Sample records for 1970-1985 crop reporting

  1. Crop Management and Diagnostic Clinic IMPACT REPORT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Farritor, Shane

    management. The response rate to the survey was 23% and in- cluded: 127 agricultural advisors influencingCrop Management and Diagnostic Clinic IMPACT REPORT University of Nebraska­Lincoln * Institute profitability and protect the environment through research-based management practices. Partnership The Crop

  2. Covering Note INTER-ACADEMY REPORT ON GM CROPS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dhingra, Narender K.

    Covering Note for INTER-ACADEMY REPORT ON GM CROPS (Updated) The Inter-Academy Report on GM crops the main conclusions and recommendations. The literature on GM crops is voluminous. More than a hundred seek to enunciate a national strategy on GM crops. The rest deals with concerns, surveillance etc. #12

  3. Short-rotation woody-crops program. Quarterly progress report for period ending May 31, 1981

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cushman, J.H.; Ranney, J.W.

    1982-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Progress of twenty projects in the Short Rotation Woody Crops Program is summarized for the period March 1 through May 31, 1981. Individual quarterly reports included from each of the projects discuss accomplishments within specific project objectives and identify recent papers and publications resulting from the research. The major project activities are species screening and genetic selection, stand establishment and cultural treatment, and harvest, collection, transportation, and storage.

  4. The Texas crop and livestock reporting service's data accumulation technique for cotton and an investigation into its reliability 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gallant, Francis Xavier

    1971-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    THE TEXAS CROP AND LIVESTOCK REPORTING SERVICE ~ S DATA ACCUMULATION TECHNIQUE FOR COTTON AND AN INVESTIGATION INTO ITS RELIABILITY A Thesis by FRANCIS XAVIER GALLANT, JR. Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas ARM University in partial... fulfillment of the requirement for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE May 1971 Major Subject: Economics THE TEXAS CROP AND LIVESTOCK REPORTING SERVICE'S DATA ACCUMULATION TECHNIQUE FOR COTTON AND AN INVESTIGATION INTO ITS RELIABILITY A Thesis By FRANCIS...

  5. Final Report for Harvesting a New Wind Crop: Innovative Economic Approaches for Rural America

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Susan Innis; Randy Udall; Project Officer - Keith Bennett

    2005-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Final Report for ''Harvesting a New Wind Crop: Innovative Economic Approaches for Rural America'': This project, ''Harvesting a New Wind Crop'', helped stimulate wind development by rural electric cooperatives and municipal utilities in Colorado. To date most of the wind power development in the United States has been driven by large investor-owned utilities serving major metropolitan areas. To meet the 5% by 2020 goal of the Wind Powering America program the 2,000 municipal and 900 rural electric cooperatives in the country must get involved in wind power development. Public power typically serves rural and suburban areas and can play a role in revitalizing communities by tapping into the economic development potential of wind power. One barrier to the involvement of public power in wind development has been the perception that wind power is more expensive than other generation sources. This project focused on two ways to reduce the costs of wind power to make it more attractive to public power entities. The first way was to develop a revenue stream from the sale of green tags. By selling green tags to entities that voluntarily support wind power, rural coops and munis can effectively reduce their cost of wind power. Western Resource Advocates (WRA) and the Community Office for Resource Efficiency (CORE) worked with Lamar Light and Power and Arkansas River Power Authority to develop a strategy to use green tags to help finance their wind project. These utilities are now selling their green tags to Community Energy, Inc., an independent for-profit marketer who in turn sells the tags to consumers around Colorado. The Lamar tags allow the University of Colorado-Boulder, the City of Boulder, NREL and other businesses to support wind power development and make the claim that they are ''wind-powered''. This urban-rural partnership is an important development for the state of Colorado's rural communities get the economic benefits of wind power and urban businesses are able to claim the environmental benefits. The second method to reduce the cost of wind power we investigated involved access to cheap capital. Municipal utilities and rural electric cooperatives have access to low-interest loan programs and frequently finance projects through the sale of revenue bonds, but we were interested in the possibility for small businesses and community banks to provide equity and debt for wind projects. We worked with Boulder Community Hospital to explore their interest in partnering with other businesses and individuals to help catalyze the first community-owned wind project in Colorado. We also met with and gained interest from the independent community banks for the idea of wind power. These small banks may be restricted by lending limits, but are an integral part of rural communities and are very interested in the economic development opportunities wind power presents for small towns. This project was successful in getting six rural electric cooperatives and municipal utilities to purchase more than 25 MW of wind power in Colorado, Wyoming and Nebraska. These utilities also announced plans to explore an additional 100 MW or more of wind power development over the next few years. Finally, munis and coops in New Mexico began exploring wind power by offering small green power programs to their customers. WRA believes the lessons learned from this project will assist other municipal utilities and rural electric cooperatives as they develop wind projects.

  6. Crop Insurance Terms and Definitions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stokes, Kenneth; Waller, Mark L.; Outlaw, Joe; Barnaby, G. A. Art

    2008-10-17T23:59:59.000Z

    This publication is a glossary of terms used by the crop insurance industry. There are definitions for terms used in crop insurance documents and for terms pertaining to coverage levels, farming, reports, units and parties to contracts....

  7. The Texas crop and livestock reporting service's data accumulation technique for cotton and an investigation into its reliability

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gallant, Francis Xavier

    1971-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    the census is conducted in January after the crop has been harvested. We are not able to 33 say definitely what type of bale the Census of A iculture uses 33 Hughes (1971). The Census of A iculture states that the census is conducted from October... to December, however Hughes states' that it is conducted in January after the crop has been harvested. We were unable to contact anyone directly connected with the Census of A iculture, however Hughes has been indirectly connected with it for many years...

  8. Technical reports and extension papers and presentations (last 10 years only) 162. Clark, E. Ann. 2009. GM crops: 12 years is long enough. Presented to the Kootenay Local

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Clark, E. Ann

    . 2009. GM crops: 12 years is long enough. Presented to the Kootenay Local Agriculture Society, Lister, B. Canadian Organic Grower (Winter 08): 58-60 155. Clark, E. Ann. 2008. GM Crop Failure. International Herald shapes our attitudes? Genetically Modified Language. A discourse of arguments for GM crops and food

  9. Production of Short-Rotation Woody Crops Grown with a Range of Nutrient and Water Availability: Establishment Report and First-Year Responses

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    D.R. Coyle; J. Blake; K. Britton; M.; Buford; R.G. Campbell; J. Cox; B. Cregg; D. Daniels; ,; M. Jacobson; K. Johnsen; T. McDonald; K. McLeod; E.; Nelson; D. Robison; R. Rummer; F. Sanchez; J.; Stanturf; B. Stokes; C. Trettin; J. Tuskan; L. Wright; ,; S. Wullschleger

    2003-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Coleman, M.D., et. al. 2003. Production of Short-Rotation Woody Crops Grown with a Range of Nutrient and Water Availability: Establishment Report and First-Year Responses. Report. USDA Forest Service, Savannah River, Aiken, SC. 26 pp. Abstract: Many researchers have studied the productivity potential of intensively managed forest plantations. However, we need to learn more about the effects of fundamental growth processes on forest productivity; especially the influence of aboveground and belowground resource acquisition and allocation. This report presents installation, establishment, and first-year results of four tree species (two cottonwood clones, sycamore, sweetgum, and loblolly pine) grown with fertilizer and irrigation treatments. At this early stage of development, irrigation and fertilization were additive only in cottonwood clone ST66 and sweetgum. Leaf area development was directly related to stem growth, but root production was not always consistent with shoot responses, suggesting that allocation of resources varies among treatments. We will evaluate the consequences of these early responses on resource availability in subsequent growing seasons. This information will be used to: (1) optimize fiber and bioenergy production; (2) understand carbon sequestration; and (3) develop innovative applications such as phytoremediation; municipal, industrial, and agricultural wastes management; and protection of soil, air, and water resources.

  10. Test of a solar crop dryer Danish Technological Institute

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Test of a solar crop dryer Danish Technological Institute Danish Institute of Agricultural Sciences Aidt Miljř A/S SEC-R-6 #12;Test of a solar crop dryer Sřren Řstergaard Jensen Danish Technological/S January 2001 #12;Preface The report describes the tests carried out on a solar crop dryer. The work

  11. Wind Turbines Benefit Crops

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Takle, Gene

    2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Ames Laboratory associate scientist Gene Takle talks about research into the effect of wind turbines on nearby crops. Preliminary results show the turbines may have a positive effect by cooling and drying the crops and assisting with carbon dioxide uptake.

  12. Wind Turbines Benefit Crops

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Takle, Gene

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Ames Laboratory associate scientist Gene Takle talks about research into the effect of wind turbines on nearby crops. Preliminary results show the turbines may have a positive effect by cooling and drying the crops and assisting with carbon dioxide uptake.

  13. CROP & SOIL SCIENCES Soybean Breeding

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arnold, Jonathan

    CROP & SOIL SCIENCES Soybean Breeding Committee Membership Dr. Joseph Bouton - committee chair Dr. Brian Schwartz Department of Crop & Soil Sciences Department of Crop & Soil Sciences University & Soil Sciences Department of Crop & Soil Sciences University of Georgia University of Georgia Center

  14. CROP & SOIL SCIENCES Forage Breeding

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arnold, Jonathan

    CROP & SOIL SCIENCES Forage Breeding Committee Membership Dr. Joseph Bouton - committee chair Dr. Brian Schwartz Department of Crop & Soil Sciences Department of Crop & Soil Sciences University & Soil Sciences Department of Crop & Soil Sciences University of Georgia University of Georgia Center

  15. CROP & SOIL SCIENCES Irrigation Specialist

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arnold, Jonathan

    CROP & SOIL SCIENCES Irrigation Specialist Committee Membership Dr. John Beasley - committee chair Dr. Jared Whitaker Department of Crop & Soil Sciences Department of Crop & Soil Sciences University: (229) 386-7308 Fax: (912) 681-0376 Dr. Robert Carrow Dr. Mark Risse Department of Crop & Soil Sciences

  16. CROP & SOIL SCIENCES Quantitative Genomics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arnold, Jonathan

    CROP & SOIL SCIENCES Quantitative Genomics Committee Membership Dr. Scott Jackson - committee chair Dr. Peng-Wah Chee Department of Crop & Soil Sciences Department of Crop & Soil Sciences University of Horticulture Department of Crop & Soil Sciences University of Georgia University of Georgia 2360 Rainwater Rd

  17. Crop Rotations in the Brazos River Valley.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Whiteley, Eli L.; Hipp, Billy W.

    1966-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and California in- volving the modification of physical properties of soil by crops and management was made by Uhland (22) . He reported that (1) plants with deep and well-developed root systems, such as alfalfa and kudzu, may be cxpected to increase...

  18. Crop acreage estimators based on satellite imagery

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vidart, Stephane

    1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    acreages have been pooled during the creation of the two data sets. Each data set refers to a particular part of the state of Texas. The two regions are shown in Figure 1. The partitioning is made according to crop reporting districts (CRD), which... studies are reported: (1) a comparison of sample behavior with theoretical asymptotic behavior, (2) an evaluation using CAMS data and fixed size sampling units of the improvement of the estimators under the new decision process over the old multinomial...

  19. Smarter Cropping: Internet program helps farmers make decisions about crops

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wythe, Kathy

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Story by Kathy Wythe tx H2O | pg. 26 Smarter Cropping Internet program helps farmers make decisions about crops Along the coastal plains of Texas, farmers and crop managers are using the Internet to make more informed decisions about growing...

  20. Biomass Energy Crops: Massachusetts' Potential

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schweik, Charles M.

    Biomass Energy Crops: Massachusetts' Potential Prepared for: Massachusetts Division of Energy;#12;Executive Summary In Massachusetts, biomass energy has typically meant wood chips derived from the region's extensive forest cover. Yet nationally, biomass energy from dedicated energy crops and from crop residues

  1. Plant Science 200: Modern Crop Production Instructor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Kuang-Yu

    classification, soil conservation and tillage. Crop classification and morphology (distinguish among the grains Crop Production Introduction Crop Importance Soil Survey/Soil Conservation Crop Classification /Sustainable Agriculture #12;References on Reserve in Chang Library: Forages: An Introduction to Grassland

  2. Insects Attacking Vegetable Crops.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Newton, Weldon H.; Deer, James A.; Hamman, Philip J.; Wolfenbarger, Dan A.; Harding, James A.; Schuster, Michael F.

    1964-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of economic importance. Worms cause consider- able damage to grain sorghum heads, but they are cannibalistic and usually only one larva reaches full growth in each head as well as in each corn ear. BLACK CUTWORM, Agrotis ipsilon (Hufnagel) Cutworms.... They frequently do considerable damage to corn ears, similar to that caused by corn ear- worms. These worms also feed as "budworms" in grain sorghum and corn whorls. Unfolding leaves from whorls of such attacked crops are per- forated with holes. Like...

  3. Insects Attacking Vegetable Crops

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Newton, Weldon H.; Deer, James A.; Hamman, Philip J.; Wolfenbarger, Dan A.; Harding, James A.; Schuster, Michael F.

    1964-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    THAT SUCK THE JUICES FROM FOLIAGE, FRUITS, STEMS AND ROOTS, CAUSING DISCOLORATION, STUNTING AND OTHER DAMAGE APHIDS Aphids are small, sluggish, soft-bodied insects often called plant lice. A number of species attack various crops, sucking plant sap..., peppers or dark brown with black leg joints, eyes and and tomatoes. cornicles. Aphids build up very rapidly and leave copious quantities of honeydew on leaves. Adults POPLAR PETIOLE GALL APHID, Pemphigus and nymphs suck juices from leaves, sapping...

  4. Variable Crop Share Leases.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sartin, Marvin; Sammons, Ray

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    )OC lAL45.7 173 1. 1224 Texas Agricultural Extension Service The Texas A&M University System Daniel C. Pfannstiel,Director colleg e Station, Texas / f , ' '~ :';,; ,,: ''': ~ " k , -~. _Variable _Crop Share _Leases ... Marvin... Sartin and Ray Sammons* Renting or leasing farmland is part of many modern farming operations and increases average farm size in U. S. agriculture. Economies of size are vitally import ant to farm operations as they strive to cope with the continuous...

  5. Forage Crops in Northwest Texas.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Conner, A. B. (Arthur Benjamin)

    1908-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ...................... Preparing. Seeding and Cultivating the Land 18 I I Harvesting the Crop; Yield per Acre ............................ 18 I ! FORAGE CROPS AT AMARILLO ....................................... 18... are the disk harrow, the spike-toothed harrow, tne sled-cultivator. and the ordinary large shovel cultivator. In some portions of this territory from ten to twelve successive crops of sorghum have been grown on the same land; this, however, is not a common...

  6. Experiments with Fertilizers on Rotated and Non-Rotated Crops.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reynolds, E. B. (Elbert Brunner)

    1928-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This is a report of experiments conducted over a period of 14 years to study the effect of fertilizers, manure, removal. of crop residues, and rota- tion on the yield of crops. The fertilizer treatments included superphos- phate; superphosphate and manure...; superphosphate and cottonseed meal; manure; rock phosphate; and rock phosphate and manure. Cotton and corn were grown continuously on the same land and in rotation with oats and cowpeas. The soil responded more readily to nitrogenous than to phosphatic fer...

  7. The Environmental Impacts of Subsidized Crop Insurance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    LaFrance, Jeffrey T.; Shimshack, J. P.; Wu, S. Y.

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    May 1996): 428-438. Environmental Impacts of Subsidized CropPaper No. 912 THE ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACTS OF SUBSIDIZED CROPsuch copies. The Environmental Impacts of Subsidized Crop

  8. Irrigation Systems for Forage Crops.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Henggeler, Joseph C.

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    TDDe Z TA24S.7 8873 NO.1611 1?1611 ' Texas Agricultural Extension Service l'BRARY FEB 0 1 1989 texas A&M University Irrigation Systems for Forage Crops Texas Agricultural Extension Service ? Zerle L. Carpenter, Director ? The Texas A...&M University System ? College Station, Texas (Blank Pa,ge -In. O-riIIJIal BuIIetinl . 1?? .. , * ): . Irrigation Systems for Forage Crops Joseph C. Henggeler* Several types of irrigation systems can be chosen for irrigating forage crops for grazing...

  9. Assistant Professor Cropping Systems Specialist

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Veiga, Pedro Manuel Barbosa

    Assistant Professor Cropping Systems Specialist Department of Plant and Soil Sciences POSITION DESCRIPTION The Department of Plant and Soil Sciences, Oklahoma State University is seeking, implementing, and evaluating educational programs to meet the needs of producers for improving existing

  10. Cover Crops for the Garden

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    matter for your soil or compost pile. Organic matter is thatin the spring or made into compost, cover crops will act asgathered up and added to your compost pile. The first method

  11. CROP & SOIL SCIENCES Extension Peanut Agronomist

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arnold, Jonathan

    CROP & SOIL SCIENCES Extension Peanut Agronomist Committee Membership Dr. J. Michael Moore - committee chair Dr. Clint Waltz Department of Crop & Soil Sciences Department of Crop & Soil Sciences-7300 Fax: (229) 386-7308 Fax: (770) 412-4734 Dr. Eric Prostko Dr. Guy Collins Department of Crop & Soil

  12. CROP & SOIL SCIENCES Cotton Physiologist Tifton campus

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arnold, Jonathan

    CROP & SOIL SCIENCES Cotton Physiologist ­ Tifton campus Committee Membership Dr. Stanley Culpepper - committee chair Dr. John Beasley Department of Crop & Soil Sciences Department of Crop & Soil Sciences & Soil Sciences Department of Crop & Soil Sciences University of Georgia-SE District University

  13. CROP & SOIL SCIENCES Water Policy and Management

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arnold, Jonathan

    CROP & SOIL SCIENCES Water Policy and Management Committee Membership Dr. David Radcliffe - committee chair Dr. George Vellidis Department of Crop & Soil Sciences Department of Crop & Soil Sciences & Soil Sciences Department of Crop & Soil Sciences University of Georgia University of Georgia Stripling

  14. The physical status of Miller clay after nine years of crop rotations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hipp, Billy Wayne

    1963-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    by crops and management was made by Uhland (24). A report from his work shows 1) plants with deep and well devel- oped root systems such as alfalfa and kudzu may be expected to increase porosity and permeability and to improve soil structure, 2) crop...

