s for prostate plans and 3 min 40 s for head and neck plans. The mean dose within the 50% isodose was calculated and compared with the predictions of the TomoTherapy planning system. When the modified CT (which includes the TomoTherapy couch) was used, the mean difference for ten prostate patients, was -0.4% (range -0.9% to +0.3%). With the original CT (which included the CT couch), the mean difference was -1.0% (range -1.7% to 0.0%). The number of points agreeing with a gamma 3%/3 mm averaged 99.2% with the modified CT, 96.3% with the original CT. For ten head and neck patients, for the modified and original CT, respectively, the mean difference was +1.1% (range -0.4% to +3.1%) and 1.1% (range -0.4% to +3.0%) with 94.4% and 95.4% passing a gamma 4%/4 mm. The ability of the program to detect a variety of simulated errors has been tested. Conclusions: By using the patient's CT data, the independent dose calculation performs checks that are not performed by a measurement in a cylindrical phantom. This enables it to be used either as an additional check or to replace phantom measurements for some patients. The software has potential to be used in any application where one wishes to model changes to patient conditions.

Thomas, Simon J.; Eyre, Katie R.; Tudor, G. Samuel J.; Fairfoul, Jamie [Medical Physics Department, Addenbrooke's Hospital, Cambridge CB2 0QQ (United Kingdom)

2012-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

190

Predicting the fidelity of JPEG2000 compressed CT images using DICOM header information  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: To propose multiple logistic regression (MLR) and artificial neural network (ANN) models constructed using digital imaging and communications in medicine (DICOM) header information in predicting the fidelity of Joint Photographic Experts Group (JPEG) 2000 compressed abdomen computed tomography (CT) images. Methods: Our institutional review board approved this study and waived informed patient consent. Using a JPEG2000 algorithm, 360 abdomen CT images were compressed reversibly (n = 48, as negative control) or irreversibly (n = 312) to one of different compression ratios (CRs) ranging from 4:1 to 10:1. Five radiologists independently determined whether the original and compressed images were distinguishable or indistinguishable. The 312 irreversibly compressed images were divided randomly into training (n = 156) and testing (n = 156) sets. The MLR and ANN models were constructed regarding the DICOM header information as independent variables and the pooled radiologists' responses as dependent variable. As independent variables, we selected the CR (DICOM tag number: 0028, 2112), effective tube current-time product (0018, 9332), section thickness (0018, 0050), and field of view (0018, 0090) among the DICOM tags. Using the training set, an optimal subset of independent variables was determined by backward stepwise selection in a four-fold cross-validation scheme. The MLR and ANN models were constructed with the determined independent variables using the training set. The models were then evaluated on the testing set by using receiver-operating-characteristic (ROC) analysis regarding the radiologists' pooled responses as the reference standard and by measuring Spearman rank correlation between the model prediction and the number of radiologists who rated the two images as distinguishable. Results: The CR and section thickness were determined as the optimal independent variables. The areas under the ROC curve for the MLR and ANN predictions were 0.91 (95% CI; 0.86, 0.95) and 0.92 (0.87, 0.96), respectively. The correlation coefficients of the MLR and ANN predictions with the number of radiologists who responded as distinguishable were 0.76 (0.69, 0.82, p < 0.001) and 0.78 (0.71, 0.83, p < 0.001), respectively. Conclusions: The MLR and ANN models constructed using the DICOM header information offer promise in predicting the fidelity of JPEG2000 compressed abdomen CT images.

Kim, Kil Joong; Kim, Bohyoung; Lee, Hyunna; Choi, Hosik; Jeon, Jong-June; Ahn, Jeong-Hwan; Lee, Kyoung Ho [Department of Radiation Applied Life Science, Seoul National University College of Medicine, 28 Yongon-dong, Chongno-gu, Seoul, 110-744 (Korea, Republic of); School of Computer Science and Engineering, Seoul National University, 599 Kwanak-Ro, Kwanak-Gu, Seoul, 151-742 (Korea, Republic of); Department of Informational Statistics, Hoseo University, 165, Sechul-ri, Baebang-myeon, Asan-si, Chungcheongnam-do, 336-795 (Korea, Republic of); Department of Statistics, Seoul National University, 599 Kwanak-Ro, Kwanak-Gu, Seoul, 151-742 (Korea, Republic of); Korean Intellectual Property Office, Government Complex-Daejeon, 139 Seonsa-ro, Seo-gu, Daejeon, 302-701 (Korea, Republic of); Department of Radiology, Seoul National University Bundang Hospital, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Institute of Radiation Medicine, and Seoul National University Medical Research Center, 300 Gumi-dong, Bundang-gu, Seongnam-si, Gyeonggi-do, 463-707 (Korea, Republic of)

2011-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

191

A hybrid approach for rapid, accurate, and direct kilovoltage radiation dose calculations in CT voxel space  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: To develop and validate a fast and accurate method that uses computed tomography (CT) voxel data to estimate absorbed radiation dose at a point of interest (POI) or series of POIs from a kilovoltage (kV) imaging procedure. Methods: The authors developed an approach that computes absorbed radiation dose at a POI by numerically evaluating the linear Boltzmann transport equation (LBTE) using a combination of deterministic and Monte Carlo (MC) techniques. This hybrid approach accounts for material heterogeneity with a level of accuracy comparable to the general MC algorithms. Also, the dose at a POI is computed within seconds using the Intel Core i7 CPU 920 2.67 GHz quad core architecture, and the calculations are performed using CT voxel data, making it flexible and feasible for clinical applications. To validate the method, the authors constructed and acquired a CT scan of a heterogeneous block phantom consisting of a succession of slab densities: Tissue (1.29 cm), bone (2.42 cm), lung (4.84 cm), bone (1.37 cm), and tissue (4.84 cm). Using the hybrid transport method, the authors computed the absorbed doses at a set of points along the central axis and x direction of the phantom for an isotropic 125 kVp photon spectral point source located along the central axis 92.7 cm above the phantom surface. The accuracy of the results was compared to those computed with MCNP, which was cross-validated with EGSnrc, and served as the benchmark for validation. Results: The error in the depth dose ranged from -1.45% to +1.39% with a mean and standard deviation of -0.12% and 0.66%, respectively. The error in the x profile ranged from -1.3% to +0.9%, with standard deviations of -0.3% and 0.5%, respectively. The number of photons required to achieve these results was 1x10{sup 6}. Conclusions: The voxel-based hybrid method evaluates the LBTE rapidly and accurately to estimate the absorbed x-ray dose at any POI or series of POIs from a kV imaging procedure.

Kouznetsov, Alexei; Tambasco, Mauro [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Calgary, Calgary, Alberta T2N 1N4 (Canada); Department of Physics and Astronomy and Department of Oncology, University of Calgary and Tom Baker Cancer Centre, 1331-29 Street NW Calgary, Alberta T2N 4N2 (Canada)

2011-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

192

A Backprojection-Filtration Algorithm for Nonstandard Spiral Cone-beam CT with an N-PI Window  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

triangulation. Then, they proposed a quasi-exact FBP reconstruction algorithm [9] using three sets of filter1 A Backprojection-Filtration Algorithm for Nonstandard Spiral Cone-beam CT with an N-PI Window in the nonstandard spiral scanning case. In this paper, we design an n-PI-window-based BPF algorithm, and report

Ye, Yangbo

193

Methods for reduced platen compression (RPC) test specimen cutting locations using micro-CT and planar radiographs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to complete an RPC analysis and improving the quality of the obtained results. High-resolution micro-CT scans are used to gain a better understanding of rat long bone anatomy by quantifying the location, shape, and orientation of the growth plate, primary...

Lemmon, Heber

2004-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

194

Abstract-Proton Computed Tomography (CT) has important implications for both image-guided diagnosis and radiation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-guided diagnosis and radiation therapy. For diagnosis, the fact that the patient dose committed by proton CT only render approximate stopping power estimates, limiting the power of proton radiation therapy radiation therapy is one of the most precise forms of image-guided cancer therapy since the sharp dose peak

California at Santa Cruz, University of

195

Model-based image reconstruction for dual-energy X-ray CT with fast KVP switching  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The most recent generation of X-ray CT systems can collect dual energy (DE) sinograms by rapidly switching the X-ray tube voltage between two levels for alternate projection views. This reduces motion artifacts in DE imaging, but yields sinograms that ... Keywords: dualenergy X-ray computed tomography, model-based image reconstruction, penalized likelihood

Wonseok Huh; Jeffrey A. Fessler

2009-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

196

A resource for the assessment of lung nodule size estimation methods: database of thoracic CT scans of an anthropomorphic phantom  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A number of interrelated factors can affect the precision and accuracy of lung nodule size estimation. To quantify the effect of these factors, we have been conducting phantom CT... Full-Text PDF contains links to datasets. See ISP homepage for software requirements and other information.

Gavrielides, Marios A; Kinnard, Lisa M; Myers, Kyle J; Peregoy, Jennifer; Pritchard, William F; Zeng, Rongping; Esparza, Juan; Karanian, John; Petrick, Nicholas

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

197

Multi-GPU parallelization of a 3D Bayesian CT algorithm and its application on real foam reconstruction with incomplete  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Tomography (CT) [1,2]. The limits of these methods appear when the number of projections is small, and for example, the data set are not complete due to the limited acquistion time. In this specific context is the computation time and especially for projection and backprojection steps. In this study, first we show how we

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

198

DOE Challenge Home Case Study, Preferred Builders, Old Greenwhich, CT, Custom  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Preferred Preferred Builders, Inc. Old Greenwich, CT BUILDING TECHNOLOGIES OFFICE DOE Challenge Home builders are in the top 1% of builders in the country meeting the extraordinary levels of excellence and quality specifi ed by the U.S. Department of Energy. Every DOE Challenge Home starts with ENERGY STAR for Homes Version 3 for an energy-effi cient home built on a solid foundation of building science research. Then, even more advanced technologies are designed in for a home that goes above and beyond current code to give you the superior quality construction, HVAC, appliances, indoor air quality, safety, durability, comfort, and solar-ready components along with ultra-low or no utility bills. This provides homeowners with a quality home that will last for generations to come.

199

DOE Challenge Home Case Study, BPC Green Builders, Custom Home, New Fairfield, CT  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

BPC Green BPC Green Builders New Fairfi eld, CT BUILDING TECHNOLOGIES OFFICE DOE Challenge Home builders are in the top 1% of builders in the country meeting the extraordinary levels of excellence and quality specifi ed by the U.S. Department of Energy. Every DOE Challenge Home starts with ENERGY STAR for Homes Version 3 for an energy-effi cient home built on a solid foundation of building science research. Then, even more advanced technologies are designed in for a home that goes above and beyond current code to give you the superior quality construction, HVAC, appliances, indoor air quality, safety, durability, comfort, and solar-ready components along with ultra-low or no utility bills. This provides homeowners with a quality home that will last for generations to come.

200

Dynamic Multiscale Boundary Conditions for 4D CT Images of Healthy and Emphysematous Rat  

SciTech Connect

Changes in the shape of the lung during breathing determine the movement of airways and alveoli, and thus impact airflow dynamics. Modeling airflow dynamics in health and disease is a key goal for predictive multiscale models of respiration. Past efforts to model changes in lung shape during breathing have measured shape at multiple breath-holds. However, breath-holds do not capture hysteretic differences between inspiration and expiration resulting from the additional energy required for inspiration. Alternatively, imaging dynamically without breath-holds allows measurement of hysteretic differences. In this study, we acquire multiple micro-CT images per breath (4DCT) in live rats, and from these images we develop, for the first time, dynamic volume maps. These maps show changes in local volume across the entire lung throughout the breathing cycle and accurately predict the global pressure-volume (PV) hysteresis.

Jacob, Rick E.; Carson, James P.; Thomas, Mathew; Einstein, Daniel R.

2013-06-14T23:59:59.000Z

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201

Simulation of Cone Beam CT System Based on Monte Carlo Method  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Adaptive Radiation Therapy (ART) was developed based on Image-guided Radiation Therapy (IGRT) and it is the trend of photon radiation therapy. To get a better use of Cone Beam CT (CBCT) images for ART, the CBCT system model was established based on Monte Carlo program and validated against the measurement. The BEAMnrc program was adopted to the KV x-ray tube. Both IOURCE-13 and ISOURCE-24 were chosen to simulate the path of beam particles. The measured Percentage Depth Dose (PDD) and lateral dose profiles under 1cm water were compared with the dose calculated by DOSXYZnrc program. The calculated PDD was better than 1% within the depth of 10cm. More than 85% points of calculated lateral dose profiles was within 2%. The correct CBCT system model helps to improve CBCT image quality for dose verification in ART and assess the CBCT image concomitant dose risk.

Wang, Yu; Cao, Ruifen; Hu, Liqin; Li, Bingbing

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

202

Fast Scatter Artifacts Correction for Cone-Beam CT without System Modification and Repeat Scan  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We provide a fast and accurate scatter artifacts correction algorithm for cone beam CT (CBCT) imaging. The method starts with an estimation of coarse scatter profile for a set of CBCT images. A total-variation denoising algorithm designed specifically for Poisson signal is then applied to derive the final scatter distribution. Qualitatively and quantitatively evaluations using Monte Carlo (MC) simulations, experimental CBCT phantom data, and \\emph{in vivo} human data acquired for a clinical image guided radiation therapy were performed. Results show that the proposed algorithm can significantly reduce scatter artifacts and recover the correct HU within either projection domain or image domain. Further test shows the method is robust with respect to segmentation procedure.

Zhao, Wei; Wang, Luyao

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

203

Contouring Variability of the Penile Bulb on CT Images: Quantitative Assessment Using a Generalized Concordance Index  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: Within a multicenter study (DUE-01) focused on the search of predictors of erectile dysfunction and urinary toxicity after radiotherapy for prostate cancer, a dummy run exercise on penile bulb (PB) contouring on computed tomography (CT) images was carried out. The aim of this study was to quantitatively assess interobserver contouring variability by the application of the generalized DICE index. Methods and Materials: Fifteen physicians from different Institutes drew the PB on CT images of 10 patients. The spread of DICE values was used to objectively select those observers who significantly disagreed with the others. The analyses were performed with a dedicated module in the VODCA software package. Results: DICE values were found to significantly change among observers and patients. The mean DICE value was 0.67, ranging between 0.43 and 0.80. The statistics of DICE coefficients identified 4 of 15 observers who systematically showed a value below the average (p value range, 0.013 - 0.059): Mean DICE values were 0.62 for the 4 'bad' observers compared to 0.69 of the 11 'good' observers. For all bad observers, the main cause of the disagreement was identified. Average DICE values were significantly worse from the average in 2 of 10 patients (0.60 vs. 0.70, p < 0.05) because of the limited visibility of the PB. Excluding the bad observers and the 'bad' patients,' the mean DICE value increased from 0.67 to 0.70; interobserver variability, expressed in terms of standard deviation of DICE spread, was also reduced. Conclusions: The obtained values of DICE around 0.7 shows an acceptable agreement, considered the small dimension of the PB. Additional strategies to improve this agreement are under consideration and include an additional tutorial of the so-called bad observers with a recontouring procedure, or the recontouring by a single observer of the PB for all patients included in the DUE-01 study.

Carillo, Viviana [Department of Medical Physics, San Raffaele Scientific Institute, Milano (Italy)] [Department of Medical Physics, San Raffaele Scientific Institute, Milano (Italy); Cozzarini, Cesare [Department of Radiotherapy, San Raffaele Scientific Institute, Milano (Italy)] [Department of Radiotherapy, San Raffaele Scientific Institute, Milano (Italy); Perna, Lucia; Calandra, Mauro [Department of Medical Physics, San Raffaele Scientific Institute, Milano (Italy)] [Department of Medical Physics, San Raffaele Scientific Institute, Milano (Italy); Gianolini, Stefano [Medical Software Solutions GmbH, Hagendorn (Switzerland)] [Medical Software Solutions GmbH, Hagendorn (Switzerland); Rancati, Tiziana [Prostate Cancer Program, IRCCS National Institute of Cancer, Milano (Italy)] [Prostate Cancer Program, IRCCS National Institute of Cancer, Milano (Italy); Spinelli, Antonello Enrico [Department of Medical Physics, San Raffaele Scientific Institute, Milano (Italy)] [Department of Medical Physics, San Raffaele Scientific Institute, Milano (Italy); Vavassori, Vittorio [Department of Radiotherapy, Cliniche Gavazzeni Humanitas, Bergamo (Italy)] [Department of Radiotherapy, Cliniche Gavazzeni Humanitas, Bergamo (Italy); Villa, Sergio [Department of Radiotherapy 1, IRCCS National Institute of Cancer, Milano (Italy)] [Department of Radiotherapy 1, IRCCS National Institute of Cancer, Milano (Italy); Valdagni, Riccardo [Prostate Cancer Program, IRCCS National Institute of Cancer, Milano (Italy) [Prostate Cancer Program, IRCCS National Institute of Cancer, Milano (Italy); Department of Radiotherapy 1, IRCCS National Institute of Cancer, Milano (Italy); Fiorino, Claudio, E-mail: fiorino.claudio@hsr.it [Department of Medical Physics, San Raffaele Scientific Institute, Milano (Italy)] [Department of Medical Physics, San Raffaele Scientific Institute, Milano (Italy)

2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

204

Statistical CT noise reduction with multiscale decomposition and penalized weighted least squares in the projection domain  

SciTech Connect

Purposes: The suppression of noise in x-ray computed tomography (CT) imaging is of clinical relevance for diagnostic image quality and the potential for radiation dose saving. Toward this purpose, statistical noise reduction methods in either the image or projection domain have been proposed, which employ a multiscale decomposition to enhance the performance of noise suppression while maintaining image sharpness. Recognizing the advantages of noise suppression in the projection domain, the authors propose a projection domain multiscale penalized weighted least squares (PWLS) method, in which the angular sampling rate is explicitly taken into consideration to account for the possible variation of interview sampling rate in advanced clinical or preclinical applications. Methods: The projection domain multiscale PWLS method is derived by converting an isotropic diffusion partial differential equation in the image domain into the projection domain, wherein a multiscale decomposition is carried out. With adoption of the Markov random field or soft thresholding objective function, the projection domain multiscale PWLS method deals with noise at each scale. To compensate for the degradation in image sharpness caused by the projection domain multiscale PWLS method, an edge enhancement is carried out following the noise reduction. The performance of the proposed method is experimentally evaluated and verified using the projection data simulated by computer and acquired by a CT scanner. Results: The preliminary results show that the proposed projection domain multiscale PWLS method outperforms the projection domain single-scale PWLS method and the image domain multiscale anisotropic diffusion method in noise reduction. In addition, the proposed method can preserve image sharpness very well while the occurrence of 'salt-and-pepper' noise and mosaic artifacts can be avoided. Conclusions: Since the interview sampling rate is taken into account in the projection domain multiscale decomposition, the proposed method is anticipated to be useful in advanced clinical and preclinical applications where the interview sampling rate varies.

Tang Shaojie; Tang Xiangyang [Imaging and Medical Physics, Department of Radiology and Imaging Sciences, Emory University School of Medicine, 1701 Uppergate Dr., C-5018, Atlanta, Georgia 30322 (United States); School of Automation, Xi'an University of Posts and Telecommunications, Xi'an, Shaanxi 710121 (China); Imaging and Medical Physics, Department of Radiology and Imaging Sciences, Emory University School of Medicine, 1701 Uppergate Dr., C-5018, Atlanta, Georgia 30322 (United States)

2012-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

205

Best fit refractive index of matching liquid for 3D NIPAM gel dosimeters using optical CT  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The accuracy of an optical computed tomography (CT)-based dosimeter is significantly affected by the refractive index (RI) of the matching liquid. Mismatched RI induces reflection and refraction as the laser beam passes through the gel phantom. Moreover, the unwanted light rays collected by the photodetector produce image artifacts after image reconstruction from the collected data. To obtain the best image quality, this study investigates the best-fit RI of the matching liquid for a 3D NIPAM gel dosimeter. The three recipes of NIPAM polymer gel used in this study consisted of 5% gelatin, 5% NIPAM and 3% N,N'-methylene bisacrylamide, which were combined with three compositions (5, 10, and 20mM) of Tetrakis (hydroxymethyl) phosphonium chloride. Results were evaluated using a quantitative evaluation method of the gamma evaluation technique. Results showed that the best-fit RI for the non-irradiated NIPAM gel ranges from 1.340 to 1.346 for various NIPAM recipes with sensitivities ranging from 0.0113 to 0.0227. The greatest pass rate of 88.00% is achieved using best-fit RI=1.346 of the matching liquid. The adoption of mismatching RI decreases the gamma pass rate by 2.63% to 16.75% for all three recipes of NIPAM gel dosimeters. In addition, the maximum average deviation is less than 0.1% for the red and transparent matching liquids. Thus, the color of the matching liquid does not affect the measurement accuracy of the NIPAM gel dosimeter, as measured by optical CT.

Chin-Hsing Chen; Jay Wu; Bor-Tsung Hsieh; De-Shiou Chen; Tzu-Hwei Wang; Sou-Hsin Chien; Yuan-Jen Chang

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

206

Supercritical CO2 core flooding and imbibition in Berea sandstone CT imaging and numerical simulation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper reports a numerical simulation study of a full CO2 core flooding and imbibition cycle on a Berea sandstone core (measured 14.45cm long and 3.67cm in diameter). During the test, supercritical CO2 (at 10MPa and 40C) and CO2-saturated brine was injected into one end of the horizontal core and a X-ray CT scanner (with a resolution of 0.35mmנ0.35mm) was employed to monitor and record changes in the fluid saturations, which enabled 3D mapping of the saturation profiles throughout the core during the course of core flooding test. From the digital CT saturation data, mean saturation profiles along the core length were plotted with time. A 1D model of the core was constructed to simulate the core flooding test and attempt was made to history match core test results, particularly the evolution of the mean CO2 saturation profiles during CO2 injection. Curve-fitting of the centrifugal air-water capillary pressure data (drainage) for the Berea core showed that the core test data could be adequately described by the Van Genuchten equation. The matched set of parameters ( S l r , P 0 , m ) were 0.09, 20KPa, 0.425 respectively. In the absence of the relative permeability for the Berea core, it was decided to use the parameters obtained from matching the air-water capillary pressure data as a first approximation for the CO2-brine system in the model.

Ji-Quan Shi; Ziqiu Xue; Sevket Durucan

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

207

Reducing metal artifacts in cone-beam CT images by preprocessing projection data  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: Computed tomography (CT) streak artifacts caused by metallic implants remain a challenge for the automatic processing of image data. The impact of metal artifacts in the soft-tissue region is magnified in cone-beam CT (CBCT), because the soft-tissue contrast is usually lower in CBCT images. The goal of this study was to develop an effective offline processing technique to minimize the effect. Methods and Materials: The geometry calibration cue of the CBCT system was used to track the position of the metal object in projection views. The three-dimensional (3D) representation of the object can be established from only two user-selected viewing angles. The position of the shadowed region in other views can be tracked by projecting the 3D coordinates of the object. Automatic image segmentation was used followed by a Laplacian diffusion method to replace the pixels inside the metal object with the boundary pixels. The modified projection data were then used to reconstruct a new CBCT image. The procedure was tested in phantoms, prostate cancer patients with implanted gold markers and metal prosthesis, and a head-and-neck patient with dental amalgam in the teeth. Results: Both phantom and patient studies demonstrated that the procedure was able to minimize the metal artifacts. Soft-tissue visibility was improved near or away from the metal object. The processing time was 1-2 s per projection. Conclusion: We have implemented an effective metal artifact-suppressing algorithm to improve the quality of CBCT images.

Zhang Yongbin [Department of Radiation Physics, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Zhang Lifei [Department of Radiation Physics, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Zhu, X. Ronald [Department of Radiation Physics, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Lee, Andrew K. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Chambers, Mark [Department of Dental Oncology, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Dong Lei [Department of Radiation Physics, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States)]. E-mail: ldong@mdanderson.org

2007-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

208

Automatic tracking of implanted fiducial markers in cone beam CT projection images  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: This paper describes a novel method for simultaneous intrafraction tracking of multiple fiducial markers. Although the proposed method is generic and can be adopted for a number of applications including fluoroscopy based patient position monitoring and gated radiotherapy, the tracking results presented in this paper are specific to tracking fiducial markers in a sequence of cone beam CT projection images. Methods: The proposed method is accurate and robust thanks to utilizing the mean shift and random sampling principles, respectively. The performance of the proposed method was evaluated with qualitative and quantitative methods, using data from two pancreatic and one prostate cancer patients and a moving phantom. The ground truth, for quantitative evaluation, was calculated based on manual tracking preformed by three observers. Results: The average dispersion of marker position error calculated from the tracking results for pancreas data (six markers tracked over 640 frames, 3840 marker identifications) was 0.25 mm (at iscoenter), compared with an average dispersion for the manual ground truth estimated at 0.22 mm. For prostate data (three markers tracked over 366 frames, 1098 marker identifications), the average error was 0.34 mm. The estimated tracking error in the pancreas data was < 1 mm (2 pixels) in 97.6% of cases where nearby image clutter was detected and in 100.0% of cases with no nearby image clutter. Conclusions: The proposed method has accuracy comparable to that of manual tracking and, in combination with the proposed batch postprocessing, superior robustness. Marker tracking in cone beam CT (CBCT) projections is useful for a variety of purposes, such as providing data for assessment of intrafraction motion, target tracking during rotational treatment delivery, motion correction of CBCT, and phase sorting for 4D CBCT.

Marchant, T. E.; Skalski, A.; Matuszewski, B. J. [Christie Medical Physics and Engineering, The Christie NHS Foundation Trust, Manchester M20 4BX, United Kingdom and Manchester Academic Health Science Centre, University of Manchester, Manchester M20 4BX (United Kingdom); AGH University of Science and Technology, al. A. Mickiewicza 30, Krakow 30-059 (Poland); School of Computing, Engineering and Physical Sciences, University of Central Lancashire, Preston PR1 2HE (United Kingdom)

2012-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

209

Patient radiation dose in prospectively gated axial CT coronary angiography and retrospectively gated helical technique with a 320-detector row CT scanner  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: The aim of this study was to evaluate radiation dose to patients undergoing computed tomography coronary angiography (CTCA) for prospectively gated axial (PGA) technique and retrospectively gated helical (RGH) technique. Methods: Radiation doses were measured for a 320-detector row CT scanner (Toshiba Aquilion ONE) using small sized silicon-photodiode dosimeters, which were implanted at various tissue and organ positions within an anthropomorphic phantom for a standard Japanese adult male. Output signals from photodiode dosimeters were read out on a personal computer, from which organ and effective doses were computed according to guidelines published in the International Commission on Radiological Protection Publication 103. Results: Organs that received high doses were breast, followed by lung, esophagus, and liver. Breast doses obtained with PGA technique and a phase window width of 16% at a simulated heart rate of 60 beats per minute were 13 mGy compared to 53 mGy with RGH technique using electrocardiographically dependent dose modulation at the same phase window width as that in PGA technique. Effective doses obtained in this case were 4.7 and 20 mSv for the PGA and RGH techniques, respectively. Conversion factors of dose length product to the effective dose in PGA and RGH were 0.022 and 0.025 mSv mGy{sup -1} cm{sup -1} with a scan length of 140 mm. Conclusions: CTCA performed with PGA technique provided a substantial effective dose reduction, i.e., 70%-76%, compared to RGH technique using the dose modulation at the same phase windows as those in PGA technique. Though radiation doses in CTCA with RGH technique were the same level as, or some higher than, those in conventional coronary angiography (CCA), the use of PGA technique reduced organ and effective doses to levels less than CCA except for breast dose.

Seguchi, Shigenobu; Aoyama, Takahiko; Koyama, Shuji; Fujii, Keisuke; Yamauchi-Kawaura, Chiyo [Graduate School of Medicine, Nagoya University, Daikominami, Higashi-ku, Nagoya 461-8673 (Japan) and Department of Medical Technology, Nagoya Daini Red Cross Hospital, Myouken-chou, Showa-ku, Nagoya 466-8650 (Japan); Graduate School of Medicine, Nagoya University, Daikominami, Higashi-ku, Nagoya 461-8673 (Japan); Section of Radiological Protection, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, Anagawa, Inage-ku, Chiba 263-8555 (Japan); Graduate School of Medicine, Nagoya University, Daikominami, Higashi-ku, Nagoya 461-8673 (Japan)

2010-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

210

Inter-slice bidirectional registration-based segmentation of the prostate gland in MR and CT image sequences  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: Accurate segmentation and volume estimation of the prostate gland in magnetic resonance (MR) and computed tomography (CT) images are necessary steps in diagnosis, treatment, and monitoring of prostate cancer. This paper presents an algorithm for the prostate gland volume estimation based on the semiautomated segmentation of individual slices in T2-weighted MR and CT image sequences. Methods: The proposedInter-Slice Bidirectional Registration-based Segmentation (iBRS) algorithm relies on interslice image registration of volume data to segment the prostate gland without the use of an anatomical atlas. It requires the user to mark only three slices in a given volume dataset, i.e., the first, middle, and last slices. Next, the proposed algorithm uses a registration algorithm to autosegment the remaining slices. We conducted comprehensive experiments to measure the performance of the proposed algorithm using three registration methods (i.e., rigid, affine, and nonrigid techniques). Results: The results with the proposed technique were compared with manual marking using prostate MR and CT images from 117 patients. Manual marking was performed by an expert user for all 117 patients. The median accuracies for individual slices measured using the Dice similarity coefficient (DSC) were 92% and 91% for MR and CT images, respectively. The iBRS algorithm was also evaluated regarding user variability, which confirmed that the algorithm was robust to interuser variability when marking the prostate gland. Conclusions: The proposed algorithm exploits the interslice data redundancy of the images in a volume dataset of MR and CT images and eliminates the need for an atlas, minimizing the computational cost while producing highly accurate results which are robust to interuser variability.