  15. Interdisciplinary Pest Management Potentials of Cover Cropping Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bachie, Oli Gurmu

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Cover Crops: Cowpea, Sunn Hemp, and Velvetbean. HottscienceCover Crops: Cowpea, Sunn Hemp, and Velvetbean. Hottsciencethan grasses using sun hemp mulches. While cover cropping

  16. Vegetable Crops Hotline index 2005 MANAGEMENT TIPS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ginzel, Matthew

    Labeled for Row Middle Use in Vegetable Crops 446 Kudzu Turning Over New Leaves in Indiana Counties 447

  17. CropIrri: A DECISION SUPPORT SYSTEM FOR CROP IRRIGATION MANAGEMENT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    CropIrri: A DECISION SUPPORT SYSTEM FOR CROP IRRIGATION MANAGEMENT Yi Zhang1 , Liping Feng1,* 1: A field crop irrigation management decision-making system (CropIrri) was developed based on the soil water of optimal irrigation methods and irrigation decision support system have obtained important achievements (J

  18. CROP & SOIL SCIENCES Small Grain Breeding

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arnold, Jonathan

    CROP & SOIL SCIENCES Small Grain Breeding Committee Membership Dr. Paul Raymer - committee chair Dr. Scott Jackson Department of Crop & Soil Sciences Department of Crop & Soil Sciences University & Soil Sciences Department of Horticulture University of Georgia University of Georgia 2360 Rainwater Rd

  19. Regional Focus on GM Crop Regulation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Church, George M.

    Regional Focus on GM Crop Regulation THE RECENT MEDIA COVERAGE OF THE DEVEL- opments in Brazil for com- mercial genetically modified (GM) crops in both the scientific and regulatory arena. The release of GM crops in these coun- tries might result in the unintentional entry of GM seeds into neighboring

  20. alternative agricultural crops: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    crops in new areas; (6) growing crops for new uses; (7) growing crops with new management techniques; (8) selling crops in new markets. Ernest Small 1999-01-01 2 ASSESSMENT...

  1. Evaluating Crop-Share Leases.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sartin, Marvin; Brints, Norman

    1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    -SHARE LEASES Marvin Sartin and Norman Brints* There are many approaches for evaluating a crop-share lease. The easiest and most commonly used method relies on history and tradition. Throughout most of Texas, share leases have tra ditionally been one...-third for grain and one-fourth for cotton. While such agreements continue, the economic factors governing farming operations have changed, thus creating a need for reexamin ing terms of share leases. An accepted approach to evaluating sharing arrangements...

  2. Biomass fuel from woody crops for electric power generation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Perlack, R.D.; Wright, L.L.; Huston, M.A.; Schramm, W.E.

    1995-06-22T23:59:59.000Z

    This report discusses the biologic, environmental, economic, and operational issues associated with growing wood crops in managed plantations. Information on plantation productivity, environmental issues and impacts, and costs is drawn from DOE`s Biofuels Feedstock Development as well as commercial operations in the US and elsewhere. The particular experiences of three countries--Brazil, the Philippines, and Hawaii (US)--are discussed in considerable detail.

  3. Reports

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Reports Reports Individual Permit reports are prepared annually to facilitate public review of activities for the previous year. Contact Environmental Communication & Public...

  4. Cassava, a potential biofuel crop in China

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jansson, C.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Cassava, a potential biofuel crop in China Christer Janssoncassava; bioethanol; biofuel; metabolic engineering; Chinathe potentials of cassava in the biofuel sector and point to

  5. Cassava, a potential biofuel crop in China

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jansson, C.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    18-673389 Keywords: cassava; bioethanol; biofuel; metabolicRecently, cassava-derived bioethanol production has beenbenefits compared to other bioethanol- producing crops in

  6. Microbially derived crop protection products

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Torok, Tamas

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Date 6/10/2010 CRADA FinalReport CRADA No. BG0022201 LBNL Report Number Parties:directly related to the CRADA? "Microbial Diversity-Based

  7. CROP & SOIL SCIENCES Statewide Variety Testing Program Coordinator

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arnold, Jonathan

    CROP & SOIL SCIENCES Statewide Variety Testing Program Coordinator Committee Membership Dr. Jerry Johnson - committee chair Dr. Paul Raymer Department of Crop & Soil Sciences Department of Crop & Soil Department of Crop & Soil Sciences Department of Crop & Soil Sciences University of Georgia University

  8. Miscanthus: A Review of European Experience with a Novel Energy Crop

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Scurlock, J.M.O.

    1999-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Miscanthus is a tall perennial grass which has been evaluated in Europe over the past 5-10 years as a new bioenergy crop. The sustained European interest in miscanthus suggests that this novel energy crop deserves serious investigation as a possible candidate biofuel crop for the US alongside switchgrass. To date, no agronomic trials or trial results for miscanthus are known from the conterminous US, so its performance under US conditions is virtually unknown. Speculating from European data, under typical agricultural practices over large areas, an average of about 8t/ha (3t/acre dry weight) may be expected at harvest time. As with most of the new bioenergy crops, there seems to be a steep ''learning curve.'' Establishment costs appear to be fairly high at present (a wide range is reported from different European countries), although these may be expected to fall as improved management techniques are developed.

  9. ABSTRACT: Bioenergy Harvesting Technologies to Supply Crop Residues...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    ABSTRACT: Bioenergy Harvesting Technologies to Supply Crop Residues In a Densified Large Square Bale Format ABSTRACT: Bioenergy Harvesting Technologies to Supply Crop Residues In a...

  10. alternative cropping systems: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    and environmental health is a key challenge for agricultural sustainability. Most crop production Sims, Gerald K. 33 Dryland Winter Wheat and Grain Sorghum Cropping...

  11. PETRO: Higher Productivity Crops for Biofuels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    PETRO Project: The 10 projects that comprise ARPA-E’s PETRO Project, short for “Plants Engineered to Replace Oil,” aim to develop non-food crops that directly produce transportation fuel. These crops can help supply the transportation sector with agriculturally derived fuels that are cost-competitive with petroleum and do not affect U.S. food supply. PETRO aims to redirect the processes for energy and carbon dioxide (CO2) capture in plants toward fuel production. This would create dedicated energy crops that serve as a domestic alternative to petroleum-based fuels and deliver more energy per acre with less processing prior to the pump.

  12. Collection Policy: SOIL, CROP AND ATMOSPHERIC SCIENCES Subject Scope | Priority Tables | Other policies . . .

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Angenent, Lars T.

    ; weed science; soil/ root zone processes; manure and sludge management; water quality 1.6 Noteworthy, oil, fiber and sugar crops. Forage crops. Forest crops. Weeds. Tropical crops. Non-traditional crops

  13. Crop Management Factors: What is Important?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kastens, Terry L.; Dhuyvetter, Kevin C.; Nivens, Heather; Klinefelter, Danny A.

    1999-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Crop Management Factors: What is Important? Terry L. Kastens, Kevin C. Dhuyvetter, Heather Nivens and Danny Klinefelter* Defining Good Farm Management Economically, a well-managed farm is one that consistently makes greater prof- its than similarly...

  14. Modelling the UK perennial energy crop market 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alexander, Peter Mark William

    2014-11-27T23:59:59.000Z

    Biomass produced from perennial energy crops, Miscanthus and willow or poplar grown as short-rotation coppice, is expected to contribute to UK renewable energy targets and reduce the carbon intensity of energy production. ...

  15. Aphids on Cruciferous Crops: Identification and Management

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liu, Tong-Xian; Sparks Jr., Alton N.

    2001-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

    At least five species of aphids attack cruciferous crops (cabbage, collards, cauliflower, broccoli, kale and others). This publication explains the characteristics that can help producers identify aphids and the damage they cause. Suggestions...

  16. Features . . . Cover Crop Value to Cotton

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Watson, Craig A.

    .............................................................................................Page 6 Fuel Prices Projections - Encouraging News .......................Page 7 Agronomy Notes VolumeFeatures . . . Cotton Cover Crop Value to Cotton Cotton Price and Rotation ..............................................................Page 5 Miscellaneous Large differences in nitrogen prices.......................................Page 6

  17. Cassava, a potential biofuel crop in China

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jansson, C.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    as a means to produce novel biodiesel crops. We also don’tto oil Ethanol and biodiesel are the two major bio-basedin transportation. Compared to biodiesel, the net energy

  18. An Internship in crop chemical protection

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McHam, Charles

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    AN INTERNSHIP IN CROP CHEMICAL PROTECTION A PROFESSIONAL PAPER BY CHARLES McHAM Submitted to the College of Agriculture and Life Sciences of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER... OF AGRICULTURE August 1991 Department of Agricultural Education Agricultural Development AN INTERNSHIP IN CROP CHEMICAL PROTECTION A PROFESSIONAL PAPER BY CHARLES McHAM Approved as to style and content by: Dr. Don R. Herring, C ir, Graduate Committee Dr...

  19. Risk in agriculture : a study of crop yield distributions and crop insurance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gayam, Narsi Reddy

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Agriculture is a business fraught with risk. Crop production depends on climatic, geographical, biological, political, and economic factors, which introduce risks that are quantifiable given the appropriate mathematical ...

  20. Crop-tree release thinning in 65-year-old commercial cherry-maple stands (5-year results). Forest Service research paper (Final)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, H.C.; Miller, G.W.; Lamson, N.I.

    1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The report includes a crop-tree release plan which was applied to a 65-year-old cherry-maple stand in north central West Virginia. Criteria were developed for selecting crop trees for high quality sawtimber and veneer products. Five-year stand growth, mortality, and ingrowth using basal areas, volume, relative density, and number of trees were discussed for the treatments.

  1. Higher U.S. Crop Prices Trigger Little Area Expansion so Marginal Land for Biofuel Crops Is Limited

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Swinton, S.; Babcock, Bruce; James, Laura; Bandaru, Varaprasad

    2011-06-12T23:59:59.000Z

    By expanding energy biomass production on marginal lands that are not currently used for crops, food price increases and indirect climate change effects can be mitigated. Studies of the availability of marginal lands for dedicated bioenergy crops have focused on biophysical land traits, ignoring the human role in decisions to convert marginal land to bioenergy crops. Recent history offers insights about farmer willingness to put non-crop land into crop production. The 2006-09 leap in field crop prices and the attendant 64% gain in typical profitability led to only a 2% increase in crop planted area, mostly in the prairie states

  2. REVIEW ARTICLE Models to support cropping plan and crop rotation decisions.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    . To support farmers and efficiently allocate scarce resources, decision support models are developed. DecisionREVIEW ARTICLE Models to support cropping plan and crop rotation decisions. A review JĂ©rĂ´me Dury /Published online: 8 July 2011 # INRA and Springer Science+Business Media B.V. 2011 Abstract Farmers must

  3. Fecundity selection in a sunflower crop-wild study: can ecological data predict crop allele changes?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cummings, Charity L.; Alexander, Helen M.; Snow, Allison A.; Rieseberg, Loren H.; Kim, Min Ju; Culley, Theresa M.

    2002-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    escape rates via crop–weed mating. Conservation Biology 5:531–535. Klinger, T., and N. C. Ellstrand. 1994. Engineered genes in wild populations: fitness of weed–crop hybrids of Raphanus sativus. Ecological Applications 4:117–120. Langevin, S. A., K. Clay...

  4. Improving the Profitability of Willow Crops--Identifying Opportunities with a Crop Budget Model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vermont, University of

    for energy generation and bioproducts. However, since willow crops are not widely grown in North America understood. We developed a budget model, EcoWillow v1.4 (Beta), that allows users to analyze the entire . Coppice . Willow. Economics . Management . Profitability Introduction Perennial energy crops like short

  5. The Potential for Pennsylvania Crops as Biofuels Higher energy costs over the past few years have created opportunities for the use of crops and crop residues

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Dongwon

    The Potential for Pennsylvania Crops as Biofuels Higher energy costs over the past few years have Potential for Pennsylvania Crops as Biofuels 2 Soybeans Soybean acreage is on the increase in Pennsylvania

  6. Cost Methodology for Biomass Feedstocks: Herbaceous Crops and Agricultural Residues

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Turhollow Jr, Anthony F [ORNL; Webb, Erin [ORNL; Sokhansanj, Shahabaddine [ORNL

    2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes a set of procedures and assumptions used to estimate production and logistics costs of bioenergy feedstocks from herbaceous crops and agricultural residues. The engineering-economic analysis discussed here is based on methodologies developed by the American Society of Agricultural and Biological Engineers (ASABE) and the American Agricultural Economics Association (AAEA). An engineering-economic analysis approach was chosen due to lack of historical cost data for bioenergy feedstocks. Instead, costs are calculated using assumptions for equipment performance, input prices, and yield data derived from equipment manufacturers, research literature, and/or standards. Cost estimates account for fixed and variable costs. Several examples of this costing methodology used to estimate feedstock logistics costs are included at the end of this report.

  7. Seasonality and Its Effects on Crop Markets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tierney Jr., William I.; Waller, Mark L.; Amosson, Stephen H.

    1999-07-12T23:59:59.000Z

    consistent than the highs) and then rely on magnitude to predict the high. For example, a particular crop?s seasonal low may have occurred in October-November 80 percent of the time. The seasonal high was 12 to 15 percent above the seasonal low 75 percent... of the time. Based on this analysis, one would expect the seasonal low to come at harvest (in October or November) and the high to be 12 to 15 percent above the low. Of the two, timing is the more important for speculative purposes, whereas magnitude is often...

  8. Reports

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Scienceand Requirements Recently ApprovedReliability TechnologyRenewalReport Period:Reports

  9. SOIL QUALITY AND CROP Dick Wolkowski

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Balser, Teri C.

    Protection Soil pH Crop residue Tillage intensity Soil test P and K Water availability Bulk density Soil SOIL QUALITY Inherent properties Texture Organic matter Aggregation Water holding capacity - Nutrient cycling - 1 g of soil has 100,000,000 bacteria #12;Water Soil particle Plant root SOIL IS HABITAT

  10. affecting lilium crops: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    number and the course Weiblen, George D 299 Improvements of switchgrass as a bioenergy crop. InGenetic Improvement of Bioenergy Crops. Edited by Vermerris W CiteSeer...

  11. Genetically modified food and crops: perceptions of risks 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hall, Clare R.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The debate around genetically modified food and crops has proved to be complex and far-reaching, involving diverse stakeholder groups and many issues. Although the extent of global uptake of GM crops has been substantial (23 countries and 114...

  12. Microbiological and nutritional aspects of pendulous crop in turkey poults

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wheeler, Harry Ogden

    1959-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    with pendulous crop-------------- 39 2. "Milking" of turkey poult with, pendulous crop? - ---------- --- 40 3* Turkey poult after draining the crop, amount of fluid drained is shown in the 1 liter graduated cylinder? --------- ? ? - ---- 41 4. Blood alcohol... levels of poults on glucose monohydrate, starch and practiced type diets (4-week average)------ - ------- ? ------42 5. Weekly blood alcohols on turkey poults-? ----? --- -? *---43 JE vitro alcohol production by organism isolated from crop of turkey...

  13. Less Acres and Variable Yield Mark Ohio's Crops

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jones, Michelle

    developing technologies and cropping systems that are efficient in capturing solar energy, sus- tainable overLess Acres and Variable Yield Mark Ohio's Crops From 1994 to 2004, the combined acreage of soybean Pathology Dr. Mark Loux Horticulture and Crop Science Dr. Robert Mullen School of Natural Resources Dr. Mark

  14. ORIGINAL PAPER Genetically modified crops and aquatic ecosystems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gruner, Daniel S.

    of genetically modified (GM) crops. The ERA for terrestrial agroecosystems is well-developed, whereas guidance for ERA of GM crops in aquatic ecosystems is not as well-defined. The purpose of this document studies are necessary to inform the risk assessment for a specific GM crop should be done on a case

  15. CliCrop: a Crop Water-Stress and Irrigation Demand Model for an Integrated Global Assessment Model Approach

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fant, C.A.

    This paper describes the use of the CliCrop model in the context of climate change general assessment

  16. REPORT

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn April 23, 2014, an OHASeptember 2010In addition to 1 |D I S P U REPORT of the

  17. Water on Crop Biomass and Soil Permeability FINAL TECHNICAL REPORT

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What'sis Taking Over OurThe Iron SpinPrincetonUsing Maps1DOE AwardsDNitrateEnergyNews3 Water

  18. Japanese Sugar Cane as a Forage Crop.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Leidigh, A. H. (Arthur Henry); McNess, George Thomas; Laude, H. H. (Hilmer Henry)

    1916-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STAT10 N BULLETIN NO. 195 AUGUST, 1916 DIVISION OF AGRONOMY JAPANESE SUGAR CANE AS A FORAGE CROP BY A. H. LEIDIGH, B. S., Agronomist, IN CONSULTATION WITH G. T. McNESS, Superintendent, Substation No. 11, Nacogdoches, and H. H.... LAUDE, B. S., Superintendenr, Substation No. 4, Beaumont I POSTOFFICE: COLLEGE STATION, BRAZOS COUNTY, TEXAS AUSTIN, TEXAS VON BOECKMANN-JONES CO., PRINTERS 1916 AGRICULTURAL AND MECHANICAL COLLEGE OF TEXAS W. B. BIZZELL, A. hq.. D. C. L...

  19. A national research & development strategy for biomass crop feedstocks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wright, L.L.; Cushman, J.H.

    1997-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Planning was initiated in 1996 with the objective of reevaluating current biomass feedstock research and development strategies to: (1) assure that by 2005, one or more commercial lignocellulosic to ethanol projects will be able to acquire a dependable supply of biomass crop feedstocks; (2) assure that recently initiated demonstrations of crops to electricity will be successful and; (3) assure that the research base needed to support future biomass industry expansion is being developed. Multiple trends and analyses indicate that biomass energy research and development strategies must take into account the fact that competition for land will define the upper limits of available biomass energy crop supplies and will largely dictate the price of those supplies. Only crop production and utilization strategies which contribute profit to the farmer or landowner and to energy producers will be used commercially for biomass energy production. Strategies for developing biomass {open_quotes}energy{close_quotes} crop supplies must take into consideration all of the methods by which biomass crops will enter biomass energy markets. The lignocellulosic materials derived from crops can be available as primary residues or crop by-products; secondary residues or processing by-products; co-products (at both the crop production and processing stages); or, as dedicated energy crops. Basic research and development (R&D) leading to yield improvement continues to be recommended as a major long-term focus for dedicated energy crops. Many additional near term topics need attention, some of which are also applicable to by-products and co-products. Switchgrass R&D should be expanded and developed with greater collaboration of USDA and state extension groups. Woody crop research should continue with significant cost-share from industries developing the crops for other commercial products. Co-product options need more investigation.

  20. The Impact of Tenure Arrangements and Crop Rotations on Upper Gulf Coast Rice Farms.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Perry, Gregory M.; Rister, M. Edward; Richardson, James W.; Grant, Warren R.; Sij, John W. Jr

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    I ____J - TDOC Z TA245 .7 8873 N0.1530 The Impact Of Tenure Arrangements And Crop Rotations On Upper Gulf Coast Rice Farms The Texas Agricultural Experiment Station/ Neville P. Clarke, Director/ The Texas A&M University System/ College... .. . .. . . .................. . . . . . .. . ... .. .... ... 88 PREFACE This bulletin reports economic analyses of the effects of important variables affecting the viability of rice-soybean farming operations in the Texas Upper Gulf Coast region. The study attempts to recognize many factors that affect...

  1. Crops sought as high chemical energy source

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rawls, R.

    1983-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. Dept of Agriculture's Agricultural Research Service is searching for native plants that are not now being grown as commercial crops but that could be grown profitably to produce easily extractable, high-energy organic products. Usually these products are hydrocarbons or whole plant oils; protein content and plant fiber content are also considered. One such plant being investigated is smooth sumac, a woody perennial that is native to North America and is a particularly good source of polyphenols, resins and oils.

  2. Traffic lights for crop-based biofuels

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Phalan, Ben

    Traffic lights for crop-based biofuels Ben Phalan Department of Zoology, University of Cambridge, Cambridge CB2 3EJ, UK Email: btp22@cam.ac.uk Nobody likes to have limits put on their freedom. However, in all areas of life... of having to slow down is an acceptable price to pay if it reduces the number of pedestrians killed and injured. How is this relevant to biofuels? There are many different kinds of biofuels, including some with considerable potential to generate cleaner...

  3. Development and Deployment of a Short Rotation Woody Crops Harvesting...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    SRC Woody Crop Header Re-direct Destination: Demand for bioenergy sourced from woody biomass is projected to increase; however, the expansion and rapid deployment of short...

  4. alley cropping system: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Markus 460 Organic and inorganic fertilization with and without microbial inoculants in peat-based substrate and hydroponic crop production. Open Access Theses and Dissertations...

  5. affect crop production: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Haseeb 93 Organic and inorganic fertilization with and without microbial inoculants in peat-based substrate and hydroponic crop production. Open Access Theses and Dissertations...

  6. alley cropping: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Markus 400 Organic and inorganic fertilization with and without microbial inoculants in peat-based substrate and hydroponic crop production. Open Access Theses and Dissertations...

  7. alley cropping systems: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Markus 460 Organic and inorganic fertilization with and without microbial inoculants in peat-based substrate and hydroponic crop production. Open Access Theses and Dissertations...

  8. aestivum cropping system: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Markus 455 Organic and inorganic fertilization with and without microbial inoculants in peat-based substrate and hydroponic crop production. Open Access Theses and Dissertations...

  9. When crop transgenes wander in California, should we worry?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ellstrand, Norman C.

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    crop hybrids of radish, Raphanus sativus L. Ecologic Applicaright, wild radish (Raphanus sativus). IN 1985, scientistswild radish (Raphanus sativus), an important California

  10. Introducing the Canadian Crop Yield Forecaster Aston Chipanshi1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Miami, University of

    for crop yield forecasting and risk analysis. Using the Census Agriculture Region (CAR) as the unit Climate Decision Support and Adaptation, Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada, 1011, Innovation Blvd, Saskatoon, SK S7V 1B7, Canada The Canadian Crop Yield Forecaster (CCYF) is a statistical modelling tool

  11. Chengci Chen, Ph.D. Professor of Agronomy (Cropping Systems)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dyer, Bill

    of Agriculture Promotion and Tenure Committee member, 2010-2011, 2013-present Western Society of Crop ScienceChengci Chen, Ph.D. Professor of Agronomy (Cropping Systems) Central Agricultural Research Center and oilseed bioenergy feedstock productions; nutrient management, water quality and water use efficiency

  12. Translational genomics of Vegetable Crops Las Vegas, NV

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Douches, David S.

    Translational genomics of Vegetable Crops Las Vegas, NV July 21, 2005 David Francis and Allen Van Deynze At the recent ASHS meetings in Las Vegas, a workshop "Translational Genomics of Vegetable Crops interventions" (Minna and Gazdar, 1996). In applied plant science, "translational genomics" implies

  13. Water footprint assessment of crop production in Shaanxi, China

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vellekoop, Michel

    #12;i Water footprint assessment of crop production in Shaanxi, China Bachelor Thesis Civil, Yangling, China Keywords: Agricultural crops, water footprint, Shaanxi province, CROPWAT #12;ii #12;iii ABSTRACT The water footprint, introduced by professor A.Y. Hoekstra, is an indicator of freshwater use

  14. October 2009 Minnesota Crop Cost & Return Guide for 2010

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Minnesota, University of

    funding was provided by the state of Minnesota's ReInvest in Minnesota Clean Energy Program. #12, spring wheat, sugar beets, and alfalfa hay) as well as potential energy crops (grassland crops, hybrid National Agricultural Statistics Service (NASS) regions and for Minnesota as a whole (see Figure 1

  15. November 2010 Minnesota Crop Cost & Return Guide for 2011

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Minnesota, University of

    funding was provided by the state of Minnesota's ReInvest in Minnesota Clean Energy Program. #12, and alfalfa hay) as well as potential energy crops (grassland crops, hybrid poplar trees, willow trees using the Bureau of Labor Statistics producer price index and the USDANASS index of prices paid

  16. Developing salt-tolerant crop plants: challenges and opportunities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Blumwald, Eduardo

    Developing salt-tolerant crop plants: challenges and opportunities Toshio Yamaguchi and Eduardo areas of the world; the need to produce salt-tolerant crops is evident. Two main approaches are being used to improve salt tolerance: (i) the exploitation of natural genetic variations, either through

  17. The United States and Illegal Crops in Colombia: The Tragic Mistake of Futile Fumigation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tokatlian, Juan Gabriel

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The United States and Illegal Crops in Colombia: The Tragic94720 The United States and Illegal Crops in Colombia: Theof the process of eradicating illegal crops in Colombia. The

  18. Haiti Soil Fertility Analysis and Crop Interpretations for Principal Crops in the Five WINNER Watershed Zones of Intervention

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ma, Lena

    1 Haiti Soil Fertility Analysis and Crop Interpretations for Principal Crops in the Five WINNER degradation dominate the landscape in Haiti and there is little accurate soil-fertility research available in five major watershed regions of Haiti: Gonaives, Archaie/Cabaret, Cul-de-Sac, Kenscoff, and Mirebalais

  19. Taxonomic and Life History Bias in Herbicide Resistant Weeds: Implications for Deployment of Resistant Crops

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Commercialized Biotech/GM Crops: ISAAA Brief No. 34. ISAAA:Commercialized Biotech/GM Crops: ISAAA Brief No. 42. ISAAA:

  20. Functional Genomics of Drought Tolerance in Bioenergy Crops

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yin, Hengfu [ORNL; Chen, Rick [ORNL; Yang, Jun [ORNL; Weston, David [ORNL; Chen, Jay [ORNL; Muchero, Wellington [ORNL; Ye, Ning [ORNL; Tschaplinski, Timothy J [ORNL; Wullschleger, Stan D [ORNL; Cheng, Zong-Ming [ORNL; Tuskan, Gerald A [ORNL; Yang, Xiaohan [ORNL

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    With the predicted trends in climate change, drought will increasingly impose a grand challenge to biomass production. Most of the bioenergy crops have some degree of drought susceptibility with low water-use efficiency (WUE). It is imperative to improve drought tolerance and WUE in bioenergy crops for sustainable biomass production in arid and semi-arid regions with minimal water input. Genetics and functional genomics can play a critical role in generating knowledge to inform and aid genetic improvement of drought tolerance in bioenergy crops. The molecular aspect of drought response has been extensively investigated in model plants like Arabidopsis, yet our understanding of the molecular mechanisms underlying drought tolerance in bioenergy crops are limited. Crops exhibit various responses to drought stress depending on species and genotype. A rational strategy for studying drought tolerance in bioenergy crops is to translate the knowledge from model plants and pinpoint the unique features associated with individual species and genotypes. In this review, we summarize the general knowledge about drought responsive pathways in plants, with a focus on the identification of commonality and specialty in drought responsive mechanisms among different species and/or genotypes. We describe the genomic resources developed for bioenergy crops and discuss genetic and epigenetic regulation of drought responses. We also examine comparative and evolutionary genomics to leverage the ever-increasing genomics resources and provide new insights beyond what has been known from studies on individual species. Finally, we outline future exploration of drought tolerance using the emerging new technologies.

  1. Impact of Interspecific Hybridization between Crops and Weedy Relatives on the Evolution of Flowering Time in Weedy Phenotypes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vacher, Corinne; Kossler, Tanya M.; Hochberg, Michael E.; Weis, Arthur E.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    transgene dispersal from GM crops to their weedy relativesof hybridizing with GM crop plants or hybrids. This may

  2. Engineering Enzymes in Energy Crops: Conditionally Activated Enzymes Expressed in Cellulosic Energy Crops

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2010-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Broad Funding Opportunity Announcement Project: Enzymes are required to break plant biomass down into the fermentable sugars that are used to create biofuel. Currently, costly enzymes must be added to the biofuel production process. Engineering crops to already contain these enzymes will reduce costs and produce biomass that is more easily digested. In fact, enzyme costs alone account for $0.50-$0.75/gallon of the cost of a biomass-derived biofuel like ethanol. Agrivida is genetically engineering plants to contain high concentrations of enzymes that break down cell walls. These enzymes can be “switched on” after harvest so they won’t damage the plant while it’s growing.

  3. The 2008 Farm Bill What's In It For Specialty Crops

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ­ Promote diversification of rural areas through biobased energy ­ Enhance efficiency of bioenergy Show 21st Century Challenges, The Farm Bill, and Purdue Agriculture Sonny Ramaswamy ·Grand challenges. · Agricultural Competitiveness ­ Improving crop and animal agriculture; enhancing farm productivity and income

  4. annual chilean crops: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    from the ground to their faucet. Sloggett (1979) estimated that 23 percent of the on-farm energy use for crop production in the U.S. was for onfarm pumping. The energy required to...

  5. annual traditional crops: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    and two alternatives) in two (more) Li, Li 2014-01-01 3 TECHNICAL EFFICIENCY OF ANNUAL CROP FARMS IN NORTHERN VIETNAM Giang Dao and Phil Lewis Environmental Sciences and Ecology...

  6. Early detection of oil-induced stress in crops using spectral and thermal

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Blackburn, Alan

    ; thermography; plant; crop; oil pollution. Paper 12205 received Jul. 10, 2012; revised manuscript received Dec

  7. Using Legumes to Enhance Sustainability of Sorghum Cropping Systems in the East Texas Pineywoods Ecoregion: Impacts on Soil Nitrogen, Soil Carbon, and Crop Yields 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Neely, Clark B

    2013-05-03T23:59:59.000Z

    bicolor (L.) Moench], high-biomass sorghum [Sorghum bicolor (L.) Moench], and annual forage cropping systems. These studies quantified legume soil moisture usage and C and N contributions to the soil and subsequent crop yields in East Texas. Primary...

  8. Climate impacts on agriculture: Implications for crop production

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hatfield, Jerry L.; Boote, Kenneth J.; Kimball, B. A.; Ziska, Lewis A.; Izaurralde, Roberto C.; Ort, Don; Thomson, Allison M.; Wolfe, David W.

    2011-04-19T23:59:59.000Z

    Changes in temperature, CO2, and precipitation under the scenarios of climate change for the next 30 years present a challenge to crop production. This review focuses on the impact of temperature, CO2, and ozone on agronomic crops and the implications for crop production. Understanding these implications for agricultural crops is critical for developing cropping systems resilient to stresses induced by climate change. There is variation among crops in their response to CO2, temperature, and precipitation changes and, with the regional differences in predicted climate, a situation is created in which the responses will be further complicated. For example, the temperature effects on soybean could potentially cause yield reductions of 2.4% in the South but an increase of 1.7% in the Midwest. The frequency of years when temperatures exceed thresholds for damage during critical growth stages is likely to increase for some crops and regions. The increase in CO2 contributes significantly to enhanced plant growth and improved water use efficiency; however, there may be a downscaling of these positive impacts due to higher temperatures plants will experience during their growth cycle. A challenge is to understand the interactions of the changing climatic parameters because of the interactions among temperature, CO2, and precipitation on plant growth and development and also on the biotic stresses of weeds, insects, and diseases. Agronomists will have to consider the variations in temperature and precipitation as part of the production system if they are to ensure the food security required by an ever increasing population.

  9. 2013 Dry Bean Research Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Page 1 2013 Dry Bean Research Report Black Bean Color Retention and White Mold Control in Narrow Row Production Systems Michigan Dry Edible Bean Production Research Advisory Board #12;Page 2 The Michigan Bean Commission was awarded a grant from the MDARD Specialty Crop Block Grant Program-Farm Bill

  10. Historical Perspective on How and Why Switchgrass was Selected as a "Model" High-Potential Energy Crop

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wright, Lynn L [ORNL

    2007-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A review of several publications of the Biofuels Feedstock Development Program, and final reports from the herbaceous crop screening trials suggests that there were several technical and non-technical factors that influenced the decision to focus on one herbaceous "model" crop species. The screening trials funded by the U.S. Department of Energy in the late 1980's to early 1990's assessed a wide range of about 34 species with trials being conducted on a wide range of soil types in 31 different sites spread over seven states in crop producing regions of the U.S. While several species, including sorghums, reed canarygrass and other crops, were identified as having merit for further development, the majority of institutions involved in the herbaceous species screening studies identified switchgrass as having high priority for further development. Six of the seven institutions included switchgrass among the species recommended for further development in their region and all institutions recommended that perennial grasses be given high research priority. Reasons for the selection of switchgrass included the demonstration of relatively high, reliable productivity across a wide geographical range, suitability for marginal quality land, low water and nutrient requirements, and positive environmental attributes. Economic and environmental assessments by Oak Ridge National Laboratory's Biofuels Feedstock Development Program staff together with the screening project results, and funding limitations lead to making the decision to further develop only switchgrass as a "model" or "prototype" species in about 1990. This paper describes the conditions under which the herbaceous species were screened, summarizes results from those trials, discusses the various factors which influenced the selection of switchgrass, and provides a brief evaluation of switchgrass with respect to criteria that should be considered when selecting and developing a crop for biofuels and bioproducts.

  11. Evaluating environmental consequences of producing herbaceous crops for bioenergy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McLaughlin, S.B.

    1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The environmental costs and benefits of producing bioenergy crops can be measured both in kterms of the relative effects on soil, water, and wildlife habitat quality of replacing alternate cropping systems with the designated bioenergy system, and in terms of the quality and amount of energy that is produced per unit of energy expended. While many forms of herbaceous and woody energy crops will likely contribute to future biofuels systems, The Dept. of Energy`s Biofuels Feedstock Development Program (BFDP), has chosen to focus its primary herbaceous crops research emphasis on a perennial grass species, switchgrass (Panicum virgatum), as a bioenergy candidate. This choice was based on its high yields, high nutrient use efficiency, and wide geographic distribution, and also on its poistive environmental attributes. The latter include its positive effects on soil quality and stabiity, its cover value for wildlife, and the lower inputs of enerty, water, and agrochemicals required per unit of energy produced. A comparison of the energy budgets for corn, which is the primary current source of bioethanol, and switchgrass reveals that the efficiency of energy production for a perennial grass system can exceed that for an energy intensive annual row crop by as much as 15 times. In additions reductions in CO{sub 2} emission, tied to the energetic efficiency of producing transportation fuels, are very efficient with grasses. Calculated carbon sequestration rates may exceed those of annual crops by as much as 20--30 times, due in part to carbon storage in the soil. These differences have major implications for both the rate and efficiency with which fossil energy sources can be replaced with cleaner burning biofuels.