Khalvati, Farzad, E-mail: farzad.khalvati@uwaterloo.ca; Tizhoosh, Hamid R. [Department of Systems Design Engineering, University of Waterloo, Waterloo, Ontario N2L 3G1 (Canada)] [Department of Systems Design Engineering, University of Waterloo, Waterloo, Ontario N2L 3G1 (Canada); Salmanpour, Aryan; Rahnamayan, Shahryar [Department of Engineering and Applied Science, University of Ontario Institute of Technology, Oshawa, Ontario L1H 7K4 (Canada)] [Department of Engineering and Applied Science, University of Ontario Institute of Technology, Oshawa, Ontario L1H 7K4 (Canada); Rodrigues, George [Department of Radiation Oncology, London Regional Cancer Program, London, Ontario N6C 2R6, Canada and Department of Epidemiology/Biostatistics, University of Western Ontario, London, Ontario N6A 3K7 (Canada)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, London Regional Cancer Program, London, Ontario N6C 2R6, Canada and Department of Epidemiology/Biostatistics, University of Western Ontario, London, Ontario N6A 3K7 (Canada)

2013-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

211

Experimental evaluation of actual delivered dose using mega-voltage cone-beam CT and direct point dose measurement  

SciTech Connect

Radiation therapy in patients is planned by using computed tomography (CT) images acquired before start of the treatment course. Here, tumor shrinkage or weight loss or both, which are common during the treatment course for patients with head-and-neck (H and N) cancer, causes unexpected differences from the plan, as well as dose uncertainty with the daily positional error of patients. For accurate clinical evaluation, it is essential to identify these anatomical changes and daily positional errors, as well as consequent dosimetric changes. To evaluate the actual delivered dose, the authors proposed direct dose measurement and dose calculation with mega-voltage cone-beam CT (MVCBCT). The purpose of the present study was to experimentally evaluate dose calculation by MVCBCT. Furthermore, actual delivered dose was evaluated directly with accurate phantom setup. Because MVCBCT has CT-number variation, even when the analyzed object has a uniform density, a specific and simple CT-number correction method was developed and applied for the H and N site of a RANDO phantom. Dose distributions were calculated with the corrected MVCBCT images of a cylindrical polymethyl methacrylate phantom. Treatment processes from planning to beam delivery were performed for the H and N site of the RANDO phantom. The image-guided radiation therapy procedure was utilized for the phantom setup to improve measurement reliability. The calculated dose in the RANDO phantom was compared to the measured dose obtained by metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect transistor detectors. In the polymethyl methacrylate phantom, the calculated and measured doses agreed within about +3%. In the RANDO phantom, the dose difference was less than +5%. The calculated dose based on simulation-CT agreed with the measured dose within3%, even in the region with a high dose gradient. The actual delivered dose was successfully determined by dose calculation with MVCBCT, and the point dose measurement with the image-guided radiation therapy procedure.

Matsubara, Kana, E-mail: matsubara-kana@hs.tmu.ac.jp [Graduate School of Human Health Sciences, Tokyo Metropolitan University, Arakawa-ku Tokyo (Japan); Kohno, Ryosuke [National Cancer Center Hospital East, Chiba (Japan); National Cancer Center Research Institute, Chiba (Japan); Nishioka, Shie; Shibuya, Toshiyuki; Ariji, Takaki; Akimoto, Tetsuo [National Cancer Center Hospital East, Chiba (Japan); Saitoh, Hidetoshi [Graduate School of Human Health Sciences, Tokyo Metropolitan University, Arakawa-ku Tokyo (Japan)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

212

Potential of dual-energy subtraction for converting CT numbers to electron density based on a single linear relationship  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: The conversion of the computed tomography (CT) number to electron density is one of the main processes that determine the accuracy of patient dose calculations in radiotherapy treatment planning. However, the CT number and electron density of tissues cannot be generally interrelated via a simple one-to-one correspondence because the CT number depends on the effective atomic number as well as the electron density. The purpose of this study is to present a simple conversion from the energy-subtracted CT number ({Delta}HU) by means of dual-energy CT (DECT) to the relative electron density ({rho}{sub e}) via a single linear relationship. Methods: The {Delta}HU-{rho}{sub e} conversion method was demonstrated by performing analytical DECT image simulations that were intended to imitate a second-generation dual-source CT (DSCT) scanner with an additional tin filtration for the high-kV tube. The {Delta}HU-{rho}{sub e} calibration line was obtained from the image simulation with a 33 cm-diameter electron density calibration phantom equipped with 16 inserts including polytetrafluoroethylene, polyvinyl chloride, and aluminum; the elemental compositions of these three inserts were quite different to those of body tissues. The {Delta}HU-{rho}{sub e} conversion method was also applied to previously published experimental CT data, which were measured using two different CT scanners, to validate the clinical feasibility of the present approach. In addition, the effect of object size on {rho}{sub e}-calibrated images was investigated by image simulations using a 25 cm-diameter virtual phantom for two different filtrations: with and without the tin filter for the high-kV tube. Results: The simulated {Delta}HU-{rho}{sub e} plot exhibited a predictable linear relationship over a wide range of {rho}{sub e} from 0.00 (air) to 2.35 (aluminum). Resultant values of the coefficient of determination, slope, and intercept of the linear function fitted to the data were close to those of the ideal case. The maximum difference between the ideal and simulated {rho}{sub e} values was -0.7%. The satisfactory linearity of {Delta}HU-{rho}{sub e} was also confirmed from analyses of the experimental CT data. In the experimental cases, the maximum difference between the nominal and simulated {rho}{sub e} values was found to be 2.5% after two outliers were excluded. When compared with the case without the tin filter, the {Delta}HU-{rho}{sub e} conversion performed with the tin filter yielded a lower dose and more reliable {rho}{sub e} values that were less affected by the object-size variation. Conclusions: The {Delta}HU-{rho}{sub e} calibration line with a simple one-to-one correspondence would facilitate the construction of a well-calibrated {rho}{sub e} image from acquired dual-kV images, and currently, second generation DSCT may be a feasible modality for the clinical use of the {Delta}HU-{rho}{sub e} conversion method.

Saito, Masatoshi [Department of Radiological Technology, School of Health Sciences, Faculty of Medicine, Niigata University, Niigata 951-8518 (Japan)

2012-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

213

A One-Step Cone-Beam CT-Enabled Planning-to-Treatment Model for Palliative Radiotherapy-From Development to Implementation  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: To develop a cone-beam computed tomography (CT)-enabled one-step simulation-to-treatment process for the treatment of bone metastases. Methods and Materials: A three-phase prospective study was conducted. Patients requiring palliative radiotherapy to the spine, mediastinum, or abdomen/pelvis suitable for treatment with simple beam geometry ({<=}2 beams) were accrued. Phase A established the accuracy of cone-beam CT images for the purpose of gross tumor target volume (GTV) definition. Phase B evaluated the feasibility of implementing the cone-beam CT-enabled planning process at the treatment unit. Phase C evaluated the online cone-beam CT-enabled process for the planning and treatment of patients requiring radiotherapy for bone metastases. Results: Eighty-four patients participated in this study. Phase A (n = 9) established the adequacy of cone-beam CT images for target definition. Phase B (n = 45) established the quality of treatment plans to be adequate for clinical implementation for bone metastases. When the process was applied clinically in bone metastases (Phase C), the degree of overlap between planning computed tomography (PCT) and cone-beam CT for GTV and between PCT and cone-beam CT for treatment field was 82% {+-} 11% and 97% {+-} 4%, respectively. The oncologist's decision to accept the plan under a time-pressured environment remained of high quality, with the cone-beam CT-generated treatment plan delivering at least 90% of the prescribed dose to 100% {+-} 0% of the cone-beam CT planning target volume (PTV). With the assumption that the PCT PTV is the gold-standard target, the cone-beam CT-generated treatment plan delivered at least 90% and at least 95% of dose to 98% {+-} 2% and 97% {+-} 5% of the PCT PTV, respectively. The mean time for the online planning and treatment process was 32.7 {+-} 4.0 minutes. Patient satisfaction was high, with a trend for superior satisfaction with the cone-beam CT-enabled process. Conclusions: The cone-beam CT-enabled palliative treatment process is feasible and is ready for clinical implementation for the treatment of bone metastases using simple beam geometry, providing a streamlined one-step process toward palliative radiotherapy.

Wong, Rebecca K.S., E-mail: rebecca.wong@rmp.uhn.on.ca [Radiation Medicine Program, Princess Margaret Hospital, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Letourneau, Daniel; Varma, Anita [Radiation Medicine Program, Princess Margaret Hospital, Toronto, Ontario (Canada) [Radiation Medicine Program, Princess Margaret Hospital, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Bissonnette, Jean Pierre; Fitzpatrick, David; Grabarz, Daniel; Elder, Christine [Radiation Medicine Program, Princess Margaret Hospital, Toronto, Ontario (Canada)] [Radiation Medicine Program, Princess Margaret Hospital, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Martin, Melanie; Bezjak, Andrea [Radiation Medicine Program, Princess Margaret Hospital, Toronto, Ontario (Canada) [Radiation Medicine Program, Princess Margaret Hospital, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Panzarella, Tony [Department of Biostatistics, Princess Margaret Hospital, Toronto, Ontario (Canada)] [Department of Biostatistics, Princess Margaret Hospital, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Gospodarowicz, Mary [Radiation Medicine Program, Princess Margaret Hospital, Toronto, Ontario (Canada) [Radiation Medicine Program, Princess Margaret Hospital, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Jaffray, David A. [Radiation Medicine Program, Princess Margaret Hospital, Toronto, Ontario (Canada) [Radiation Medicine Program, Princess Margaret Hospital, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Department of Medical Biophysics, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada)

2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

214

Effects of ray profile modeling on resolution recovery in clinical CT  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: Iterative image reconstruction gains more and more interest in clinical routine, as it promises to reduce image noise (and thereby patient dose), to reduce artifacts, or to improve spatial resolution. However, among vendors and researchers, there is no consensus of how to best achieve these goals. The authors are focusing on the aspect of geometric ray profile modeling, which is realized by some algorithms, while others model the ray as a straight line. The authors incorporate ray-modeling (RM) in nonregularized iterative reconstruction. That means, instead of using one simple single needle beam to represent the x-ray, the authors evaluate the double integral of attenuation path length over the finite source distribution and the finite detector element size in the numerical forward projection. Our investigations aim at analyzing the resolution recovery (RR) effects of RM. Resolution recovery means that frequencies can be recovered beyond the resolution limit of the imaging system. In order to evaluate, whether clinical CT images can benefit from modeling the geometrical properties of each x-ray, the authors performed a 2D simulation study of a clinical CT fan-beam geometry that includes the precise modeling of these geometrical properties. Methods: All simulations and reconstructions are performed in native fan-beam geometry. A water phantom with resolution bar patterns and a Forbild thorax phantom with circular resolution patterns representing calcifications in the heart region are simulated. An FBP reconstruction with a RamLak kernel is used as a reference reconstruction. The FBP is compared to iterative reconstruction techniques with and without RM: An ordered subsets convex (OSC) algorithm without any RM (OSC), an OSC where the forward projection is modeled concerning the finite focal spot and detector size (OSC-RM) and an OSC with RM and with a matched forward and backprojection pair (OSC-T-RM, T for transpose). In all cases, noise was matched to be able to focus on comparing spatial resolution. The authors use two different simulation settings. Both are based on the geometry of a typical clinical CT system (0.7 mm detector element size at isocenter, 1024 projections per rotation). Setting one has an exaggerated source width of 5.0 mm. Setting two has a realistically small source width of 0.5 mm. The authors also investigate the transition from setting one to two. To quantify image quality, the authors analyze line profiles through the resolution patterns to define a contrast factor (CF) for contrast-resolution plots, and the authors compare the normalized cross-correlation (NCC) with respect to the ground truth of the circular resolution patterns. To independently analyze whether RM is of advantage, the authors implemented several iterative reconstruction algorithms: The statistical iterative reconstruction algorithm OSC, the ordered subsets simultaneous algebraic reconstruction technique (OSSART) and another statistical iterative reconstruction algorithm, denoted with ordered subsets maximum likelihood (OSML) algorithm. All algorithms were implemented both without RM (denoted as OSC, OSSART, and OSML) and with RM (denoted as OSC-RM, OSSART-RM, and OSML-RM). Results: For the unrealistic case of a 5.0 mm focal spot the CF can be improved by a factor of two due to RM: the 4.2 LP/cm bar pattern, which is the first bar pattern that cannot be resolved without RM, can be easily resolved with RM. For the realistic case of a 0.5 mm focus, all results show approximately the same CF. The NCC shows no significant dependency on RM when the source width is smaller than 2.0 mm (as in clinical CT). From 2.0 mm to 5.0 mm focal spot size increasing improvements can be observed with RM. Conclusions: Geometric RM in iterative reconstruction helps improving spatial resolution, if the ray cross-section is significantly larger than the ray sampling distance. In clinical CT, however, the ray is not much thicker than the distance between neighboring ray centers, as the focal spot size is small and detector crosstalk is negligi

Hofmann, Christian [Institute of Medical Physics, FriedrichAlexander University (FAU), Erlangen, Bavaria 91052 (Germany)] [Institute of Medical Physics, FriedrichAlexander University (FAU), Erlangen, Bavaria 91052 (Germany); Knaup, Michael [Medical Physics in Radiology, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Heidelberg 69120 (Germany)] [Medical Physics in Radiology, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Heidelberg 69120 (Germany); Kachelrie, Marc, E-mail: marc.kachelriess@dkfz-heidelberg.de [Medical Physics in Radiology, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Heidelberg 69120, Germany and Institute of Medical Physics, FriedrichAlexander University (FAU), Erlangen, Bavaria 91052 (Germany)] [Medical Physics in Radiology, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Heidelberg 69120, Germany and Institute of Medical Physics, FriedrichAlexander University (FAU), Erlangen, Bavaria 91052 (Germany)

2014-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

215

Three-dimensional anisotropic adaptive filtering of projection data for noise reduction in cone beam CT  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: The combination of quickly rotating C-arm gantry with digital flat panel has enabled the acquisition of three-dimensional data (3D) in the interventional suite. However, image quality is still somewhat limited since the hardware has not been optimized for CT imaging. Adaptive anisotropic filtering has the ability to improve image quality by reducing the noise level and therewith the radiation dose without introducing noticeable blurring. By applying the filtering prior to 3D reconstruction, noise-induced streak artifacts are reduced as compared to processing in the image domain. Methods: 3D anisotropic adaptive filtering was used to process an ensemble of 2D x-ray views acquired along a circular trajectory around an object. After arranging the input data into a 3D space (2D projections + angle), the orientation of structures was estimated using a set of differently oriented filters. The resulting tensor representation of local orientation was utilized to control the anisotropic filtering. Low-pass filtering is applied only along structures to maintain high spatial frequency components perpendicular to these. The evaluation of the proposed algorithm includes numerical simulations, phantom experiments, and in-vivo data which were acquired using an AXIOM Artis dTA C-arm system (Siemens AG, Healthcare Sector, Forchheim, Germany). Spatial resolution and noise levels were compared with and without adaptive filtering. A human observer study was carried out to evaluate low-contrast detectability. Results: The adaptive anisotropic filtering algorithm was found to significantly improve low-contrast detectability by reducing the noise level by half (reduction of the standard deviation in certain areas from 74 to 30 HU). Virtually no degradation of high contrast spatial resolution was observed in the modulation transfer function (MTF) analysis. Although the algorithm is computationally intensive, hardware acceleration using Nvidia's CUDA Interface provided an 8.9-fold speed-up of the processing (from 1336 to 150 s). Conclusions: Adaptive anisotropic filtering has the potential to substantially improve image quality and/or reduce the radiation dose required for obtaining 3D image data using cone beam CT.

Maier, Andreas; Wigstroem, Lars; Hofmann, Hannes G.; Hornegger, Joachim; Zhu Lei; Strobel, Norbert; Fahrig, Rebecca [Department of Radiology, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 (United States); Department of Radiology, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 (United States) and Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization, Linkoeping University, Linkoeping (Sweden); Pattern Recognition Laboratory, Department of Computer Science, Friedrich-Alexander University of Erlangen-Nuremberg, 91054, Erlangen (Germany); Nuclear and Radiological Engineering and Medical Physics Programs, George W. Woodruff School of Mechanical Engineering, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, Georgia 30332 (United States); Siemens AG Healthcare, Forchheim 91301 (Germany); Department of Radiology, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 (United States)

2011-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

216

Methane hydrate distribution from prolonged and repeated formation in natural and compacted sand samples: X-ray CT observations  

SciTech Connect

To study physical properties of methane gas hydrate-bearing sediments, it is necessary to synthesize laboratory samples due to the limited availability of cores from natural deposits. X-ray computed tomography (CT) and other observations have shown gas hydrate to occur in a number of morphologies over a variety of sediment types. To aid in understanding formation and growth patterns of hydrate in sediments, methane hydrate was repeatedly formed in laboratory-packed sand samples and in a natural sediment core from the Mount Elbert Stratigraphic Test Well. CT scanning was performed during hydrate formation and decomposition steps, and periodically while the hydrate samples remained under stable conditions for up to 60 days. The investigation revealed the impact of water saturation on location and morphology of hydrate in both laboratory and natural sediments during repeated hydrate formations. Significant redistribution of hydrate and water in the samples was observed over both the short and long term.

Rees, E.V.L.; Kneafsey, T.J.; Seol, Y.

2010-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

217

Fusion of Immunoscintigraphy Single Photon Emission Computed Tomography (SPECT) with CT of the Chest in Patients with Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...the eighth patient, fusion demonstrated the absence...image registration or fusion of oefunctional studies...were acquired with dual energy windows to provide anatomic and landmark...the other. The 5761s FUSION OF CHEST SPECT AND CT...

Sanjeev Katyal; Elissa Lipcon Kramer; Marilyn E. Noz; Dorothy McCauley; Abraham Chachoua; and Alan Steinfeld

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

218

Bone scintigraphy (BS) may no longer be relevant in the era of integrated PET/CT for women undergoing evaluation for suspected metastatic breast cancer (MBC).  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...women undergoing extent-of-disease (EOD) evaluation for suspected MBC. Methods: Women undergoing EOD evaluation for suspected MBC with integrated...CT in detecting osseous metastases when EOD evaluation for suspected MBC is considered...

HL McArthur; C Lynch; P Morris; S Larson; K Grabski; J Howard; S Patil; CA Hudis; MN Dickler

2009-02-19T23:59:59.000Z

219

PREFECTURE-WIDE MULTI-CENTRE RADIATION DOSE SURVEY AS A USEFUL TOOL FOR CT DOSE OPTIMISATION: REPORT OF GUNMA RADIATION DOSE STUDY  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......as two or more different patients with each undergoing a single CT session. The anatomical regions were divided into head (brain), face, neck, chest, upper abdomen, pelvis (lower abdomen) and coronary. When a patient was scanned in two or more......

Yasuhiro Fukushima; Ayako Taketomi-Takahashi; Takahito Nakajima; Yoshito Tsushima

2014-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

220

Application of X-ray CT for investigating fluid flow and conformance control during CO2 injection in highly heterogeneous media  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

were performed using homogeneous and heterogeneous cores and a 4th generation X-Ray CT scanner was used to visualize heterogeneity and fluid flow in the core. Porosity and saturation measurements were made during the course of the experiment...

Chakravarthy, Deepak

2005-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

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221

Effects of ceftriaxone on ethanol intake: a possible role for xCT and GLT-1 isoforms modulation of glutamate levels in P rats  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Evidence suggests that glutamate transporter 1 (GLT-1) and cystine/glutamate exchanger transporter(xCT) are critical in maintaining glutamate homeostasis. We have recently demonstrated that ceftriaxone treatment...

Hasan Alhaddad; Sujan C. Das; Youssef Sari

2014-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

222

PET Motion Compensation for Radiation Therapy Using a CT-Based Mid-Position Motion Model: Methodology and Clinical Evaluation  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: Four-dimensional positron emission tomography (4D PET) imaging of the thorax produces sharper images with reduced motion artifacts. Current radiation therapy planning systems, however, do not facilitate 4D plan optimization. When images are acquired in a 2-minute time slot, the signal-to-noise ratio of each 4D frame is low, compromising image quality. The purpose of this study was to implement and evaluate the construction of mid-position 3D PET scans, with motion compensated using a 4D computed tomography (CT)-derived motion model. Methods and Materials: All voxels of 4D PET were registered to the time-averaged position by using a motion model derived from the 4D CT frames. After the registration the scans were summed, resulting in a motion-compensated 3D mid-position PET scan. The method was tested with a phantom dataset as well as data from 27 lung cancer patients. Results: PET motion compensation using a CT-based motion model improved image quality of both phantoms and patients in terms of increased maximum SUV (SUV{sub max}) values and decreased apparent volumes. In homogenous phantom data, a strong relationship was found between the amplitude-to-diameter ratio and the effects of the method. In heterogeneous patient data, the effect correlated better with the motion amplitude. In case of large amplitudes, motion compensation may increase SUV{sub max} up to 25% and reduce the diameter of the 50% SUV{sub max} volume by 10%. Conclusions: 4D CT-based motion-compensated mid-position PET scans provide improved quantitative data in terms of uptake values and volumes at the time-averaged position, thereby facilitating more accurate radiation therapy treatment planning of pulmonary lesions.

Kruis, Matthijs F.; Kamer, Jeroen B. van de; Houweling, Antonetta C.; Sonke, Jan-Jakob; Belderbos, Jos S.A.; Herk, Marcel van, E-mail: m.v.herk@nki.nl

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

223

Exposure to Ionizing Radiation and Estimate of Secondary Cancers in the Era of High-Speed CT Scanning: Projections From the Medicare Population  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Purpose The aims of this study were to analyze the distribution and amount of ionizing radiation delivered by CT scans in the modern era of high-speed CT and to estimate cancer risk in the elderly, the patient group most frequently imaged using CT scanning. Methods A retrospective cohort study was conducted using Medicare claims spanning 8 years (1998-2005) to assess CT use. The data were analyzed in two 4-year cohorts, 1998 to 2001 (n = 5,267,230) and 2002 to 2005 (n = 5,555,345). The number and types of CT scans each patient received over the 4-year periods were analyzed to determine the percentage of patients exposed to threshold radiation of 50 to 100 mSv (defined as low) and >100 mSv (defined as high). The National Research Council's Biological Effects of Ionizing Radiation VII models were used to estimate the number of radiation-induced cancers. Results CT scans of the head were the most common examinations in both Medicare cohorts, but abdominal imaging delivered the greatest proportion (43% in the first cohort and 40% in the second cohort) of radiation. In the 1998 to 2001 cohort, 42% of Medicare patients underwent CT scans, with 2.2% and 0.5% receiving radiation doses in the low and high ranges, respectively. In the 2002 to 2005 cohort, 50% of Medicare patients received CT scans, with 4.2% and 1.2% receiving doses in the low and high ranges. In the two populations, 1,659 (0.03%) and 2,185 (0.04%) cancers related to ionizing radiation were estimated, respectively. Conclusions Although radiation doses have been increasing along with the increasing reliance on CT scans for diagnosis and therapy, using conservative estimates with worst-case scenario methodology, the authors found that the risk for secondary cancers is low in older adults, the group subjected to the most frequent CT scanning. Trends showing increasing use, however, underscore the importance of monitoring CT utilization and its consequences.

Aabed B. Meer; Pat A. Basu; Laurence C. Baker; Scott W. Atlas

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

224

CT Scan Not Only a Medical Technique NETL Wins Two 2008  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

S . D e p a r t m e n t o f E n e r g y * O f f i c e o f F o s s i l E n e r g y * N a t i o n a l E n e r g y Te c h n o l o g y L a b o r a t o r y S . D e p a r t m e n t o f E n e r g y * O f f i c e o f F o s s i l E n e r g y * N a t i o n a l E n e r g y Te c h n o l o g y L a b o r a t o r y CT Scan Not Only a Medical Technique NETL Wins Two 2008 R&D 100 Awards First Measurements at Oxy-Fuel Flame Test Facility NETL's R&D newsletter January 2008 / issue 8 October 2008, Issue 11 CONTENTS Medical Technique Adopted to Study Mobility of CO 2 in Coal ____________________________________________ 2 Two Technologies Chosen for 2008 R&D 100 Awards _____ 3 Computer Code for Geologic Sequestration Modified for Parallel Computers ________________________________

225

Introduction of heat map to fidelity assessment of compressed CT images  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: This study aimed to introduce heat map, a graphical data presentation method widely used in gene expression experiments, to the presentation and interpretation of image fidelity assessment data of compressed computed tomography (CT) images. Methods: The authors used actual assessment data that consisted of five radiologists' responses to 720 computed tomography images compressed using both Joint Photographic Experts Group 2000 (JPEG2000) 2D and JPEG2000 3D compressions. They additionally created data of two artificial radiologists, which were generated by partly modifying the data from two human radiologists. Results: For each compression, the entire data set, including the variations among radiologists and among images, could be compacted into a small color-coded grid matrix of the heat map. A difference heat map depicted the advantage of 3D compression over 2D compression. Dendrograms showing hierarchical agglomerative clustering results were added to the heat maps to illustrate the similarities in the data patterns among radiologists and among images. The dendrograms were used to identify two artificial radiologists as outliers, whose data were created by partly modifying the responses of two human radiologists. Conclusions: The heat map can illustrate a quick visual extract of the overall data as well as the entirety of large complex data in a compact space while visualizing the variations among observers and among images. The heat map with the dendrograms can be used to identify outliers or to classify observers and images based on the degree of similarity in the response patterns.

Lee, Hyunna; Kim, Bohyoung; Seo, Jinwook; Park, Seongjin; Shin, Yeong-Gil [School of Computer Science and Engineering, Seoul National University, 599 Kwanak-ro, Kwanak-gu, Seoul 151-742 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Kil Joong [Department of Radiation Applied Life Science, Seoul National University College of Medicine, 28 Yongon-dong, Chongno-gu, Seoul 110-744 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Kyoung Ho [Department of Radiology, Seoul National University Bundang Hospital, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Institute of Radiation Medicine and Seoul National University Medical Research Center, 300 Gumi-dong, Bundang-gu, Seongnam-si, Gyeonggi-do 463-707 (Korea, Republic of)

2011-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

226

Combined iterative reconstruction and image-domain decomposition for dual energy CT using total-variation regularization  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: Dual-energy CT (DECT) is being increasingly used for its capability of material decomposition and energy-selective imaging. A generic problem of DECT, however, is that the decomposition process is unstable in the sense that the relative magnitude of decomposed signals is reduced due to signal cancellation while the image noise is accumulating from the two CT images of independent scans. Direct image decomposition, therefore, leads to severe degradation of signal-to-noise ratio on the resultant images. Existing noise suppression techniques are typically implemented in DECT with the procedures of reconstruction and decomposition performed independently, which do not explore the statistical properties of decomposed images during the reconstruction for noise reduction. In this work, the authors propose an iterative approach that combines the reconstruction and the signal decomposition procedures to minimize the DECT image noise without noticeable loss of resolution. Methods: The proposed algorithm is formulated as an optimization problem, which balances the data fidelity and total variation of decomposed images in one framework, and the decomposition step is carried out iteratively together with reconstruction. The noise in the CT images from the proposed algorithm becomes well correlated even though the noise of the raw projections is independent on the two CT scans. Due to this feature, the proposed algorithm avoids noise accumulation during the decomposition process. The authors evaluate the method performance on noise suppression and spatial resolution using phantom studies and compare the algorithm with conventional denoising approaches as well as combined iterative reconstruction methods with different forms of regularization. Results: On the Catphan600 phantom, the proposed method outperforms the existing denoising methods on preserving spatial resolution at the same level of noise suppression, i.e., a reduction of noise standard deviation by one order of magnitude. This improvement is mainly attributed to the high noise correlation in the CT images reconstructed by the proposed algorithm. Iterative reconstruction using different regularization, including quadratic orq-generalized Gaussian Markov random field regularization, achieves similar noise suppression from high noise correlation. However, the proposed TV regularization obtains a better edge preserving performance. Studies of electron density measurement also show that our method reduces the average estimation error from 9.5% to 7.1%. On the anthropomorphic head phantom, the proposed method suppresses the noise standard deviation of the decomposed images by a factor of ?14 without blurring the fine structures in the sinus area. Conclusions: The authors propose a practical method for DECT imaging reconstruction, which combines the image reconstruction and material decomposition into one optimization framework. Compared to the existing approaches, our method achieves a superior performance on DECT imaging with respect to decomposition accuracy, noise reduction, and spatial resolution.

Dong, Xue; Niu, Tianye; Zhu, Lei, E-mail: leizhu@gatech.edu [Nuclear and Radiological Engineering and Medical Physics Programs, The George W. Woodruff School of Mechanical Engineering, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, Georgia 30332 (United States)] [Nuclear and Radiological Engineering and Medical Physics Programs, The George W. Woodruff School of Mechanical Engineering, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, Georgia 30332 (United States)

2014-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

227

DOE Zero Energy Ready Home Case Study, Palo Duro Homes, Inc., Albuquerque, NM, Production  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Case study of a DOE Zero Energy Ready Home in Aztec, NM that scored HERS 49 without PV. This 2,064 ft2 production home has advance framed walls, a spray foamed attic, an air source heat pump, and an HRV.

228

DOE Zero Energy Ready Home Case Study: Palo Duro Homes, Albuquerque, NM  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Case study of a New Mexico-based home builder who has built more DOE Zero Energy Ready certified homes than any builder in the nation. One example home achieved a HERS score of HERS 55 without PV...

229

EPA-Provided Comment: Stakeholder comment received at the May 12, 2010 Stakeholder meeting in Albuquerque  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the structure of plutonium nanocluster contaminants increases risk of spreading," 2008. DOE Response: The DOE to the much higher pH systems typically of concern in groundwater/brine systems, and transport properties were brine enters the WIPP repository leading to a dissolved concentration release of plutonium (that would

230

E-Print Network 3.0 - albuquerque operations office Sample Search...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

A U L , M N 5 5 1 0 2 6 5 1 -9 6 4 -8 8 8 8 K S T I L @ H O T M A I L . C O M Summary: Stiller 2 EMPLOYMENT HISTORY Field Technician 2001, 2004-2009 Aidant Fire Protection-...

231

University of New Mexico, Albuquerque Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

@eece.unm.edu Tel: (505) 277-1611 , Fax: (505) 277-1439 Prerequisite ECE-541, ECE-539, knowledge of MATLAB Location, Prentice Hall Inc., New York, 2002. Office Hours TBA GRADING SCHEME: Problem Sets/Computer Projects : 40) biomedical signal pro- cessing applications. The applications component will involve several MATLAB

Santhanam, Balu

232

University of New Mexico, Albuquerque Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-1611 , Fax: (505) 277-1439 Prerequisite EECE-314, Math-314, Basic knowledge of MATLAB Location DSH­132/Computer Projects : 10% Midterm I : 25% Midterm II : 25% Final Exam : Dec 13th, Wed: 40% REFERENCES: · Sheldon Ross, characteristic functions and probability generating functions, application to reliability calculations. MATLAB

Santhanam, Balu

233

University of New Mexico, Albuquerque Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. Office Hours TBA TA TBA Contact Info TBA GRADING SCHEME: Weekly Quizzes: 10% Computer Projects : 10, "Signals and Systems: Analysis Using Transform Methods and MATLAB," McGraw Hill Publications, New York in Signals and Systems Using MATLAB," Second Edition, Prentice Hall, New Jersey, 2002. 1 #12;CONCEPTUAL

Santhanam, Balu

234

Preliminary safety analysis report for the Auxiliary Hot Cell Facility, Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico  

SciTech Connect

The Auxiliary Hot Cell Facility (AHCF) at Sandia National Laboratories, New Mexico (SNL/NM) will be a Hazard Category 3 nuclear facility used to characterize, treat, and repackage radioactive and mixed material and waste for reuse, recycling, or ultimate disposal. A significant upgrade to a previous facility, the Temporary Hot Cell, will be implemented to perform this mission. The following major features will be added: a permanent shield wall; eight floor silos; new roof portals in the hot-cell roof; an upgraded ventilation system; and upgraded hot-cell jib crane; and video cameras to record operations and facilitate remote-handled operations. No safety-class systems, structures, and components will be present in the AHCF. There will be five safety-significant SSCs: hot cell structure, permanent shield wall, shield plugs, ventilation system, and HEPA filters. The type and quantity of radionuclides that could be located in the AHCF are defined primarily by SNL/NM's legacy materials, which include radioactive, transuranic, and mixed waste. The risk to the public or the environment presented by the AHCF is minor due to the inventory limitations of the Hazard Category 3 classification. Potential doses at the exclusion boundary are well below the evaluation guidelines of 25 rem. Potential for worker exposure is limited by the passive design features incorporated in the AHCF and by SNL's radiation protection program. There is no potential for exposure of the public to chemical hazards above the Emergency Response Protection Guidelines Level 2.