  12. Determine metrics and set targets for soil quality on agriculture residue and energy crop pathways

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ian Bonner; David Muth

    2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    There are three objectives for this project: 1) support OBP in meeting MYPP stated performance goals for the Sustainability Platform, 2) develop integrated feedstock production system designs that increase total productivity of the land, decrease delivered feedstock cost to the conversion facilities, and increase environmental performance of the production system, and 3) deliver to the bioenergy community robust datasets and flexible analysis tools for establishing sustainable and viable use of agricultural residues and dedicated energy crops. The key project outcome to date has been the development and deployment of a sustainable agricultural residue removal decision support framework. The modeling framework has been used to produce a revised national assessment of sustainable residue removal potential. The national assessment datasets are being used to update national resource assessment supply curves using POLYSIS. The residue removal modeling framework has also been enhanced to support high fidelity sub-field scale sustainable removal analyses. The framework has been deployed through a web application and a mobile application. The mobile application is being used extensively in the field with industry, research, and USDA NRCS partners to support and validate sustainable residue removal decisions. The results detailed in this report have set targets for increasing soil sustainability by focusing on primary soil quality indicators (total organic carbon and erosion) in two agricultural residue management pathways and a dedicated energy crop pathway. The two residue pathway targets were set to, 1) increase residue removal by 50% while maintaining soil quality, and 2) increase soil quality by 5% as measured by Soil Management Assessment Framework indicators. The energy crop pathway was set to increase soil quality by 10% using these same indicators. To demonstrate the feasibility and impact of each of these targets, seven case studies spanning the US are presented. The analysis has shown that the feedstock production systems are capable of simultaneously increasing productivity and soil sustainability.

  13. Regulating the Regulators: The Increased Role for the Federal Judiciary in Monitoring the Debate over Genetically Modified Crops

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Denton, Blake

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    w]hat Monsanto [a GM crop producer] wished for fromresponsible for regulating GM crops. It is through thisin the discussion about GM crops. See See See See supra Part

  14. Arundo Donax Analysis Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Corrie I. Nichol, Ph.D.; Tyler L. Westover, Ph.D.

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This is a summary report of preliminary analysis conducted on Arundo Donax. Arundo Donax was received from Greenwood Resources via Portland General Electric. PGE plans to transition a coal-fired boiler to 100% biomass by 2020, and has partnered with EPRI and INL to conduct the necessary testing and development to understand what needs to take place to make this transition. Arundo Donax is a promising energy crop for biopower, and is as yet relatively untested and uncharacterized. The INL has begun initial characterization of this material, and this summary report presents the initial findings.

  15. Estimated Costs of Crop Production in Iowa 2001

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Duffy, Michael D.

    Estimated Costs of Crop Production in Iowa ­ 2001 The estimated costs of corn, corn silage. They include the annual Iowa Farm Business Association record summaries, production and costs data from and a survey of selected agriculture cooperatives around the state. These costs estimates are representative

  16. Estimated Costs of Crop Production in Iowa 2000

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Duffy, Michael D.

    Estimated Costs of Crop Production in Iowa ­ 2000 The estimated costs of corn, corn silage. They include the annual Iowa Farm Business Association record summaries, production and costs data from and a survey of selected agriculture cooperatives around the state. These costs estimates are representative

  17. Estimated Costs of Crop Production in Iowa 2005

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Duffy, Michael D.

    Estimated Costs of Crop Production in Iowa ­ 2005 The estimated costs of corn, corn silage. They include the annual Iowa Farm Business Association record summaries, production and costs data from and a survey of selected agricultural cooperatives and other input suppliers around the state. These costs

  18. Estimated Costs of Crop Production in Iowa 2002

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Duffy, Michael D.

    Estimated Costs of Crop Production in Iowa ­ 2002 The estimated costs of corn, corn silage. They include the annual Iowa Farm Business Association record summaries, production and costs data from and a survey of selected agricultural cooperatives and other input suppliers around the state. These costs

  19. Estimated Costs of Crop Production in Iowa 2006

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Duffy, Michael D.

    Estimated Costs of Crop Production in Iowa ­ 2006 The estimated costs of corn, corn silage. They include the annual Iowa Farm Business Association record summaries, production and costs data from and a survey of selected agricultural cooperatives and other input suppliers around the state. These costs

  20. TRADE COSTS AND THE GAINS FROM TRADE IN CROP AGRICULTURE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tullos, Desiree

    TRADE COSTS AND THE GAINS FROM TRADE IN CROP AGRICULTURE JEFFREY J. REIMER AND MAN LI We develop trade, and the elasticity of trade volumes to trade costs. The distribution of the gains from trade the extent by which changes in one country are transmitted to others. Key words: geography, grains, trade

  1. Using Animal Manure and Wastewater for Crops and Pastures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mukhtar, Saqib

    Using Animal Manure and Wastewater for Crops and Pastures * Assistant Professor and Extension Agricultural Engineering Specialist Waste Management; The Texas A&M University System. E-47 9-00 Know and Take Credit for your N, P and K Saqib Mukhtar* E ffluent from animal manure and wastewater impoundments

  2. Non-Traditional Soil Additives: Can They Improve Crop Production?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mukhtar, Saqib

    or no nutrient content. Unlike fertilizers, additives are commonly not mar- keted with, nor are they required these materials to the soil will enhance crop production by improving water and/or nutrient availability such as evaporated sea water or sulfates, which may be com- bined with organic extracts of materials such as kelp

  3. 2008 GRASS ENERGY CROPS INFORMATION SHEET #1 Introduction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pawlowski, Wojtek

    1 2008 GRASS ENERGY CROPS INFORMATION SHEET #1 Introduction The purpose of this information sheet are considering planting perennial grasses for energy uses, either on their own or rented land. The bioenergy-disciplinary renewable energy research effort supported by the New York Farm Viability Institute (NYFVI), Cornell

  4. Editor's Choice Editor's Choice: Crop Genome Plasticity and Its Relevance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Parrott, Wayne

    . The term GE is preferred over the term "genetically modified" (commonly referred to as GMEditor's Choice Editor's Choice: Crop Genome Plasticity and Its Relevance to Food and Feed Safety of Genetically Engineered Breeding Stacks1 Genetically engineered (GE) stacks, combinations of two or more single

  5. Purpose-designed Crop Plants for Biofuels BIOENERGY PROGRAM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Purpose-designed Crop Plants for Biofuels BIOENERGY PROGRAM The Texas AgriLife Research Center for the biofuels industry. This program recognizes that the ideal combination of traits required for an economically and energetically sustainable biofuels industry does not yet exist in a single plant spe- cies

  6. No-till Cropping Systems for Stretching Limited Irrigation Supplies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nebraska-Lincoln, University of

    No-till Cropping Systems for Stretching Limited Irrigation Supplies Gary W. Hergert, Professor, limited irrigation), (2) irrigation water management (improved scheduling, automated systems, converting management is required to reduce the causes of that conflict. Lower groundwater levels in irrigated areas

  7. FIELD CROPS 2012 Weeds: Corn 5-53

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liskiewicz, Maciej

    in Delmarva corn production. To be successful in controlling weeds in corn, the weed control program must this record to plan your weed control program. Cultural control. Several aspects of cultural weed control should be considered in planning a corn weed control program. These include weed-free seed, cover crops

  8. Control Strategies for Late Blight in the Alaska Potato Crop

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wagner, Diane

    Control Strategies for Late Blight in the Alaska Potato Crop PMC-00339 Late blight is a devastating disease of both tomatoes and potatoes that is occasionally found in Alaska. There is no "cure" for the disease and there are very few re- sistant varieties of potatoes, so disease management strategies

  9. Scientists, growers assess trade-offs in use of tillage, cover crops and compost

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    depth depth depth depth compost was added two times perConv. crops were present. Compost was ap- Main effect Fof tillage, cover crops and compost Louise E. Jackson Irenee

  10. Intraspecific interference in forage crops. Biolo-gical density and its implication in the predic-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    , Italy SUMMARY From a series of experiments on intraspecific interference in such forage crops as lucerne inter- ference in such forage crops as lucerne (Medicago sativa L.) (ROTIL1, 1975, 1979 ; ROTILI

  11. CONTENT ANR @ MSU AgBioResearch Michigan Dry Bean Crop Protection Products

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    SKIP TO CONTENT ANR @ MSU AgBioResearch Home Bean Info Beet Info Directions History InfoVideos Links Michigan Dry Bean Crop Protection Products Common Chemical Name Brand Name Company Crop Use Seed

  12. Fact Sheet No. 0.710 Crop Series|Production Quick Facts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    StateUniversity Extension.8/14. www.ext.colostate.edu Since GM crops were introduced in the U.S. in the mid-1990s, they have the technology for developing GM crops and describes GM crops currently on the market in the U.S. What are GM technology are not allowed in organic production. Which GM crops are currently grown in the U.S.? Although

  13. CROPS AND SOILS RESEARCH PAPER Improved weather-based late blight risk management

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Douches, David S.

    CROPS AND SOILS RESEARCH PAPER Improved weather-based late blight risk management: comparing models infestans) risk at 26 locations in the Great Lakes region. Accuracies of predictions made using an early number of early warning systems for crop disease risk that integrate with crop- specific decision support

  14. Age-Dependent Demographic Rates of the Bioenergy Crop Miscanthus 3 giganteus

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sims, Gerald K.

    - generation biofuels, or from the biomass crops, referred to as second-generation biofuels, cellulosic renewable energy production (Genovesi 2011; Raghu et al. 2006). Biofuels, produced from crops, are a source biofuels or bioen- ergy crops (Jessup 2009). Because of their high yields and cellulose content, perennial

  15. Crop & Soil Science Seminar Series Mondays at 4:00 pm in Ag Life Sciences

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tullos, Desiree

    Crop & Soil Science Seminar Series Fall 2013 Mondays at 4:00 pm in Ag Life Sciences 4000 September 30 NO SEMINAR October 7 Dan Sullivan Crop & Soil Science Dept. "Phosphorus: Now and Then" October 14/CSSA/SSSA meetings) November 11 Chris Klatt Crop & Soil Science Dept. "Tracking Microbial Use of C and N

  16. An integrated biogeochemical and economic analysis of bioenergy crops in the Midwestern United States

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jain, Atul K.

    -specific economic analysis of breakeven prices of bioenergy crop production to assess the biophysical and economicAn integrated biogeochemical and economic analysis of bioenergy crops in the Midwestern United potential of biofuel production in the Midwestern United States. The bioenergy crops considered

  17. Effects of Weed Resistance Concerns and Resistance Management Practices on the Value of Roundup Ready Crops

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mitchell, Paul D.

    modified (GM) crops since commercialization more than a decade ago. Globally, total planted acres of GM by 2008 (James, 2009). The U.S. dominates in use of GM crops, planting about half of the world's total GM recently, in a global analysis of the various GM crops, Brookes and Barfoot (2008) find that herbicide

  18. Multi-Attribute Modelling of Economic and Ecological Impacts of Agricultural Innovations on Cropping Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bohanec, Marko

    requires reversible private net-benefits from GM crops, such as net-benefits accruing to farmers with the adoption of a new technology. This factor is the so called hurdle rate. Hurdle rates associated to GM crops be inferred from time series data on farmer gross margins and secondary literature, by assuming that GM crops

  19. SUMMARY OF CHANGES FOR THE CENTRAL AND SOUTHERN POTATO CROP PROVISIONS (09-0284)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goodman, Robert M.

    SUMMARY OF CHANGES FOR THE CENTRAL AND SOUTHERN POTATO CROP PROVISIONS (09-0284) The following, New Mexico, it has been included in the Northern Potato Crop Provisions. Language has been added to allow the inclusion of other states or counties to the Central and Southern Potato Crop Provisions

  20. August 15, 2003 Crop conditions: Peach harvest is underway across the state, generally with good crops being re-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ginzel, Matthew

    -fighting capabilities. The new "dietary guidance state- ment" unveiled last month informs consumers that "diets ric across the state, generally with good crops being re- ported. Early apple varieties are being harvested, with Gala harvest underway now in southern areas of the state. Early varieties of grapes are being harvested

  1. Effect of crop residue harvest on long-term crop yield, soil erosion, and carbon balance: tradeoffs for a sustainable bioenergy feedstock

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gregg, Jay S.; Izaurralde, Roberto C.

    2010-08-26T23:59:59.000Z

    Agricultural residues are a potential feedstock for bioenergy production, if residue harvest can be done sustainably. The relationship between crop residue harvest, soil erosion, crop yield and carbon balance was modeled with the Erosion Productivity Impact Calculator/ Environment Policy Integrated Climate (EPIC) using a factorial design. Four crop rotations (winter wheat [Triticum aestivum (L.)] – sunflower [Helianthus annuus]; spring wheat [Triticum aestivum (L.)] – canola [Brassica napus]; corn [Zea mays L.] – soybean [Glycine max (L.) Merr.]; and cotton [Gossypium hirsutum] – peanut [Arachis hypogaea]) were simulated at four US locations each, under different topographies (0-10% slope), and management practices [crop residue removal rates (0-75%), conservation practices (no till, contour cropping, strip cropping, terracing)].

  2. Executive Summary High-Yield Scenario Workshop Series Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Leslie Park Ovard; Thomas H. Ulrich; David J. Muth Jr.; J. Richard Hess; Steven Thomas; Bryce Stokes

    2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    To get a collective sense of the impact of research and development (R&D) on biomass resource availability, and to determine the feasibility that yields higher than baseline assumptions used for past assessments could be achieved to support U.S. energy independence, an alternate “High-Yield Scenario” (HYS) concept was presented to industry experts at a series of workshops held in December 2009. The workshops explored future production of corn/agricultural crop residues, herbaceous energy crops (HECs), and woody energy crops (WECs). This executive summary reports the findings of that workshop.

  3. Regional Uptake and Release of Crop Carbon in the United States

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    West, Tristram O.; Bandaru, Varaprasad; Brandt, Craig C.; Schuh, A.E.; Ogle, S.M.

    2011-08-03T23:59:59.000Z

    Carbon fixed by agricultural crops in the US creates regional CO2 sinks where it is harvested and regional CO2 sources where it is released back to the atmosphere. The quantity and location of these fluxes differ depending on the annual supply and demand of crop commodities. Data on the harvest of crop biomass, storage, import and export, and on the use of biomass for food, feed, fiber, and fuel were compiled to estimate an annual crop carbon budget for 2000 to 2008. Net sources of CO2 associated with the consumption of crop commodities occurred in the Eastern Uplands, Southern Seaboard, and Fruitful Rim regions. Net sinks associated with the production of crop commodities occurred in the Heartland, Northern Crescent, Northern Great Plains, and Mississippi Portal regions. The national crop carbon budget was balanced to within 0.7 to 6.6% yr-1 during the period of this analysis.

  4. Methods for generating or increasing revenues from crops

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Copenhaver, Gregory P.; Keith, Kevin; Preuss, Daphne

    2007-03-20T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention provides methods of doing business and providing services. For example, methods of increasing the revenue of crops are provided. To this end, the method includes the use of a nucleic acid sequences of plant centromeres. This will permit construction of stably inherited recombinant DNA constructs and mini chromosomes which can serve as vectors for the construction of transgenic plant and animal cells.

  5. The Effect of Sulphur on Yield of Certain Crops.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reynolds, E. B. (Elbert Brunner)

    1930-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    TFXAS AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION A. B. CONNER, DIRECTOR College Station, Brazos County, Texas BUL - LETIN NO. 408 FEBRUARY, 1930 DIVISION OF AGRONOMY THE EFFECT OF SULPHUR ON YIELD OF CERTAIN CROPS -- AGRICULTURAL AND MECHANICAL.... H. ROGERS, Feed Inspector W. H. WOOD, Feed Inspector I<. I,. KIRKLAND. B. S., Fred Inspector . W. D. NORTHCUTT, JR., B. S., Feed Inspector SIDNEY D. REYNOLDS, JR., Feed Inspector P. A. MOORE, Feed Inspector SUBSTATIONS No. 1, Beeville, Bee...

  6. Accurate, objective, reliable, and timely predictions of crop yield over large areas are critical to helping ensure the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liang, Shunlin

    /export plans and prices. Development of objective mathematical models of crop yield prediction using remote

  7. Current biofuel feedstock crops such as corn lead to large environmental losses of N through nitrate leaching and N2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    DeLucia, Evan H.

    219 Current biofuel feedstock crops such as corn lead to large environmental losses of N through biofuel crops established on a rich Mollisol soil. Reduced Nitrogen Losses after Conversion of Row Crop Agriculture to Perennial Biofuel Crops Candice M. Smith, Mark B. david,* Corey A. Mitchell, Michael d. Masters

  8. Department of Soil and Crop Sciences Honors Program The Department of Soil and Crop Sciences (SCSC) Honors Program is designed for highly-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Behmer, Spencer T.

    Department of Soil and Crop Sciences Honors Program The Department of Soil and Crop Sciences (SCSC programs, Plant and Environmental Soil Science (PSSC), or Turfgrass Science (TGSC), to enhance learning the distinction of Plant and Environmental Soil Science Honors, or Turfgrass Science Honors. Admission

  9. Quantifying the effect of buffer zones, crop areas and spatial aggregation on the externalities of genetically modified crops at landscape level

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of GM crops are being addressed in the coexistence debate (e.g. Bock et al., 2002; Boelt, 2003 of genetically modified (GM) crops has led the European Union (EU) to put forward the concept of `coexistence). Coexistence is entirely an economic problem and therefore it does not refer to the environmental impact of GM

  10. Ris Energy Report 2 Biomass production

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and the EU (Venendaal et al., 1997). No new inventory of European energy crop area has been done since 19966.1 Risř Energy Report 2 Biomass production This chapter mainly concerns the production of ligno for renewable energy increases to fulfil the ambitious goals of the EU's White Paper on renewable energy, new

  11. A soil moisture availability model for crop stress prediction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gay, Roger Franklin

    1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    wet so11 profile [Ritch1e et al. , 1972] . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12 Relationships between the ratio of actual evaporation (Ea) to pan evaporat1on (E an) as a function of the available soil water in Rule and Bragg soybean [Burch et al. , 1978...] F1gure Interact1ons between soil-moisture status and other components of a general crop yield model . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16 Figure Root densit1es for ra1nfed Ruse and Bragg soybean, 98 days after planting [Burch et al. , 1978...

  12. Forage Crops: Alfalfa, Peanuts, Velvet Beans, Millet, Rape

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pittuck, B. C.

    1903-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    is dry the seed should be covered not less than one inch. Utah and Kansas furnish the bulk of our commercial crop of alfalfa seed. Well-matured seed will retain their germinating power without showing any perceptible degree of deterioration for a... of alfalfa contained 635,- 400 plants per acre (15 to the square foot) and another ten years old contaied 326,793 (12 to the square foot) plants per acre, and still another which con- tained 139,392 (3 to the square foot) plants per acre. These fields...

  13. Production Practices for Irrigated Crops on the High Plains.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bonnen, C. A.; McArthur, W. C.; Magee, A. C.; Hughes, W.F.

    1953-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    was snapped and the re- mainder was machine-stripped. th lint yields averaging nearly a bale per acre (Table and 24.0 hours, respectively, of off-farm labor were cotton snapping on sandy and on heavy soils. From hour of labor was used to cover... approximately half rl acreage with a stripper. hough machine operations on dry-land and on irrigated CULLIJI~ are similar for seedbed preparation, planting and culti- vating, nearly twice as much labor was needed for production of the irrigated crop...

  14. Biomass Crop Assistance Program (BCAP) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnualProperty EditCalifornia: EnergyAvignon,Belcher HomesLyons BiomassBiofuels) JumpCombustionCrop

  15. Weekly Weather and Crop Bulletin | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnualProperty Edit withTianlin BaxinUmweltVillageGraph HomeWaranaWaterEnergyWeekly Weather and Crop

  16. D1 Fuel Crops Ltd | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnualProperty EditCalifornia:PowerCER.pngRoofs andCrops Ltd Jump to: navigation, search Name: D1

  17. Crop insurance as a form of disaster relief: an analysis of the alternatives

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Crenwelge, Cheryl

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    coverage. e Provide an approval method for farmers who wish to produce crops that would not typically be covered in a specific areas. ~ Allow farmers to prove actual yields for the Disaster Protection portion of the plan as well as for additional crop... RELIEF. AN ANALYSIS OP THE ALTERNATIVES Cheryl Crenwelge INTRODUCTION The federal crop insurance program faces warranted scrutiny in the formulation of the 1990 Farm Bill. After major reform in 1980, the program was intended to provide the primary...

  18. Long-term tillage, cropping sequence, and nitrogen fertilization effects on soil carbon and nitrogen dynamics 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dou, Fugen

    2006-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

    Management practices that may increase soil organic matter (SOM) storage include conservation tillage, especially no till (NT), enhanced cropping intensity, and fertilization. My objectives were to evaluate management ...

  19. Switchgrass is a promising, high-yielding crop for California biofuel

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    both as forage and as a biofuel crop, switchgrass may bepanic grass grown as a biofuel in southern England. Bioresfor switchgrass for biofuel systems. Biomass Bioenergy 30:

  20. Biomass crops can be used for biological disinfestation and remediation of soils and water

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stapleton, James J; Banuelos, Gary

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    liquid biofuels from biomass: The writings on the walls. Newreduced feed intake. Biomass crop sustainability flexibilityMC, et al. 2009. Cali- fornia biomass resources, potentials,

  1. The impact of mineral fertilizers on the carbon footprint of crop production

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brentrup, Frank

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    the GHG emissions (“carbon footprint”) of crop production inMaterials and methods – “carbon footprint” calculation basedLCA) principles A carbon footprint is “the total set of

  2. Modeling Poplar Growth as a Short Rotation Woody Crop for Biofuels

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hart, Quinn James

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    a Short Rotation Woody Crop for Biofuels Q. J. Hart 1,? , O.for cellulosic derived biofuels. The ability to accuratelycrops for bioenergy and biofuels applications. In vitro

  3. Soil Test Report The following information is being provided for farmers. For consumer soil test report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Isaacs, Rufus

    Soil Test Report The following information is being provided for farmers. For consumer soil test fertility status of the soil in each field can invest wisely in fertilizer and lime to produce the most economical crop yields. A soil test provides the needed information about soil pH, lime need and available

  4. Using Legumes to Enhance Sustainability of Sorghum Cropping Systems in the East Texas Pineywoods Ecoregion: Impacts on Soil Nitrogen, Soil Carbon, and Crop Yields

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Neely, Clark B

    2013-05-03T23:59:59.000Z

    practices are needed to prevent further SOM depletion. Incorporating legumes into cropping systems is one alternative that can bolster soil organic C (SOC) (key indicator of SOM) and reduce N fertilizer applications through symbiotic legume N fixation...

  5. A System Dynamics Study of Carbon Cycling and Electricity Generation from Energy Crops

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ford, Andrew

    Pullman, WA 99164-4430 USA Abstract The Climate Stewardship Act, a global warming mitigation policy1 A System Dynamics Study of Carbon Cycling and Electricity Generation from Energy Crops Hilary of these rotations. Our results show that using energy crops to displace coal in electricity generation will have

  6. Introduction The bioenergy industry is pursuing low-input crops to be

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liskiewicz, Maciej

    - leading threat to biodiversity. Most of our worst invasive plant species were intentionally introduced across the Southeast to support the growing bioeconomy. Successful development of renewable power biomass crops. These cellulosic crops share many traits with invasive plants (e.g., drought tolerant, fast

  7. Tea Oil Camellia: a New Edible Oil Crop for the United States John M. Ruter

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Radcliffe, David

    1 Tea Oil Camellia: a New Edible Oil Crop for the United States© John M. Ruter The University@uga.edu INTRODUCTION Camellia oleifera has been cultivated in China as a source of edible oil. oleifera as a commercial oil seed crop for the southeast (Ruter, 2002). Considerable research is being

  8. Long-term persistence of crop alleles in weedy populations of wild radish (Raphanus raphanistrum)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Snow, Allison A.

    -seeding, hybrid populations of Raphanus raphani- strum · Raphanus sativus (radish) in Michigan, USA, over a decadeLong-term persistence of crop alleles in weedy populations of wild radish (Raphanus raphanistrum) A (Raphanus raphanistrum). Summary · Hybridization allows transgenes and other crop alleles to spread to wild

  9. LCA Applied to Perennial Cropping Systems: a Review Focused on the Farm Stage C. Bessou 1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    winter as underground storage or perennating organs, or woody perennials whose tissues persist above for the perennial cropping systems, and methods and data for field emissions helped reveal the more critical issues of crop managements and field emissions over several years. · Conclusions: According to the reviewed

  10. LCA Applied to Perennial Cropping Systems: a Review Focused on the Farm Stage C. Bessou 1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    are either herbaceous which survive winter as underground storage or perennating organs, or woody perennials, modelling approach for the perennial cropping systems, and methods and data for field emissions helped with a comprehensive inventory of crop managements and field emissions over several years. · Conclusions: According

  11. agronomie: agriculture and environment Nitrogen uptake capacities of maize and sorghum crops

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    agronomie: agriculture and environment Nitrogen uptake capacities of maize and sorghum crops to a larger quantity of intercepted radiation. The efficiency of transforming intercepted energy into aerial nitrogen input should enable this species to grow in extensive cropping conditions. Moreover, the higher N

  12. THE POTENTIAL FOR MICRO-ALGAE AND OTHER "MICRO-CROPS" TO PRODUCE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Edwards, Paul N.

    THE POTENTIAL FOR MICRO-ALGAE AND OTHER "MICRO-CROPS" TO PRODUCE SUSTAINABLE BIOFUELS A REVIEW INTRODUCTION Biofuel derived from algae and other micro-crops has been proposed as an environmentally benign transportation fuel. Algae can be cultivated on low productivity lands using low quality water. Interest in algae

  13. Implications of Three Biofuel Crops for Beneficial Arthropods in Agricultural Landscapes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Landis, Doug

    Implications of Three Biofuel Crops for Beneficial Arthropods in Agricultural Landscapes Mary A Science+Business Media, LLC. 2010 Abstract Production of biofuel feedstocks in agricultural landscapes and generalist natural enemies in three model biofuel crops: corn, switch- grass, and mixed prairie, we tested

  14. Influence of habitat and landscape perenniality on insect natural enemies in three candidate biofuel crops

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Landis, Doug

    biofuel crops Ben P. Werling a, , Timothy D. Meehan b , Claudio Gratton b , Douglas A. Landis April 2011 Accepted 22 June 2011 Available online 28 June 2011 Keywords: Biofuels Biodiversity Biological control Land use change a b s t r a c t Cultivation of biofuel crops could change agricultural

  15. REVIEW PAPER Strategies for reducing the carbon footprint of field crops

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    REVIEW PAPER Strategies for reducing the carbon footprint of field crops for semiarid areas emission. To provide the potential solution, we estimated the carbon footprint [i.e., the total amount the effect of crop sequences on the carbon footprint of durum wheat. Key strategies for reducing the carbon

  16. PhD Graduate Research Assistantship: Horticultural Science/Crop Quality Position Summary

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Collins, Gary S.

    , plastic mulches need to be disposed of at the end of the growing season. Biodegradable plastic mulches biodegradable plastic mulches degrade in soil and what their effect is on crop yield and quality. Field experiments will be conducted to investigate the effects of biodegradable plastic mulches on crop yield

  17. SUBSURFACE DRIP IRRIGATION SYSTEMS FOR SPECIALTY CROP PRODUCTION IN NORTH DAKOTA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Steele, Dean D.

    SUBSURFACE DRIP IRRIGATION SYSTEMS FOR SPECIALTY CROP PRODUCTION IN NORTH DAKOTA D.D.Steele, R.G.Greenland, B. L. Gregor ABSTRACT. Subsurface drip irrigation (SDI) systems offer advantages over other types of irrigation systems for specialty crop production, including water savings, improved trafficability

  18. MOVEMENT OF FEMALE WHITE-TAILED DEER: EFFECTS OF CLIMATE AND INTENSIVE ROW-CROP AGRICULTURE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1099 MOVEMENT OF FEMALE WHITE-TAILED DEER: EFFECTS OF CLIMATE AND INTENSIVE ROW-CROP AGRICULTURE in intensively (>80%) cultivated areas. From January 2001 to August 2002, we monitored movements of 77 (61 adult of seasonal migration, whereas crop emergence and harvest had minimal effects. Four deer (8%) dispersed a mean

  19. On the regulation of spatial externalities: coexistence between GM and conventional crops

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    by GM crops. An externality occurs when a decision by one actor directly affects another actor's utility-mediated gene flow is one of the main concerns associated with the introduc- tion of genetically modified (GM) crops. Should a premium for non-GM varieties emerge on the market, `contamination' by GM pollen would

  20. Global Environmental Change 12 (2002) 197202 Increased crop damage in the US from excess precipitation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Global Environmental Change 12 (2002) 197­202 Increased crop damage in the US from excess Laboratory, 1 Cyclotron Road, MS 90-4000, Berkeley, CA 94720, USA d Environmental Defense, 18 Tremont Street and worldwide have caused great damage to crop production. If the frequency of these weather extremes were

  1. Biodiesel is produced from a wide variety of oilseed crops. In Europe, canola is the major biodiesel crop while in the U.S. soybeans dominates. Montana State University and USDA researchers have

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maxwell, Bruce D.

    Technology Biodiesel is produced from a wide variety of oilseed crops. In Europe, canola is the major biodiesel crop while in the U.S. soybeans dominates. Montana State University and USDA researchers to work for a broad range of oilseed plants including biodiesel and cereal crops. Increased oil

  2. Impact of Climate Change on Irrigation Water Availability, Crop Water Requirements and Soil Salinity in the SJV, CA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hopmans, Jan W; Maurer, Edwin P

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    many crops suffer heat stress beyond an optimal temperaturecrop growth due to heat stress and therefore a pronounced

  3. Impact of Climate Change on Irrigation Water Availability, Crop Water Requirements and Soil Salinity in the SJV, CA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hopmans, Jan W; Maurer, Edwin P

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    on Irrigation Water Availability, Crop Water Requirementsreduced surface water availability can be managed byrequirement and water availability (surface water and

  4. Effects of cropping-system-related soil moisture and nutrient dynamics on the sustainability of semiarid dryland agriculture

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Norton, Jay B.

    Effects of cropping-system-related soil moisture and nutrient dynamics on the sustainability are to evaluate sustainability of conservation cropping systems in order to improve management approaches of semiarid dryland agriculture Project Summary We propose to investigate cropping-system-related soil

  5. Greenhouse Gas Mitigation Through Energy Crops in the U.S. With Implications for Asian-Pacific Countries

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McCarl, Bruce A.

    into energy crop production will most likely carry this price through increased purchasing cost and all energy the production of energy crops and other agricultural mitigation strategies. This analysis estimates the economicGreenhouse Gas Mitigation Through Energy Crops in the U.S. With Implications for Asian

  6. Application of food and feed safety assessment principles to evaluate transgenic approaches to gene modulation in crops

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Parrott, Wayne

    safety of genetically modified (GM) crops has been assessed by the application of a set of internationally accepted procedures for evaluating the safety of GM crops. The goal of this paper is to review for conducting a safety assessment for GM crops that are developed by technologies that modify endogenous plant

  7. The role of short-rotation woody crops in sustainable development

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shepard, J.P. [National Council of the Paper Industry for Air and Stream Improvement, Medford, MA (United States); Tolbert, V.R. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

    1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    One answer to increase wood production is by increasing management intensity on existing timberland, especially in plantation forests. Another is to convert land currently in agriculture to timberland. Short-rotation woody crops can be used in both cases. But, what are the environmental consequences? Short-rotation woody crops can provide a net improvement in environmental quality at both local and global scales. Conversion of agricultural land to short-rotation woody crops can provide the most environmental quality enhancement by reducing erosion, improving soil quality, decreasing runoff, improving groundwater quality, and providing better wildlife habitat. Forest products companies can use increased production from intensively managed short-rotation woody crop systems to offset decreased yield from the portion of their timberland that is managed less intensively, e.g. streamside management zones and other ecologically sensitive or unique areas. At the global scale, use of short-rotation woody crops for bioenergy is part of the solution to reduce greenhouse gases produced by burning fossil fuels. Incorporating short-rotation woody crops into the agricultural landscape also increases storage of carbon in the soil, thus reducing atmospheric concentrations. In addition, use of wood instead of alternatives such as steel, concrete, and plastics generally consumes less energy and produces less greenhouse gases. Cooperative research can be used to achieve energy, fiber, and environmental goals. This paper will highlight several examples of ongoing cooperative research projects that seek to enhance the environmental aspects of short-rotation woody crop systems. Government, industry, and academia are conducting research to study soil quality, use of mill residuals, nutrients in runoff and groundwater, and wildlife use of short-rotation woody crop systems in order to assure the role of short-rotation crops as a sustainable way of meeting society`s needs.

  8. Power Lines and Crops Can Be Good Neighbors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none,

    2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Two of the Pacific Northwest’s greatest economic assets are its wealth of agriculture and its clean and reliable electricity fueled largely by hydropower. Sometimes the two intersect. Transmission lines carrying electricity to the region’s farms, businesses and homes must, of necessity, span large areas where people grow crops and orchards. To ensure a safe and reliable flow of electricity across these expanses, trees and other vegetation must be managed to certain standards. At the same time, the Bonneville Power Administration — which owns and operates three-quarters of the region’s high-voltage transmission — recognizes the importance of our region’s agricultural bounty. We are committed to working with individuals and agricultural communities to facilitate ongoing land-use activities in transmission rights-of-way as long as those uses are compatible with transmission safety and reliability standards. Our goal with vegetation management is to keep you and your property safe while protecting the reliability of our region’s electricity system. By working together, BPA and landowners can protect the system and public safety.

  9. Climate change effects on winter chill for fruit crops in Germany

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Luedeling, Eike; Blanke, Michael; Gebauer, Jens

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    chill for fruit crops in Germany Abstract To quantify thechange on fruit production in Germany, this study aimed atof typical winter chill in Germany around 2010, as well as

  10. Effects of Oilseed Meals on the Germination, Growth, and Survival of Crop and Weed Species

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rothlisberger, Katie Lynn

    2012-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Oilseed crops are being widely evaluated for potential biodiesel production. Seed meal (SM) remaining after extracting oil may have use as a bioherbicide or organic fertilizer. Brassicaceae SM often contains glucosinolates that can hydrolyze...

  11. Agronomy Journal Volume 106, Issue 2 2014 545 Crop Ecology & Physiology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Minnesota, University of

    , Jerry L. Hatfield, Mark W. Heuer, Daniel M. Howard, Monique Y. Leclerc, Henry W. Loescher, Oliver North America as the major agricultural crops (Gilmanov et al., 2013), and the present study expands

  12. Crop yield estimation model for Iowa using remote sensing and surface parameters

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Singh, Ramesh P.

    and prediction using piecewise linear regression method with breakpoint. Crop production environment consists of inherent sources of heterogeneity and their non-linear behavior. A non-linear Quasi-Newton multi

  13. Long-term tillage, cropping sequence, and nitrogen fertilization effects on soil carbon and nitrogen dynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dou, Fugen

    2006-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

    observed in surface soils. NT significantly increased SOC. Nitrogen fertilization significantly increased SOC only under NT. Compared to NT or N addition, enhanced cropping intensity only slightly increased SOC. Estimates of C sequestration rates under NT...