OSCAR,DEBBY S.; WALKER,SHARON ANN; HUNTER,REGINA LEE; WALKER,CHERYL A.

1999-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

235

Microsoft PowerPoint - How To Do Business with DOE Albuquerque...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Affairs 541990 - All Other Professional Scientific and Technical Services 541330 - Engineering Services 541611 - Administrative Management and General Management Consulting...

236

Office of Civil Rights, NNSA, NA 1.2, Albuquerque Complex  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Los Alamos Site Office OCR Functions: Technical advisory services for managers, supervisors, and employees Discrimination complaints program management Alternative...

237

Building America Whole-House Solutions for New Homes: Artistic Homes, Albuquerque, New Mexico  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Case study of Artistic Homes who worked with Building America research partners Building Science Corporation and BIRA to design homes that achieve HERS

238

Gamma Irradiation Facility at Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico. Final environmental assessment  

SciTech Connect

The US Department of Energy (DOE) has prepared an environmental assessment (EA) on the proposed construction and operation of a new Gamma Irradiation Facility (GIF) at Sandia National Laboratories/New Mexico (SNL/NM). This facility is needed to: enhance capabilities to assure technical excellence in nuclear weapon radiation environments testing, component development, and certification; comply with all applicable ES and H safeguards, standards, policies, and regulations; reduce personnel radiological exposure to comply with ALARA limits in accordance with DOE orders and standards; consolidate major gamma ray sources into a central, secured area; and reduce operational risks associated with operation of the GIF and LICA in their present locations. This proposed action provides for the design, construction, and operation of a new GIF located within TA V and the removal of the existing GIF and Low Intensity Cobalt Array (LICA). The proposed action includes potential demolition of the gamma shield walls and removal of equipment in the existing GIF and LICA. The shielding pool used by the existing GIF will remain as part of the ACRR facility. Transportation of the existing {sup 60}Co sources from the existing LICA and GIF to the new facility is also included in the proposed action. Relocation of the gamma sources to the new GIF will be accomplished by similar techniques to those used to install the sources originally.

NONE

1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

239

Support des mesures de PattersonSullivan en rang sup'erieur Paul ALBUQUERQUE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

invari­ antes pour le flot g'eod'esique sur la surface quotient H n =\\Gamma. Ces mesures invariantes sont'eom'etrique qui correspond aux directions o`u la diver­ gence des g'eod'esiques est la plus forte, ou de mani) localement compact. Le bord g'eom'etrique X(1) de X est l'ensemble des classes d''equivalence de rayons g'eod

Genève, Université de

240

Microsoft PowerPoint - How To Do Business with DOE Albuquerque...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Federal water projects in order to repay the Government's investment in the projects. 1. BPA - Bonneville Power Administration - headquartered in Portland, Oregon 2. SEPA -...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "1977-1980 albuquerque ct" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Office of Civil Rights, NNSA, NA 1.2, Albuquerque Complex  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Male 11 14 27.27% 14.14% 6.17% Hispanic Female 18 19 5.55% 19.19% 4.52% White Male 34 40 17.65% 40.40% 39.03% White Female 15 19 26.67% 19.19% 33.74%...

242

Office of Civil Rights, NNSA, NA 1.2, Albuquerque Complex  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

1.71% Hispanic Male 6 5 -16.67% 6.41% 6.17% Hispanic Female 5 5 0.00% 6.41% 4.52% White Male 44 43 -2.27% 55.13% 39.03% White Female 15 14 -6.67% 17.95% 33.74% GENDER...

243

Office of Civil Rights, NNSA, NA 1.2, Albuquerque Complex  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

1.71% Hispanic Male 0 1 -16.67% 2.33% 6.17% Hispanic Female 0 0 0.00% 0.00% 4.52% White Male 28 30 -2.27% 69.77% 39.03% White Female 5 6 -6.67% 13.95% 33.74% GENDER...

244

Office of Civil Rights, NNSA, NA 1.2, Albuquerque Complex  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

1.71% Hispanic Male 0 0 0.00% 0.00% 6.17% Hispanic Female 1 1 0.00% 1.22% 4.52% White Male 46 47 2.17% 57.32% 39.03% White Female 22 22 0.00% 26.83% 33.74% GENDER...

245

Office of Civil Rights, NNSA, NA 1.2, Albuquerque Complex  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

1.71% Hispanic Male 0 0 0.00% 0.00% 6.17% Hispanic Female 0 0 0.00% 0.00% 4.52% White Male 13 14 7.69% 45.16% 39.03% White Female 9 9 0.00% 29.03% 33.74% GENDER...

246

Office of Civil Rights, NNSA, NA 1.2, Albuquerque Complex  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Male 83 79 -4.82% 13.74% 6.17% Hispanic Female 23 21 -8.70% 3.65% 4.52% White Male 435 409 -5.98% 71.13% 39.03% White Female 17 18 5.88% 3.13% 33.74% GENDER...

247

Office of Civil Rights, NNSA, NA 1.2, Albuquerque Complex  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

managers, supervisors, and employees Discrimination complaints program management Alternative Dispute Resolution Program (Mediation) EEO Counselor Program ...

248

Environmental Information Management Conference 2008 Albuquerque, New Mexico, September 10 -11, 2008  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

across sites. The Grasslands ANPP Data Integration (GDI) project has brought together experts in ecology valid cross-site analysis. The GDI database facilitates transformation, integration, and exploration. The GDI team has created processes and tools that will enable future warehousing of ANPP data

LeRoy, Carri J.

249

Office of Civil Rights, NNSA, NA 1.2, Albuquerque Complex  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Additionally, for current employees, and those viewing our reports on the World- Wide Web, to share with interested parties. More information on the programs is located in the...

250

Microsoft Word - Albuquerque_RTG_TECmeetingsummaryApr04doc.doc  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

and OCRWM Routing Approach - Leads: Steven Hamp and Judith Holm and OCRWM Routing Approach - Leads: Steven Hamp and Judith Holm Rail Topic Group Update - Steven Hamp Summary: Mr. Steven Hamp (NTPA) reviewed the topic group charter and noted that the main purpose of the topic group is to identify and discuss important issues to members in a smaller group setting. Steven also stated that the topic group was first formed in 1997, temporarily sunsetted in 1999, and then reformed in 2002 during the January TEC meeting. Over the years, the Rail Topic Group efforts have been to develop and prepare issue papers on particular topics of interest. Past efforts are available on the TEC Website and include: Transportation Inspections Summary Matrix, and the 2002 Summary of the Rail Topic Group Transportation Safety WIPP-Program Implementation Guide (PIG) Rail Comparison. The latter

251

A robust and efficient approach to detect 3D rectal tubes from CT colonography  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: The rectal tube (RT) is a common source of false positives (FPs) in computer-aided detection (CAD) systems for CT colonography. A robust and efficient detection of RT can improve CAD performance by eliminating such ''obvious'' FPs and increase radiologists' confidence in CAD. Methods: In this paper, we present a novel and robust bottom-up approach to detect the RT. Probabilistic models, trained using kernel density estimation on simple low-level features, are employed to rank and select the most likely RT tube candidate on each axial slice. Then, a shape model, robustly estimated using random sample consensus (RANSAC), infers the global RT path from the selected local detections. Subimages around the RT path are projected into a subspace formed from training subimages of the RT. A quadratic discriminant analysis (QDA) provides a classification of a subimage as RT or non-RT based on the projection. Finally, a bottom-top clustering method is proposed to merge the classification predictions together to locate the tip position of the RT. Results: Our method is validated using a diverse database, including data from five hospitals. On a testing data with 21 patients (42 volumes), 99.5% of annotated RT paths have been successfully detected. Evaluated with CAD, 98.4% of FPs caused by the RT have been detected and removed without any loss of sensitivity. Conclusions: The proposed method demonstrates a high detection rate of the RT path, and when tested in a CAD system, reduces FPs caused by the RT without the loss of sensitivity.

Yang Xiaoyun; Slabaugh, Greg [Medicsight PLC, Kensington Centre, 66 Hammersmith Road, London (United Kingdom)

2011-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

252

Establishing a process of irradiating small animal brain using a CyberKnife and a microCT scanner  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: Establish and validate a process of accurately irradiating small animals using the CyberKnife G4 System (version 8.5) with treatment plans designed to irradiate a hemisphere of a mouse brain based on microCT scanner images. Methods: These experiments consisted of four parts: (1) building a mouse phantom for intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) quality assurance (QA), (2) proving usability of a microCT for treatment planning, (3) fabricating a small animal positioning system for use with the CyberKnife's image guided radiotherapy (IGRT) system, and (4)in vivo verification of targeting accuracy. A set of solid water mouse phantoms was designed and fabricated, with radiochromic films (RCF) positioned in selected planes to measure delivered doses. After down-sampling for treatment planning compatibility, a CT image set of a phantom was imported into the CyberKnife treatment planning systemMultiPlan (ver. 3.5.2). A 0.5 cm diameter sphere was contoured within the phantom to represent a hemispherical section of a mouse brain. A nude mouse was scanned in an alpha cradle using a microCT scanner (cone-beam, 157 149 pixels slices, 0.2 mm longitudinal slice thickness). Based on the results of our positional accuracy study, a planning treatment volume (PTV) was created. A stereotactic body mold of the mouse was printed using a 3D printer laying UV curable acrylic plastic. Printer instructions were based on exported contours of the mouse's skin. Positional reproducibility in the mold was checked by measuring ten CT scans. To verify accurate dose delivery in vivo, six mice were irradiated in the mold with a 4 mm target contour and a 2 mm PTV margin to 3 Gy and sacrificed within 20 min to avoid DNA repair. The brain was sliced and stained for analysis. Results: For the IMRT QA using a set of phantoms, the planned dose (6 Gy to the calculation point) was compared to the delivered dose measured via film and analyzed using Gamma analysis (3% and 3 mm). A passing rate of 99% was measured in areas of above 40% of the prescription dose. The final inverse treatment plan was comprised of 43 beams ranging from 5 to 12.5 mm in diameter (2.5 mm size increments are available up to 15 mm in diameter collimation). Using the Xsight Spine Tracking module, the CyberKnife system could not reliably identify and track the tiny mouse spine; however, the CyberKnife system could identify and track the fiducial markers on the 3D mold.In vivo positional accuracy analysis using the 3D mold generated a mean error of 1.41 mm 0.73 mm when fiducial markers were used for position tracking. Analysis of the dissected brain confirmed the ability to target the correct brain volume. Conclusions: With the use of a stereotactic body mold with fiducial markers, microCT imaging, and resolution down-sampling, the CyberKnife system can successfully perform small-animal radiotherapy studies.

Kim, Haksoo; Welford, Scott [Department of Radiation Oncology, School of Medicine, Case Western Reserve University, 10900 Euclid Avenue, Cleveland, Ohio 44106 (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, School of Medicine, Case Western Reserve University, 10900 Euclid Avenue, Cleveland, Ohio 44106 (United States); Fabien, Jeffrey; Zheng, Yiran; Yuan, Jake; Brindle, James; Yao, Min; Lo, Simon; Wessels, Barry; Machtay, Mitchell; Sohn, Jason W., E-mail: jason.sohn@case.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, School of Medicine, Case Western Reserve University, 10900 Euclid Avenue, Cleveland, Ohio 44106 and University Hospitals of Cleveland, 11100 Euclid Avenue, Cleveland, Ohio 44106 (United States); Sloan, Andrew [Department of Neurosurgery, School of Medicine, Case Western Reserve University, 10900 Euclid Avenue, Cleveland, Ohio 44106 (United States)] [Department of Neurosurgery, School of Medicine, Case Western Reserve University, 10900 Euclid Avenue, Cleveland, Ohio 44106 (United States)

2014-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

253

Tumor Tracking Method Based on a Deformable 4D CT Breathing Motion Model Driven by an External Surface Surrogate  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: To develop a tumor tracking method based on a surrogate-driven motion model, which provides noninvasive dynamic localization of extracranial targets for the compensation of respiration-induced intrafraction motion in high-precision radiation therapy. Methods and Materials: The proposed approach is based on a patient-specific breathing motion model, derived a priori from 4-dimensional planning computed tomography (CT) images. Model parameters (respiratory baseline, amplitude, and phase) are retrieved and updated at each treatment fraction according to in-room radiography acquisition and optical surface imaging. The baseline parameter is adapted to the interfraction variations obtained from the daily cone beam (CB) CT scan. The respiratory amplitude and phase are extracted from an external breathing surrogate, estimated from the displacement of the patient thoracoabdominal surface, acquired with a noninvasive surface imaging device. The developed method was tested on a database of 7 lung cancer patients, including the synchronized information on internal and external respiratory motion during a CBCT scan. Results: About 30 seconds of simultaneous acquisition of CBCT and optical surface images were analyzed for each patient. The tumor trajectories identified in CBCT projections were used as reference and compared with the target trajectories estimated from surface displacement with the a priori motion model. The resulting absolute differences between the reference and estimated tumor motion along the 2 image dimensions ranged between 0.7 and 2.4 mm; the measured phase shifts did not exceed 7% of the breathing cycle length. Conclusions: We investigated a tumor tracking method that integrates breathing motion information provided by the 4-dimensional planning CT with surface imaging at the time of treatment, representing an alternative approach to point-based externalinternal correlation models. Although an in-room radiograph-based assessment of the reliability of the motion model is envisaged, the developed technique does not involve the estimation and continuous update of correlation parameters, thus requiring a less intense use of invasive imaging.

Fassi, Aurora, E-mail: aurora.fassi@mail.polimi.it [Dipartimento di Elettronica, Informazione e Bioingegneria, Politecnico di Milano, Milano (Italy); Schaerer, Jol; Fernandes, Mathieu [CREATIS, CNRS UMR 5220, INSERM U1044, Universit Lyon 1, INSA-Lyon, Villeurbanne (France); Department of Radiotherapy, Centre Lon Brard, Lyon (France); Riboldi, Marco [Dipartimento di Elettronica, Informazione e Bioingegneria, Politecnico di Milano, Milano (Italy); Bioengineering Unit, CNAO Foundation, Pavia (Italy); Sarrut, David [CREATIS, CNRS UMR 5220, INSERM U1044, Universit Lyon 1, INSA-Lyon, Villeurbanne (France); Department of Radiotherapy, Centre Lon Brard, Lyon (France); Baroni, Guido [Dipartimento di Elettronica, Informazione e Bioingegneria, Politecnico di Milano, Milano (Italy); Bioengineering Unit, CNAO Foundation, Pavia (Italy)

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

254

Screening of mixed surfactant systems: Phase behavior studies and CT imaging of surfactant-enhanced oil recovery experiments  

SciTech Connect

A systematic chemical screening study was conducted on selected anionic-nonionic and nonionic-nonionic systems. The objective of the study was to evaluate and determine combinations of these surfactants that would exhibit favorable phase behavior and solubilization capacity. The effects of different parameters including (a) salinity, (b) temperature, (c) alkane carbon number, (c) hydrophilic/lipophilic balance (HLB) of nonionic component, and (d) type of surfactant on the behavior of the overall chemical system were evaluated. The current work was conducted using a series of ethoxylated nonionic surfactants in combinations of several anionic systems with various hydrocarbons. Efforts to correlate the behavior of these mixed systems led to the development of several models for the chemical systems tested. The models were used to compare the different systems and provided some guidelines for formulating them to account for variations in salinity, oil hydrocarbon number, and temperature. The models were also evaluated to determine conformance with the results from experimental measurements. The models provided good agreement with experimental results. X-ray computed tomography (CT) was used to study fluid distributions during chemical enhanced oil recovery experiments. CT-monitored corefloods were conducted to examine the effect of changing surfactant slug size injection on oil bank formation and propagation. Reducing surfactant slug size resulted in lower total oil production. Oil recovery results, however, did not correlate with slug size for the low-concentration, alkaline, mixed surfactant system used in these tests. The CT measurements showed that polymer mobility control and core features also affected the overall oil recovery results.

Llave, F.M.; Gall, B.L.; Lorenz, P.B.; Cook, I.M.; Scott, L.J.

1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

255

TH?D?201C?08: Multi?Modal MRI SPECT and CT Imaging of Theranostic Nanoplatforms  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Purpose: The development of non?invasive imaging techniques for the assessment of cancer treatment is rapidly becoming highly important. Magnetic Cationic Liposomes (MCL) that carry a cargo of anti?cancer drugs and magnetic nanoparticles that will selectively target primary and metastatic cancertumorsdeliver drugs to them and visualize their effects through magnetic resonance imaging(MRI)single photon emission computed tomography(SPECT) and fluorescence spectroscopy. The aim of the present study is to evaluate MCL as a versatile theranostic nanoplatform for enhanced drug deliveryimaging and monitoring of cancer treatment. Materials and Method: Poly?ethyleneglycol (PEG) coated cationic liposomes are loaded with superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIONS) and tagged with the radioisotope Indium?111. MCL was administered to SCID mouse with metastatic (B16?F10) melanoma grown in the right flank. Pre?injection and post?injection MR and SPECT/CT images were used to assess response to magnetic targeting effects and tumor and organ distribution. Results:Tumor signal intensities in T2 weighted images decreased an average of 205% and T2* values decreased and average of 147ms in the absence of magnetic targeting. This compares to an average signal decrease of 5712% and a decrease in T2* relaxation times of 278ms with the aid of external magnet showing up to 2?fold greater accumulation by magnetic targeting. SPECT/CT images showed the localization and distribution of MCL in the tumor.Conclusion: MR SPECT/CT and biodistribution analyses clearly show the efficacy of MCL as MRI contrast agents prove the use of magnetic guidance and demonstrate the potential of MCL as agents for imaging guidance and therapeutic delivery.

F Reynoso; E Gultepe; A Jhaveri; P Kulkarni; B Gershman; C Ferris; R Campbell; M Harisinghani; S Sridhar

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

256

Image-guided radiotherapy for prostate cancer by CT-linear accelerator combination: Prostate movements and dosimetric considerations  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: Multiple studies have indicated that the prostate is not stationary and can move as much as 2 cm. Such prostate movements are problematic for intensity-modulated radiotherapy, with its associated tight margins and dose escalation. Because of these intrinsic daily uncertainties, a relative generous 'margin' is necessary to avoid marginal misses. Using the CT-linear accelerator combination in the treatment suite (Primatom, Siemens), we found that the daily intrinsic prostate movements can be easily corrected before each radiotherapy session. Dosimetric calculations were performed to evaluate the amount of discrepancy of dose to the target if no correction was done for prostate movement. Methods and materials: The Primatom consists of a Siemens Somatom CT scanner and a Siemens Primus linear accelerator installed in the same treatment suite and sharing a common table/couch. The patient is scanned by the CT scanner, which is movable on a pair of horizontal rails. During scanning, the couch does not move. The exact location of the prostate, seminal vesicles, and rectum are identified and localized. These positions are then compared with the planned positions. The daily movement of the prostate and rectum were corrected for and a new isocenter derived. The patient was treated immediately using the new isocenter. Results: Of the 108 patients with primary prostate cancer studied, 540 consecutive daily CT scans were performed during the last part of the cone down treatment. Of the 540 scans, 46% required no isocenter adjustments for the AP-PA direction, 54% required a shift of {>=}3 mm, 44% required a shift of >5 mm, and 15% required a shift of >10 mm. In the superoinferior direction, 27% required a shift of >3 mm, 25% required a shift of >5 mm, and 4% required a shift of >10 mm. In the right-left direction, 34% required a shift of >3 mm, 24% required a shift of >5 mm, and 5% required a shift of >10 mm. Dosimetric calculations for a typical case of prostate cancer using intensity-modulated radiotherapy with 5-mm margin coverage from the clinical target volume (prostate gland) was performed. With a posterior shift of 10 mm for the prostate, the dose coverage dropped from 95-107% to 71-100% coverage. Conclusion: We have described a technique that corrects for the daily prostate motion, allowing for extremely precise prostate cancer treatment. This technique has significant implications for dose escalation and for decreasing rectal complications in the treatment of prostate cancer.

Wong, James R. [Carol G. Simon Cancer Center, Morristown Memorial Hospital/Atlantic Health System, Morristown, NJ (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, New York Presbyterian Hospital, Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons, New York, NY (United States); Grimm, Lisa [Carol G. Simon Cancer Center, Morristown Memorial Hospital/Atlantic Health System, Morristown, NJ (United States); Uematsu, Minoru [National Defense Medical College, Namiki, Tokorozawa (Japan); Oren, Reva [Carol G. Simon Cancer Center, Morristown Memorial Hospital/Atlantic Health System, Morristown, NJ (United States); Cheng, C.W. [Carol G. Simon Cancer Center, Morristown Memorial Hospital/Atlantic Health System, Morristown, NJ (United States); Merrick, Scott; Schiff, Peter [Department of Radiation Oncology, New York Presbyterian Hospital, Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons, New York, NY (United States)

2005-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

257

A prototype fan-beam optical CT scanner for 3D dosimetry  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: The objective of this work is to introduce a prototype fan-beam optical computed tomography scanner for three-dimensional (3D) radiation dosimetry. Methods: Two techniques of fan-beam creation were evaluated: a helium-neon laser (HeNe, {lambda} = 543 nm) with line-generating lens, and a laser diode module (LDM, {lambda} = 635 nm) with line-creating head module. Two physical collimator designs were assessed: a single-slot collimator and a multihole collimator. Optimal collimator depth was determined by observing the signal of a single photodiode with varying collimator depths. A method of extending the dynamic range of the system is presented. Two sample types were used for evaluations: nondosimetric absorbent solutions and irradiated polymer gel dosimeters, each housed in 1 liter cylindrical plastic flasks. Imaging protocol investigations were performed to address ring artefacts and image noise. Two image artefact removal techniques were performed in sinogram space. Collimator efficacy was evaluated by imaging highly opaque samples of scatter-based and absorption-based solutions. A noise-based flask registration technique was developed. Two protocols for gel manufacture were examined. Results: The LDM proved advantageous over the HeNe laser due to its reduced noise. Also, the LDM uses a wavelength more suitable for the PRESAGE{sup TM} dosimeter. Collimator depth of 1.5 cm was found to be an optimal balance between scatter rejection, signal strength, and manufacture ease. The multihole collimator is capable of maintaining accurate scatter-rejection to high levels of opacity with scatter-based solutions (T < 0.015%). Imaging protocol investigations support the need for preirradiation and postirradiation scanning to reduce reflection-based ring artefacts and to accommodate flask imperfections and gel inhomogeneities. Artefact removal techniques in sinogram space eliminate streaking artefacts and reduce ring artefacts of up to {approx}40% in magnitude. The flask registration technique was shown to achieve submillimetre and subdegree placement accuracy. Dosimetry protocol investigations emphasize the need to allow gel dosimeters to cool gradually and to be scanned while at room temperature. Preliminary tests show that considerable noise reduction can be achieved with sinogram filtering and by binning image pixels into more clinically relevant grid sizes. Conclusions: This paper describes a new optical CT scanner for 3D radiation dosimetry. Tests demonstrate that it is capable of imaging both absorption-based and scatter-based samples of high opacities. Imaging protocol and gel dosimeter manufacture techniques have been adapted to produce optimal reconstruction results. These optimal results will require suitable filtering and binning techniques for noise reduction purposes.

Campbell, Warren G.; Rudko, D. A.; Braam, Nicolas A.; Jirasek, Andrew [University of Victoria, Victoria, British Columbia V8P 5C2 (Canada); Wells, Derek M. [British Columbia Cancer Agency, Vancouver Island Centre, Victoria, British Columbia V8R 6V5 (Canada)

2013-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

258

Rotational micro-CT using a clinical C-arm angiography gantry  

SciTech Connect

Rotational angiography (RA) gantries are used routinely to acquire sequences of projection images of patients from which 3D renderings of vascular structures are generated using Feldkamp cone-beam reconstruction algorithms. However, these systems have limited resolution (<4 lp/mm). Micro-computed tomography (micro-CT) systems have better resolution (>10 lp/mm) but to date have relied either on rotating object imaging or small bore geometry for small animal imaging, and thus are not used for clinical imaging. The authors report here the development and use of a 3D rotational micro-angiography (RMA) system created by mounting a micro-angiographic fluoroscope (MAF) [35 {mu}m pixel, resolution >10 lp/mm, field of view (FOV)=3.6 cm] on a standard clinical FPD-based RA gantry (Infinix, Model RTP12303J-G9E, Toshiba Medical Systems Corp., Tustin, CA). RA image sequences are obtained using the MAF and reconstructed. To eliminate artifacts due to image truncation, lower-dose (compared to MAF acquisition) full-FOV (FFOV) FPD RA sequences (194 {mu}m pixel, FOV=20 cm) were also obtained to complete the missing data. The RA gantry was calibrated using a helical bead phantom. To ensure high-quality high-resolution reconstruction, the high-resolution images from the MAF were aligned spatially with the lower-dose FPD images, and the pixel values in the FPD image data were scaled to match those of the MAF. Images of a rabbit with a coronary stent placed in an artery in the Circle of Willis were obtained and reconstructed. The MAF images appear well aligned with the FPD images (average correlation coefficient before and after alignment: 0.65 and 0.97, respectively) Greater details without any visible truncation artifacts are seen in 3D RMA (MAF-FPD) images than in those of the FPD alone. The FWHM of line profiles of stent struts (100 {mu}m diameter) are approximately 192{+-}21 and 313{+-}38 {mu}m for the 3D RMA and FPD data, respectively. In addition, for the dual-acquisition 3D RMA, FFOV FPD data need not be of the highest quality, and thus may be acquired at lower dose compared to a standard FPD acquisition. These results indicate that this system could provide the basis for high resolution images of regions of interest in patients with a reduction in the integral dose compared to the standard FPD approach.

Patel, V.; Hoffmann, K. R.; Ionita, C. N.; Keleshis, C.; Bednarek, D. R.; Rudin, S. [Toshiba Stroke Research Center, Department of Physics, State University of New York at Buffalo, Buffalo, New York 14214 (United States); Toshiba Stroke Research Center, Department of Neurosurgery, Department of Physics, Department of Physiology and Biophysics, Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, and Department of Computer Science, State University of New York at Buffalo, Buffalo, New York 14214 (United States); Toshiba Stroke Research Center, Department of Neurosurgery, State University of New York at Buffalo, Buffalo, New York 14214 (United States); Toshiba Stroke Research Center, Department of Electrical Engineering, State University of New York at Buffalo, Buffalo, New York 14214 (United States); Toshiba Stroke Research Center, Department of Radiology, Department of Neurosurgery, Department of Physics, and Department of Physiology and Biophysics, State University of New York at Buffalo, Buffalo, New York 14214 (United States); Toshiba Stroke Research Center, Department of Radiology, Department of Neurosurgery, Department of Physiology and Biophysics, Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, and Department of Electrical Engineering, State University of New York at Buffalo, Buffalo, New York 14214 (United States)

2008-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

259

Radial Flow Bearing Heat Exchanger  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Lead Performer: Sandia National Laboratories - Albuquerque, NM Partners: -- Tribologix - Golden, CO -- United Technologies Research Center - East Hartford, CT -- University of Maryland - College Park, MD -- Oak Ridge National Laboratory - Oak Ridge, TN -- Whirlpool - Benton Harbor, MI -- Optimized Thermal Systems - College Park, MD

260

MRI-based Preplanning Using CT and MRI Data Fusion in Patients With Cervical Cancer Treated With 3D-based Brachytherapy: Feasibility and Accuracy Study  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-assisted radiation treatment planning enables enhanced target contouring. The purpose of this study is to analyze the feasibility and accuracy of computed tomography (CT) and MRI data fusion for MRI-based treatment planning in an institution where an MRI scanner is not available in the radiotherapy department. Methods and Materials: The registration inaccuracy of applicators and soft tissue was assessed in 42 applications with CT/MRI data fusion. The absolute positional difference of the center of the applicators was measured in four different planes from the top of the tandem to the cervix. Any inaccuracy of registration of soft tissue in relation to the position of applicators was determined and dose-volume parameters for MRI preplans and for CT/MRI fusion plans with or without target and organs at risk (OAR) adaptation were evaluated. Results: We performed 6,132 measurements in 42 CT/MRI image fusions. Median absolute difference of the center of tandem on CT and MRI was 1.1 mm. Median distance between the center of the right ovoid on CT and MRI was 1.7 and 1.9 mm in the laterolateral and anteroposterior direction, respectively. Corresponding values for the left ovoid were 1.6 and 1.8 mm. Rotation of applicators was 3.1 Degree-Sign . Median absolute difference in position of applicators in relation to soft tissue was 1.93, 1.50, 1.05, and 0.84 mm in the respective transverse planes, and 1.17, 1.28, 1.27, and 1.17 mm in selected angular directions. The dosimetric parameters for organs at risk on CT/MRI fusion plans without OAR adaptation were significantly impaired whereas the target coverage was not influenced. Planning without target adaptation led to overdosing of the target volume, especially high-risk clinical target volume - D{sub 90} 88.2 vs. 83.1 (p < 0.05). Conclusions: MRI-based preplanning with consecutive CT/MRI data fusion can be safe and feasible, with an acceptable inaccuracy of soft tissue registration.

Dolezel, Martin, E-mail: dolezelm@email.cz [Oncology Centre, Multiscan and Pardubice Regional Hospital, Pardubice (Czech Republic) [Oncology Centre, Multiscan and Pardubice Regional Hospital, Pardubice (Czech Republic); First Faculty of Medicine, Charles University, Prague (Czech Republic); Odrazka, Karel [Oncology Centre, Multiscan and Pardubice Regional Hospital, Pardubice (Czech Republic) [Oncology Centre, Multiscan and Pardubice Regional Hospital, Pardubice (Czech Republic); First Faculty of Medicine, Charles University, Prague (Czech Republic); Zizka, Jan [Department of Radiology, Charles University Teaching Hospital, Hradec Kralove (Czech Republic)] [Department of Radiology, Charles University Teaching Hospital, Hradec Kralove (Czech Republic); Vanasek, Jaroslav; Kohlova, Tereza; Kroulik, Tomas [Oncology Centre, Multiscan and Pardubice Regional Hospital, Pardubice (Czech Republic)] [Oncology Centre, Multiscan and Pardubice Regional Hospital, Pardubice (Czech Republic); Spitzer, Dusan; Ryska, Pavel [Department of Radiology, Multiscan and Pardubice Regional Hospital, Pardubice (Czech Republic)] [Department of Radiology, Multiscan and Pardubice Regional Hospital, Pardubice (Czech Republic); Tichy, Michal; Kostal, Milan [Department of Gynaecology, Multiscan and Pardubice Regional Hospital, Pardubice (Czech Republic)] [Department of Gynaecology, Multiscan and Pardubice Regional Hospital, Pardubice (Czech Republic); Jalcova, Lubica [Oncology Centre, Multiscan and Pardubice Regional Hospital, Pardubice (Czech Republic)] [Oncology Centre, Multiscan and Pardubice Regional Hospital, Pardubice (Czech Republic)

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "1977-1980 albuquerque ct" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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261

SU?E?I?41: Study On the CT Radiation Attenuation Characteristics of Human Body for Phantom Design Using Monte Carlo Simulations  

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Purpose: The CTDI values measured with standard PMMA phantoms were now being challenged due to the clinical application of new technologies such as automatic tube current modulation(TCM) the aim of this study is to simulate the CT radiation attenuation characteristics of human body along Z?axis which were the basic data of developing new phantoms used to evaluate TCM. Methods: The CT model used in this study has been modeled including the source energy spectrum the bow?tie filter as well and the beam shape. The voxel phantoms RPI Adult Male designed to match the ICRP anatomical references for average individuals were also selected in this study. MCNPX 2.5.0 was used to simulate the 120 kVp CT X?ray attenuation of voxel phantom along the z?axis. Averaged photon flux was tallied before and after it passed though the phantom separately simulations were also carried out using different thickness of PMMA plates instead of the voxel phantom. Results: The CT X?ray attenuation of PMMA and its thickness presents a significant negative exponential relationship with the r2=0.9975. The CT X?ray attenuation data of every 2cm along Z?axis direction of voxel phantom were obtained combined with characteristics of CT X?ray attenuation of PMMA the PMMA equivalent thickness of the voxel phantom torso along the Z?axis direction in terms of CT X?ray attenuation were calculated. The PMMA equivalent thickness ranges from 5.5cm to 30.1cm. The liver and spleen plane which contents substantive organs such as the liver and spleen and bone structure as ribs and the lumbar was the maximum attenuation plane. Conclusion: The trend of the overall attenuation characteristics of the human body in terms of CT X?ray was in accord with the anatomical structure these results could be used to develop new dose phantoms which were used to evaluate automatic tube current modulation with further study. This project was partially funded by National Institutes of Health (National Library of Medicine R01LM009362 and National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering R42EB010404)

h Liu

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

262

Multi-energy CT based on a prior rank, intensity and sparsity model (PRISM) This article has been downloaded from IOPscience. Please scroll down to see the full text article.  

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Multi-energy CT based on a prior rank, intensity and sparsity model (PRISM) This article has been:10.1088/0266-5611/27/11/115012 Multi-energy CT based on a prior rank, intensity and sparsity model and sparsity of a multi-energy image, and intensity/spectral characteristics of base materials. Furthermore, we

Wang, Ge

263

3/26/13 Section of brain does more than expected, Universityof Chicago scientists find -chicagotribune.com www.chicagotribune.com/health/ct-x-monkeys-processing-visual-information-0320-20130320,0,298755.story 1/3  

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- chicagotribune.com www.chicagotribune.com/health/ct-x-monkeys-processing-visual-information-0320 of brain does more than expected, Universityof Chicago scientists find - chicagotribune.com www.chicagotribune.com/health/ct-x-monkeys-processing and troubleshooting HOME PROTECTION PLANS From foundation to fixtures FESTIVAL OF HOMES Five financial things every

Freedman, David J.

264

A Phase II Comparative Study of Gross Tumor Volume Definition With or Without PET/CT Fusion in Dosimetric Planning for Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer (NSCLC): Primary Analysis of Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) 0515  

SciTech Connect

Background: Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) 0515 is a Phase II prospective trial designed to quantify the impact of positron emission tomography (PET)/computed tomography (CT) compared with CT alone on radiation treatment plans (RTPs) and to determine the rate of elective nodal failure for PET/CT-derived volumes. Methods: Each enrolled patient underwent definitive radiation therapy for non-small-cell lung cancer ({>=}60 Gy) and had two RTP datasets generated: gross tumor volume (GTV) derived with CT alone and with PET/CT. Patients received treatment using the PET/CT-derived plan. The primary end point, the impact of PET/CT fusion on treatment plans was measured by differences of the following variables for each patient: GTV, number of involved nodes, nodal station, mean lung dose (MLD), volume of lung exceeding 20 Gy (V20), and mean esophageal dose (MED). Regional failure rate was a secondary end point. The nonparametric Wilcoxon matched-pairs signed-ranks test was used with Bonferroni adjustment for an overall significance level of 0.05. Results: RTOG 0515 accrued 52 patients, 47 of whom are evaluable. The follow-up time for all patients is 12.9 months (2.7-22.2). Tumor staging was as follows: II = 6%; IIIA = 40%; and IIIB = 54%. The GTV was statistically significantly smaller for PET/CT-derived volumes (98.7 vs. 86.2 mL; p < 0.0001). MLDs for PET/CT plans were slightly lower (19 vs. 17.8 Gy; p = 0.06). There was no significant difference in the number of involved nodes (2.1 vs. 2.4), V20 (32% vs. 30.8%), or MED (28.7 vs. 27.1 Gy). Nodal contours were altered by PET/CT for 51% of patients. One patient (2%) has developed an elective nodal failure. Conclusions: PET/CT-derived tumor volumes were smaller than those derived by CT alone. PET/CT changed nodal GTV contours in 51% of patients. The elective nodal failure rate for GTVs derived by PET/CT is quite low, supporting the RTOG standard of limiting the target volume to the primary tumor and involved nodes.

Bradley, Jeffrey, E-mail: jbradley@wustl.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO (United States); Bae, Kyounghwa [Department of Statistics, RTOG, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Choi, Noah [Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA (United States); Forster, Ken [H. Lee Moffitt Cancer Center, Tampa, FL (United States); Siegel, Barry A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO (United States); Brunetti, Jacqueline [Holy Name Medical Center, Teaneck, NJ (United States); Purdy, James [University of California at Davis, Davis, CA (United States); Faria, Sergio [McGill University, Montreal (Canada); Vu, Toni [Centre Hospitalier Universitaire de Montreal, Hospital Notre Dame, Montreal (Canada); Thorstad, Wade [Department of Radiation Oncology, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO (United States); Choy, Hak [University of Texas Southwestern, Dallas, TX (United States)

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

265

CT-guided Bipolar and Multipolar Radiofrequency Ablation (RF Ablation) of Renal Cell Carcinoma: Specific Technical Aspects and Clinical Results  

SciTech Connect

Purpose. This study was designed to evaluate the clinical efficacy of CT-guided bipolar and multipolar radiofrequency ablation (RF ablation) of renal cell carcinoma (RCC) and to analyze specific technical aspects between both technologies. Methods. We included 22 consecutive patients (3 women; age 74.2 {+-} 8.6 years) after 28 CT-guided bipolar or multipolar RF ablations of 28 RCCs (diameter 2.5 {+-} 0.8 cm). Procedures were performed with a commercially available RF system (Celon AG Olympus, Berlin, Germany). Technical aspects of RF ablation procedures (ablation mode [bipolar or multipolar], number of applicators and ablation cycles, overall ablation time and deployed energy, and technical success rate) were analyzed. Clinical results (local recurrence-free survival and local tumor control rate, renal function [glomerular filtration rate (GFR)]) and complication rates were evaluated. Results. Bipolar RF ablation was performed in 12 procedures and multipolar RF ablation in 16 procedures (2 applicators in 14 procedures and 3 applicators in 2 procedures). One ablation cycle was performed in 15 procedures and two ablation cycles in 13 procedures. Overall ablation time and deployed energy were 35.0 {+-} 13.6 min and 43.7 {+-} 17.9 kJ. Technical success rate was 100 %. Major and minor complication rates were 4 and 14 %. At an imaging follow-up of 15.2 {+-} 8.8 months, local recurrence-free survival was 14.4 {+-} 8.8 months and local tumor control rate was 93 %. GFR did not deteriorate after RF ablation (50.8 {+-} 16.6 ml/min/1.73 m{sup 2} before RF ablation vs. 47.2 {+-} 11.9 ml/min/1.73 m{sup 2} after RF ablation; not significant). Conclusions. CT-guided bipolar and multipolar RF ablation of RCC has a high rate of clinical success and low complication rates. At short-term follow-up, clinical efficacy is high without deterioration of the renal function.

Sommer, C. M., E-mail: christof.sommer@med.uni-heidelberg.de [University Hospital Heidelberg, INF 110, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology (Germany); Lemm, G.; Hohenstein, E. [Minimally Invasive Therapies and Nuclear Medicine, SLK Kliniken Heilbronn GmbH, Clinic for Radiology (Germany); Bellemann, N.; Stampfl, U. [University Hospital Heidelberg, INF 110, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology (Germany); Goezen, A. S.; Rassweiler, J. [Clinic for Urology, SLK Kliniken Heilbronn GmbH (Germany); Kauczor, H. U.; Radeleff, B. A. [University Hospital Heidelberg, INF 110, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology (Germany); Pereira, P. L. [Minimally Invasive Therapies and Nuclear Medicine, SLK Kliniken Heilbronn GmbH, Clinic for Radiology (Germany)

2013-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

266

HDRMC, an accelerated Monte Carlo dose calculator for high dose rate brachytherapy with CT-compatible applicators  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: To present a new accelerated Monte Carlo code for CT-based dose calculations in high dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy. The new code (HDRMC) accounts for both tissue and nontissue heterogeneities (applicator and contrast medium). Methods: HDRMC uses a fast ray-tracing technique and detailed physics algorithms to transport photons through a 3D mesh of voxels representing the patient anatomy with applicator and contrast medium included. A precalculated phase space file for the{sup 192}Ir source is used as source term. HDRM is calibrated to calculated absolute dose for real plans. A postprocessing technique is used to include the exact density and composition of nontissue heterogeneities in the 3D phantom. Dwell positions and angular orientations of the source are reconstructed using data from the treatment planning system (TPS). Structure contours are also imported from the TPS to recalculate dose-volume histograms. Results: HDRMC was first benchmarked against the MCNP5 code for a single source in homogenous water and for a loaded gynecologic applicator in water. The accuracy of the voxel-based applicator model used in HDRMC was also verified by comparing 3D dose distributions and dose-volume parameters obtained using 1-mm{sup 3} versus 2-mm{sup 3} phantom resolutions. HDRMC can calculate the 3D dose distribution for a typical HDR cervix case with 2-mm resolution in 5 min on a single CPU. Examples of heterogeneity effects for two clinical cases (cervix and esophagus) were demonstrated using HDRMC. The neglect of tissue heterogeneity for the esophageal case leads to the overestimate of CTV D90, CTV D100, and spinal cord maximum dose by 3.2%, 3.9%, and 3.6%, respectively. Conclusions: A fast Monte Carlo code for CT-based dose calculations which does not require a prebuilt applicator model is developed for those HDR brachytherapy treatments that use CT-compatible applicators. Tissue and nontissue heterogeneities should be taken into account in modern HDR brachytherapy planning.

Chibani, Omar, E-mail: omar.chibani@fccc.edu; C-M Ma, Charlie [Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19111 (United States)] [Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19111 (United States)

2014-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

267

54 IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON CIRCUIT THEORY, VOL. CT-15,NO. 1, MARCH 1968 Synthesis of a Class of n-Port Networks  

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54 IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON CIRCUIT THEORY, VOL. CT-15,NO. 1, MARCH 1968 Synthesis of a Class of n-Port ports is connected to a voltage source keep- ing all the other ports short circuited, then all the short-circuited ports are at the same potential. The Zn-node network with a pair of equal conductances joining any two

Thulsiraman, Krishnaiyan

268

Connecticut State Library Address: 231 Capitol Avenue, Hartford, CT 06106 Phone: (860) 757-6540 Fax: 860-757-6542 Connecticut State Library  

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Connecticut State Library · Address: 231 Capitol Avenue, Hartford, CT 06106 · Phone: (860) 757-6540 · Fax: 860-757-6542 Connecticut State Library Office of the Public Records Administrator RIPped records in your custody (office/cubicle/work space). This could be a simple handwritten list or a detailed

Alpay, S. Pamir

269

Geochemical monitoring at Soultz-sous-Forts (France) between October 2006 and March 2007 1 EC Contract SES6-CT-2003-502706  

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in the main fracture and porosity zones of the granite to optimize their permeability. Before the injection Contract SES6-CT-2003-502706 PARTICIPANT ORGANIZATION NAME: BRGM Related with Work Package WP5 (Reservoir of the fractured areas, and recovering significant amounts of drilling wastes (grease, rests of cuttings), rock

Boyer, Edmond

270

Estimates of the image quality and the radiation dose for head and abdomen phantom image acquisition by using dual-energy CT  

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Using dual-energy computed tomography (CT) scans, we obtained ... data set by using low- and high-energy scans (usually 80 and 140 kV, ... and the abdomen examinations were performed using single-energy (120 kV) ...

Dae-Hong Kim; Hee-Joung Kim; Chang-Lae Lee

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

271

ATLAS ATLID Algorithms and Level 2 System Aspects ATBD Contract No 22638/09/NL/CT Page 1 of 49  

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ATLAS ­ ATLID Algorithms and Level 2 System Aspects ATBD Contract No 22638/09/NL/CT Page 1 of 49 Issue 2.2 ATLAS ATLID Algorithms and Level 2 System Aspects Algorithm Theoretical Basis Document (ATBD.P. Donovan G-J van Zadelhoff #12;ATLAS ­ ATLID Algorithms and Level 2 System Aspects ATBD Contract No 22638

Stoffelen, Ad

272

ATLAS ATLID Algorithms and Level 2 System Aspects ATBD Contract No 22638/09/NL/CT Page 1 of 25  

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ATLAS ­ ATLID Algorithms and Level 2 System Aspects ATBD Contract No 22638/09/NL/CT Page 1 of 25 Issue 1.3 ATLAS ATLID Algorithms and Level 2 System Aspects Algorithm Theoretical Basis Document (ATBD-J van Zadelhoff #12;ATLAS ­ ATLID Algorithms and Level 2 System Aspects ATBD Contract No 22638/09/NL

Stoffelen, Ad

273

Connecticut State Library Address: 231 Capitol Avenue, Hartford, CT 06106 Phone: (860) 757-6540 Fax: 860-757-6542 Connecticut State Library  

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Connecticut State Library · Address: 231 Capitol Avenue, Hartford, CT 06106 · Phone: (860) 757-6540 · Fax: 860-757-6542 Connecticut State Library Office of the Public Records Administrator Managing Change periods. 4. Forward state publications to the Connecticut State Library (Pursuant to CGS §11-9d). 5

Alpay, S. Pamir

274

High resolution cortical thickness measurement from clinical CT data G.M. Treece, A.H. Gee, P.M. Mayhew and K.E.S. Poole  

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) methods of assessing hip structure, most notably with multi-detector computed tomography, MDCT (Bouxsein and technically limited by thresholding errors caused by relatively low resolution data sets. Ideally, we wouldHigh resolution cortical thickness measurement from clinical CT data G.M. Treece, A.H. Gee, P

Drummond, Tom

275

Exergetic and exergo-economic analysis of a turboprop engine: a case study for CT7-9C  

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The turboprop engine has played an important role in short haul commuter and military transport aircraft where high speed is not critical. It may provide the aviation sector with one of the most significant means of achieving reduced operating costs through reductions in fuel consumption. This paper deals with exergo-economic analysis of a modern turboprop engine (CT7-9C) with a free power turbine used for a medium-range twin-engine transport plane that was jointly developed as a regional airliner and military transport. The investigated main components of the engine are the compressor, the combustor, the gas generator, the power turbine and the exhaust. Exergetic parameters, along with exergo-economic parameters, have been calculated for each engine component.

Hakan Aydin; Onder Turan; Adnan Midilli; T. Hikmet Karakoc

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

276

Comparison of Quantitative EEG to current clinical decision rules for Head CT use in acute mild traumatic brain injury in the ED  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Study Objective We compared the performance of a hand-held Quantitative Electroencephalogram (QEEG) acquisition device to New Orleans Criteria (NOC), Canadian CT Head Rule (CCHR) and National Emergency X-Radiography Utilization Study II (NEXUS II) Rule in predicting intracranial lesions on Head CT in acute mild traumatic brain injury (TBI) in the Emergency Department (ED). Methods Patients between 18-80 years of age who presented to the ED with acute blunt head trauma were enrolled in this prospective observational study at two urban academic \\{EDs\\} in Detroit, Michigan. Data was collected for 10minutes from frontal leads to determine a QEEG discriminant score that could maximally classify intracranial lesions on Head CT. Results: 152 patients were enrolled from July 2012 to February 2013. 17.1% had acute traumatic intracranial lesions on Head CT. QEEG discriminant score of ?31 was found to be a good cut-off (AUC=0.84, 95% CI 0.76-0.93) to classify patients with positive head CT. The sensitivity of QEEG discriminant score was 92.3 (95% CI 73.4-98.6) while the specificity was 57.1 (95% CI 48.0-65.8). The sensitivity and specificity of the decision rules were as follows: NOC 96.1 (95% CI 78.4-99.7) and 15.8 (95% CI 10.1-23.6); CCHR 46.1 (95% CI 27.1-66.2) and 86.5 (95% CI 78.9-91.7); NEXUS II 96.1 (95% CI 78.4-99.7) and 31.7 (95% CI 23.9-40.7). Conclusion At a sensitivity of greater than 90%, QEEG discriminant score had better specificity than NOC and NEXUS II. Only CCHR had better specificity than QEEG discriminant score but at the cost of low (<50%) sensitivity.

Syed Imran Ayaz; Craig Thomas; Andrew Kulek; Rosa Tolomello; Valerie Mika; Duane Robinson; Patrick Medado; Claire Pearson; Leslie S. Prichep; Brian J. ONeil

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

277

Investigation of self-sealing in high-strength and ultra-low-permeability concrete in water using micro-focus X-ray CT  

SciTech Connect

High-strength and ultra-low-permeability concrete (HSULPC) is thought to be useful as a radioactive waste package. Thus, a high confining ability is desirable. For cementitious materials, sealing of cracks may occur in water due to the precipitation of calcium compounds. This can affect the confining ability. In this study, the sealing of a crack in HSULPC in water was investigated using micro-focus X-ray computed tomography (CT). The sealing by precipitation occurred only around the end of the specimen. Sealed regions of the crack were identified using three-dimensional image registration and CT image subtraction of images obtained for the specimen before and after it was immersed in water to evaluate temporal changes of the sealing deposits in the crack. The sealing deposits increased as the HSULPC specimen was kept in water longer. It was concluded that cracks in HSULPC in water are sealed by precipitation.

Fukuda, Daisuke [Graduate School of Engineering, Hokkaido University, Kita 13 Nishi 8, Kita-ku, Sapporo, Hokkaido 060-8628 (Japan)] [Graduate School of Engineering, Hokkaido University, Kita 13 Nishi 8, Kita-ku, Sapporo, Hokkaido 060-8628 (Japan); Nara, Yoshitaka, E-mail: nara.yoshitaka.2n@kyoto-u.ac.jp [Graduate School of Engineering, Kyoto University, Kyoto 611-8540 (Japan)] [Graduate School of Engineering, Kyoto University, Kyoto 611-8540 (Japan); Kobayashi, Yuya; Maruyama, Megumi; Koketsu, Mayuko [Graduate School of Engineering, Hokkaido University, Kita 13 Nishi 8, Kita-ku, Sapporo, Hokkaido 060-8628 (Japan)] [Graduate School of Engineering, Hokkaido University, Kita 13 Nishi 8, Kita-ku, Sapporo, Hokkaido 060-8628 (Japan); Hayashi, Daisuke; Ogawa, Hideo [Taiheiyo Consultant Co., Ltd., Ohsaku, Sakura 285-8655 (Japan)] [Taiheiyo Consultant Co., Ltd., Ohsaku, Sakura 285-8655 (Japan); Kaneko, Katsuhiko [Faculty of Engineering, Hokkaido University, Kita 13 Nishi 8, Kita-ku, Sapporo, Hokkaido 060-8628 (Japan)] [Faculty of Engineering, Hokkaido University, Kita 13 Nishi 8, Kita-ku, Sapporo, Hokkaido 060-8628 (Japan)

2012-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

278

Utility of Megavoltage Fan-Beam CT for Treatment Planning in a Head-And-Neck Cancer Patient with Extensive Dental Fillings Undergoing Helical Tomotherapy  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this study was to demonstrate the potential utility of megavoltage fan-beam computed tomography (MV-FBCT) for treatment planning in a patient undergoing helical tomotherapy for nasopharyngeal carcinoma in the presence of extensive dental artifact. A 28-year-old female with locally advanced nasopharyngeal carcinoma presented for radiation therapy. Due to the extensiveness of the dental artifact present in the oral cavity kV-CT scan acquired at simulation, which made treatment planning impossible on tomotherapy planning system, MV-FBCT imaging was obtained using the HI-ART tomotherapy treatment machine, with the patient in the treatment position, and this information was registered with her original kV-CT scan for the purposes of structure delineation, dose calculation, and treatment planning. To validate the feasibility of the MV-FBCT-generated treatment plan, an electron density CT phantom (model 465, Gammex Inc., Middleton, WI) was scanned using MV-FBCT to obtain CT number to density table. Additionally, both a 'cheese' phantom (which came with the tomotherapy treatment machine) with 2 inserted ion chambers and a generic phantom called Quasar phantom (Modus Medical Devices Inc., London, ON, Canada) with one inserted chamber were used to confirm dosimetric accuracy. The MV-FBCT could be used to clearly visualize anatomy in the region of the dental artifact and provide sufficient soft-tissue contrast to assist in the delineation of normal tissue structures and fat planes. With the elimination of the dental artifact, the MV-FBCT images allowed more accurate dose calculation by the tomotherapy system. It was confirmed that the phantom material density was determined correctly by the tomotherapy MV-FBCT number to density table. The ion chamber measurements agreed with the calculations from the MV-FBCT generated phantom plan within 2%. MV-FBCT may be useful in radiation treatment planning for nasopharyngeal cancer patients in the setting of extensive dental artifacts.

Yang, Claus; Liu Tianxiao; Jennelle, Richard L.; Ryu, Janice K.; Vijayakumar, Srinivasan; Purdy, James A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California Davis School of Medicine, Sacramento, CA (United States); Chen, Allen M. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California Davis School of Medicine, Sacramento, CA (United States)], E-mail: allen.chen@ucdmc.ucdavis.edu

2010-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

279

NJ WY AK AL CA AR CO CT DE FL GA HI ID KS IL IN IA IA KY LA  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0.00-1.99 0.00-1.99 2.00-2.99 3.00-3.99 4.00-4.99 5.00-5.99 6.00-6.99 7.00+ NJ WY AK AL CA AR CO CT DE FL GA HI ID KS IL IN IA IA KY LA ME MI MA MD MN MS MT MO NE ND OH NV NM NY NH NC OK OR PA RI SC SD TN TX UT VT WA WV WI AZ VA DC 0.00-1.99 2.00-2.99 3.00-3.99 4.00-4.99 5.00-5.99 6.00-6.99 7.00+ 18. Average Price of Natural Gas Delivered to U.S. Onsystem Industrial Consumers, 1996 (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet) Figure 19. Average Price of Natural Gas Delivered to U.S. Electric Utilities, 1996 (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet) Figure Sources: Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC), Form FERC-423, "Monthly Report of Cost and Quality of Fuels for Electric Plants," and Energy Information Administration (EIA), Form EIA-176, "Annual Report of Natural and Supplemental Gas Supply and Disposition." Note: In 1996, consumption of natural gas for agricultural use

280

CT head-scan dosimetry in an anthropomorphic phantom and associated measurement of ACR accreditation-phantom imaging metrics under clinically representative scan conditions  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: To measure radiation absorbed dose and its distribution in an anthropomorphic head phantom under clinically representative scan conditions in three widely used computed tomography (CT) scanners, and to relate those dose values to metrics such as high-contrast resolution, noise, and contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) in the American College of Radiology CT accreditation phantom.Methods: By inserting optically stimulated luminescence dosimeters (OSLDs) in the head of an anthropomorphic phantom specially developed for CT dosimetry (University of Florida, Gainesville), we measured dose with three commonly used scanners (GE Discovery CT750 HD, Siemens Definition, Philips Brilliance 64) at two different clinical sites (Walter Reed National Military Medical Center, National Institutes of Health). The scanners were set to operate with the same data-acquisition and image-reconstruction protocols as used clinically for typical head scans, respective of the practices of each facility for each scanner. We also analyzed images of the ACR CT accreditation phantom with the corresponding protocols. While the Siemens Definition and the Philips Brilliance protocols utilized only conventional, filtered back-projection (FBP) image-reconstruction methods, the GE Discovery also employed its particular version of an adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction (ASIR) algorithm that can be blended in desired proportions with the FBP algorithm. We did an objective image-metrics analysis evaluating the modulation transfer function (MTF), noise power spectrum (NPS), and CNR for images reconstructed with FBP. For images reconstructed with ASIR, we only analyzed the CNR, since MTF and NPS results are expected to depend on the object for iterative reconstruction algorithms.Results: The OSLD measurements showed that the Siemens Definition and the Philips Brilliance scanners (located at two different clinical facilities) yield average absorbed doses in tissue of 42.6 and 43.1 mGy, respectively. The GE Discovery delivers about the same amount of dose (43.7 mGy) when run under similar operating and image-reconstruction conditions, i.e., without tube current modulation and ASIR. The image-metrics analysis likewise showed that the MTF, NPS, and CNR associated with the reconstructed images are mutually comparable when the three scanners are run with similar settings, and differences can be attributed to different edge-enhancement properties of the applied reconstruction filters. Moreover, when the GE scanner was operated with the facility's scanner settings for routine head exams, which apply 50% ASIR and use only approximately half of the 100%-FBP dose, the CNR of the images showed no significant change. Even though the CNR alone is not sufficient to characterize the image quality and justify any dose reduction claims, it can be useful as a constancy test metric.Conclusions: This work presents a straightforward method to connect direct measurements of CT dose with objective image metrics such as high-contrast resolution, noise, and CNR. It demonstrates that OSLD measurements in an anthropomorphic head phantom allow a realistic and locally precise estimation of magnitude and spatial distribution of dose in tissue delivered during a typical CT head scan. Additional objective analysis of the images of the ACR accreditation phantom can be used to relate the measured doses to high contrast resolution, noise, and CNR.

Brunner, Claudia C.; Stern, Stanley H.; Chakrabarti, Kish [U.S. Food and Drug Administration, 10903 New Hampshire Avenue, Silver Spring, Maryland 20993 (United States)] [U.S. Food and Drug Administration, 10903 New Hampshire Avenue, Silver Spring, Maryland 20993 (United States); Minniti, Ronaldo [National Institute of Standards and Technology, 100 Bureau Drive, Gaithersburg, Maryland 20899 (United States)] [National Institute of Standards and Technology, 100 Bureau Drive, Gaithersburg, Maryland 20899 (United States); Parry, Marie I. [Walter Reed National Military Medical Center, 8901 Rockville Pike, Bethesda, Maryland 20889 (United States)] [Walter Reed National Military Medical Center, 8901 Rockville Pike, Bethesda, Maryland 20889 (United States); Skopec, Marlene [National Institutes of Health, 9000 Rockville Pike, Bethesda, Maryland 20892 (United States)] [National Institutes of Health, 9000 Rockville Pike, Bethesda, Maryland 20892 (United States)

2013-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "1977-1980 albuquerque ct" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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281

Predicting target vessel location on robot-assisted coronary artery bypass graft using CT to ultrasound registration  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: Although robot-assisted coronary artery bypass grafting (RA-CABG) has gained more acceptance worldwide, its success still depends on the surgeon's experience and expertise, and the conversion rate to full sternotomy is in the order of 15%-25%. One of the reasons for conversion is poor pre-operative planning, which is based solely on pre-operative computed tomography (CT) images. In this paper, the authors propose a technique to estimate the global peri-operative displacement of the heart and to predict the intra-operative target vessel location, validated via both an in vitro and a clinical study. Methods: As the peri-operative heart migration during RA-CABG has never been reported in the literatures, a simple in vitro validation study was conducted using a heart phantom. To mimic the clinical workflow, a pre-operative CT as well as peri-operative ultrasound images at three different stages in the procedure (Stage{sub 0}--following intubation; Stage{sub 1}--following lung deflation; and Stage{sub 2}--following thoracic insufflation) were acquired during the experiment. Following image acquisition, a rigid-body registration using iterative closest point algorithm with the robust estimator was employed to map the pre-operative stage to each of the peri-operative ones, to estimate the heart migration and predict the peri-operative target vessel location. Moreover, a clinical validation of this technique was conducted using offline patient data, where a Monte Carlo simulation was used to overcome the limitations arising due to the invisibility of the target vessel in the peri-operative ultrasound images. Results: For the in vitro study, the computed target registration error (TRE) at Stage{sub 0}, Stage{sub 1}, and Stage{sub 2} was 2.1, 3.3, and 2.6 mm, respectively. According to the offline clinical validation study, the maximum TRE at the left anterior descending (LAD) coronary artery was 4.1 mm at Stage{sub 0}, 5.1 mm at Stage{sub 1}, and 3.4 mm at Stage{sub 2}. Conclusions: The authors proposed a method to measure and validate peri-operative shifts of the heart during RA-CABG. In vitro and clinical validation studies were conducted and yielded a TRE in the order of 5 mm for all cases. As the desired clinical accuracy imposed by this procedure is on the order of one intercostal space (10-15 mm), our technique suits the clinical requirements. The authors therefore believe this technique has the potential to improve the pre-operative planning by updating peri-operative migration patterns of the heart and, consequently, will lead to reduced conversion to conventional open thoracic procedures.