  14. Physiological Effects of Saline Water on Two Economically Important Horticultural Crops in South Texas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Simpson, Catherine Ross

    2013-12-02T23:59:59.000Z

    Citrus and watermelons are valuable economic crops worldwide, contributing approximately $120 million combined each year in Texas alone. Both citrus and watermelons are sensitive to saline conditions, which can be problematic in the Lower Rio...

  15. Field Guide to the Insects, Mites and Mollusks of Nursery, Floral and Greenhouse Crops

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gouge, Dawn H.; Smith, Kirk A.; Wilkerson, Don

    2000-01-12T23:59:59.000Z

    This field guide provides excellent photo identification keys for numerous pests and beneficials found in nursery, greenhouse and floral crops. The text includes a physical description, examples of damage and information on the life cycle of each...

  16. Novel enabling technologies of gene isolation and plant transformation for improved crop protection

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Torok, Tamas

    2013-02-04T23:59:59.000Z

    Meeting the needs of agricultural producers requires the continued development of improved transgenic crop protection products. The completed project focused on developing novel enabling technologies of gene discovery and plant transformation to facilitate the generation of such products.

  17. Analysis of MODIS 250 m NDVI Using Different Time-Series Data for Crop Type Separability

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Eunmok

    2014-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The primary objectives of this research were to: (1) investigate the use of different compositing periods of NDVI values of time-series MODIS 250 m data for distinguishing major crop types on the central Great Plains of ...

  18. Economic Implications of New Crops, Row Damming and Land Clearing in the Texas Winter Garden

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Muncrief, G.E.; Lacewell, R. D.; Cornforth, G. C.; Pena, J. G.

    TR- 123 1983 Economic Implications of New Crops, Row Damming and Land Clearing in the Texas Winter Garden G.E. Muncrief R.D. Lacewell G.C. Cornforth J.G. Pena Texas Water Resources Institute...

  19. Response of Peanuts to Irrigation Management at Different Crop Growth Stages

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Howell, T. A.; McFarland, M. J.; Reddell, D. L.; Brown, K. W.; Newton, R. J.; Dahmen, P.

    for peanuts at different crop growth stages for the Spanish and the Florunner varieties. The yield of the two varieties was evaluated under seven different irrigation treatments including a "no stress" check treatment and a dryland treatment. Each treatment...

  20. Multisensor Fusion of Ground-based and Airborne Remote Sensing Data for Crop Condition Assessment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Huihui

    2012-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

    In this study, the performances of the optical sensors and instruments carried on both ground-based and airborne platforms were evaluated for monitoring crop growing status, detecting the vegetation response to aerial applied herbicides...

  1. An Economic Feasibility Study of Irrigated Crop Production in the Pecos Valley of Texas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Condra, G. D.; Lacewell, R. D.; Hardin, D. C.; Lindsey, K.; Whitson, R. E.

    to the Coyanosa and St. Lawrence regions under alternative future scenarios for inflation rates, energy prices, crop prices, and interest rates. The Coyanosa model was also applied under most likely scenario conditions to analyze the effects of alternative levels...

  2. Projecting net incomes for Texas crop producers: an application of probabilistic forecasting

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eggerman, Christopher Ryan

    2006-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

    unexplained by OLS equations between Texas and U.S. variables. Deterministic and probabilistic NFI projections for Texas crops were compared under the January 2005 and January 2006 FAPRI Baseline projections. With production costs increasing considerably...

  3. Establishing Crop Acreage Flexibility Restraints for Subregions of the Texas High Plains

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Condra, G. D.; Lacewell, R. D.

    Cropping pattern shifts in many aggregate linear programming (LP) models need to be constrained due to institutional, marketing machinery, and price uncertainty factors. The purpose of this study was to estimate constraints which are referred...

  4. South Carolina Pest Management Handbook for Field Crops -2013 TOBACCO HARVEST MANAGEMENT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stuart, Steven J.

    South Carolina Pest Management Handbook for Field Crops - 2013 265 TOBACCO HARVEST MANAGEMENT to PPE. Delay in harvesting could result in loss of yield and quality and may cause leaf drop. Treat only

  5. Crop water stress under climate change uncertainty : global policy and regional risk

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gueneau, Arthur

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Fourty percent of all crops grown in the world today are grown using irrigation, and shifting precipitation patterns due to climate change are viewed as a major threat to food security. This thesis examines, in the framework ...

  6. Evaluation of Salmonella disinfection strategies for pre-slaughter broiler crop decontamination

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barnhart, Eric Thomas

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of the following studies was to evaluate selected potential decontamination methods for ability to reduce the incidence of Salmonella recovery from broiler crops during pre-slaughter feed withdrawal. The efficacy of prolonged lactose...

  7. Riv Report No. 200 Danish Atomic Energy Commission

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    i Riv Report No. 200 Danish Atomic Energy Commission Research Establishment Risř Studies-1307 CoptnlHfm K, Damuk Avalhblt on rxchange from: Litary, DMU* Atomic Energy RiM, DK-4000 Rnk Species 78 35.4. Root Crops 81 3.2.5. Wild Plants 81 3.2.6. Allium Species 82 3.2.7. Comparison

  8. A History of Small Grain Crops in Texas: Wheat, Oats, Barley, Rye 1582-1976.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Atkins, Irvin Milburn

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    that the production in Texas increased from 41,729 in 1850 to 2,500,000 bushels in 1880. The Texas Almanac (1 10) records that Denton and Wilbarger Counties each produced 2 million bushels in * 1904. Farther south in Central Texas, settlement and crop...) records that Denton and Wilbarger Counties each produced 2 million bushels in * 1904. Farther south in Central Texas, settlement and crop production also were rapidly expanding (Tyler, 1 16). The Tennessee Colony settled at Nashville, below Waco...

  9. A climate-soil-crop model to evaluate drought incidence and severity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Puvirajasinghe, Patrick

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A CLINATE-SOIL-CROP MODEL TO EVALUATE DROUGHT INCIDENCE AND SEVERITY A Thesis by PATRICK PUVIRAJASINGHE Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirement for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE... August 1982 Major Subject: Agronomy A CLIMATE-SOIL-CROP MODEL TO EVALUATE DROUGHT INCIDENCE AND SEVERITY A Thesis by PATRICK PUVIRAJASINGHE Approved as to style and content by: (Chairman of Committee) 5' 9 (Member) (Me r) (Member ead of e...

  10. GM Crops Are Not Containable: so what? E. Ann Clark, Plant Agriculture, University of Guelph (eaclark@uoguelph.ca) 2005 E. Ann Clark

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Clark, E. Ann

    GM Crops Are Not Containable: so what? E. Ann Clark, Plant Agriculture, University of Guelph years of commercial experience with GM crops allow us to explore two theses: 1. that the premise that GM field crops can co-exist without contaminating weedy relatives as well as non-GM crops is inconsistent

  11. Global Simulation of Bioenergy Crop Productivity: Analytical Framework and Case Study for Switchgrass

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kang, Shujiang [ORNL; Kline, Keith L [ORNL; Nair, S. Surendran [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Nichols, Dr Jeff A [ORNL; Post, Wilfred M [ORNL; Brandt, Craig C [ORNL; Wullschleger, Stan D [ORNL; Wei, Yaxing [ORNL; Singh, Nagendra [ORNL

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A global energy crop productivity model that provides geospatially explicit quantitative details on biomass potential and factors affecting sustainability would be useful, but does not exist now. This study describes a modeling platform capable of meeting many challenges associated with global-scale agro-ecosystem modeling. We designed an analytical framework for bioenergy crops consisting of six major components: (i) standardized natural resources datasets, (ii) global field-trial data and crop management practices, (iii) simulation units and management scenarios, (iv) model calibration and validation, (v) high-performance computing (HPC) simulation, and (vi) simulation output processing and analysis. The HPC-Environmental Policy Integrated Climate (HPC-EPIC) model simulated a perennial bioenergy crop, switchgrass (Panicum virgatum L.), estimating feedstock production potentials and effects across the globe. This modeling platform can assess soil C sequestration, net greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions, nonpoint source pollution (e.g., nutrient and pesticide loss), and energy exchange with the atmosphere. It can be expanded to include additional bioenergy crops (e.g., miscanthus, energy cane, and agave) and food crops under different management scenarios. The platform and switchgrass field-trial dataset are available to support global analysis of biomass feedstock production potential and corresponding metrics of sustainability.

  12. agricultural crops grown: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    mills make as fine a flour as could be desired." Taylor (log), who went by horseback from San Antonio to El Paso and on to California in 1876, observed wheat..., he reports (1876)...

  13. additional crop yield: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    mills make as fine a flour as could be desired." Taylor (log), who went by horseback from San Antonio to El Paso and on to California in 1876, observed wheat..., he reports (1876)...

  14. Estimating crop net primary production using inventory data and MODIS-derived parameters

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bandaru, Varaprasad; West, Tristram O.; Ricciuto, Daniel M.; Izaurralde, Roberto C.

    2013-06-03T23:59:59.000Z

    National estimates of spatially-resolved cropland net primary production (NPP) are needed for diagnostic and prognostic modeling of carbon sources, sinks, and net carbon flux. Cropland NPP estimates that correspond with existing cropland cover maps are needed to drive biogeochemical models at the local scale and over national and continental extents. Existing satellite-based NPP products tend to underestimate NPP on croplands. A new Agricultural Inventory-based Light Use Efficiency (AgI-LUE) framework was developed to estimate individual crop biophysical parameters for use in estimating crop-specific NPP. The method is documented here and evaluated for corn and soybean crops in Iowa and Illinois in years 2006 and 2007. The method includes a crop-specific enhanced vegetation index (EVI) from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS), shortwave radiation data estimated using Mountain Climate Simulator (MTCLIM) algorithm and crop-specific LUE per county. The combined aforementioned variables were used to generate spatially-resolved, crop-specific NPP that correspond to the Cropland Data Layer (CDL) land cover product. The modeling framework represented well the gradient of NPP across Iowa and Illinois, and also well represented the difference in NPP between years 2006 and 2007. Average corn and soybean NPP from AgI-LUE was 980 g C m-2 yr-1 and 420 g C m-2 yr-1, respectively. This was 2.4 and 1.1 times higher, respectively, for corn and soybean compared to the MOD17A3 NPP product. Estimated gross primary productivity (GPP) derived from AgI-LUE were in close agreement with eddy flux tower estimates. The combination of new inputs and improved datasets enabled the development of spatially explicit and reliable NPP estimates for individual crops over large regional extents.

  15. Benefits of supplementing an industrial waste anaerobic digester with energy crops for increased biogas production

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nges, Ivo Achu, E-mail: Nges.Ivo_Achu@biotek.lu.se [Department of Biotechnology, Lund University, P.O. Box 124, SE 221 00 Lund (Sweden); Escobar, Federico; Fu Xinmei; Bjoernsson, Lovisa [Department of Biotechnology, Lund University, P.O. Box 124, SE 221 00 Lund (Sweden)

    2012-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer This study demonstrates the feasibility of co-digestion food industrial waste with energy crops. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Laboratory batch co-digestion led to improved methane yield and carbon to nitrogen ratio as compared to mono-digestion of industrial waste. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Co-digestion was also seen as a means of degrading energy crops with nutrients addition as crops are poor in nutrients. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Batch co-digestion methane yields were used to predict co-digestion methane yield in full scale operation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer It was concluded that co-digestion led an over all economically viable process and ensured a constant supply of feedstock. - Abstract: Currently, there is increasing competition for waste as feedstock for the growing number of biogas plants. This has led to fluctuation in feedstock supply and biogas plants being operated below maximum capacity. The feasibility of supplementing a protein/lipid-rich industrial waste (pig manure, slaughterhouse waste, food processing and poultry waste) mesophilic anaerobic digester with carbohydrate-rich energy crops (hemp, maize and triticale) was therefore studied in laboratory scale batch and continuous stirred tank reactors (CSTR) with a view to scale-up to a commercial biogas process. Co-digesting industrial waste and crops led to significant improvement in methane yield per ton of feedstock and carbon-to-nitrogen ratio as compared to digestion of the industrial waste alone. Biogas production from crops in combination with industrial waste also avoids the need for micronutrients normally required in crop digestion. The batch co-digestion methane yields were used to predict co-digestion methane yield in full scale operation. This was done based on the ratio of methane yields observed for laboratory batch and CSTR experiments compared to full scale CSTR digestion of industrial waste. The economy of crop-based biogas production is limited under Swedish conditions; therefore, adding crops to existing industrial waste digestion could be a viable alternative to ensure a constant/reliable supply of feedstock to the anaerobic digester.

  16. Opportunities for Energy Crop Production Based on Subfield Scale Distribution of Profitability

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ian Bonner; Kara Cafferty; David Muth Jr.; Mark Tomer

    2014-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Incorporation of dedicated herbaceous energy crops into row crop landscapes is a promising means to supply an expanding biofuel industry while increasing biomass yields, benefiting soil and water quality, and increasing biodiversity. Despite these positive traits energy crops remain largely unaccepted due to concerns over their practicality and cost of implementation. This paper presents a case study on Hardin County, Iowa to demonstrate how subfield decision making can be used to target candidate areas for conversion to energy crop production. The strategy presented integrates switchgrass (Panicum virgatum L.) into subfield landscape positions where corn (Zea mays L.) grain is modeled to operate at a net economic loss. The results of this analysis show that switchgrass integration has the potential to increase sustainable biomass production from 48 to 99% (depending on the rigor of conservation practices applied to corn stover collection) while also improving field level profitability. Candidate land area is highly sensitive to grain price (0.18 to 0.26 US$ kg-1) and dependent on the acceptable net profit for corn production (ranging from 0 to -1,000 US$ ha-1). This work presents the case that switchgrass can be economically implemented into row crop production landscapes when management decisions are applied at a subfield scale and compete against areas of the field operating at a negative net profit.

  17. Global Simulation of Bioenergy Crop Productivity: Analytical framework and Case Study for Switchgrass

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nair, S. Surendran [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK)] [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Nichols, Jeff A. {Cyber Sciences} [ORNL; Post, Wilfred M [ORNL] [ORNL; Wang, Dali [ORNL] [ORNL; Wullschleger, Stan D [ORNL] [ORNL; Kline, Keith L [ORNL] [ORNL; Wei, Yaxing [ORNL] [ORNL; Singh, Nagendra [ORNL] [ORNL; Kang, Shujiang [ORNL] [ORNL

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Contemporary global assessments of the deployment potential and sustainability aspects of biofuel crops lack quantitative details. This paper describes an analytical framework capable of meeting the challenges associated with global scale agro-ecosystem modeling. We designed a modeling platform for bioenergy crops, consisting of five major components: (i) standardized global natural resources and management data sets, (ii) global simulation unit and management scenarios, (iii) model calibration and validation, (iv) high-performance computing (HPC) modeling, and (v) simulation output processing and analysis. A case study with the HPC- Environmental Policy Integrated Climate model (HPC-EPIC) to simulate a perennial bioenergy crop, switchgrass (Panicum virgatum L.) and global biomass feedstock analysis on grassland demonstrates the application of this platform. The results illustrate biomass feedstock variability of switchgrass and provide insights on how the modeling platform can be expanded to better assess sustainable production criteria and other biomass crops. Feedstock potentials on global grasslands and within different countries are also shown. Future efforts involve developing databases of productivity, implementing global simulations for other bioenergy crops (e.g. miscanthus, energycane and agave), and assessing environmental impacts under various management regimes. We anticipated this platform will provide an exemplary tool and assessment data for international communities to conduct global analysis of biofuel biomass feedstocks and sustainability.

  18. Management of lignite fly ash for improving soil fertility and crop productivity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ram, L.C.; Srivastava, N.K.; Jha, S.K.; Sinha, A.K.; Masto, R.E.; Selvi, V.A. [Central Fuel Research Institute, Dhanbad (India)

    2007-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Lignite fly ash (LFA), being alkaline and endowed with excellent pozzolanic properties, a silt loam texture, and plant nutrients, has the potential to improve soil quality and productivity. Long-term field trials with groundnut, maize, and sun hemp were carried out to study the effect of LFA on growth and yield. Before crop I was sown, LFA was applied at various doses with and without press mud (an organic waste from the sugar industry, used as an amendment and source of nutrients). LFA with and without press mud was also applied before crops III and V were cultivated. Chemical fertilizer, along with gypsum, humic acid, and bioferfertilizer, was applied in all treatments, including the control. With one-time and repeat applications of LFA (with and without press mud), yield increased significantly (7.0-89.0%) in relation to the control crop. The press mud enhanced the yield (3.0-15.0%) with different LFA applications. One-time and repeat application of LFA (alone and in combination with press mud) improved soil quality and the nutrient content of the produce. The highest dose of LFA (200 t/ha) with and without press mud showed the best residual effects (eco-friendly increases in the yield of succeeding crops). Some increase in trace- and heavy metal contents and in the level of gamma-emitters in soil and crop produce, but well within permissible limits, was observed. Thus, LFA can be used on a large scale to boost soil fertility and productivity with no adverse effects on the soil or crops, which may solve the problem of bulk disposal of fly ash in an eco-friendly manner.