Cho, Daniel S.; Linte, Cristian; Chen, Elvis C. S.; Bainbridge, Daniel; Wedlake, Chris; Moore, John; Barron, John; Patel, Rajni; Peters, Terry [Imaging Research Laboratories, Robarts Research Institute and Biomedical Engineering Graduate Program, University of Western Ontario, Ontario N6A 5K8 (Canada); Imaging Research Laboratories, Robarts Research Institute and Biomedical Imaging Resource, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota 55905 (United States); Imaging Research Laboratories, Robarts Research Institute, University of Western Ontario, Ontario N6A 5K8 (Canada); Canadian Surgical Technologies and Advanced Robotics, London, Ontario N6A 5A5 (Canada); Imaging Research Laboratories, Robarts Research Institute, University of Western Ontario, Ontario N6A 5K8 (Canada); Department of Computer Science, University of Western Ontario, Ontario N6A 5B7 (Canada); Canadian Surgical Technologies and Advanced Robotics, London, Ontario N6A 5A5 (Canada); Imaging Research Laboratories, Robarts Research Institute, Biomedical Engineering Graduate Program, University of Western Ontario N6A 5K8 (Canada); and Canadian Surgical Technologies and Advanced Robotics, London, Ontario N6A 5A5 (Canada)

2012-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

282

A Novel Markerless Technique to Evaluate Daily Lung Tumor Motion Based on Conventional Cone-Beam CT Projection Data  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: In this study, we present a novel markerless technique, based on cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) raw projection data, to evaluate lung tumor daily motion. Method and Materials: The markerless technique, which uses raw CBCT projection data and locates tumors directly on every projection, consists of three steps. First, the tumor contour on the planning CT is used to create digitally reconstructed radiographs (DRRs) at every projection angle. Two sets of DRRs are created: one showing only the tumor, and another with the complete anatomy without the tumor. Second, a rigid two-dimensional image registration is performed to register the DRR set without the tumor to the CBCT projections. After the registration, the projections are subtracted from the DRRs, resulting in a projection dataset containing primarily tumor. Finally, a second registration is performed between the subtracted projection and tumor-only DRR. The methodology was evaluated using a chest phantom containing a moving tumor, and retrospectively in 4 lung cancer patients treated by stereotactic body radiation therapy. Tumors detected on projection images were compared with those from three-dimensional (3D) and four-dimensional (4D) CBCT reconstruction results. Results: Results in both static and moving phantoms demonstrate that the accuracy is within 1 mm. The subsequent application to 22 sets of CBCT scan raw projection data of 4 lung cancer patients includes about 11,000 projections, with the detected tumor locations consistent with 3D and 4D CBCT reconstruction results. This technique reveals detailed lung tumor motion and provides additional information than conventional 4D images. Conclusion: This technique is capable of accurately characterizing lung tumor motion on a daily basis based on a conventional CBCT scan. It provides daily verification of the tumor motion to ensure that these motions are within prior estimation and covered by the treatment planning volume.

Yang Yin; Zhong Zichun; Guo Xiaohu [Department of Computer Science, University of Texas at Dallas, Richardson, TX (United States); Wang Jing; Anderson, John; Solberg, Timothy [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center at Dallas, Dallas, TX 75390 (United States); Mao Weihua, E-mail: weihua.mao@utsouthwestern.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center at Dallas, Dallas, TX 75390 (United States)

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

283

Word Pro - Untitled1  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 2 Crude Oil and Natural Gas Cumulative Production and Proved Reserves, 1977-2010 Crude Oil Natural Gas (Dry) Cumulative Production and Proved Reserves, Indexed 90 U.S. Energy Information Administration / Annual Energy Review 2011 Notes: * Data are at end of year. * Crude oil includes lease condensate. Source: Table 4.2. Natural Gas (Dry) Cumulative Production Crude Oil Cumulative Production Natural Gas (Dry) Proved Reserves Crude Oil Proved Reserves 1977 1980 1983 1986 1989 1992 1995 1998 2001 2004 2007 2010 0 50 100 150 200 250 Index: 1977=100 1977 1980 1983 1986 1989 1992 1995 1998 2001 2004 2007 2010 0 300 600 900 1,200 1,500 Trillion Cubic Feet 1977 1980 1983 1986 1989 1992 1995 1998 2001 2004 2007 2010 0 50 100 150 200 250 Billion Barrels Cumulative Production Cumulative Production Proved Reserves

284

Building America Top Innovations Hall of Fame Profile … Affordable High Performance in Production Homes: Artistic Homes, Albuquerque, NM  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

help from Building America, Artistic help from Building America, Artistic Homes built affordable, high-performance homes in New Mexico and Colorado with HERS scores of 0 to 60. Many builders remain resistant to adopting high-performance innovations based on misconceptions about high cost and design challenges. Thus, Building America projects such as Artistic Homes have had an extraordinary impact, demonstrating the mainstream builder's business case for adopting proven innovations such as efficient thermal enclosures and ducts inside the conditioned space, even in entry-level homes. The U.S. Department of Energy's Building America program has helped develop best practices for creating efficient thermal enclosures and locating HVAC ducts inside the conditioned space. These measures cost-effectively reduce heating and

285

Simulations of Microturbulence in JET and DIII-D plasmas Oral LO1.009, APS, Albuquerque, Oct 29, 2003  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

transport in tokamak burning plasmas Our research compares nonlinear GS2 simulations of microturbu- lence

Budny, Robert

286

Western Society of Weed Science, Albuquerque, New Mexico. March 10-12, 2009. Skurski TC, Maxwell, BD, and Rew LJ  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

" approaches are utilized to measure the competitive effects of NIS: weed removal and weed addition8. We to four treatments: manual removal of B. tectorum, ground disturbance to mimic that caused in the manual removal plots, herbicide application (fall application of Plateau at 10 oz/acre). We hypothesize

Maxwell, Bruce D.

287

Review of Sandia National Laboratories - Albuquerque New Mexico DOE/DP Critical Skills Development Progrmas FY04.  

SciTech Connect

Sandia National Laboratories has developed a portfolio of programs to address the critical skills needs of the DP labs, as identified by the 1999 Chiles Commission Report. The goals are to attract and retain the best and the brightest students and transition them into Sandia - and DP Complex - employees. The US Department of Energy/Defense Programs University Partnerships funded ten laboratory critical skills development programs in FY04. This report provides a qualitative and quantitative evaluation of these programs and their status. 3

Gorman, Anna K; Wilson, Dominique; CLARK, KATHERINE

2005-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

288

Proceedings of the American Solar Energy Society Solar 98 Conference Albuquerque, NM (June 1998): 231-237.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, and public policy changes. The DU concept describes a utility structure in which small scale generation utility company to defer investments in upgrading transmission and distribution facilities, among other

Delaware, University of

289

Verification Survey of Rooms 113, 114, and 208 of the Inhalation Toxicology Laboratory, Lovelace Respiratory Research Institute, Albuquerque, NM  

SciTech Connect

The objectives of the verification survey were to confirm that accessible surfaces of the three laboratories meet the DOEs established criteria for residual contamination. Drain pipes and ductwork were not included within the survey scope.

T.J. Vitkus

2008-06-25T23:59:59.000Z

290

Space Technology and Applications International Forum Proceedings, Albuquerque, New Mexico, January 2000 Miniaturized Radioisotope Solid State Power Sources  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

thermoelectric generators (RTGs) have been successfully used for a number of deep space missions RTGs. However 2000 Miniaturized Radioisotope Solid State Power Sources J.-P. Fleurial, G.J. Snyder, J. Patel, J-pierre.fleurial@jpl.nasa.gov Abstract. Electrical power requirements for the next generation of deep space missions cover a wide range

291

Quantitative CT of lung nodules: Dependence of calibration on patient body size, anatomic region, and calibration nodule size for single- and dual-energy techniques  

SciTech Connect

Calcium concentration may be a useful feature for distinguishing benign from malignant lung nodules in computer-aided diagnosis. The calcium concentration can be estimated from the measured CT number of the nodule and a CT number vs calcium concentration calibration line that is derived from CT scans of two or more calcium reference standards. To account for CT number nonuniformity in the reconstruction field, such calibration lines may be obtained at multiple locations within lung regions in an anthropomorphic phantom. The authors performed a study to investigate the effects of patient body size, anatomic region, and calibration nodule size on the derived calibration lines at ten lung region positions using both single energy (SE) and dual energy (DE) CT techniques. Simulated spherical lung nodules of two concentrations (50 and 100 mg/cc CaCO{sub 3}) were employed. Nodules of three different diameters (4.8, 9.5, and 16 mm) were scanned in a simulated thorax section representing the middle of the chest with large lung regions. The 4.8 and 9.5 mm nodules were also scanned in a section representing the upper chest with smaller lung regions. Fat rings were added to the peripheries of the phantoms to simulate larger patients. Scans were acquired on a GE-VCT scanner at 80, 120, and 140 kVp and were repeated three times for each condition. The average absolute CT number separations between the calibration lines were computed. In addition, under- or overestimates were determined when the calibration lines for one condition (e.g., small patient) were used to estimate the CaCO{sub 3} concentrations of nodules for a different condition (e.g., large patient). The authors demonstrated that, in general, DE is a more accurate method for estimating the calcium contents of lung nodules. The DE calibration lines within the lung field were less affected by patient body size, calibration nodule size, and nodule position than the SE calibration lines. Under- or overestimates in CaCO{sub 3} concentrations of nodules were also in general smaller in quantity with DE than with SE. However, because the slopes of the calibration lines for DE were about one-half the slopes for SE, the relative improvement in the concentration estimates for DE as compared to SE was about one-half the relative improvement in the separation between the calibration lines. Results in the middle of the chest thorax section with large lungs were nearly completely consistent with the above generalization. On the other hand, results in the upper-chest thorax section with smaller lungs and greater amounts of muscle and bone were mixed. A repeat of the entire study in the upper thorax section yielded similar mixed results. Most of the inconsistencies occurred for the 4.8 mm nodules and may be attributed to errors caused by beam hardening, volume averaging, and insufficient sampling. Targeted, higher resolution reconstructions of the smaller nodules, application of high atomic number filters to the high energy x-ray beam for improved spectral separation, and other future developments in DECT may alleviate these problems and further substantiate the superior accuracy of DECT in quantifying the calcium concentrations of lung nodules.

Goodsitt, Mitchell M.; Chan, Heang-Ping; Way, Ted W.; Schipper, Mathew J.; Larson, Sandra C.; Christodoulou, Emmanuel G. [Department of Radiology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109-5842 (United States)

2009-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

292

MO?F?213CD?02: A Series of NURBS and MicroCT?Based Reference Skeletal Dosimetry Models of Pediatric and Adolescent Skeleton  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Purpose: The hematopoietically active tissues of the skeleton are an important target tissue for dosimetric analysis both in terms of diagnostic risk optimization and evaluating treatment efficacy. In the work presented here a recently published dosimetry model of the adult is extended to all pediatric ages of the ICRP reference series. Methods: NURBS/PM?based computational phantoms of the ICRP 89 reference newborn 1?year 5?year 10?year and 15?year male and female were constructed from image segmentation of age and gender?matched CTimages. Bone samples were subsequently acquired from autopsy harvest of two female newborns and one 18?year male subject. Individual bones were collected and segmented following high?resolution ex?vivo CT to yield fractional volumes of cortical bone and spongiosa. Cored samples of spongiosa were later imaged under microCT to yield fractional volumes of bone trabeculae and marrow tissues and to provide a 3D geometry for radiation transport. Previously acquired pathlength distributions of trabecular spongiosa for a 1.7?year and 9?year child were used to supplement the dataset. Results: A comprehensive set of absorbed fractions of energy for internally emitted electrons are presented for active and shallow marrow targets in all bones all ages and over the energies 1 keV to 10 MeV. These electron absorbed fractions were then used to assemble photon fluence?to?dose response functions permitting detailed marrow dosimetry for both externally incident (e.g. CT) and internally emitted (e.g. nuclear medicine)photons by bone site and subject age. Techniques and issues for patient?specific adjustments are discussed. Conclusions: Marrow dosimetry is a critical component to nuclear medicine risk assessment and therapy treatment planning. This work provides state?of?the?art methods for pediatric marrow dosimetry that supplants those developed previously for simpler stylized models of the pediatric skeleton. R01 CA116743 R01 CA96441 DE?FG07?06ID14773

W Bolch; D Pafundi; M Wayson; C Lee; C Watchman

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

293

Comparison of Planned Versus Actual Dose Delivered for External Beam Accelerated Partial Breast Irradiation Using Cone-Beam CT and Deformable Registration  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: To assess the adequacy of dose delivery to the clinical target volume (CTV) using external beam (EB) accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI). Methods and Materials: Sixteen patients treated with EB APBI underwent cone beam CT (CBCT) before each fraction and daily helical CT (HCT) scans to determine setup errors and calculate the dose per fraction. For 12 patients, an in-house image-intensity-based deformable registration program was used to register the HCTs to the planning CT and generate the cumulative dose. Treatment was 38.5 Gy in 10 fractions. EB APBI constraints from the National Surgical Adjuvant Breast and Bowel Project B39/Radiation Therapy Oncology Group 0413 Phase III protocol were used. Results: The mean setup error per CBCT registration was 9 {+-} 5 mm. Dose-volume histogram analysis showed only one patient (8%) with a decrease in the CTV V90 (8% underdosage). All other patients demonstrated adequate target coverage. PTV{sub E}VAL V90 was on average 3% (range, 0%-16%) less than planned. For the ipsilateral breast, four patients had an increase in V50 ({<=}1% increase) and three patients had an increase in V100 ({<=}9% increase). Only one patient showed an increase >5%. Four patients had an increase in ipsilateral lung V30 (maximum 3%), and one had an increase in heart V5 (1%). Four patients had an increase in MaxDose (maximum 89 cGy). Conclusions: The current CTV-to-PTV margin of 10 mm appears sufficient for {approx}92% of patients treated with EB APBI. Although expansion of the population PTV margin to 14 mm would provide {approx}97% confidence level for CTV coverage, online image guidance should be considered.

Hasan, Yasmin; Kim, Leonard; Wloch, Jennifer; Chi, Y.; Liang, J.; Martinez, Alvaro; Yan Di [Department of Radiation Oncology, William Beaumont Hospital, Royal Oak, MI (United States); Vicini, Frank, E-mail: fvicini@beaumont.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, William Beaumont Hospital, Royal Oak, MI (United States)

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

294

CT Clean Energy Communities  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Clean Energy Communities program, offered by the Clean Energy Finance & Investment Authority and the Connecticut Energy Efficiency Fund, offers incentives for communities that pledge their...

295

Semiautomatic technique for defining the internal gross tumor volume of lung tumors close to liver/spleen cupola by 4D-CT  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: It has been shown that in cases of lung tumors close to the liver cupola, the four dimensional (4D)-CT postprocessing maximum intensity projection (MIP) algorithm does not fully recover the radiotherapy internal gross tumor volume (IGTV). In this work, a semiautomatic technique was evaluated by which the residual IGTV that was not included into the IGTV by MIP algorithm was actually added. Methods: A moving phantom and five selected patients were considered. The various IGTVs produced by the semiautomatic approach were compared to those generated by 4D-CT manual contouring. Results: In all cases, the radiation oncologist qualitatively concurred with the semiautomatic IGTV. A quantitative difference in volume of 2.6% was found in the phantom study, whereas a mean difference of 0.1{+-}4.6% was obtained in the patient studies. Conclusions: A semiautomatic technique to include the residual part of IGTV covered by liver/spleen cupola when using MIP algorithm was validated on phantom and on selected patients, revealing the possibility of defining the IGTV for patients with lesions located near liver/spleen cupola by performing only the contours on the MIP series.

Mancosu, Pietro; Sghedoni, Roberto; Bettinardi, Valentino; Aquilina, Mark Anthony; Navarria, Piera; Cattaneo, Giovanni Mauro; Di Muzio, Nadia; Cozzi, Luca; Scorsetti, Marta [Department of Radiotherapy, IRCCS Istituto Clinico Humanitas, Rozzano, 20089 Milano (Italy); Department of Medical Physics, Arcispedale S. Maria Nuova, Reggio, 42100 Emilia (Italy); Department of Nuclear Medicine, Scientific Institute H. S. Raffaele, 20089 Milan (Italy); Department of Radiotherapy, IRCCS Istituto Clinico Humanitas, 20089 Rozzano, Milano (Italy); Department of Medical Physics, San Raffaele Scientific Institute, 20133 Milan (Italy); Department of Radiotherapy, San Raffaele Scientific Institute, 20133 Milan (Italy); Medical Physics Unit, Oncology Institute of Southern Switzerland, 6504 Bellinzona (Switzerland); Department of Radiotherapy, IRCCS Istituto Clinico Humanitas, 20089 Rozzano, Milano (Italy)

2010-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

296

Rapid, automated imaging of mouse articular cartilage by microCT for early detection of osteoarthritis and finite element modelling of joint mechanics  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

SummaryObjective Mouse articular cartilage (AC) is mostly assessed by histopathology and its mechanics is poorly characterised. In this study: (1) we developed non-destructive imaging for quantitative assessment of AC morphology and (2) evaluated the mechanical implications of AC structural changes. Methods Knee joints obtained from nave mice and from mice with osteoarthritis (OA) induced by destabilization of medial meniscus (DMM) for 4 and 12 weeks, were imaged by phosphotungstic acid (PTA) contrast enhanced micro-computed tomography (PTA-CT) and scored by conventional histopathology. Our software (Matlab) automatically segmented tibial AC, drew two regions centred on each tibial condyle and evaluated the volumes included. A finite element (FE) model of the whole mouse joint was implemented to evaluate AC mechanics. Results Our method achieved rapid, automated analysis of mouse AC (structural parameters in simulations estimated that AC thinning at early-stages in the DMM model (4 weeks) increases contact pressures (+39%) and Tresca stresses (+43%) in AC. Conclusion PTA-CT imaging is a fast and simple method to assess OA in murine models. Once applied more extensively to confirm its robustness, our approach will be useful for rapidly phenotyping genetically modified mice used for OA research and to improve the current understanding of mouse cartilage mechanics.

P. Das Neves Borges; A.E. Forte; T.L. Vincent; D. Dini; M. Marenzana

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

297

Validity of Fusion Imaging of Hamster Heart obtained by Fluorescent and Phase-Contrast X-Ray CT with Synchrotron Radiation  

SciTech Connect

Fluorescent X-ray CT (FXCT) to depict functional information and phase-contrast X-ray CT (PCCT) to demonstrate morphological information are being developed to analyze the disease model of small animal. To understand the detailed pathological state, integration of both functional and morphological image is very useful. The feasibility of image fusion between FXCT and PCCT were examined by using ex-vivo hearts injected fatty acid metabolic agent (127I-BMIPP) in normal and cardiomyopathic hamsters. Fusion images were reconstructed from each 3D image of FXCT and PCCT. 127I-BMIPP distribution within the heart was clearly demonstrated by FXCT with 0.25 mm spatial resolution. The detailed morphological image was obtained by PCCT at about 0.03 mm spatial resolution. Using image integration technique, metabolic abnormality of fatty acid in cardiomyopathic myocardium was easily recognized corresponding to anatomical structures. Our study suggests that image fusion provides important biomedical information even in FXCT and PCCT imaging.

Wu, J.; Takeda, T.; Lwin, Thet Thet; Huo, Q.; Minami, M. [Graduate School of Comprehensive Human Sciences, University of Tsukuba, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8575 (Japan); Sunaguchi, N.; Murakami, T.; Mouri, S.; Nasukawa, S.; Fukami, T.; Yuasa, T.; Akatsuka, T. [Faculty of Engineering, Yamagata University, Yonezawa, Yamagata 992-8510 (Japan); Hyodo, K. [Institute of Material Science, High Energy Accelerator Research Organization, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0801 (Japan); Hontani, H. [Department of Computer Science and Engineering, Nagoya Institute of Technology, Nagoya, Aichi 466-8555 (Japan)

2007-01-19T23:59:59.000Z

298

A Comparative Analysis of the Supernova Legacy Survey Sample with {\\Lambda}CDM and the $R_{\\rm h}=ct$ Universe  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The use of Type~Ia SNe has thus far produced the most reliable measurement of the expansion history of the Universe, suggesting that $\\Lambda$CDM offers the best explanation for the redshift--luminosity distribution observed in these events. But the analysis of other kinds of source, such as cosmic chronometers, gamma ray bursts, and high-$z$ quasars, conflicts with this conclusion, indicating instead that the constant expansion rate implied by the $R_{\\rm h}=ct$ Universe is a better fit to the data. The central difficulty with the use of Type~Ia SNe as standard candles is that one must optimize three or four nuisance parameters characterizing supernova luminosities simultaneously with the parameters of an expansion model. Hence in comparing competing models, one must reduce the data independently for each. We carry~out such a comparison of $\\Lambda$CDM and the $R_{\\rm h}=ct$ Universe, using the Supernova Legacy Survey (SNLS) sample of 252 SN~events, and show that each model fits its individually reduced data...

Wei, Jun-Jie; Melia, Fulvio; Maier, Robert S

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

299

Computerized method for evaluating diagnostic image quality of calcified plaque images in cardiac CT: Validation on a physical dynamic cardiac phantom  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: In cardiac computed tomography (CT), important clinical indices, such as the coronary calcium score and the percentage of coronary artery stenosis, are often adversely affected by motion artifacts. As a result, the expert observer must decide whether or not to use these indices during image interpretation. Computerized methods potentially can be used to assist in these decisions. In a previous study, an artificial neural network (ANN) regression model provided assessability (image quality) indices of calcified plaque images from the software NCAT phantom that were highly agreeable with those provided by expert observers. The method predicted assessability indices based on computer-extracted features of the plaque. In the current study, the ANN-predicted assessability indices were used to identify calcified plaque images with diagnostic calcium scores (based on mass) from a physical dynamic cardiac phantom. The basic assumption was that better quality images were associated with more accurate calcium scores. Methods: A 64-channel CT scanner was used to obtain 500 calcified plaque images from a physical dynamic cardiac phantom at different heart rates, cardiac phases, and plaque locations. Two expert observers independently provided separate sets of assessability indices for each of these images. Separate sets of ANN-predicted assessability indices tailored to each observer were then generated within the framework of a bootstrap resampling scheme. For each resampling iteration, the absolute calcium score error between the calcium scores of the motion-contaminated plaque image and its corresponding stationary image served as the ground truth in terms of indicating images with diagnostic calcium scores. The performances of the ANN-predicted and observer-assigned indices in identifying images with diagnostic calcium scores were then evaluated using ROC analysis. Results: Assessability indices provided by the first observer and the corresponding ANN performed similarly (AUC{sub OBS1}=0.80 [0.73,0.86] vs AUC{sub ANN1}=0.88 [0.82,0.92]) as that of the second observer and the corresponding ANN (AUC{sub OBS2}=0.87 [0.83,0.91] vs AUC{sub ANN2}=0.90 [0.85,0.94]). Moreover, the ANN-predicted indices were generated in a fraction of the time required to obtain the observer-assigned indices. Conclusions: ANN-predicted assessability indices performed similar to observer-assigned assessability indices in identifying images with diagnostic calcium scores from the physical dynamic cardiac phantom. The results of this study demonstrate the potential of using computerized methods for identifying images with diagnostic clinical indices in cardiac CT images.

King, Martin; Rodgers, Zachary; Giger, Maryellen L.; Bardo, Dianna M. E.; Patel, Amit R. [Department of Radiology, Committee on Medical Physics, University of Chicago, 5841 South Maryland Avenue, MC 2026, Chicago, Illinois 60637 (United States); Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Oregon Health and Science University, 3181 Southwest Sam Jackson Park Road, Portland, Oregon 97239 (United States); Department of Medicine, University of Chicago, 5841 South Maryland Avenue, MC 5084, Chicago, Illinois 60637 (United States)

2010-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

300

Assessment of dedicated low-dose cardiac micro-CT reconstruction algorithms using the left ventricular volume of small rodents as a performance measure  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: Phase-correlated microcomputed tomography (micro-CT) imaging plays an important role in the assessment of mouse models of cardiovascular diseases and the determination of functional parameters as the left ventricular volume. As the current gold standard, the phase-correlated Feldkamp reconstruction (PCF), shows poor performance in case of low dose scans, more sophisticated reconstruction algorithms have been proposed to enable low-dose imaging. In this study, the authors focus on the McKinnon-Bates (MKB) algorithm, the low dose phase-correlated (LDPC) reconstruction, and the high-dimensional total variation minimization reconstruction (HDTV) and investigate their potential to accurately determine the left ventricular volume at different dose levels from 50 to 500 mGy. The results were verified in phantom studies of a five-dimensional (5D) mathematical mouse phantom. Methods: Micro-CT data of eight mice, each administered with an x-ray dose of 500 mGy, were acquired, retrospectively gated for cardiac and respiratory motion and reconstructed using PCF, MKB, LDPC, and HDTV. Dose levels down to 50 mGy were simulated by using only a fraction of the projections. Contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) was evaluated as a measure of image quality. Left ventricular volume was determined using different segmentation algorithms (Otsu, level sets, region growing). Forward projections of the 5D mouse phantom were performed to simulate a micro-CT scan. The simulated data were processed the same way as the real mouse data sets. Results: Compared to the conventional PCF reconstruction, the MKB, LDPC, and HDTV algorithm yield images of increased quality in terms of CNR. While the MKB reconstruction only provides small improvements, a significant increase of the CNR is observed in LDPC and HDTV reconstructions. The phantom studies demonstrate that left ventricular volumes can be determined accurately at 500 mGy. For lower dose levels which were simulated for real mouse data sets, the HDTV algorithm shows the best performance. At 50 mGy, the deviation from the reference obtained at 500 mGy were less than 4%. Also the LDPC algorithm provides reasonable results with deviation less than 10% at 50 mGy while PCF and MKB reconstruction show larger deviations even at higher dose levels. Conclusions: LDPC and HDTV increase CNR and allow for quantitative evaluations even at dose levels as low as 50 mGy. The left ventricular volumes exemplarily illustrate that cardiac parameters can be accurately estimated at lowest dose levels if sophisticated algorithms are used. This allows to reduce dose by a factor of 10 compared to today's gold standard and opens new options for longitudinal studies of the heart.

Maier, Joscha, E-mail: joscha.maier@dkfz.de [Medical Physics in Radiology, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Im Neuenheimer Feld 280, 69120 Heidelberg (Germany)] [Medical Physics in Radiology, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Im Neuenheimer Feld 280, 69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Sawall, Stefan; Kachelrie, Marc [Medical Physics in Radiology, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Im Neuenheimer Feld 280, 69120 Heidelberg, Germany and Institute of Medical Physics, University of ErlangenNrnberg, 91052 Erlangen (Germany)] [Medical Physics in Radiology, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Im Neuenheimer Feld 280, 69120 Heidelberg, Germany and Institute of Medical Physics, University of ErlangenNrnberg, 91052 Erlangen (Germany)

2014-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "1977-1980 albuquerque ct" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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301

Novel Carbon Monoxide Sensor for PEM Fuel Cell Systems C.T. Holt, A.-M. Azad, S.L. Swartz, W.J. Dawson, and P.K. Dutta  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Novel Carbon Monoxide Sensor for PEM Fuel Cell Systems C.T. Holt, A.-M. Azad, S.L. Swartz, W The importance of carbon monoxide sensors for automotive PEM fuel cell systems is illustrated by a schematic will protect the PEM fuel cell stack; detection of CO is extremely important because too much CO will poison

Azad, Abdul-Majeed

302

Geothermal technology publications and related reports: a bibliography, January 1977-December 1980  

SciTech Connect

This bibliograhy lists titles, authors, abstracts, and reference information for publications which have been published in the areas of drilling technology, logging instrumentation, and magma energy during the period 1977-1980. These publications are the results of work carried on at Sandia National Laboratories and their subcontractors. Some work was also done in conjunction with the Morgantown, Bartlesville, and Pittsburgh Energy Technology Centers.

Hudson, S.R. (ed.)

1981-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

303

Fiducial marker-based correction for involuntary motion in weight-bearing C-arm CT scanning of knees. II. Experiment  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: A C-arm CT system has been shown to be capable of scanning a single cadaver leg under loaded conditions by virtue of its highly flexible acquisition trajectories. In Part I of this study, using the 4D XCAT-based numerical simulation, the authors predicted that the involuntary motion in the lower body of subjects in weight-bearing positions would seriously degrade image quality and the authors suggested three motion compensation methods by which the reconstructions could be corrected to provide diagnostic image quality. Here, the authors demonstrate that a flat-panel angiography system is appropriate for scanning both legs of subjectsin vivo under weight-bearing conditions and further evaluate the three motion-correction algorithms using in vivo data. Methods: The geometry of a C-arm CT system for a horizontal scan trajectory was calibrated using the PDS-2 phantom. The authors acquired images of two healthy volunteers while lying supine on a table, standing, and squatting at several knee flexion angles. In order to identify the involuntary motion of the lower body, nine 1-mm-diameter tantalum fiducial markers were attached around the knee. The static mean marker position in 3D, a reference for motion compensation, was estimated by back-projecting detected markers in multiple projections using calibrated projection matrices and identifying the intersection points in 3D of the back-projected rays. Motion was corrected using three different methods (described in detail previously): (1) 2D projection shifting, (2) 2D deformable projection warping, and (3) 3D rigid body warping. For quantitative image quality analysis, SSIM indices for the three methods were compared using the supine data as a ground truth. Results: A 2D Euclidean distance-based metric of subjects motion ranged from 0.85 mm (0.49 mm) to 3.82 mm (2.91 mm) (corresponding to 2.76 to 12.41 pixels) resulting in severe motion artifacts in 3D reconstructions. Shifting in 2D, 2D warping, and 3D warping improved the SSIM in the central slice by 20.22%, 16.83%, and 25.77% in the data with the largest motion among the five datasets (SCAN5); improvement in off-center slices was 18.94%, 29.14%, and 36.08%, respectively. Conclusions: The authors showed that C-arm CT control can be implemented for nonstandard horizontal trajectories which enabled us to scan and successfully reconstruct both legs of volunteers in weight-bearing positions. As predicted using theoretical models, the proposed motion correction methods improved image quality by reducing motion artifacts in reconstructions; 3D warping performed better than the 2D methods, especially in off-center slices.

Choi, Jang-Hwan [Department of Radiology, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 and Department of Mechanical Engineering, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 (United States)] [Department of Radiology, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 and Department of Mechanical Engineering, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 (United States); Maier, Andreas; Keil, Andreas; McWalter, Emily J.; Gold, Garry E.; Fahrig, Rebecca [Department of Radiology, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 (United States)] [Department of Radiology, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 (United States); Pal, Saikat [Biomedical Engineering Department, California Polytechnic State University, San Luis Obispo, California 93407 (United States)] [Biomedical Engineering Department, California Polytechnic State University, San Luis Obispo, California 93407 (United States); Beaupr, Gary S. [Musculoskeletal Research Laboratory, VA Palo Alto Health Care System, Palo Alto, California 94304 (United States)] [Musculoskeletal Research Laboratory, VA Palo Alto Health Care System, Palo Alto, California 94304 (United States)

2014-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

304

Auto-segmentation of normal and target structures in head and neck CT images: A feature-driven model-based approach  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: Intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) allows greater control over dose distribution, which leads to a decrease in radiation related toxicity. IMRT, however, requires precise and accurate delineation of the organs at risk and target volumes. Manual delineation is tedious and suffers from both interobserver and intraobserver variability. State of the art auto-segmentation methods are either atlas-based, model-based or hybrid however, robust fully automated segmentation is often difficult due to the insufficient discriminative information provided by standard medical imaging modalities for certain tissue types. In this paper, the authors present a fully automated hybrid approach which combines deformable registration with the model-based approach to accurately segment normal and target tissues from head and neck CT images. Methods: The segmentation process starts by using an average atlas to reliably identify salient landmarks in the patient image. The relationship between these landmarks and the reference dataset serves to guide a deformable registration algorithm, which allows for a close initialization of a set of organ-specific deformable models in the patient image, ensuring their robust adaptation to the boundaries of the structures. Finally, the models are automatically fine adjusted by our boundary refinement approach which attempts to model the uncertainty in model adaptation using a probabilistic mask. This uncertainty is subsequently resolved by voxel classification based on local low-level organ-specific features. Results: To quantitatively evaluate the method, they auto-segment several organs at risk and target tissues from 10 head and neck CT images. They compare the segmentations to the manual delineations outlined by the expert. The evaluation is carried out by estimating two common quantitative measures on 10 datasets: volume overlap fraction or the Dice similarity coefficient (DSC), and a geometrical metric, the median symmetric Hausdorff distance (HD), which is evaluated slice-wise. They achieve an average overlap of 93% for the mandible, 91% for the brainstem, 83% for the parotids, 83% for the submandibular glands, and 74% for the lymph node levels. Conclusions: Our automated segmentation framework is able to segment anatomy in the head and neck region with high accuracy within a clinically-acceptable segmentation time.

Qazi, Arish A.; Pekar, Vladimir; Kim, John; Xie, Jason; Breen, Stephen L.; Jaffray, David A. [Radiation Medicine Program, Princess Margaret Hospital, Toronto, Ontario M5G 2M9 (Canada); Philips Research North America, Markham, Ontario L6C 2S3 (Canada); Radiation Medicine Program, Princess Margaret Hospital, Toronto, Ontario M5G 2M9 (Canada)

2011-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

305

Investigation of water and CO2 (carbon dioxide) flooding using micro-CT (micro-computed tomography) images of Berea sandstone core using finite element simulations  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The present study reports a numerical investigation of water and CO2 (carbon dioxide) flooding at the pore scale of a porous medium. We use high resolution micro-computed tomography (micro-CT) images of Berea sandstone core to obtain the pore geometry. The numerical solution used for the simulation was carried out by a finite element based software package. Level Set method is used to determine the position of the interface between two immiscible fluids when oil is displaced by water and CO2, respectively. The present formulation is validated against single-phase flow through the porous structure. It is found that, fluid flow inside the pore space takes place through preferential inlet and outlet pores. For two-phase flow, it is observed that continuous displacement of oil occurs during water flooding but CO2 is able to displace oil at certain locations in the pores. Also, the separation of flow front is observed in the case of CO2 flooding. A quantitative comparison of the results obtained in two types of flooding simulations suggests that water displaces a higher volume of oil than CO2 in the time period for which the simulations are performed.

Akshay C. Gunde; Bijoyendra Bera; Sushanta K. Mitra

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

306

Minimally Invasive Repair of a Left Ventricular Pseudoaneurysm After Surgical Patch Reconstruction of an Infarct-Related Free Posterior Wall Rupture: CT-Guided Intervention  

SciTech Connect

Ventricular free wall rupture remains the most serious complication after acute myocardial infarction. In early-recognized, subacute cases a surgical intervention using patches can be lifesaving. However, in the rare case of postoperative patch leakage, a relapse of a pseudoaneurysm may occur. This is the first case in the literature-to the best of our knowledge-describing a minimally invasive strategy using CT fluoroscopic guidance to perform an injection of thrombin into the perfused pseudoaneurysm to seal a leakage. This therapeutical regimen was chosen-in accordance with cardiac surgeons, cardiologists, and interventional radiologists-due to the high risk of adverse event after repeated surgery in this particular patient. The follow-up images showed complete occlusion of the pseudoaneurysm after the thrombin injection. This approach could be discussed in a multidisciplinary setting in similar cases, especially due to the described negligible recurrence rate after successful initial thrombosis after treating femoral pseudoaneurysms, pseudoaneurysms of the pancreatic artery, or even endoleaks after stenting of aneurysms of the aorta.

Hoffmann, Ralf Thorsten, E-mail: ralf-thorsten.hoffmann@med.uni-muenchen.de; Nikolaou, Konstantin [Ludwig-Maximilians-University, Department of Clinical Radiology (Germany); Boekstegers, Peter [Ludwig-Maximilians-University, Department of Cardiology (Germany); Reichart, Bruno [Ludwig-Maximilians-University, Department of Cardiac Surgery (Germany); Reiser, Maximilian F. [Ludwig-Maximilians-University, Department of Clinical Radiology (Germany)

2007-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

307

Evaluation of dual energy quantitative CT for determining the spatial distributions of red marrow and bone for dosimetry in internal emitter radiation therapy  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: To evaluate a three-equation three-unknown dual-energy quantitative CT (DEQCT) technique for determining region specific variations in bone spongiosa composition for improved red marrow dose estimation in radionuclide therapy. Methods: The DEQCT method was applied to 80/140 kVp images of patient-simulating lumbar sectional body phantoms of three sizes (small, medium, and large). External calibration rods of bone, red marrow, and fat-simulating materials were placed beneath the body phantoms. Similar internal calibration inserts were placed at vertebral locations within the body phantoms. Six test inserts of known volume fractions of bone, fat, and red marrow were also scanned. External-to-internal calibration correction factors were derived. The effects of body phantom size, radiation dose, spongiosa region segmentation granularity [single (?17 17 mm) region of interest (ROI), 2 2, and 3 3 segmentation of that single ROI], and calibration method on the accuracy of the calculated volume fractions of red marrow (cellularity) and trabecular bone were evaluated. Results: For standard low dose DEQCT x-ray technique factors and the internal calibration method, the RMS errors of the estimated volume fractions of red marrow of the test inserts were 1.21.3 times greater in the medium body than in the small body phantom and 1.31.5 times greater in the large body than in the small body phantom. RMS errors of the calculated volume fractions of red marrow within 2 2 segmented subregions of the ROIs were 1.61.9 times greater than for no segmentation, and RMS errors for 3 3 segmented subregions were 2.32.7 times greater than those for no segmentation. Increasing the dose by a factor of 2 reduced the RMS errors of all constituent volume fractions by an average factor of 1.40 0.29 for all segmentation schemes and body phantom sizes; increasing the dose by a factor of 4 reduced those RMS errors by an average factor of 1.71 0.25. Results for external calibrations exhibited much larger RMS errors than size matched internal calibration. Use of an average body size external-to-internal calibration correction factor reduced the errors to closer to those for internal calibration. RMS errors of less than 30% or about 0.01 for the bone and 0.1 for the red marrow volume fractions would likely be satisfactory for human studies. Such accuracies were achieved for 3 3 segmentation of 5 mm slice images for: (a) internal calibration with 4 times dose for all size body phantoms, (b) internal calibration with 2 times dose for the small and medium size body phantoms, and (c) corrected external calibration with 4 times dose and all size body phantoms. Conclusions: Phantom studies are promising and demonstrate the potential to use dual energy quantitative CT to estimate the spatial distributions of red marrow and bone within the vertebral spongiosa.

Goodsitt, Mitchell M., E-mail: goodsitt@umich.edu; Shenoy, Apeksha; Howard, David; Christodoulou, Emmanuel; Dewaraja, Yuni K. [Department of Radiology, University of Michigan, 1500 East Medical Center Drive, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109 (United States)] [Department of Radiology, University of Michigan, 1500 East Medical Center Drive, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109 (United States); Shen, Jincheng [Department of Biostatistics, University of Michigan, 1415 Washington Heights, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109 (United States)] [Department of Biostatistics, University of Michigan, 1415 Washington Heights, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109 (United States); Schipper, Matthew J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan, 1500 East Medical Center Drive, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109 (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan, 1500 East Medical Center Drive, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109 (United States); Wilderman, Scott [Department of Nuclear Engineering, University of Michigan, 1500 East Medical Center Drive, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109 (United States)] [Department of Nuclear Engineering, University of Michigan, 1500 East Medical Center Drive, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109 (United States); Chun, Se Young [Ulsan National Institute of Science and Technology (UNIST), School of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Ulsan 689-798 (Korea, Republic of)] [Ulsan National Institute of Science and Technology (UNIST), School of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Ulsan 689-798 (Korea, Republic of)

2014-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

308

Prospectively ECG-triggered high-pitch coronary angiography with third-generation dual-source CT at 70 kVp tube voltage: Feasibility, image quality, radiation dose, and effect of iterative reconstruction  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

AbstractBackground Low tube voltage reduces radiation exposure in coronary CT angiography (CTA). Using 70kVp tube potential has so far not been possible because CT systems were unable to provide sufficiently high tube current with low voltage. Objective We evaluated feasibility, image quality (IQ), and radiation dose of coronary CTA using a third-generation dual-source CT system capable of producing 450mAs tube current at 70 kVp tube voltage. Methods Coronary CTA was performed in 26 consecutive patients with suspected coronary artery disease, selected for body weight pitch spiral acquisition was used. Filtered back projection (FBP) and iterative reconstruction (IR)algorithms were applied. IQ was assessed using a 4-point rating scale (1= excellent, 4= nondiagnostic) and objective parameters. Results Mean age was 62 9years (46% males; mean body mass index, 27.7 3.8kg/m2; mean heart rate, 54 5 beats/min). Mean dose-length product was 20.6 1.9mGy cm; mean estimated effective radiation dose was 0.3 0.03mSv. Diagnostic IQ was found in 365 of 367 (FBP) and 366 of 367 (IR) segments (P nonsignificant). IQ was rated excellent in 53% (FBP) and 86% (IR) segments (P= .001) and nondiagnostic in 2 (FBP) and 1 segment (IR) (P nonsignificant). Mean IQ score was lesser in FBP vs IR (1.5 0.4 vs 1.1 0.2; P pitch spiral acquisition and 70 kVp tube voltage is feasible and provides both robust IQ and very low radiation exposure.

Michaela M. Hell; Daniel Bittner; Annika Schuhbaeck; Gerd Muschiol; Michael Brand; Michael Lell; Michael Uder; Stephan Achenbach; Mohamed Marwan

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

309

CT_50m_Wind  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Metadata also available as Metadata: IdentificationInformation DataQualityInformation SpatialDataOrganizationInformation SpatialReferenceInformation EntityandAttributeI...

310

Accident Investigation of the December 11, 2013, Integrated Device Fireset and Detonator Accidental Discharge at the Sandia National Laboratory Site 9920, Albuquerque, NM  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Accident Investigation Board investigated an accident at Sandia National Laboratories, Site 9920 on December 11, 2013. Site 9920 personnel were testing an integrated explosive device, containing a fireset and detonator when the IED unexpectedly went off during handling, causing injury to the firing officers left hand.

311

Office of the Vice President for Health Sciences Health Sciences and Services Bldg. Albuquerque, NM 87131-5001 Phone (505) 272-5849 Fax (505) 272-3601  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

;#12;R. Philip Eaton, MD Interim Vice President, Health Sciences Center Stephen W . McKernan Chief Sciences Center Library Stephanie W ilson Senior Associate University Counsel Bob Earnest Associate Vice President, Finance & Administration Mary Kenney Associate Director of Facility Planning, Health Sciences

Maccabe, Barney

312

Type B Accident Investigation Report on the Exertional Heat Illnesses during SPOTC 2006 at the National Training Center in Albuquerque, New Mexico, July 13, 2006  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This Report addresses three injuries that occurred on June 15, 2006 during the annual Security Protective Officer Training Competition (SPOTC) at the National Training Center (NTC). One individual required hospitalization for more than a week, much of the time in intensive care. Two other individuals were examined at the hospital and released.

313

Radiation dose management in CT, SPECT/CT and PET/CT techniques  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......report from the Swedish Radiation Safety Authority showed that...of the collective radiation dose in Sweden in 2005...more and more wasted radiation dose is delivered to...overscanning(37). Both a software solution(38) and......

Sren Mattsson; Marcus Sderberg

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

314

Chapter 18 - Correlation of the Same Fields Imaged in the TEM, Confocal, LM, and MicroCT by Image Registration: From Specimen Preparation to Displaying a Final Composite Image  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Correlated imaging is the process of imaging a specimen with two complementary modalities and then registering and overlaying the fields obtained in each modality to create a composite view. One of the images is made somewhat transparent, allowing detail in the underlying image to be visible and assisting in the registration of the two images. As an example, an image localizing a specific tissue component by fluorescence may be overlaid atop a TEM image of the same field. The resulting composite image would demonstrate specific ultrastructural features in the high-resolution TEM field, which are colorized in the overlay. Other examples include composites from MicroCT or soft X-ray images overlaid atop light microscopy or TEM images. Automated image registration may be facilitated by a variety of sophisticated computer programs utilized by high-throughput laboratories. This chapter is meant for the more occasional user wishing to align images manually. ImageJ is a public domain, image processing program developed at the National Institutes of Health and is available to anyone as a free download. ImageJ performs marvelously well for the purpose of image registration; therefore, step-by-step instructions are included here. Specimen handling, including fixation and choice of embedding media, is not straightforward for correlative imaging. A step-by-step description of the protocols which work in our laboratory is included for simultaneous localization in LM, EM and micro-CT, as well as maintaining GFP emission in tissue embedded for TEM.

Douglas R. Keene; Sara F. Tufa; Melissa H. Wong; Nicholas R. Smith; Lynn Y. Sakai; William A. Horton

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

315

"EMM Region","PC","IGCC","PC","Conv. CT","Adv. CT","Conv. CC","Adv. CC","Adv. CC w/CCS","Fuel Cell","Nuclear","Biomass","MSW","On-shore Wind","Off-shore Wind","Solar Thermal","Solar PV"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Regional cost adjustments for technologies modeled by NEMS by Electric Market Modul (EMM) region 10,11" Regional cost adjustments for technologies modeled by NEMS by Electric Market Modul (EMM) region 10,11" "EMM Region","PC","IGCC","PC","Conv. CT","Adv. CT","Conv. CC","Adv. CC","Adv. CC w/CCS","Fuel Cell","Nuclear","Biomass","MSW","On-shore Wind","Off-shore Wind","Solar Thermal","Solar PV" ,,,"w/CCS" "1 (ERCT)",0.91,0.92,0.92,0.93,0.95,0.91,0.92,0.9,0.96,0.96,0.93,0.93,0.95,0.92,0.86,0.87 "2 (FRCC)",0.92,0.93,0.94,0.93,0.93,0.91,0.92,0.92,0.97,0.97,0.94,0.94,"N/A","N/A",0.89,0.9 "3 (MROE)",1.01,1.01,0.99,0.99,1.01,0.99,0.99,0.97,0.99,1.01,0.99,0.98,0.99,0.97,"N/A",0.96

316

Long-term Results of Carbon Ion Radiation Therapy for Locally Advanced or Unfavorably Located Choroidal Melanoma: Usefulness of CT-based 2-Port Orthogonal Therapy for Reducing the Incidence of Neovascular Glaucoma  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: To determine the long-term results of carbon ion radiation therapy (C-ion RT) in patients with choroidal melanoma, and to assess the usefulness of CT-based 2-port irradiation in reducing the risk of neovascular glaucoma (NVG). Methods and Materials: Between January 2001 and February 2012, a total of 116 patients with locally advanced or unfavorably located choroidal melanoma received CT-based C-ion RT. Of these patients, 114 were followed up for more than 6 months and their data analyzed. The numbers of T3 and T2 patients (International Union Against Cancer [UICC], 5th edition) were 106 and 8, respectively. The total dose of C-ion RT varied from 60 to 85 GyE, with each dose given in 5 fractions. Since October 2005, 2-port therapy (51 patients) has been used in an attempt to reduce the risk of NVG. A dose-volume histogram analysis was also performed in 106 patients. Results: The median follow-up was 4.6 years (range, 0.5-10.6 years). The 5-year overall survival, cause-specific survival, local control, distant metastasis-free survival, and eye retention rates were 80.4% (95% confidence interval 89.0%-71.8%), 82.2% (90.6%-73.8%), 92.8% (98.5%-87.1%), 72.1% (81.9%-62.3%), and 92.8% (98.1%-87.5%), respectively. The overall 5-year NVG incidence rate was 35.9% (25.9%-45.9%) and that of 1-port group and 2-port group were 41.6% (29.3%-54.0%) and 13.9% (3.2%-24.6%) with statistically significant difference (P<.001). The dose-volume histogram analysis showed that the average irradiated volume of the iris-ciliary body was significantly lower in the non-NVG group than in the NVG group at all dose levels, and significantly lower in the 2-port group than in the 1-port group at high dose levels. Conclusions: The long-term results of C-ion RT for choroidal melanoma are satisfactory. CT-based 2-port C-ion RT can be used to reduce the high-dose irradiated volume of the iris-ciliary body and the resulting risk of NVG.

Toyama, Shingo [Research Center for Charged Particle Therapy, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, Chiba (Japan) [Research Center for Charged Particle Therapy, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, Chiba (Japan); Department of Heavy Particle Therapy and Radiation Oncology, Faculty of Medicine, Saga University, Saga (Japan); Tsuji, Hiroshi, E-mail: h_tsuji@nirs.go.jp [Research Center for Charged Particle Therapy, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, Chiba (Japan)] [Research Center for Charged Particle Therapy, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, Chiba (Japan); Mizoguchi, Nobutaka; Nomiya, Takuma; Kamada, Tadashi [Research Center for Charged Particle Therapy, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, Chiba (Japan)] [Research Center for Charged Particle Therapy, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, Chiba (Japan); Tokumaru, Sunao [Department of Heavy Particle Therapy and Radiation Oncology, Faculty of Medicine, Saga University, Saga (Japan)] [Department of Heavy Particle Therapy and Radiation Oncology, Faculty of Medicine, Saga University, Saga (Japan); Mizota, Atsushi [Department of Ophthalmology, Teikyo University School of Medicine, Tokyo (Japan)] [Department of Ophthalmology, Teikyo University School of Medicine, Tokyo (Japan); Ohnishi, Yoshitaka [Department of Ophthalmology, Wakayama Medical University, Wakayama (Japan)] [Department of Ophthalmology, Wakayama Medical University, Wakayama (Japan); Tsujii, Hirohiko [Research Center for Charged Particle Therapy, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, Chiba (Japan)] [Research Center for Charged Particle Therapy, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, Chiba (Japan)

2013-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

317

Table of Contents for Desk Guide  

Energy Savers (EERE)

NNSA sites and facilities. Realty Specialists within NNSA function as a Headquarters unit at the Albuquerque Complex in Albuquerque, New Mexico, and provide realty support to...

318

CT-guided intracavitary radiotherapy for cervical cancer: Comparison of conventional point A plan with clinical target volume-based three-dimensional plan using dose-volume parameters  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: To perform an intracavitary radiotherapy (ICR) plan comparison between the conventional point A plan (conventional plan) and computed tomography (CT)-guided clinical target volume-based plan (CTV plan) by analysis of the quantitative dose-volume parameters and irradiated volumes of organs at risk in patients with cervical cancer. Methods and Materials: Thirty plans for {sup 192}Ir high-dose-rate ICR after 30-40-Gy external beam radiotherapy were investigated. CT images were acquired at the first ICR session with artifact-free applicators in place. The gross tumor volume, clinical target volume (CTV), point A, and International Commission on Radiation Units and Measurements Report 38 rectal and bladder points were defined on reconstructed CT images. A fractional 100% dose was prescribed to point A in the conventional plan and to the outermost point to cover all CTVs in the CTV plan. The reference volume receiving 100% of the prescribed dose (V{sub ref}), and the dose-volume parameters of the coverage index, conformal index, and external volume index were calculated from the dose-volume histogram. The bladder, rectal point doses, and percentage of volumes receiving 50%, 80%, and 100% of the prescribed dose were also analyzed. Results: Conventional plans were performed, and patients were categorized on the basis of whether the 100% isodose line of point A prescription dose fully encompassed the CTV (Group 1, n = 20) or not (Group 2, n = 10). The mean gross tumor volume (11.6 cm{sup 3}) and CTV (24.9 cm{sup 3}) of Group 1 were smaller than the corresponding values (23.7 and 44.7 cm{sup 3}, respectively) for Group 2 (p = 0.003). The mean V{sub ref} for all patients was 129.6 cm{sup 3} for the conventional plan and 97.0 cm{sup 3} for the CTV plan (p = 0.003). The mean V{sub ref} in Group 1 decreased markedly with the CTV plan (p < 0.001). For the conventional and CTV plans in all patients, the mean coverage index, conformal index, and external volume index were 0.98 and 1.0, 0.23 and 0.34, and 3.86 and 2.15, respectively. Statistical analysis showed that the conformal index and external volume index improved significantly with the CTV plan, and this improvement was more marked in Group 1. The mean values of the bladder and rectal point doses and volume fractions receiving 50%, 80%, and 100% of the reference dose did not differ between plans for all patients. The reduction in the mean rectal and bladder point doses and irradiated volumes for the CTV plan was statistically significant in Group 1. Conclusion: Computed tomography-guided CTV planning of ICR is superior to conventional point A planning in terms of conformity of target coverage and avoidance of overdosed normal tissue volume. To ascertain the potential benefit of treatment outcome, ICR with image-guided three-dimensional plans will be pursued and correlated with the dose-volume parameters.

Shin, Kyung Hwan [Research Institute and Hospital, National Cancer Center, Goyang, Gyeonggi (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Tae Hyun [Research Institute and Hospital, National Cancer Center, Goyang, Gyeonggi (Korea, Republic of)]. E-mail: k2onco@ncc.re.kr; Cho, Jung Keun [Research Institute and Hospital, National Cancer Center, Goyang, Gyeonggi (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Joo-Young [Research Institute and Hospital, National Cancer Center, Goyang, Gyeonggi (Korea, Republic of); Park, Sung Yong [Research Institute and Hospital, National Cancer Center, Goyang, Gyeonggi (Korea, Republic of); Park, Sang-Yoon [Research Institute and Hospital, National Cancer Center, Goyang, Gyeonggi (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Dae Yong [Research Institute and Hospital, National Cancer Center, Goyang, Gyeonggi (Korea, Republic of); Chie, Eui Kyu [Research Institute and Hospital, National Cancer Center, Goyang, Gyeonggi (Korea, Republic of); Pyo, Hong Ryull [Research Institute and Hospital, National Cancer Center, Goyang, Gyeonggi (Korea, Republic of); Cho, Kwan Ho [Research Institute and Hospital, National Cancer Center, Goyang, Gyeonggi (Korea, Republic of)

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

319

Typical Consultants/Vendors used by EOTA for Subject Matter Expert and  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Consultants/Vendors used by EOTA for Subject Matter Expert and Consultants/Vendors used by EOTA for Subject Matter Expert and operatioal support Typical Consultants/Vendors used by EOTA for Subject Matter Expert and operatioal support Vendor's Name Contact/Rep Address Work Phone 615 Music Productions, Inc. Steve Hayes or Laura Palmer 1030 16th Ave. South, Nashville, TN 37212 616-244-6515 Adams, James F. James Adams 1217 Brookshire Dr., Bedford, TX 76021 214-674-6868 Adobe Systems Inc. N/A 2750 Barrett Lakes Blvd., Kennesaw, GA 30144 800-833-6687 Atlantech Resellers Inc, DBA CablesAndKits.com Craig Haynie 4555 Atwater Ct Ste ! Buford, GA 21075 877-633-2629 Albuquerque Printing Co Albert Padilla 3838 Bogan Ave.NE, Albq. 87109 505-872-2200 AlphaTRAC, Inc. John Ciolek 8670 Wolff Ct Ste 120 Westminster, CO 80031 303-428-5670 Amazon.com CSR

320

Advanced Organic Vapor Cycles for Improving Thermal Conversion Efficiency in Renewable Energy Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Solar Thermal Energy Research," in Sandia National Laboratory Science and Engineering Exposition 2011, Albuquerque, New Mexico,

Ho, Tony

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "1977-1980 albuquerque ct" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

X-ray CT Observations of Methane Hydrate Distribution Changes over Time in a Natural Sediment Core from the BPX-DOE-USGS Mount Elbert Gas Hydrate Stratigraphic Test Well  

SciTech Connect

When maintained under hydrate-stable conditions, methane hydrate in laboratory samples is often considered a stable and immobile solid material. Currently, there do not appear to be any studies in which the long-term redistribution of hydrates in sediments has been investigated in the laboratory. These observations are important because if the location of hydrate in a sample were to change over time (e.g. by dissociating at one location and reforming at another), the properties of the sample that depend on hydrate saturation and pore space occupancy would also change. Observations of hydrate redistribution under stable conditions are also important in understanding natural hydrate deposits, as these may also change over time. The processes by which solid hydrate can move include dissociation, hydrate-former and water migration in the gas and liquid phases, and hydrate formation. Chemical potential gradients induced by temperature, pressure, and pore water or host sediment chemistry can drive these processes. A series of tests were performed on a formerly natural methane-hydrate-bearing core sample from the BPX-DOE-USGS Mount Elbert Gas Hydrate Stratigraphic Test Well, in order to observe hydrate formation and morphology within this natural sediment, and changes over time using X-ray computed tomography (CT). Long-term observations (over several weeks) of methane hydrate in natural sediments were made to investigate spatial changes in hydrate saturation in the core. During the test sequence, mild buffered thermal and pressure oscillations occurred within the sample in response to laboratory temperature changes. These oscillations were small in magnitude, and conditions were maintained well within the hydrate stability zone.

Kneafsey, T.J.; Rees, E.V.L.

2010-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

322

Siemens Corporate Technology CT | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Solar Product: R&D lab for Siemens AG. Currently researching buckyballs and conductive plastic for solar cells and photodetectors; seeks practical flexible cells by 2005....

323

Maximizing dose reductions with cardiac CT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

when heart rates are [60 bpm or when heart rate variabilitya heart rate dependent fashion as follows: 3039 bpm, 175 mspadding; 4049 bpm, 150 ms padding; 50 59 bpm, 125 ms

Budoff, Matthew J.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

324

Reconstruction of CT Images from Parsimonious Angular ...  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

It has found diagnostic use for such diverse problems as brain tumors, strokes, pulmonary embolisms, re- nal stones, abdominal aortic aneurysm etc.

2008-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

325

PET/CT shielding design comparisons  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

moving through the gantry (with permission from Bushong 2001). 7 Positron Emission Tomography (PET) is a noninvasive diagnostic imaging tool that takes advantage of certain radiopharmaceuticals and allows abnormal metabolic... activity in and around organs to be examined by injection of a radionuclide into a patient (Radiology 2006). These radiopharmaceuticals, biological compounds linked to radiation-emitting radionuclides, can in some cases be tailored for concentration...

Coker, Audra Lee

2007-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

326

CT January 2012 Page 1 of 14  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

) Government means the United States of America and includes the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) or duly22725 with DOE. (c) Seller means the person or organization that has entered into this Agreement. (d) Agreement means Purchase Order, Subcontract, General Order Agreement, Basic Ordering Agreement, Task Order

327

CT September 2012 Page 1 of 14  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

) Government means the United States of America and includes the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) or duly22725 with DOE. (c) Seller means the person or organization that has entered into this Agreement. (d) Agreement means Purchase Order, Subcontract, General Order Agreement, Basic Ordering Agreement, Task Order

Pennycook, Steve

328

CT. L-2 United States Government  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

its use. A future worker performing demolition of all of the manhole linings and drain lines could receive a maximum annual dose of 0.5 mremyr, which is also below the DOE...

329

A radiation exposure index for CT  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......metrics provided to operators at the completion of each examination relate to the amount...for each scan, whereas current CTDI indices only quantify the radiation incident...requires manufacturers to generate these indices for clinical examinations. With this......

Walter Huda

2013-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

330

Courses of Instruction InstruCtIon  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

.....................................................................ART Astronomy...................................................... ASTR Audio Technology............................................AUD Automotive Engineering.................................. AUE Animal and Veterinary Sciences....................... AVS Biochemistry ................................................ BCHM Biosystems Engineering

Stuart, Steven J.

331

The U.S. Department of Energy Office of Indian Energy Policy and Programs  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Albuquerque, New Mexico, Roundtable Summary Albuquerque, New Mexico, Roundtable Summary April 6, 2011 Prepared by: The Udall Foundation's U.S. Institute for Environmental Conflict Resolution DOE Tribal Roundtable on Tribal Energy Albuquerque, New Mexico April 6, 2011 ALBUQUERQUE EXECUTIVE SUMMARY The Albuquerque, New Mexico, DOE Tribal Roundtable convened at 8:30 a.m., Wednesday, April 6, at the Pueblo Indian Cultural Center in Albuquerque, New Mexico. The meeting was hosted by the Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Indian Energy Policy and Programs (Office of Indian Energy). Pilar Thomas, Deputy Director-Policy, DOE Office of Indian Energy, Brandt Petrasek, Office of Environmental Management, Don Ami, National Nuclear Security

332

Nano-CT and Micro-CT Imaging Featured in Microscopy Today | GE...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

part fabrication. It is also widely used in metrology for inspecting components made with additive manufacturing techniques, reverse engineering, and computer-aided design (CAD)...