  19. Influence of rainfall on the retention of sludge trace metals by the leaves of forage crops

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jones, Stephen Grady

    1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    INFLUENCE OF RAINFALL ON THE RETENTION OF SLUDGE TRACE METALS BY THE LEAVES OF FORAGE CROPS A Thesis STEPHEN GRADY JONES Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirement for the degree... of MASTER OF SCIENCE December 1977 Major Subject: Soil Science INFLUENCE OF RAINFALL ON THE RETENTION OF SLUDGE TRACE MFTALS BY THE LEAVES OF FORAGE CROPS A Thesis by STEPHEN GRADY JONES Approved a to style and content by: 1 (Chairman of Committee...

  20. The effect of irrigated cropping systems on certain soil physical properties of Willacy fine sandy loam

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Khan, Shiraj Hossain

    1958-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    By SHIRAJ HOSSAIH KHAH Approved a to style and content by: g. Cha n of Cosssittee H of the Depa ent of Agronoay / August 1958 Thanks are due to Dr. M. E. Bloodworth, Associate Professor, and Dr. H. H. Hampton, Professor of Agronomy, of the A. 6 M... percolatioa rate of water in centineters per hour in 0-6, 6-12, and 12-18 inch saturated field cores as influenced by different cropping systens . . . . . . . . . . . . . . , ~ . 22 4. Average bulk density of field cores under different cropping systens...

  1. Biodiesel is produced from a wide variety of oilseed crops. In Europe, canola is the major biodiesel crop while in the U.S. soybeans dominate. Montana State University researchers have developed a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maxwell, Bruce D.

    Technology Biodiesel is produced from a wide variety of oilseed crops. In Europe, canola is the major biodiesel crop while in the U.S. soybeans dominate. Montana State University researchers have plants used for biodiesel. Seed oil content increases are induced by puroindoline genes which promote

  2. Wavelet analysis of MODIS time series to detect expansion and intensification of row-crop agriculture in Brazil

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vermont, University of

    -crop agriculture in Brazil Gillian L. Galford a,b,, John F. Mustard a , Jerry Melillo b , Aline Gendrin a Nuclear na Agricultura, Universidade de Săo Paulo, Brazil e Escola Superior de Agricultura Luiz de Queiroz from natural vegetation and pastures to row-crop agricultural with the potential to affect regional

  3. Evaluating the potential use of winter cover crops in cornsoybean systems for sustainable co-production of food and fuel

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Minnesota, University of

    in displacement of grain crops with dedicated bioenergy crops such as switch grass, miscanthus, and hybrid poplar. Meeting the ambitious goals that have been set for bioenergy production without impacting food production, specifically that by displacing food production it will lead to higher food prices, increased incidence

  4. Watershed Scale Optimization to Meet Sustainable Cellulosic Energy Crop Demands

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your DensityEnergy U.S.-China Electric Vehicle and03/02ReportWaste-to-Energy andAprilWater andWatershed Scale

  5. Estimated Costs of Crop Production in Iowa -2011 File A1-20

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Duffy, Michael D.

    Estimated Costs of Crop Production in Iowa - 2011 File A1-20 T heestimatedcostsofcorn the annual Iowa Farm Business Association record summaries, production and costs data from the Departments of selected agricultural coop- eratives and other input suppliers around the state. These costs estimates

  6. Estimated Costs of Crop Production in Iowa -2010 File A1-20

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Duffy, Michael D.

    Estimated Costs of Crop Production in Iowa - 2010 File A1-20 T heestimatedcostsofcorn Farm Business Association record summaries, production and costs data from the De- partments. Thesecostsestimatesarerepresentativeofaveragecosts for farms in Iowa. Very large or small farms may have lower or higher fixed costs per acre. Due

  7. Estimated Costs of Crop Production in Iowa -2014 File A1-20

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Duffy, Michael D.

    Estimated Costs of Crop Production in Iowa - 2014 File A1-20 T he estimated costs of corn, corn. They include the annual Iowa Farm Busi- ness Association record summaries, production and costs data from, and a survey of selected agricultural cooperatives and other input suppliers around the state. These cost

  8. Estimated Costs of Crop Production in Iowa -2013 File A1-20

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Duffy, Michael D.

    Estimated Costs of Crop Production in Iowa - 2013 File A1-20 T he estimated costs of corn, corn. They include the annual Iowa Farm Busi- ness Association record summaries, production and costs data from and a survey of selected agricultural cooperatives and other input suppliers around the state. These cost

  9. Estimated Costs of Crop Production in Iowa -2012 File A1-20

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Duffy, Michael D.

    Estimated Costs of Crop Production in Iowa - 2012 File A1-20 T he estimated costs of corn, corn. They include the annual Iowa Farm Business Asso- ciation record summaries, production and costs data from and a survey of selected agricultural cooperatives and other input suppliers around the state. These costs

  10. Estimated Costs of Crop Production in Iowa -2007 File A1-20

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Duffy, Michael D.

    Estimated Costs of Crop Production in Iowa - 2007 File A1-20 T he estimated costs of corn, corn sources. They include the annual Iowa Farm Business Asso- ciation record summaries, production and costs the state. These costs estimates are representative of average costs for farms in Iowa. Very large or small

  11. Estimated Costs of Crop Production in Iowa -2009 File A1-20

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Duffy, Michael D.

    Estimated Costs of Crop Production in Iowa - 2009 File A1-20 T he estimated costs of corn, corn sources. They include the annual Iowa Farm Business Asso- ciation record summaries, production and costs the state. These costs estimates are representative of average costs for farms in Iowa. Very large or small

  12. Estimated Costs of Crop Production in Iowa -2008 File A1-20

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Duffy, Michael D.

    Estimated Costs of Crop Production in Iowa - 2008 File A1-20 T he estimated costs of corn, corn sources. They include the annual Iowa Farm Business Asso- ciation record summaries, production and costs the state. These costs estimates are representative of average costs for farms in Iowa. Very large or small

  13. Effect of a Legume Cover Crop on Carbon Storage and Erosion in an Ultisol under Maize

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    143 CHAPTER 10 Effect of a Legume Cover Crop on Carbon Storage and Erosion in an Ultisol under...........................................................................................145 10.2.3 Carbon and Nitrogen Determination, and Other Analyses......................................145 10.2.4 Determinations of Runoff, Soil Losses, and Eroded Carbon

  14. Predicting the net carbon exchanges of crop rotations in Europe with an agro-ecosystem model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    Predicting the net carbon exchanges of crop rotations in Europe with an agro-ecosystem model S.Lehuger@art.admin.ch. Fax: (+41) 44 377 72 01. Phone: (+41) 44 377 75 13. hal-00414342,version2-1Sep2010 #12;Abstract Carbon and measuring land-atmosphere carbon exchanges from arable lands are important tasks to predict the influence

  15. Introduction The dwarf sour cherry (Prunus cerasus L.) is an experimental and innovative crop

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Saskatchewan, University of

    1 Introduction The dwarf sour cherry (Prunus cerasus L.) is an experimental and innovative crop and flavour, increased cold hardiness, and a dwarf-size plant that make orchard maintenance and mechanized harvesting easier. Growers and fruit processors are showing keen interest as more acreage is being planted

  16. Sunflower as a biofuels crop: An analysis of lignocellulosic chemical properties

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Burke, John M.

    Sunflower as a biofuels crop: An analysis of lignocellulosic chemical properties Angela L. Ziebell Lignocellulosic biofuel Lignin S/G-lignin Sugar content Pyrolysis Molecular Beam Mass Spectrometry a b s t r a c sunflower with improved lignocellulosic biofuels traits, namely increased biomass, decreased lignin

  17. UNCORRECTEDPROOF Carbon balance of a three crop succession over two cropland sites

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    ). Hutchinson et al. (2007) concluded that the carbon sequestration potential of croplands should be consideredUNCORRECTEDPROOF Carbon balance of a three crop succession over two cropland sites in South West and quantifying carbon sources and sinks is a major challenge for the scientific community. The main goal

  18. Grazing Strategies for Beef Production Escalating energy costs and alternative cropping systems for biofuels production have

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grazing Strategies for Beef Production Escalating energy costs and alternative cropping systems with pasture-feedlot manage-· ment alternatives. Assess economic implications of beef production using an array character- istics of beef that may provide an alternative lean-to-fat composition for consum- ers. http

  19. Horticultural & Forest crops 2014 Grapes: Weed Control in Vineyards 3-19

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liskiewicz, Maciej

    Horticultural & Forest crops 2014 Grapes: Weed Control in Vineyards 3-19 Weed Control in Vineyards and postemergence herbicides can be made to control existing vegetation and control weeds germinating from seed oz) Vines must be established at least 5 years. Do not use in soils high in sand or gravel. Apply

  20. Assessing the individual contributions of variations in temperature, solar radiation and precipitation to crop yield

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Robertson, Andrew W.

    Short Title:15 Contributions, Temperature, Solar radiation, Precipitation, Crop yield16 Page 1 of 41 The results showed that year-to-year variations in temperature, solar radiation and precipitation28 in solar radiation showed the strongest isolated impact on simulated yields.34 Its decrease caused

  1. CROPS AND SOILS RESEARCH PAPER The effects of treatments with selected pesticides on viability and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    CROPS AND SOILS RESEARCH PAPER The effects of treatments with selected pesticides on viability of the present study was to evaluate the effect of pesticidal seed treatments of maize (Zea mays L.) on seed consisted of water-treated seeds. None of the pesticides reduced the standard germination under laboratory

  2. October 23, 2007 Artificial Chromosome Poised to Pump Up GM Crops with Extra Genes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Copenhaver, Gregory P.

    of multigene "stacks" may help biofuel plants and other crops reach their potential A new method for creating and whistles such as better drought resistance, easier refinement into biofuels or even the ability spent thousands of years breeding plants for agriculture, but biofuels need much more work to reach

  3. Agronomy Journal Volume 104, Issue 2 2012 215 CropEconomics,Production&Management

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maxwell, Bruce D.

    of energy input in wheat production (Hoeppner et al., 2006; Piringer and Steinberg, 2006). Introducing pea of produced grain annually (National Agricultural Statistical Ser- vice [USDA], 2010). The widely adopted Agricultural Statistical Service [USDA], 2010). Many benefits of pea and lentil, as rotational crops, have been

  4. Robotics in Crop Production Department of Agricultural and Biological Engineering, University of Illinois at

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Robotics in Crop Production Tony Grift Department of Agricultural and Biological Engineering such as harvesting of citrus fruits, grapes, and raisins. An important part of Automation is the use of robots. Robotics in agriculture is not a new concept; in controlled environments (green houses), it has a his- tory

  5. 2 SPRAY OILS--BEYOND 2000 Modern use of petroleum-derived oils as agricultural crop

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Agnello, Arthur M.

    ,buttheseweretoophytotoxic.Eventually, researchersconcentratedondistillatesintherangebetween kerosene and lubricating oils.Three basic classes of carbon structures present in petroleum oils2 SPRAY OILS--BEYOND 2000 Abstract Modern use of petroleum-derived oils as agricultural crop (aromatics and other un- saturated components) in oils that were removable with sulfuric acid; the remainder

  6. An experimental study of intraspecific competition within several forage crops (1).

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    ., tall fescue Festuca arundinacea Schreb., lucerne Medicago sativa L. and red clover Trifolium pratense L. Departures from this general rule are discussed. Additional key-words : Cocksfoot, tall fescue, lucerne, red crops (lucerne, red clover, cocksfoot, tall fescue). This program was oriented towards two distinct

  7. Morphology and fitness components of wild 3 crop F1 hybrids of Sorghum bicolor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Snow, Allison A.

    : implications for survival and introgression of crop genes in the wild pool Asfaw Adugna* and Endashaw Bekele and Huckabay, 1967) and in many cases, both occur in overlapping regions (Hooftman et al., 2007; Adugna and Burke, 2006). Wild and weedy sorghum populations exhibit great diversity (Adugna et al., 2012) and may

  8. CROP SCIENCE, VOL. 49, JULYAUGUST 2009 1523 Agricultural production in the United States and Europe

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sims, Gerald K.

    and Europe has changed dramatically in the last 60 yr. One significant change has been replacement of manyKenzie et al., 1999; Tracy and Zhang, 2008). Weed Biomass and Species Composition as Affected was to evaluate how an integrated crop­livestock system would influence weed biomass and weed species composition

  9. The persistence of imazapic in peanut (Arachis hypogaea L.) crop rotations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Matocha, Mark Andrew

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    reduction of fresh weight of grain sorghum or cotton from soil collected three months after treatment. These data support field data and the conclusion that up to a 3X rate of imazapic did not cause carryover injury to five rotation crops planted...

  10. GM Crops 1:2, 1-4; March/April 2010 2010 Landes Bioscience CoMMentAryCoMMentAry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ginzel, Matthew

    GM Crops 1:2, 1-4; March/April 2010 © 2010 Landes Bioscience CoMMentAryCoMMentAry February 19, 2009.landesbioscience.com GM Crops 1 .ebeenassigned

  11. Plant Disease Note 2004 | Iris Yellow Spot Virus in Onion Bulb and Seed Crops in Washington Overview Current Issue Past Issues Search PD Search APS Journals

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pappu, Hanu R.

    Plant Disease Note 2004 | Iris Yellow Spot Virus in Onion Bulb and Seed Crops in Washington Yellow Spot Virus in Onion Bulb and Seed Crops in Washington. L. J. du Toit, Washington State University of the NP gene. In August 2003, symptoms of IYSV infection were observed in two onion bulb crops, each

  12. Regulation of GM Crops in Canada: Science-Based or...... ? E. Ann Clark, Plant Agriculture, University of Guelph, Guelph (eaclark@uoguelph.ca) 2004 E. Ann Clark

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Clark, E. Ann

    Regulation of GM Crops in Canada: Science-Based or...... ? E. Ann Clark, Plant Agriculture spokesperson making an empassioned plea for science-based decisionmaking on GM crops? What a curious arguing regulatory system actually is science-based, rather than simply a way to facilitate the flow of GM crops

  13. The appropriateness of GM crops for Sub-Saharan Africa: an assessment of current evidence (with special reference to cassava in Nigeria) 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schoof, Eva

    2011-11-23T23:59:59.000Z

    -Saharan African countries struggle to find a solution for food security issues, others could benefit from GM crops as cash and export crops. The increasing interest of biofuels adds to the potential of GM crops in creating food surpluses which can be used...

  14. A model to evaluate the consequences of GM and non-GM1 segregation scenarios on GM crop placement in the landscape and2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    1 A model to evaluate the consequences of GM and non-GM1 segregation scenarios on GM crop placement organisation can therefore be compared while using18 the percentage of GM grain in non-GM crops due to cross weather risks. The `spatial' strategy leads to areas of either GM or non-GM crops surrounding21

  15. Texas Water Resources Institute Annual Technical Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , of Texas AMUniversity Soil and Crop Sciences Department, studied how chemically-treated composted biosolids

  16. Biomass thermochemical conversion program. 1985 annual report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schiefelbein, G.F.; Stevens, D.J.; Gerber, M.A.

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Wood and crop residues constitute a vast majority of the biomass feedstocks available for conversion, and thermochemical processes are well suited for conversion of these materials. The US Department of Energy (DOE) is sponsoring research on this conversion technology for renewable energy through its Biomass Thermochemical Conversion Program. The Program is part of DOE's Biofuels and Municipal Waste Technology Division, Office of Renewable Technologies. This report briefly describes the Thermochemical Conversion Program structure and summarizes the activities and major accomplishments during fiscal year 1985. 32 figs., 4 tabs.

  17. Comparison of hydroponic crop production techniques in a recirculating fish culture system

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wren, Steven Whitaker

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    1984) Steven W. Wren, B. S. , Texas ASM University Chairman of Advisory Committee: Dr. William Clark Two methods of hydroponic vegetable crop production, gravel bed culture and the nutrient film technique, were tested to compare plant success..., and dissolved oxygen were monitored. Fish growth was satisfactory and no diseases were detected. Food conversion ratio for the tilapia was 1. 4. Plants in the gravel beds grew, flowered, and produced good quality fruit with no signs of nutritional deficiency...

  18. Crop response at various stages of growth to sprinkler and furrow irrigation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bausch, Walter Charles

    1971-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    OF LITERATURE Comparative Studies Of Irrigation Methods Research Performed With Peanuts Other Moisture Stress Studies TEST AREA, EQUIPMENT, AND PROCEDURE Test Area Equipment Irrigation Systems Sprinkler Furrow Meteorological Instrumentation Anemometer... and crop yields are controlled directly by plant water stress and only indirectly by soil water stress. Consequently, the only safe procedure to use for studies involving soil-plant-water relations is to measure the plant water stress. TEST AREA ~ EQUI...

  19. Managing Insect and Mite Pests of Legumes, Grasses and Forage Crops in Texas.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Neeb, Charles W.; Thomas, John G.

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    or chemicals remain the most widely used control tool. Major factors to be con- sidered when using insecticides include: 1) protection of natural enemies of crop pests, 2) resurgence of primary insect or mite pests and increased numbers of secondary insect..., and Extension entomolo- gist and project group supervisor, College Station, The Texas A&M University System. INSECTICIDE APPLICATION Ground machines and aircraft may be used to apply most insecticides. For best results with aerial applications, flag...

  20. Effect of soil acidity factors on yields and foliar composition of tropical root crops

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abruna-Rodriguez, F.; Vicente-Chandler, J.I. Rivera, E.; Rodriguez, J.