333

Category:Utility Rate Impacts on PV Economics By Location | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Utility Rate Impacts on PV Economics By Location Utility Rate Impacts on PV Economics By Location Jump to: navigation, search Impact of Utility Rates on PV Economics Montgomery, AL Little Rock, AR Flagstaff, AZ Phoenix, AZ Tucson, AZ Arcata, CA LA, CA San Francisco, CA Boulder, CO Eagle County, CO Pueblo, CO Bridgeport, CT Wilmington, DE Miami, FL Tampa, FL Atlanta, GA Savannah, GA Des Moines, IA Mason, IA Boise, ID Chicago, IL Springfield, IL Indianapolis, IN Goodland, KS Wichita, KS Lexington, KY New Orleans, LA Shreveport, LA Boston, MA Baltimore, MD Caribou, ME Portland, ME Detroit, MI Houghton-Lake, MI Traverse City, MI International Falls, MN Minneapolis, MN Kansas City, MO Jackson, MS Billings, MT Greensboro, NC Wilmington, NC Bismarck, ND Minot, ND Omaha, NE Concord, NH Atlantic City, NJ Albuquerque, NM Las Vegas, NV Reno, NV New York, NY

334

LightWeight KerneL  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Catamount n-Way Catamount n-Way LightWeight KerneL 1 R&D 100 Entry Catamount n-Way LightWeight KerneL 2 R&D 100 Entry Submitting organization Sandia National Laboratories PO Box 5800 Albuquerque, NM 87185-1319 USA Ron Brightwell Phone: (505) 844-2099 Fax: (505) 845-7442 rbbrigh@sandia.gov AFFIRMATION: I affirm that all information submitted as a part of, or supplemental to, this entry is a fair and accurate representation of this product. _____________________________ Ron Brightwell Joint entry Operating Systems Research 1527 16th NW #5 Washington, DC 20036 USA Trammell Hudson Phone: (240) 283-1700 Fax: (843) 971-9774 hudson@osresearch.net ProduCt name Catamount N-Way (CNW) Lightweight Kernel brief deSCriPtion CNW is an operating system that exploits existing features of multi-core processors

335

N:\WORK\WORDPERF\CLEANCO1\MEETINGS\PUBLIC\CCPIREG.PDF  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Power Initiative Power Initiative Public Meeting, January 17, 2002 Participants Name Company Location 1 Webcast Attendees David Akers CQ Inc. Homer City PA Richard Armstrong Alchemix Corporation Carefree AZ Piyush Banafar Mitsui Babcock (US) LLC Atlanta GA Bob Bellemare SCIENTECH Inc. Albuquerque NM Berkeley Booth Reliant Energy Houston TX Christine Booth Alchemix Corporation Carefree AZ Mark Bring Minnkota Power Cooperative, Inc. Grand Forks ND Leon Chuck U. of Dayton Research Institute Dayton OH Patrick Curry CiDRA Corporation Wallingford CT Alan Darby Rocketdyne Canoga Park CA Dana Davis Charleston WV Bruce Dean Gilead Resources, Inc. Mount Gilead OH Richard Delaney Fluor Corp. Aliso Viejo CA Don Denton Duke Engineering & Services Charlotte NC Steven Derenne Wisconsin Electric Power Milwaukee WI Ray Drnevich

336

DOE/EIS-0293 Final Environmental Impact Statement for the Conveyance and Transfer of Certain Land Tracts Administered by the U.S. Department of Energy and Located at Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos and Santa Fe Counties, New Mexico (Oct. 1999)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

S-1 S-1 Final CT EIS SUMMARY Introduction Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) is one of several national laboratories that supports the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) responsibilities for national security, energy resources, environmental quality, and science. LANL is located in north-central New Mexico, within Los Alamos County and Santa Fe County, about 60 miles (97 kilometers) north-northeast of Albuquerque and about 25 miles (40 kilometers) northwest of Santa Fe (see Figure S-1). The small communities of Los Alamos townsite, White Rock, Pajarito Acres, the Royal Crest Mobile Home Park, and San Ildefonso Pueblo are located in the immediate vicinity of LANL. On November 26, 1997, Congress passed Public Law (PL) 105-119, the Departments of Commerce, Justice, and State, the Judiciary,

337

Category:QuickServiceRestaurant | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

QuickServiceRestaurant QuickServiceRestaurant Jump to: navigation, search Go Back to PV Economics By Building Type Media in category "QuickServiceRestaurant" The following 77 files are in this category, out of 77 total. SVQuickServiceRestaurant Albuquerque NM Public Service Co of NM.png SVQuickServiceRestaura... 65 KB SVQuickServiceRestaurant Atlantic City NJ Public Service Elec & Gas Co.png SVQuickServiceRestaura... 64 KB SVQuickServiceRestaurant Baltimore MD Baltimore Gas & Electric Co.png SVQuickServiceRestaura... 67 KB SVQuickServiceRestaurant Bismarck ND Montana-Dakota Utilities Co (North Dakota).png SVQuickServiceRestaura... 72 KB SVQuickServiceRestaurant Boulder CO Public Service Co of Colorado.png SVQuickServiceRestaura... 61 KB SVQuickServiceRestaurant Bridgeport CT Connecticut Light & Power Co.png

338

DOE Zero Energy Ready Home Case Study, Palo Duro Homes, Inc....  

Energy Savers (EERE)

Study, Palo Duro Homes, Inc., Albuquerque, NM, Production DOE Zero Energy Ready Home Case Study, Palo Duro Homes, Inc., Albuquerque, NM, Production Case study of a DOE Zero Energy...

339

Can UV Exposure Reduce Mortality?  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Cancer Center, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87131-0001. Phone: 505-272-4369...Affiliation: University of New Mexico Cancer Center, Albuquerque, New Mexico A Swedish cohort analysis in...recommendations are based on minimal solar exposure (i.e., almost...

Marianne Berwick

2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

340

North Carolina School of Science and Mathematics from Durham...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

North Carolina School of Science and Mathematics from Durham, NC and Albuquerque Academy from Albuquerque, NM Win the U.S. Department of Energy National Science Bowl North Carolina...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "1977-1980 albuquerque ct" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

AEROSPACE TECHNOLOGY REVIEW FOR LBL WINDOW/PASSIVE SOLAR PROGRAM FINAL REPORT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

associated wi the DOE/New Mexico Solar Irrigation Project.Solar Total Energy lity Sandia Laboratories, Albuquerque. New Mexico,

Viswanathan, R.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

342

MODELING PASSIVE SOLAR BUILDINGS WITH HAND CALCULATIONS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Solar Buildings: A Compilation of Data and Results." Sandia Laboratories, SAND 77-1204, Albuquerque, New Mexico,

Goldstein, David B.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

343

E-Print Network 3.0 - associada ao alongamento Sample Search...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

uma acao associada a ele, o cursor... Lucinelma Pessoa Albuquerque Orientacao: Luiz Velho 1 Introducao Realidade virtual, simulacoes, video... -conferencia,...

344

2002 DOE Final Inherently Governmental and Commercial Activities Inventory  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

2 Inherently Governmental and Commercial Activities Inventory 2 Inherently Governmental and Commercial Activities Inventory 12/23/2002 10:51 AM Org Unit Additional Information 2002ID Agency Bureau Organization unit City StateCode Country Total FTEs FunctionCode Status ReasonCode ReasonSub_Code YrFirstOnInventory YearofCostComapre CIF/FTESavings EstAnnualSavings MEOPerfReview 444 019 05 AL ALBUQUERQUE NM US 15 K999 I 1999 452 019 05 AL ALBUQUERQUE NM US 1 R660 I 1999 436 019 05 AL ALBUQUERQUE NM US 1 Y220 I 1999 437 019 05 AL ALBUQUERQUE NM US 1 Y999 I 1999 438 019 05 AL ALBUQUERQUE NM US 1 T833 I 1999 439 019 05 AL ALBUQUERQUE NM US 1 R660 I 1999 440 019 05 AL KANSAS CITY MO US 1 K999 I 1999 441 019 05 AL ALBUQUERQUE NM US 3 K999 I 1999 434 019 05 AL ALBUQUERQUE NM US 1 Y150 I 1999 443 019 05 AL ALBUQUERQUE NM US 14 K999 I 1999 433 019 05 AL ALBUQUERQUE NM US 4 Y150 I 1999 445 019 05 AL ALBUQUERQUE NM US 1 K999 I 1999 446 019 05 AL ALBUQUERQUE NM US 3 K999 I 1999

345

Photoreactivation of Ultraviolet Radiation-induced Skin and Eye Tumors of Monodelphis domestica  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...with Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc. Ronald...Albuquerque, New Mexico 87108 [R. D. L...Albuquerque, New Mexico 87108. | Journal...Albuquerque, New Mexico 87108 [R. D. L...UVR portion of the solar spectrum. Received...S. Department of Energy, under Contract...

Ronald D. Ley; Lee A. Applegate; R. J. Michael Fry; and Anne B. Sanchez

1991-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

346

Author's Contact Information Center for High Technology Materials  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

DepartmentAU1 of Electrical and Computer Engineering University of New Mexico Albuquerque NM 87106 AU2 USA of Electrical and Computer Engineering University of New Mexico Albuquerque New Mexico 87106 NM 87106 USA Tel: þ Detectors E Plis, University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM, USA J B Rodriguez, Universite´ Montpellier 2

Krishna, Sanjay

347

B O N N E V I L L E P O W E R A D M I N I S T R A T I O N W A S H I N G T 0 N W I L D L I F E M I T I G AT I 0 N P R 0 J E CT S  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

E E P O W E R A D M I N I S T R A T I O N W A S H I N G T 0 N W I L D L I F E M I T I G AT I 0 N P R 0 J E CT S F I N A L P R 0 G RAM M AT1 C EN V I RO N M ENTAL ASS ESS M E NT ( D 0 E l EA- 1 0 9 6 ) AND FINDING OF NO SIGNIFICANT IMPACT Columbia Columbia Plateau Acquis~~onllmpmvement Project activities could occur in Okanogan. Dougla G m t , Adams andlor Fmklrn Countres. In cooperation with: Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife DISCLAIMER Portions of this document may be illegible in electronic image products. Images are produced f r o m the best available original document. U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Bonneville Power Administration 1 Finding of No SignZcant Impact for Washington Wildlife Mitigation Projects SUMMARY BPA proposes to fund the portion of the Washington Wildlife Mitigation

348

IG-0524.PDF  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

4 4 AUDIT REPORT ALBUQUERQUE OPERATIONS OFFICE'S GRANT ADMINISTRATION U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY OFFICE OF INSPECTOR GENERAL OFFICE OF AUDIT SERVICES SEPTEMBER 2001 MEMORANDUM FOR THE SECRETARY FROM: Gregory H. Friedman (Signed) Inspector General SUBJECT: INFORMATION: Audit Report on "Albuquerque Operations Office's Grant Administration" BACKGROUND As of September 30, 1999, the Albuquerque Operations Office (Albuquerque) administered grants with a total value of $509 million. These grants funded numerous activities such as research and development, education, and state and local projects. Albuquerque personnel were

349

A new CT grading system for hip osteoarthritis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

protocol and methodology and were then free to examine test cases over the next few weeks. A second meeting followed this familiarisation period to cover any questions on methodology. The first interpretation run was performed in a randomised order? #28... , and Doherty M. Radiographic patterns and associations of osteoarthritis of the hip. Ann Rheum Dis 1992;51(10):1111-6. 23. Solomon L, Schnitzler CM, and Browett JP. Osteoarthritis of the hip: the patient behind the disease. Ann Rheum Dis 1982...

Turmezei, T. D.; Fotiadou, A.; Lomas, D. J.; Hopper, M. A.; Poole, K. E. S.

2014-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

350

HANWEI ZHANG 19 Riley Ct. Skillman, NJ 08558  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

3, Pages 277-298 [6]. Klein, A., Zhang, H. & Themelis, N. J. (2003). A Waste-To-Energy Power Plant.zhang@gmail.com Research Interests Thermal conversion of municipal solid waste to energy; Numerical Analysis of High (2007). Process Simulation of a large Mass Burn Waste-To-Energy boiler by the combination of CFD

351

USACE, HUMPHREYS ENGR CTR SPT ACTIVITY ATTN: CEHEC-CT,  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-4107 CODE 10. THIS ACQUISITION IS UNRESTRICTED FAX: NAICS: TEL: CODE 18a. PAYMENT WILL BE MADE BYOFFEROR INTEGRITY DRIVE MILLINGTON TN 38054-5005 18b. SUBMIT INVOICES TO ADDRESS SHOWN IN BLOCK 18a. UNLESS BLOCK 15 SEE ADDENDUM BLOCK IS MARKED DESTINATION UNLESS 12. DISCOUNT TERMS F&A HQ (No Collect Calls) $6.0 mil

US Army Corps of Engineers

352

3.5 Dissolved inorganic carbon (CT) 5 February 2005  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

such as burning of fossil fuels, deforestation, cement production, etc. It is an urgent task to estimate drawing tube (PFA tubing connected to silicone rubber tubing) into a 300 ml borosilicate glass bottle

353

An evaluation of in-plane shields during thoracic CT  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......non-parametric image quality data were analysed using Kruskal-Wallis tests with pairwise comparisons done using the Mann-Whitney...routine thorax (b) CTPA and (c) CCTA examinations. Kruskal-Wallis testing followed by pairwise comparisons using the......

S. J. Foley; M. F. McEntee; L. A. Rainford

2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

354

District cooling and heating development in Stamford, CT. Final report  

SciTech Connect

This report summarizes the development options for introducing district cooling and heating in downtown Stamford, Connecticut. A district energy system as defined for the Stamford project is the production of chilled and hot water at a central energy plant, and its distribution underground to participating building in the vicinity. The objective of the study was to investigate implementation of a district energy system in conjunction with cogeneration as a means to encourage energy conservation and provide the city with an economic development tool. Analysis of the system configuration focused on selecting an arrangement which offered a realistic opportunity for implementation. Three main alternatives were investigated: (1) construction of an 82 MW cogeneration plant and a district heating and cooling system to serve downtown buildings, (2) construction of a small (4 MW) in-fence cogeneration plant combined with cooling and heating, and (3) construction of a district cooling and heating plant to supply selected buildings. Option (1) was determined to be unfeasible at this time due to low electricity prices. The analysis demonstrated that alternatives (2) and (3) were feasible. A number of recommendations are made for detailed cost estimates and ownership, leasing, and financial issues. 12 figs., 10 tabs.

NONE

1994-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

355

QER Public Meeting in Providence, RI & Hartford, CT: New England...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

& Local Affairs - New England Dominion Resources, Inc. Remarks of Joe Rose, President, Propane Gas Association of New England Remarks of Michael Trunzo, President & CEO, New...

356

bectso-ct121 | netl.doe.gov  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

2 Industrial Carbon Capture and Storage Clean Coal Power Initiative Power Plant Improvement Initiative Clean Coal Technology Demonstration Program FutureGen Demonstration of...

357

Provide solutions to today's problems ContaCt Us  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

­ all rely on chemical expertise. The basic understanding of how substances are interrelated table.The basic processes of lifesuchasphotosynthesis,respirationandanabundanceofenzyme- catalysed living organisms.The study of organic chemistry is vital to the understanding of living processes

Waikato, University of

358

ACCELERATING REGULARIZED ITERATIVE CT RECONSTRUCTION ON COMMODITY GRAPHICS HARDWARE (GPU)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

overhead to very moderate levels. Index Terms-- Iterative Reconstruction, Computed Tomography, Ordered Klaus Mueller Center for Visual Computing, Computer Science Department, Stony Brook University ABSTRACT) is the overall theme in many efforts to lower these exposures. Effective methods here include limiting either

Mueller, Klaus

359

Making an impact in public health through philanthrocapitalism : the PaCT Project and ImPaCT Commercial Ventures  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Large-scale epidemiologic longitudinal cohort studies are a distinct area of epidemiology and public health. To conduct such studies, it often requires exorbitant resources. African collaborators and a team of Harvard ...

Reid, Todd Germaine

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

360

CX-004542: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

42: Categorical Exclusion Determination 42: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-004542: Categorical Exclusion Determination Ground Mount Photovoltaic Installations at City of Albuquerque Fire Academy CX(s) Applied: B5.1 Date: 11/24/2010 Location(s): Albuquerque, New Mexico Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Golden Field Office The City of Albuquerque proposes to use $1,349,562.50 of Energy Efficiency and Conservation Block Grant funding to install an approximately 200 kilowatts of ground mounted solar photovoltaic at the City of Albuquerque Fire training Academy complex. The photovoltaic array will provide alternative energy to the Academy and the adjacent City owned facilities of City of Albuquerque West-side Animal Shelter and the City of Albuquerque Air Quality District Administration buildings.

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361

North Carolina School of Science and Mathematics from Durham, NC and  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

North Carolina School of Science and Mathematics from Durham, NC North Carolina School of Science and Mathematics from Durham, NC and Albuquerque Academy from Albuquerque, NM Win the U.S. Department of Energy National Science Bowl North Carolina School of Science and Mathematics from Durham, NC and Albuquerque Academy from Albuquerque, NM Win the U.S. Department of Energy National Science Bowl May 3, 2010 - 12:00am Addthis WASHINGTON, D.C. - A high school team from Durham and a middle school team from Albuquerque won the 2010 U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) National Science Bowl today at the National Building Museum in Washington. North Carolina School of Science and Mathematics beat Mira Loma High School from Sacramento CA in the high school national championship match by correctly answering a chemistry question. Albuquerque Academy beat Gale

362

PowerPoint Presentation  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

th U.S.-China Energy Efficiency Forum th U.S.-China Energy Efficiency Forum Welcoming Remarks David Danielson Assistant Secretary Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy U.S. Department of Energy Dr. David Danielson, Assistant Secretary The 4th U.S. - China Energy Efficiency Forum 3 - 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 1971 1974 1977 1980 1983 1986 1989 1992 1995 1998 2001 2004 2007 2010 U.S. and China : World's Largest Energy Consumers and Emitters Total CO2 from Energy Consumption (Gt) Source: World Bank Indicators. CO2 Emissions from Fuel Combustion (2012 Edition), IEA, Paris. U.S. 5.4 China 7.3 Global Energy Consumption - 100 200 300 400 500 600 Quadrillion Btu Rest of the World 38% 4 0 10 20 30 40 50 60 70 80 90 1980 1985 1990 1995 2000 2005 2010 0 50 100 150 200

363

qryFairAct2000  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Fair Act Inventory Data Fair Act Inventory Data OrgUnit State Location FTE Function Reason YrFirst Appeared RespName RespTitle RespPhone YrCostConv FTESav EstAnnCostSav PostMEODate The Secretary of Energy Advisory Board DC Forrestal 1.0 Y000 A 1999 Roscoe+Harris Management+Analyst 0 0 The Secretary of Energy Advisory Board DC Forrestal 1.0 Y000 B 1999 Roscoe+Harris Management+Analyst 0 0 The Secretary of Energy Advisory Board DC Forrestal 1.0 Y000 A 1999 Roscoe+Harris Management+Analyst 202-586-5527 Albuquerque Field Office NM Albuquerque 1.0 Y815 A 1999 John Jackson 505-845-5474 0 0 Albuquerque Field Office NM ALBUQUERQUE 1.0 U800 A 1999 John Jackson 505-845-5474 Albuquerque Field Office NM ALBUQUERQUE 1.0 U800 A 1999 John Jackson 505-845-5474 Albuquerque Field Office NM ALBUQUERQUE 3.0 U800 A 1999 John Jackson 505-845-5474 Albuquerque Field Office

364

FEM94.PDF  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

FATIGUE CASE STUDY AND LOADING SPECTRA FOR WIND TURBINES* Herbert J. Sutherland Wind Energy Technology Sandia National Laboratories Albuquerque, NM 87185-0708 ABSTRACT * The...

365

E-Print Network 3.0 - abelhas hymenoptera apoidea Sample Search...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

de Abelhas Solitrias (Hymenoptera: Apoidea) em Dunas Litorneas no Nordeste do Brasil BLANDINA F... Citada Albuquerque, P. 1998. Abelhas silvestres (Hymenoptera, Apoidea) e...

366

Type B Accident Investigation Board Report on the May 24, 1998, Electrical Arc Blast at the Kansas City Plant  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This report is a product of an accident investigation board appointed by Bruce G. Twining, Manager, Albuquerque Operations Office, Department of Energy.

367

April  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Innovations; SAVSU Technologies; and Albuquerque Delicate Dentistry Inc. - 43012 Jordan Medlock Manzano student wins top award in 22nd New Mexico Supercomputing Challenge...

368

Office of Secure Transportation | National Nuclear Security Administra...  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

from which OST Federal Agents operate: Albuquerque, New Mexico; Amarillo, Texas; and Oak Ridge, Tennessee. The OST Training Command is located at Fort Chaffee, Arkansas. A key...

369

Other Participants 1991 | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)  

Office of Science (SC) Website

Laboratory Lab Team, Rocky Flats Lab Team, Pacific Northwest Laboratory Lab Team, Solar Energy Research Institute La Cueva High School , Albuquerque , NM Lake Forest High...

370

R25 Polyisocyanurate Composite Insulation Material  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Lead Performer: Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) - Oak Ridge, TN Partners: -- NanoPore, Inc. - Albuquerque, NM; -- Firestone Building Products Company - Indianapolis, IN

371

Sandia National Laboratories: Solar  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Sandian Selected for Outstanding Young Engineer Award On June 4, 2014, in Energy, News, News & Events, Photovoltaic, Renewable Energy, Solar The Albuquerque Section of the...

372

Sandia National Laboratories: Sandian Selected for Outstanding...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Engineer Award On June 4, 2014, in Energy, News, News & Events, Photovoltaic, Renewable Energy, Solar The Albuquerque Section of the Institute of Electrical and Electronics...

373

Overcoming the Barrier to Achieving Large-Scale Production -...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

CPV TestingValidation * Solar Cell - NREL (Golden, CO) - Fraunhofer ISE (Freiburg, Germany) * Module - NREL (Golden, CO) - SNL (Albuquerque, NM) - Fraunhofer ISE (Freiburg,...

374

Type A Accident Investigation Board Report on the July 11, 1996, Electrical Shock at Technical Area 53, Building MPF-14, Los Alamos National Laboratory  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This report is an independent product of an electrical shock accident investigation board appointed by Bruce G. Twining, Manager, Albuquerque Operations Office, Department of Energy.

375

Technical Challenges and Scientific Payoffs of Muon Beam Accelerators for Particle Physics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of 2006 European Particle Accelerator Conf. , Edinburgh,Proc. 1992 European Particle Accelerator Conference, Berlin,in Proc. 2007 Particle Accelerator Conf. , Albuquerque, June

Zisman, Michael S.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

376

10-04-2010 NNSA-B-10-0390  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

office space at the Aperture Center at Mesa del Sol, in Albuquerque, New Mexico. This Energy Showcase facilitates joint efforts between the organizations, and this activity...

377

2008 Solar Technologies Market Report  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in Albuquerque, New Mexico. Barclays. (2009). Solar Energysolar development on the public lands of six states (Arizona, California, Colorado, New Mexico,

Price, S.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

378

Inspection Report: IG-0455 | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

XPS supercomputer (Paragon) by Sandia National Laboratories (Sandia), Albuquerque, New Mexico. This inspection was initiated at your request based on concerns that the sale of the...

379

xwhd395.tmp  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

from Hydromagnesite in Brine Peng-Chu Zhang* , Howard L. Anderson, Jr., John W. Kelly, James L. Krumhansl, and Hans W. Papenguth Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque,...

380

NETL F 451.1/1-1, Categorical Exclusion Designation Form  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Albuquerque, NM Geomechanics investigation of CO2 Reservoir Seals Perform bench-scale laboratory experiments on rock samples and perform computer modeling of fractures in...

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381

FORCE RECONSTRUCTION USING THE SUM OF WEIGHTED ACCELERATIONS  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

I. Bateman .... i : Sandia NationalLaboratories . .... Albuquerque, NewMexico87185, USA ' i ABSTRACT important design consideration. This would include payloador...

382

[7] V.A.Andreev, V.V.Baublis, E.A.Damaskinskii, A.G.Krivshich, L.G.Kudin, V.V.Marchenkov, V.F.Morozov, V.V.Nelyubin, E.M.Orichtchine, G.E.Petrov,  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. Instr. Meth., 1996. V.B119. P.308. [12] CERN Courier, 1996. V.36(1). P.3. [13] D.Chen, I.F. Albuquerque

Titov, Anatoly

383

Fact Sheet on Sandia Corporation PNOV | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Laboratories, with the main multi-program laboratory located in Albuquerque, New Mexico. Preliminary Notice of Violation, Sandia National Laboratories - WEA-2010-03, Fact...

384

Surfect Technologies Inc | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Inc Jump to: navigation, search Name: Surfect Technologies Inc Place: Albuquerque, New Mexico Zip: 87112 Sector: Solar Product: US-based manufacturer of computerised...

385

Workplace Charging Challenge Partner: Fraunhofer Center for Sustainabl...  

Energy Savers (EERE)

work and at home. By installing electric vehicle charging stations at their Albuquerque solar test laboratory, employees who now drive longer distances to work can consider the use...

386

Secretary Bodman Announces $34.6 Million to Fund State Energy...  

Energy Savers (EERE)

Generating Station - a new solar photovoltaic plant - outside of Albuquerque, New Mexico. And Assistant Secretary for Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Andy Karsner...

387

AEROSPACE TECHNOLOGY REVIEW FOR LBL WINDOW/PASSIVE SOLAR PROGRAM FINAL REPORT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Energy's Solar Total Energy lity Sandia Laboratories, Albuquerque. New Mexico,Mexico Solar Irrigation Project. REVI a thermal storage subsystem in a solar total energy

Viswanathan, R.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

388

Vehicle to Micro-Grid: Leveraging Existing Assets for Reliable...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

of Renewable & Distributed Energy Resources, December 6-10 , 2010 * Albuquerque, New Mexico U.S. military bases, such as Fort Carson, are interested in opportunities to lower...

389

Solar Distinction | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Distinction Jump to: navigation, search Name: Solar Distinction Place: Albuquerque, New Mexico Product: New Mexico-based PV module maker. References: Solar Distinction1 This...

390

Ted Pietrok - Biography | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

working for the DOE in Albuquerque, New Mexico where he was responsible for oversight of Conduct of Operations and the Facility Representative Program within the Weapons Complex...

391

CX-002268: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

CX-002268: Categorical Exclusion Determination From Sensing to Enhancing the Brain Processes CX(s) Applied: B3.12 Date: 02252010 Location(s): Albuquerque, New Mexico...

392

Sandia National Laboratories: MEPV  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

for Outstanding Young Engineer Award On June 4, 2014, in Energy, News, News & Events, Photovoltaic, Renewable Energy, Solar The Albuquerque Section of the Institute of...

393

Building America Whole-House Solutions for New Homes: Artistic...  

Energy Savers (EERE)

DOE Zero Energy Ready Home Case Study: Palo Duro Homes, Albuquerque, NM Building America Whole-House Solutions for New Homes: Nelson Construction, Farmington, Connecticut...

394

SciTech Connect: Method for forming polymerized microfluidic...  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

National Laboratories, Albuquerque, NM (United States)) Sponsoring Org: USDOE Country of Publication: United States Language: English Word Cloud More Like This Full Text View...

395

SAND2012-4433  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

SANDIA REPORT SAND2012-4433 Unlimited Release May 2012 Graphene Resonators - Analysis and Film Transfer Maria E. Suggs Prepared by Sandia National Laboratories Albuquerque, New...

396

Type B Accident Investigation Board Report on the November 17, 1997, Chiller Line Rupture at Technical Area 35, Building 27, Los Alamos National Laboratory  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This report is a product of an accident investigation board appointed by Bruce G. Twining, Manager, Albuquerque Operations Office, Department of Energy.

397

Los Alamos National Laboratory's Quality and Performance Assurance...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Pion Recognition from Quality New Mexico and will be recognized at QNM's annual learning summit and awards ceremony April 22-23 in Albuquerque. Pion Recognition...

398

Los Alamos National Laboratory's Quality and Performance Assurance  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Pion Recognition from Quality New Mexico and will be recognized at QNM's annual learning summit and awards ceremony April 22-23 in Albuquerque. Pion Recognition...

399

Cleanable and Hardcoat Coatings for Increased Durability of Silvered...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Laboratories, Albuquerque, NM. The modeling (right) considered irradiation from the heliostat field, reradiation, discrete (particle) flow, and convection with turbulent particle...

400

Long-Term Surveillance Plan...  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

documentsrflltsp.html 1 of 25 5202009 1:38 PM Prepared for U.S. Department of Energy Environmental Restoration Division UMTRA Project Team Albuquerque, New Mexico...

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401

TEC Information Security  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

External Coordination Working Group Information Security E. Ralph Smith, Manager Institutional Programs April 22, 2004 Albuquerque, NM WIPP * Open communications * Notifications *...

402

APPENDIX A:  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Watson Submitted to Sandia Site Office, Gorn, Caughey Info Copy Only Albuquerque - Local Air Pollution Control RegulationsAir Permits No Change - Report is sent through the...

403

Summary Report Inspection of Environment, Safety, and Health...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

17 Abbreviations Used in This Report AAAHC Accreditation Association for Ambulatory Health Care AL Albuquerque Operations Office ALARA As Low As Reasonably Achievable CMR...

404

Inspection of Environment, Safety, and Health at the Los Alamos...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

... 81 ii iii ACRONYMS AAAHC Accreditation Association for Ambulatory Health Care AHA Activity Hazard Analysis AL Albuquerque Operations Office ALARA As Low As...

405

National Library of Energy (BETA): the Department of Energy's...  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Advanced Light Source Advanced Photon Source Advanced Research Projects Agency - Energy Advanced Test Reactor National Scientific User Facility Albuquerque Complex Alcator...

406

E-Print Network 3.0 - alpha-voltaic power source Sample Search...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Albuquerque, New Mexico, January 2000 Miniaturized Radioisotope Solid State Power Sources Summary: for an alpha-voltaic or a hybrid thermoelectricalpha-voltaic power...

407

NEES EFRC Poster Session  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

NEES EFRC Poster Session May 8-9 2014, Sandia, Albuquerque, NM 1. Lithographically Patterned GoldManganese Dioxide CoreShell Nanowires for High Power Supercapacitors -...

408

E-Print Network 3.0 - agressividade nas pessoas Sample Search...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

VISGRAF Instituto de Matematica Pura e Aplicada Summary: Lucinelma Pessoa Albuquerque Luiz Velho (orientador) Technical Report TR-02-04 Relatorio Tecnico June... Lucinelma...

409

N:\My Documents\porfin.pdf  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

6 Commercial and Inherently Governmental FTE Inventory Worksheet 6 Commercial and Inherently Governmental FTE Inventory Worksheet Seq No. State City Country Total FTEs Activity Fct Code Status Reason Code First Year On Inventory Reserved Reserved Reserved Reserved 1 019-60 AB DC Washington US 1 Y210 I 1999 2 019-60 AB DC Washington US 1 Y210 I 1999 3 019-60 AB DC Washington US 1 Y815 C A 1999 4 019-60 AB DC Washington US 1 Y000 C B 1999 5 019-60 AB DC Washington US 0 Y815 C B 2003 6 019-10 AL NM Albuquerque US 1 E110 C A 1999 7 019-10 AL NM Albuquerque US 1 E800 C A 2004 8 019-10 AL NM Albuquerque US 1 E110 C A 1999 9 019-10 AL NM Albuquerque US 1 E110 C A 1999 10 019-10 AL NM Albuquerque US 1 E800 C A 1999 11 019-10 AL NM Albuquerque US 1 E101 C A 2004 12 019-10 AL NM Albuquerque US 1 E110 C A 2004 13 019-10 AL NM Albuquerque US 1 E110 C A 2004 14 019-10 AL NM Albuquerque US 1 E110 C A 2004 15 019-10 AL NM Albuquerque US 1 E800 C A 1999 16 019-10 AL NM Albuquerque US 1 E110 C A 1999 17

410

Contract Number: DE-AC05-76RL01830 Modification M971  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Usage Code) Coastal Security Institute 1 CSI1 Office Environmental Molecular Science Laboratory (EMSL Storage Building 350C General Storage Oil Storage Facility 350D Hazardous/Flammable Storage Radiological Usage Code) Albuquerque NM Office Albuquerque Security Hq / Badge Issuance / Gate Houses (Polygraph

411

PHYSICAL REVIEW B 84, 115421 (2011) Efficient terahertz emission from InAs nanowires  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

PHYSICAL REVIEW B 84, 115421 (2011) Efficient terahertz emission from InAs nanowires Denis V, University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM 87131, USA 2 Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, NM 87185 measurements of electronic transport on individual nanowires, ultrafast terahertz spectroscopy, and theoretical

Sheik-Bahae, Mansoor

412

A Context-Partitioned Stochastic Modeling System with Causally Informed Context  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Management Sciences, Inc., 6022 Constitution Ave NE, Albuquerque, NM 87110, USA Abstract. We describe Computer Science Department, University of New Mexico, Albuquerque NM 87131, USA, sanik@cs.unm.edu 2 for expanding and refining the model library employs a combination of abductive inference together with EM model

Luger, George

413

HPCERC2000-014 A New Prediction Oriented Barrier  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

;Disclaimer The Albuquerque High Performance Computing Center (AHPCC) Provides a focus for high performance of the High Performance Computing, Education & Research Center (HPCERC), a strategic center of UNM Frank L of Electrical and Computer Engineering, and Albuquerque High Performance Computing Center University of New

Maccabe, Barney

414

REGIONAL RADIATION PROGRAM MANAGERS The following is a directory list of regional program managers in Federal agencies who  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Operations Office ORO Public Affairs Office Post Office Box 2001 Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831 Savannah River Operations Office Department of Energy Post Office Box A Aiken, South Carolina 29808 Albuquerque Operations Office Department of Energy Post Office Box 5400 Albuquerque, New Mexico 87185

415

Photoreactivation of Ultraviolet Radiation-induced Skin and Eye Tumors of Monodelphis domestica  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Foundation, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87108. | Journal Article Research...Foundation, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87108 [R. D. L., L, A...induced by the UVR portion of the solar spectrum. Received 7/25...653-658, 1990. 33. Jagger, J. Solar-UV actions on living cells...

Ronald D. Ley; Lee A. Applegate; R. J. Michael Fry; and Anne B. Sanchez

1991-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

416

ISSN 0091-7613 JANUARY 2007 VOL. 35 NO. 1 P. 196 JANUARY2007VOL.35NO.1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, or editing@geosociety.org. Solar forcing of Holocene climate: New insights from a speleothem record of New Mexico, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87131, USA Stephen Burns Department of Geosciences, University, University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87131, USA ABSTRACT Holocene climate change has likely had

Asmerom, Yemane

417

Creating Online Graduate Engineering Degrees at the University of New Mexico  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Creating Online Graduate Engineering Degrees at the University of New Mexico Gregory L. Heileman (Department of Electrical & Computer Engineering University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, USA heileman@ece.unm.edu) Chaouki T. Abdallah (Department of Electrical & Computer Engineering University of New Mexico, Albuquerque

418

A Novel FDTD Application Featuring OpenMP-MPI Hybrid Parallelization Mehmet F. Su  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of photons the way we tailor the properties of electrons. Harnessing the broad potential of photonic crys. of Electrical and Computer Engineering University of New Mexico Albuquerque, NM 87131 mfatihsu@ece.unm.edu Ihab@sandia.gov David A. Bader Dept. of Electrical and Computer Engineering University of New Mexico Albuquerque, NM

Bader, David A.

419

Jefferson Green  

Albuquerque, NM Jefferson Green is a three-story, 85,000 ft2 commercial office building in Albuquerque, NM. The building was designed as a speculative, core and shell new construction project. The project is located in a developed area consisting of office buildings and small retail establishments, known as Journal Center. The building has multiple tenants and has achieved LEED Gold certification.

420

Alternative transportation fuels and air quality  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Alternative transportation fuels and air quality ... Potential Air Quality Effects of Using Ethanol?Gasoline Fuel Blends: A Field Study in Albuquerque, New Mexico ... Potential Air Quality Effects of Using Ethanol?Gasoline Fuel Blends: A Field Study in Albuquerque, New Mexico ...

Tai Y. Chang; Robert H. Hammerle; Steven M. Japar; Irving T. Salmeen

1991-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

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421

Multispectral rock-type separation and classification Biliana Paskaleva  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Corporation, a Lockheed Martin Company for the United States Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security, Albuquerque, NM87131-0001 Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, NM 87185 1 Abstract This paper explores and temporal parameters. The Multi-spectral Thermal Imager (MTI) was designed to be a satellite based system

Hayat, Majeed M.

422

Application of dynamic line narrowing in resonant optical sensing  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of New Mexico, 1919 Lomas Boulevard NE, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87131, USA 2 Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering and Center for High Technology Materials, University of New Mexico, 1313 Goddard SE, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87106, USA *Corresponding author: mhz@chtm.unm.edu Received August 3, 2011; accepted

New Mexico, University of

423

IMPACT OF BEAM TRANSPORT METHOD ON CHAMBER AND DRIVER DESIGN FOR  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. V. ROSE* and D. R. WELCH Mission Research Corporation, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87110 C. L. OLSON Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87185 S. S. YU and S. NEFF Lawrence Berkeley the development of a commercially viable iner- tial fusion energy ~IFE! power plant for generating electricity.1

424

Gregory L. Heileman (Updated 5/2011) Department of Electrical & Computer Engineering  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of Undergraduate Programs, De- partment of Electrical & Computer Engineering, University of New Mexico, Albuquerque 2002 ­ present: Professor, Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of New Mexico of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM. August 1989 ­ August 1990

Heileman, Gregory L.

425

Securing Trusted Execution Environments with PUF Generated Secret Keys  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of New Mexico Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering Albuquerque, New Mexico, USA mareno@ece.unm.edu Jim Plusquellic University of New Mexico Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering Albuquerque, New Mexico, USA jimp@ece.unm.edu Abstract--Trusted Execution Environments are quickly becom- ing

Plusquellic, James

426

Density-dependent carrier dynamics in a quantum dots-in-a-well heterostructure  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87185, USA 3 Department of Electrical and Computer for Integrated Nanotechnologies, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545, USA 2 Sandia Engineering, Center for High Technology Materials, University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87106

Krishna, Sanjay

427

Theory and experiment for one-dimensional directed self-assembly of nanoparticles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and Vakhtang Putkaradze Department of Mathematics, University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87131 Deying Xia and S. R. J. Bruecka Center for High Technology Materials and Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87106 Received 23 March 2005

New Mexico, University of

428

Simultaneous interfacial misfit array formation and antiphase domain suppression on miscut silicon substrate  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Center for High Technology Materials, University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87106, USA 2 TEM Laboratory, Department of Earth and Planetary Sciences, University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87131, USA 3 California Nano Systems Institute and Department of Electrical Engineering, University

New Mexico, University of

429

Resonant coupling to a dipole absorber inside a metamaterial: Anticrossing of the negative index response  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of New Mexico, 1313 Goddard, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87106 Igal Brener, Michael B. Sinclair, Gregory A, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87185 Received 8 July 2010; accepted 27 September 2010; published 9 November 2010 resonance in the permeability of a fishnet metamaterial and an electric dipole material resonance

New Mexico, University of

430

2700 DOI: 10.1021/la904505n Langmuir 2010, 26(4), 27002706Published on Web 01/19/2010 pubs.acs.org/Langmuir  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for High Technology Materials and Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of New Mexico, 1313 Goddard, SE, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87106, Center for Micro-Engineered Materials, University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87131, and § Center for Biomedical Engineering

New Mexico, University of

431

Spectrally adaptive infrared photodetectors with bias-tunable quantum dots  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Tyo, and Majeed M. Hayat Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of New Mexico and Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87131, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87131 Sunil Raghavan and Sanjay Krishna Center for High Technology Materials

Hayat, Majeed M.

432

Information content per photon versus image fidelity in three-dimensional photon-counting integral imaging  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Technology Materials and Department of Electrical & Computer Engineering, The University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87131-1356, USA 3 Department of Electrical & Computer Engineering, The University, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87131-1356, USA 2 Department of Physics & Astronomy, The University of New Mexico

Hayat, Majeed M.

433

Fabrication of GaN nanowire arrays by confined epitaxy Xinyu Sun, Michael Fairchild, and Stephen D. Hersee  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87106 and Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of New Mexico, and Stephen D. Hersee Center for High Technology Materials, University of New Mexico, 1313 Goddard SE, 1313 Goddard SE, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87106 Received 29 August 2006; accepted 26 October 2006

New Mexico, University of

434

Simula'ng Collec've Neutrino Oscilla'ons In Core-Collapse  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Noormofidi1, Sajad Abbar2, Shashank Shalgar2, and Huaiyu Duan2 1Department of Electrical & Computer Engineering, University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM 87131 2Department of Physics & Astronomy, University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM 87131 E-mail: duan

Maccabe, Barney

435

GridJam is a realtime, geographically distributed, multimedia event. It is an  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM 87131; Paniotis, UNM Department of Electrical and Computer Mexico that provides basic immersive rendering functionality, multimodal user input paradigms Engineering, University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM 87131. Email: jackox@hpc.unm.edu #12; Grid

Maccabe, Barney

436

HPCERC2000005 10 February 2000  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. Sobolewski The University of New Mexico Electrical and Computer Engineering #12;Disclaimer The Albuquerque and communication at the University of New Mexico (UNM). AHPCC is committed to innovative research in computational Internet Initiatives in the USA John S. Sobolewski University of New Mexico Albuquerque, NM 87111 Jssob

Maccabe, Barney

437

Published: July 26, 2011 r 2011 American Chemical Society 3673 dx.doi.org/10.1021/cg101363q |Cryst. Growth Des. 2011, 11, 36733676  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of New Mexico, 1313 Goddard SE, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87106, United States Department of Earth and Planetary Sciences, University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87131, United States Strain-relieved, defect-free, epitaxial growth of heterostruc- tures

New Mexico, University of

438

Negative differential conductance in two-dimensional electron grids S. K. Lyo,1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87185, USA 2 Center for High Technology Materials, University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87108, USA Received 8 July 2007; accepted 16 January 2008; published online 5 February an external electric field E, if an electron can reach the bound- ary of the Brillouin zone BZ without being

New Mexico, University of

439

Abstract --Advantages of proton computed tomography (pCT) have been recognized in the past. However, the quality of a pCT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

estimation. A set of Monte Carlo simulations was carried out with the GEANT4 program, and reconstructed advantages in medical applications. First for diagnosis, its low-dose advantage might be utilized effectively are with the Department of Radiation Medicine, Loma Linda University Medical Center, Loma Linda, CA 92354 USA. density

Mueller, Klaus

440

Estimation of the total effective dose from low-dose CT scans and radiopharmaceutical administrations delivered to patients undergoing SPECT/CT explorations  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The effective dose calculation is useful to compare the doses from, and the radiation risks associated with, different diagnostic examinations. ... account the uncertainties associated with the estimated effectiv...

Carlos Montes; Pilar Tamayo; Jorge Hernandez

2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "1977-1980 albuquerque ct" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

rptDOEFairAct2000.PDF  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Fair Act Inventory Data Fair Act Inventory Data YrFirst OrgUnit State Location FTE Function Reason Appeared RespName RespTitle RespPhone YrCostConv FTESav EstAnnCostSav PostMEODate The Secretary of Energy Advisory DC Forrestal 3.0 Y000 B 1999 Christopher Program Analyst 202-586-0391 Board O'Gwin The Secretary of Energy Advisory DC Forrestal 2.0 Y000 A 1999 Christopher Program Analyst 202-586-0391 Board O'Gwin Albuquerque Operations Office NM Albuquerque 3.0 S999 A 1999 Lou Lubitz Management Analyst 505-845-4294 Albuquerque Operations Office NM Albuquerque 10.0 S740 A 1999 Lou Lubitz Management Analyst 505-845-4294 Albuquerque Operations Office NM Albuquerque 7.0 S742 A 1999 Lou Lubitz Management Analyst 505-845-4294 Albuquerque Operations Office MO Kansas City Area 2.0 S745 A 1999 Lou Lubitz Management Analyst 505-845-4294

442

DOE - Safety of Radioactive Material Transportation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Comments & Questions Gary Lanthrum, DOE/NTP Albuquerque, NM E-mail: glanthrum@doeal.gov Phone: (505) 845-5277 Fax: (505) 845-5508 Ashok K. Kapoor, DOE/NTP Albuquerque, NM E-mail: akapoor@doeal.gov Phone: (505) 845-4574 Fax: (505) 845-5508 David R. Miller, SNL/TP Manager, Albuquerque, NM E-mail: drmille@sandia.gov Phone: (505) 284-2574 Fax: (505) 844-2829 Mona L. Aragon, SNL/TP Advanced Visualization, Albuquerque, NM E-mail: mlrage@sandia.gov Phone: (505) 844-2541 Fax: (505) 844-0244 Doug Ammerman, SNL/TP Structural Analysis, Albuquerque, NM E-mail: djammer@sandia.gov Phone: (505) 845-8158 Fax: (505) 844-0244 Fran Kanipe, SNL/TP Computer Programming, Albuquerque, NM E-mail: flkanip@sandia.gov Phone: (505) 844-1121 Fax: (505) 844-0244 Carlos Lopez, SNL/TP Thermal Analysis, Albuquerque, NM

443

044alrpt  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

37 37 AUDIT REPORT AIRCRAFT AND AIR SERVICE MANAGEMENT PROGRAMS U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY OFFICE OF INSPECTOR GENERAL OFFICE OF AUDIT SERVICES JANUARY 1999 January 25, 1999 MEMORANDUM FOR THE SECRETARY FROM: Gregory H. Friedman Inspector General SUBJECT: INFORMATION : Audit Report on "Aircraft and Air Service Management Programs" BACKGROUND The Department of Energy's (Department) Albuquerque Operations Office (Albuquerque) owns seven aircraft that support defense programs, research and development efforts, emergency response programs, and official travel of Government and contractor employees. An Office of Inspector General (OIG) report, issued in 1994, identified concerns with Albuquerque's cost for air service. Since that report, there have

444

SciTech Connect: "light emitting diode"  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

"light emitting diode" Find "light emitting diode" Find How should I search Scitech Connect ... Basic or Advanced? Basic Search Advanced × Advanced Search Options Full Text: Bibliographic Data: Creator / Author: Name Name ORCID Title: Subject: Identifier Numbers: Research Org.: Sponsoring Org.: Site: All Alaska Power Administration, Juneau, Alaska (United States) Albany Research Center (ARC), Albany, OR (United States) Albuquerque Complex - NNSA Albuquerque Operations Office, Albuquerque, NM (United States) Amarillo National Resource Center for Plutonium, Amarillo, TX (United States) Ames Laboratory (AMES), Ames, IA (United States) Argonne National Laboratory (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States) Argonne National Laboratory-Advanced Photon Source (United States) Atlanta Regional Office,

445

SciTech Connect: enriched uranium  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

enriched uranium Find enriched uranium Find How should I search Scitech Connect ... Basic or Advanced? Basic Search Advanced × Advanced Search Options Full Text: Bibliographic Data: Creator / Author: Name Name ORCID Title: Subject: Identifier Numbers: Research Org.: Sponsoring Org.: Site: All Alaska Power Administration, Juneau, Alaska (United States) Albany Research Center (ARC), Albany, OR (United States) Albuquerque Complex - NNSA Albuquerque Operations Office, Albuquerque, NM (United States) Amarillo National Resource Center for Plutonium, Amarillo, TX (United States) Ames Laboratory (AMES), Ames, IA (United States) Argonne National Laboratory (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States) Argonne National Laboratory-Advanced Photon Source (United States) Atlanta Regional Office, Atlanta, GA (United States) Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM)

446

SciTech Connect: auroras  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

auroras Find auroras Find How should I search Scitech Connect ... Basic or Advanced? Basic Search Advanced × Advanced Search Options Full Text: Bibliographic Data: Creator / Author: Name Name ORCID Title: Subject: Identifier Numbers: Research Org.: Sponsoring Org.: Site: All Alaska Power Administration, Juneau, Alaska (United States) Albany Research Center (ARC), Albany, OR (United States) Albuquerque Complex - NNSA Albuquerque Operations Office, Albuquerque, NM (United States) Amarillo National Resource Center for Plutonium, Amarillo, TX (United States) Ames Laboratory (AMES), Ames, IA (United States) Argonne National Laboratory (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States) Argonne National Laboratory-Advanced Photon Source (United States) Atlanta Regional Office, Atlanta, GA (United States) Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM)

447

SciTech Connect: "plasma science"  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

plasma science" Find plasma science" Find How should I search Scitech Connect ... Basic or Advanced? Basic Search Advanced × Advanced Search Options Full Text: Bibliographic Data: Creator / Author: Name Name ORCID Title: Subject: Identifier Numbers: Research Org.: Sponsoring Org.: Site: All Alaska Power Administration, Juneau, Alaska (United States) Albany Research Center (ARC), Albany, OR (United States) Albuquerque Complex - NNSA Albuquerque Operations Office, Albuquerque, NM (United States) Amarillo National Resource Center for Plutonium, Amarillo, TX (United States) Ames Laboratory (AMES), Ames, IA (United States) Argonne National Laboratory (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States) Argonne National Laboratory-Advanced Photon Source (United States) Atlanta Regional Office, Atlanta, GA (United States) Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM)

448

SciTech Connect: "Greenhouse Effect"  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Greenhouse Effect" Find Greenhouse Effect" Find How should I search Scitech Connect ... Basic or Advanced? Basic Search Advanced × Advanced Search Options Full Text: Bibliographic Data: Creator / Author: Name Name ORCID Title: Subject: Identifier Numbers: Research Org.: Sponsoring Org.: Site: All Alaska Power Administration, Juneau, Alaska (United States) Albany Research Center (ARC), Albany, OR (United States) Albuquerque Complex - NNSA Albuquerque Operations Office, Albuquerque, NM (United States) Amarillo National Resource Center for Plutonium, Amarillo, TX (United States) Ames Laboratory (AMES), Ames, IA (United States) Argonne National Laboratory (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States) Argonne National Laboratory-Advanced Photon Source (United States) Atlanta Regional Office, Atlanta, GA (United States) Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM)

449

SciTech Connect: higgs  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

higgs Find higgs Find How should I search Scitech Connect ... Basic or Advanced? Basic Search Advanced × Advanced Search Options Full Text: Bibliographic Data: Creator / Author: Name Name ORCID Title: Subject: Identifier Numbers: Research Org.: Sponsoring Org.: Site: All Alaska Power Administration, Juneau, Alaska (United States) Albany Research Center (ARC), Albany, OR (United States) Albuquerque Complex - NNSA Albuquerque Operations Office, Albuquerque, NM (United States) Amarillo National Resource Center for Plutonium, Amarillo, TX (United States) Ames Laboratory (AMES), Ames, IA (United States) Argonne National Laboratory (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States) Argonne National Laboratory-Advanced Photon Source (United States) Atlanta Regional Office, Atlanta, GA (United States) Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM)

450

SciTech Connect: "fuel cells"  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

fuel cells" Find fuel cells" Find How should I search Scitech Connect ... Basic or Advanced? Basic Search Advanced × Advanced Search Options Full Text: Bibliographic Data: Creator / Author: Name Name ORCID Title: Subject: Identifier Numbers: Research Org.: Sponsoring Org.: Site: All Alaska Power Administration, Juneau, Alaska (United States) Albany Research Center (ARC), Albany, OR (United States) Albuquerque Complex - NNSA Albuquerque Operations Office, Albuquerque, NM (United States) Amarillo National Resource Center for Plutonium, Amarillo, TX (United States) Ames Laboratory (AMES), Ames, IA (United States) Argonne National Laboratory (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States) Argonne National Laboratory-Advanced Photon Source (United States) Atlanta Regional Office, Atlanta, GA (United States) Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM)

451

SciTech Connect: plasma  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

plasma Find plasma Find How should I search Scitech Connect ... Basic or Advanced? Basic Search Advanced × Advanced Search Options Full Text: Bibliographic Data: Creator / Author: Name Name ORCID Title: Subject: Identifier Numbers: Research Org.: Sponsoring Org.: Site: All Alaska Power Administration, Juneau, Alaska (United States) Albany Research Center (ARC), Albany, OR (United States) Albuquerque Complex - NNSA Albuquerque Operations Office, Albuquerque, NM (United States) Amarillo National Resource Center for Plutonium, Amarillo, TX (United States) Ames Laboratory (AMES), Ames, IA (United States) Argonne National Laboratory (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States) Argonne National Laboratory-Advanced Photon Source (United States) Atlanta Regional Office, Atlanta, GA (United States) Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM)

452

SciTech Connect: "enriched uranium"  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

enriched uranium" Find enriched uranium" Find How should I search Scitech Connect ... Basic or Advanced? Basic Search Advanced × Advanced Search Options Full Text: Bibliographic Data: Creator / Author: Name Name ORCID Title: Subject: Identifier Numbers: Research Org.: Sponsoring Org.: Site: All Alaska Power Administration, Juneau, Alaska (United States) Albany Research Center (ARC), Albany, OR (United States) Albuquerque Complex - NNSA Albuquerque Operations Office, Albuquerque, NM (United States) Amarillo National Resource Center for Plutonium, Amarillo, TX (United States) Ames Laboratory (AMES), Ames, IA (United States) Argonne National Laboratory (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States) Argonne National Laboratory-Advanced Photon Source (United States) Atlanta Regional Office, Atlanta, GA (United States) Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM)

453

SciTech Connect: "high temperature superconductivity"  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

high temperature superconductivity" Find high temperature superconductivity" Find How should I search Scitech Connect ... Basic or Advanced? Basic Search Advanced × Advanced Search Options Full Text: Bibliographic Data: Creator / Author: Name Name ORCID Title: Subject: Identifier Numbers: Research Org.: Sponsoring Org.: Site: All Alaska Power Administration, Juneau, Alaska (United States) Albany Research Center (ARC), Albany, OR (United States) Albuquerque Complex - NNSA Albuquerque Operations Office, Albuquerque, NM (United States) Amarillo National Resource Center for Plutonium, Amarillo, TX (United States) Ames Laboratory (AMES), Ames, IA (United States) Argonne National Laboratory (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States) Argonne National Laboratory-Advanced Photon Source (United States) Atlanta Regional Office,

454

SciTech Connect: "oil shale"  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

oil shale" Find oil shale" Find How should I search Scitech Connect ... Basic or Advanced? Basic Search Advanced × Advanced Search Options Full Text: Bibliographic Data: Creator / Author: Name Name ORCID Title: Subject: Identifier Numbers: Research Org.: Sponsoring Org.: Site: All Alaska Power Administration, Juneau, Alaska (United States) Albany Research Center (ARC), Albany, OR (United States) Albuquerque Complex - NNSA Albuquerque Operations Office, Albuquerque, NM (United States) Amarillo National Resource Center for Plutonium, Amarillo, TX (United States) Ames Laboratory (AMES), Ames, IA (United States) Argonne National Laboratory (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States) Argonne National Laboratory-Advanced Photon Source (United States) Atlanta Regional Office, Atlanta, GA (United States) Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM)

455

SciTech Connect: "higgs boson"  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

higgs boson" Find higgs boson" Find How should I search Scitech Connect ... Basic or Advanced? Basic Search Advanced × Advanced Search Options Full Text: Bibliographic Data: Creator / Author: Name Name ORCID Title: Subject: Identifier Numbers: Research Org.: Sponsoring Org.: Site: All Alaska Power Administration, Juneau, Alaska (United States) Albany Research Center (ARC), Albany, OR (United States) Albuquerque Complex - NNSA Albuquerque Operations Office, Albuquerque, NM (United States) Amarillo National Resource Center for Plutonium, Amarillo, TX (United States) Ames Laboratory (AMES), Ames, IA (United States) Argonne National Laboratory (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States) Argonne National Laboratory-Advanced Photon Source (United States) Atlanta Regional Office, Atlanta, GA (United States) Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM)

456

SciTech Connect: "geomagnetic storms"  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

geomagnetic storms" Find geomagnetic storms" Find How should I search Scitech Connect ... Basic or Advanced? Basic Search Advanced × Advanced Search Options Full Text: Bibliographic Data: Creator / Author: Name Name ORCID Title: Subject: Identifier Numbers: Research Org.: Sponsoring Org.: Site: All Alaska Power Administration, Juneau, Alaska (United States) Albany Research Center (ARC), Albany, OR (United States) Albuquerque Complex - NNSA Albuquerque Operations Office, Albuquerque, NM (United States) Amarillo National Resource Center for Plutonium, Amarillo, TX (United States) Ames Laboratory (AMES), Ames, IA (United States) Argonne National Laboratory (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States) Argonne National Laboratory-Advanced Photon Source (United States) Atlanta Regional Office, Atlanta, GA (United States) Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM)

457

Year Month U.S. Average PAD District I Average CT ME MA NH RI  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1994 January ........................... 89.6 91.0 90.2 83.8 88.4 80.4 87.3 88.8 92.1 102.5 February ......................... 92.9 94.6 93.8 90.4 91.3 86.6 91.4 92.3 91.5 105.5 March .............................. 91.4 92.5 92.1 85.9 88.3 83.6 89.4 91.0 91.2 102.0 April ................................ 88.2 89.0 89.4 80.8 86.0 78.2 85.1 88.3 89.2 93.7 May ................................. 86.1 86.6 85.4 76.8 85.1 75.4 83.3 86.7 84.4 83.1 June ................................ 85.2 85.6 86.1 75.6 83.7 73.1 82.3 84.6 82.0 W July ................................. 82.7 83.1 84.2 75.6 82.1 71.8 81.6 83.0 80.5 W August ............................ 82.1 82.4 79.7 78.0 78.7 72.8 84.0 83.8 82.3 81.9 September ...................... 83.2 83.7 80.5 78.5 81.1 72.9 84.7 83.3 83.1 86.2 October ........................... 84.7

458

CT Scan Not Only a Medical Technique NETL Wins Two 2008  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

January 2009, Issue 12 January 2009, Issue 12 the lab First Fuel Cell Exposure Test Completed page 3 New Patent Filed on Novel Flue Gas CO 2 Capture Process page 4 Geothermal Energy Technology Heats Oldest African-American Church page 6 CONTENTS NETL's IGCC Dynamic Simulator Project Presented at Gasification Conference ____________________________ 2 NETL Completes First Fuel Cell Exposure Tests Using Benzene Doped Syngas ____________________________ 3 NETL Researcher Presents Talk on Mercury Control Options __ 3 NETL Files for Patent on Novel Flue Gas CO 2 Capture Process _ 4 Springer Publishes Book on Inorganic Membrane Materials and Processes edited by NETL Scientist _______________ 5 Solvent Scrubbing System for CO 2 Capture Being Tested at Burger Station ____________________________________

459

CT Scan Not Only a Medical Technique NETL Wins Two 2008  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

April 2010, Issue 17 April 2010, Issue 17 the lab NETL Catalyst Successfully Reforms Biodiesel in Integrated Fuel Cell Test page 2 NETL Signs Technical Cooperation Agreement with Chinese Clean Energy Companyy page 3 Metallic Interconnects Perform page 8 netlog is a quarterly newsletter, which highlights recent achievements and ongoing research at NETL. Any comments or suggestions, please contact Paula Turner at paula.turner@netl.doe.gov or call 541-967-5966. CONTENTS NETL Catalyst Successfully Reforms Biodiesel in Integrated Fuel Cell Test _____________________________________ 2 NETL Signs Technical Cooperation Agreement with Chinese Clean Energy Company ____________________________ 3 U.N. Environmental Program Review of Gas Hydrates R&D 3 Energy Plant Design Software Wins Award _______________

460

Year Month U.S. Average PAD District I Average CT ME MA NH RI  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1993 January ........................... 94.3 95.7 94.9 85.2 94.0 87.1 91.7 93.4 91.2 105.2 February ......................... 94.6 95.9 96.2 85.4 94.4 86.9 91.8 93.3 90.8 106.8 March .............................. 95.4 96.5 96.7 86.4 94.8 86.6 92.4 93.7 92.4 108.5 April ................................ 92.6 93.4 93.6 83.0 91.5 84.5 90.4 91.2 91.6 106.7 May ................................. 91.1 91.7 91.6 81.7 91.1 83.9 90.7 91.3 89.4 104.3 June ................................ 88.9 89.4 88.6 81.1 88.6 82.4 87.6 89.7 90.6 100.4 July ................................. 85.6 85.9 86.5 78.5 83.9 78.3 85.2 85.5 86.4 100.2 August ............................ 84.1 84.6 84.0 77.4 83.4 76.0 82.7 85.6 83.5 96.1 September ...................... 85.5 85.8 84.2 78.3 83.8 74.9 84.8 86.6 84.6 95.5 October ...........................

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "1977-1980 albuquerque ct" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

CT Scan Not Only a Medical Technique NETL Wins Two 2008  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

10, Issue 16 10, Issue 16 the lab NETL Director Leaving Laboratory page 2 Ultra-deep Drilling Simulator Debuts page 3 High Speed Particle Imaging page 6 netlog is a quarterly newsletter, which highlights recent achievements and ongoing research at NETL. Any comments or suggestions, please contact Paula Turner at paula.turner@netl.doe.gov or call 541-967-5966. CONTENTS NETL Director to Retire _____________________________ 2 Extreme Drilling Laboratory Announces Debut of Ultra- deep Drilling Simulator ____________________________ 3 Hybrid Technology Response Modeled to Changes in Power Demand _______________________________________ 3 NETL Study Examines Convection-Radiation Heat Transfer in Nonlinear Fluid ___________________________________

462

CT Scan Not Only a Medical Technique NETL Wins Two 2008  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

October 2009, Issue 15 October 2009, Issue 15 the lab Nanomaterials Research Published page 2 Cerium Diffusion Coating Patent Awarded page 3 NETL Captures Four R&D 100 Awards page 4-5 netlog is a quarterly newsletter, which highlights recent achievements and ongoing research at NETL. Any comments or suggestions, please contact Paula Turner at paula.turner@netl.doe.gov or call 541-967-5966. CONTENTS Nanomaterials Research Published __________________ 2 Cerium Diffusion Coating Patent Awarded _____________ 3 NETL Captures Four R&D 100 Awards _________________ 4 SEQURE TM Tracer Technology _______________________ 4 Thief Process to Remove Mercury From Flue Gas _______ 4 Clay-Liquid CO 2 Removal Sorbent ___________________ 5 VE-PSI: Virtual Engineering Process Simulator Interface __

463

Year Month U.S. Average PAD District I Average CT ME MA NH RI  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1995 January ........................... 86.9 87.6 86.7 77.8 84.8 78.4 87.3 85.7 88.4 102.4 February ......................... 87.4 88.2 87