    1982-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Tropical root crops, a major source of food for subsistence farmers, varied in their sensitivity to soil acidity factors. Tolerance to soil acidity is an important characteristic of crops for the humid tropics where soils are often very acid and lime-scarce and expensive. Experiments on two Ultisols and an Oxisol showed that three tropical root crops differed markedly in sensitivity to soil acicity factors. Yams (Dioscorea alata L.) were very sensitive to soil acidity with yields on a Ultisol decreasing from 70% of maximum when Al saturation of the effective cation exchange capacity of the soil was 10 to 25% of maximum when Al saturation was 40%. On the other hand, cassava (Manihot esculenta Crantz) was very tolerant to high levels of soil acidity, yielding about 85% of maximum with 60% Al saturation. Taniers (Xanthosoma sp.) were intermediate between yams and cassava in their tolerance to soil acidity yielding about 60% of maximum with 50% Al saturation of the soil. Foliar composition of cassava was not affected by soil acidity levels and that of yams and taniers was also unaffected except for Ca content which decreased with decreasing soil pH and increasing Al saturation.Response of these tropical root crops to soil acidity components was far more striking on Ultisols than on the Oxisol. For yams, soils should be limed to about pH 5.5 with essentially no exhangeable Al/sup 3 +/ present whereas high yields of taniers can be obtained at about pH 4.8 with 20% exchangeable Al/sup 3 +/ and of cassava at pH as low as 4.5 with 60% exchangeable Al/sup 3 +/.

  1. Response of peanuts to irrigation management at different crop growth stages

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dahmen, Pieter George

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    FOR TREATMENT 5. . . 11. CUMULATIVE ET OVER TIME FOR TREATMENT 6. . 12. CUMULATIVE ET OVER TIME FOR TPEATMENT 7. . 13 CUMULATIVE ET OVER TIME FOR TREATMENT 8 14. LEAF AREA INDEX OVER TIME FOR TREATMENTS 1-4 15. LEAF AREA INDEX OVER TIME FOR TREATMENTS 5... Seasonal Evapotranspiration Hater Use Efficiency Relative Yield Versus Relative Evapotranspiration Cumulative ET Versus Time Evapotranspiration During Each Crop Growth Stage Leaf Area Index Dry Matter Accumulation SUMMARY AND CONCLUSIONS...

  2. www.landesbioscience.com GM Crops and Food: Biotechnology in Agriculture and the Food Chain 1 GM Crops and Food: Biotechnology in Agriculture and the Food Chain 3:4, 1-5; October/November/December 2012; 2012 Landes Bioscience

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    www.landesbioscience.com GM Crops and Food: Biotechnology in Agriculture and the Food Chain 1 GM Crops and Food: Biotechnology in Agriculture and the Food Chain 3:4, 1-5; October/November/December 2012

  3. Evaluation of sweet sorghum as a potential ethanol crop in Mississippi

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Horton, David Scott

    2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Petroleum prices have made alternative fuel crops a viable option for ethanol production. Sweet sorghum [Sorghum bicolor] is a non-food crop that may produce large quantities of ethanol with minimal inputs. Eleven cultivars were planted in 2008 and 2009 as a half-season crop. Four-row plots 6.9 m by 0.5 m, were monitored bimonthly for ���°Brix, height, and sugar accumulation. Yield and extractable sap were taken at the end of season. Stalk yield was greatest for the cultivar Sugar Top (4945 kg ha-1) and lowest for Simon (1054 kg ha-1). Dale ranked highest ethanol output (807 L ha-1) while Simon (123 L ha-1) is the lowest. All cultivars peak Brix accumulation occurs in early October. Individual sugar concentrations indicated sucrose is the predominant sugar with glucose and fructose levels dependent on cultivar. Supplemental ethanol in fermented wort was the best preservative tested to halt degradation of sorghum wort.

  4. HumanWildlife Interactions 8(1):139149, Spring 2014 Evaluation of foliar sprays to reduce crop

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    with the anthraquinone-based product, Avipel (44 minutes/day) than on reference plots (132 minutes/day; P and economical in the field. Key words: anthraquinone, Canada geese, crop damage, human­wildlife conflicts

  5. The effect of various cropping systems upon organic matter, total nitrogen, cation exchange capacity, exchangeable cations, conductivity and reaction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mannan, Mohammad Abdul

    1958-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    &IBRARY A 4 N COLLEGE OF TEXAS THE EFFECT OF VARIOUS CROPPING SYSTEMS UPON ORGANIC MATTER, TOTAL NITROGEN, CATION EXCHANGE CAPACITY, EXCHANGEABLE CATIONS, CONDUCTIVITY AND REACTION. A Thesis By MOHAMMAD ABDUL MANNAN Submitted...

  6. The Effects of Tillage, Cropping and Fertilization on Extractable Soil Nutrients in Four Agro-Ecosystems in Ghana, West Africa

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Davies, Benjamin

    2014-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Two experiments were conducted in four agro-ecosystems of Ghana: the coastal savannah, forest, forest-guinea savannah transition and guinea savannah. Experiment one assessed the effect of three tillage and four cropping treatments while experiment...

  7. Using Animal Manure and Wastewater for Crops and Pastures: Know and Take Credit for your N, P, and K

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mukhtar, Saqib

    2000-09-12T23:59:59.000Z

    Animal manure and wastewater are often applied to crops and pastures. Farmers and producers who use this effluent should calculate the amount of nitrogen, phosphorus and potassium it contains so that they do not overapply these nutrients when also...

  8. Effectiveness of rock wall terraces on soil conservation and crop performance in a southern Honduras steepland farming system

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sierra, Hector Enrique

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The effect that rock wall terraces have on soil and water conservation and crop production was studied on a steepland farm in southern Honduras during the 1995 growing season. The research compared a site with 10 year old rock terraces...

  9. The Dynamics of Irrigated Perennial Crop Production With Applications to the Murray-Darling Basin of Australia

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Franklin, Bradley

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    the annual crops, the lack of other water sources such asgroundwater, and the lack of inter-regional water trade inlarge water shocks combined with a lack of adaptation

  10. Global Economic Effects of Changes in Crops, Pasture, and Forests due to Changing Climate, Carbon Dioxide, and Ozone

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reilly, John M.

    Multiple environmental changes will have consequences for global vegetation. To the extent that crop yields and pasture and forest productivity are affected there can be important economic consequences. We examine the ...

  11. Guidelines for Stadium Application to Potato Tubers Willie Kirk (PSMS, MSU), David Ross (Syngenta crop Protection), Phillip Wharton

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Douches, David S.

    Guidelines for Stadium Application to Potato Tubers Willie Kirk (PSMS, MSU), David Ross (Syngenta crop Protection), Phillip Wharton and Nora Olsen (University of Idaho) Potatoes are susceptible leak (Pythium ultimum) and black dot (Colletotrichum coccodes). Current recommendations for potato

  12. A simulation-based soil and water resource evaluation for ratoon cropping grain sorghum in the central blacklands of Texas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stinson, David Lawrence

    1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    PROCEDURES Model Development Hydrologic Model 12 14 14 18 20 22 22 22 Chapter III (Cont. ) Initial Soil Water . Rainfall and Runoff . Drainage Evapotranspiration . Pacae 22 23 24 24 Sediment Model Crop Model System Simulation Procedure.... Cumulative probability distribution for the available soil water at the time of harvest of the plant crop, from 1939-1978, Temple, Texas. Field Capacity 20 cm. 9. Average monthly rainfall - Temple, Texas (1939-1978). . 10. Cumulative probability...

  13. Plot size and location within a cotton block: their effects on the canopy temperature function and crop water stress index

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gaitan, Camilo Alberto

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    PLOT SIZE AND LOCATION WITHIN A COTTON BLOCK: THEIR EFFECTS ON THE CANOPY TEMPERATURE FUNCTION AND CROP WATER STRESS INDEX A Thesis CAMILO ALBERTO GAITAN Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment... of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE August 1988 Major Subject: Agricultural Engineering PLOT SIZE AND LOCATION WITHIN A COTTON BLOCK: THEIR EFFECTS ON THE CANOPY TEMPERATURE FUNCTION AND CROP WATER STRESS INDEX A Thesis by CAMILO ALBERTO...

  14. 1973 projections of consumption, production, prices and crop values for Texas winter lettuce and early spring onions 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Furrh, Samuel Roger

    1970-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    1973 PROJECTIONS OF CONSUMPTION, PRODUCTION, PRICES AND CROP VALUES FOR TEXAS WINTER LETTUCE AND EARLY SPRING ONIONS A Thesis by SAMUEL ROGER FURRH Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment... of the requirement for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE Augus t, l 9 70 Major Subject: Agricultural Economics 1973 PROJECTIONS OF CONSUMPTION, PRODUCTION, PRICES AND CROP VALUES FOR TEXAS WINTER LETTUCE AND EARLY SPRING ONIONS A Thesis SAMUEL ROGER FURRH Ap...

  15. 2001 annual report 2001 annual report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    New Mexico, University of

    2001 annual report 2001 annual report 2001 annual report 2001 annual report 2001 annual report 2001 annual report 2001 annual report 2001 annual reportelectrical & computer engineering 2001 annual report the university of new mexico department of 2001 annual report 2001 annual report 2001 annual report 2001 annual

  16. Acid deposition in Maryland: Summary of results through 1989. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DeMuro, J.; Bowman, M.; Maxwell, C.; Asante-Duah, D.; Meyers, S.

    1990-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Chesapeake Bay Research and Monitoring Program coordinates Maryland's acid deposition research and reports research results annually. The report evaluates several major topic areas including transport and chemistry of acid deposition, its potential impacts on the State's streams and fish, possible impacts on terrestrial resources such as crops and forests and on materials, the ability of energy conservation programs to reduce emissions of acid-forming pollutants, and mitigation techniques for neutralizing acid waters.

  17. Development and Deployment of a Short Rotation Woody Crops Harvesting System Based on a Case New Holland Forage Harvester and SRC Woody Crop Header

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eisenbies, Mark [SUNY ESF; Volk, Timothy [SUNY ESF

    2014-10-03T23:59:59.000Z

    Demand for bioenergy sourced from woody biomass is projected to increase; however, the expansion and rapid deployment of short rotation woody crop systems in the United States has been constrained by high production costs and sluggish market acceptance due to problems with quality and consistency from first-generation harvesting systems. The objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of crop conditions on the performance of a single-pass, cut and chip harvester based on a standard New Holland FR-9000 series forage harvester with a dedicated 130FB short rotation coppice header, and the quality of chipped material. A time motion analysis was conducted to track the movement of machine and chipped material through the system for 153 separate loads over 10 days on a 54-ha harvest. Harvester performance was regulated by either ground conditions, or standing biomass on 153 loads. Material capacities increased linearly with standing biomass up to 40 Mgwet ha-1 and plateaued between 70 and 90 Mgwet hr-1. Moisture contents ranged from 39 to 51% with the majority of samples between 43 and 45%. Loads produced in freezing weather (average temperature over 10 hours preceding load production) had 4% more chips greater than 25.4 mm (P < 0.0119). Over 1.5 Mgdry ha-1 of potentially harvested material (6-9% of a load) was left on site, of which half was commercially undesirable meristematic pieces. The New Holland harvesting system is a reliable and predictable platform for harvesting material over a wide range of standing biomass; performance was consistent overall in 14 willow cultivars.

  18. Nucleic Acid-Based Detection and Identification of Bacterial and Fungal Plant Pathogens - Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kingsley, Mark T.

    2001-03-13T23:59:59.000Z

    The threat to American interests from terrorists is not limited to attacks against humans. Terrorists might seek to inflict damage to the U.S. economy by attacking our agricultural sector. Infection of commodity crops by bacterial or fungal crop pathogens could adversely impact U.S. agriculture, either directly from damage to crops or indirectly from damage to our ability to export crops suspected of contamination. Recognizing a terrorist attack against U.S. agriculture, to be able to prosecute the terrorists, is among the responsibilities of the members of Hazardous Material Response Unit (HMRU) of the Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI). Nucleic acid analysis of plant pathogen strains by the use of polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplification techniques is a powerful method for determining the exact identity of pathogens, as well as their possible region of origin. This type of analysis, however, requires that PCR assays be developed specific to each particular pathogen strain, and analysis protocols developed that are specific to the particular instrument used for detection. The objectives of the work described here were threefold: 1) to assess the potential terrorist threat to U.S. agricultural crops, 2) to determine whether suitable assays exist to monitor that threat, and 3) where assays are needed for priority plant pathogen threats, to modify or develop those assays for use by specialists at the HMRU. The assessment of potential threat to U.S. commodity crops and the availability of assays for those threats were described in detail in the Technical Requirements Document (9) and will be summarized in this report. This report addresses development of specific assays identified in the Technical Requirements Document, and offers recommendations for future development to ensure that HMRU specialists will be prepared with the PCR assays they need to protect against the threat of economic terrorism.

  19. Nucleic Acid-Based Detection and Identification of Bacterial and Fungal Plant Pathogens - Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kingsley, Mark T

    2001-03-13T23:59:59.000Z

    The threat to American interests from terrorists is not limited to attacks against humans. Terrorists might seek to inflict damage to the U.S. economy by attacking our agricultural sector. Infection of commodity crops by bacterial or fungal crop pathogens could adversely impact U.S. agriculture, either directly from damage to crops or indirectly from damage to our ability to export crops suspected of contamination. Recognizing a terrorist attack against U.S. agriculture, to be able to prosecute the terrorists, is among the responsibilities of the members of Hazardous Material Response Unit (HMRU) of the Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI). Nucleic acid analysis of plant pathogen strains by the use of polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplification techniques is a powerful method for determining the exact identity of pathogens, as well as their possible region of origin. This type of analysis, however, requires that PCR assays be developed specific to each particular pathogen strain, an d analysis protocols developed that are specific to the particular instrument used for detection. The objectives of the work described here were threefold: (1) to assess the potential terrorist threat to U.S. agricultural crops, (2) to determine whether suitable assays exist to monitor that threat, and (3) where assays are needed for priority plant pathogen threats, to modify or develop those assays for use by specialists at the HMRU. The assessment of potential threat to U.S. commodity crops and the availability of assays for those threats were described in detail in the Technical Requirements Document (9) and will be summarized in this report. This report addresses development of specific assays identified in the Technical Requirements Document, and offers recommendations for future development to ensure that HMRU specialists will be prepared with the PCR assays they need to protect against the threat of economic terrorism.

  20. Biomass in Multifunction Crop Plants: Cooperative Research and Development Final Report, CRADA Number CRD-05-163

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Decker, S. R.

    2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An array of cellulase, hemicellulase, and accessory enzymes were tested for their ability to increase the conversion levels and rates of biomass to sugar after being subjected to thermochemical pretreatment. The genes were cloned by Oklahoma State University and expressed, purified, and tested at NREL. Several enzymes were noted to be effective in increasing conversion levels, however expression levels were typically very low. The overall plan was to express these enzymes in corn as a possible mechanism towards decreased recalcitrance. One enzyme, cel5A endoglucanase from Acidothermus cellulolyticus, was transformed into both tobacco and corn. The transgenic corn stover and tobacco were examined for their susceptibility to thermochemical pretreatment followed by enzymatic digestion.

  1. Forage Crops.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1901-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    . .Jno. 117. Kirby BU ttfikld Jefferson 83. H. F. Parker Content, Runnels Co. 03. A. bI. Hill, H'iil's prairie: Bastrop I 84. R. lt. ~rockett, unction City, Iiimhle Co. 24. Hal AlcParlxncl Tyler Smith Co. 85. J.'. L. Thomas. Goree, Iinos Co. 25. L. 6...; first blooms May 1, last blooms July 1. Good yield and fine, feed for stock-hogs and horses. Grew about two feet high, branched well, and am well pleased with it. (20) J. M7. TYLER. Hunt, Hunt county (N. E. Tex.) . The soil was well pulverized before...

  2. An Integrative Modeling Framework to Evaluate the Productivity and Sustainability of Biofuel Crop Production Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, Xuesong; Izaurralde, Roberto C.; Manowitz, David H.; West, T. O.; Post, W. M.; Thomson, Allison M.; Bandaru, V. P.; Nichols, J.; Williams, J.R.

    2010-09-08T23:59:59.000Z

    The potential expansion of biofuel production raises food, energy, and environmental challenges that require careful assessment of the impact of biofuel production on greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions, soil erosion, nutrient loading, and water quality. In this study, we describe a spatially-explicit integrative modeling framework (SEIMF) to understand and quantify the environmental impacts of different biomass cropping systems. This SEIMF consists of three major components: 1) a geographic information system (GIS)-based data analysis system to define spatial modeling units with resolution of 56 m to address spatial variability, 2) the biophysical and biogeochemical model EPIC (Environmental Policy Integrated Climate) applied in a spatially-explicit way to predict biomass yield, GHG emissions, and other environmental impacts of different biofuel crops production systems, and 3) an evolutionary multi-objective optimization algorithm for exploring the trade-offs between biofuel energy production and unintended ecosystem-service responses. Simple examples illustrate the major functions of the SEIMF when applied to a 9-county Regional Intensive Modeling Area (RIMA) in SW Michigan to 1) simulate biofuel crop production, 2) compare impacts of management practices and local ecosystem settings, and 3) optimize the spatial configuration of different biofuel production systems by balancing energy production and other ecosystem-service variables. Potential applications of the SEIMF to support life cycle analysis and provide information on biodiversity evaluation and marginal-land identification are also discussed. The SEIMF developed in this study is expected to provide a useful tool for scientists and decision makers to understand sustainability issues associated with the production of biofuels at local, regional, and national scales.

  3. An integrative modeling framework to evaluate the productivity and sustainability of biofuel crop production systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, X [University of Maryland; Izaurralde, R. C. [University of Maryland; Manowitz, D. [University of Maryland; West, T. O. [University of Maryland; Thomson, A. M. [University of Maryland; Post, Wilfred M [ORNL; Bandaru, Vara Prasad [ORNL; Nichols, Jeff [ORNL; Williams, J. [AgriLIFE, Temple, TX

    2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The potential expansion of biofuel production raises food, energy, and environmental challenges that require careful assessment of the impact of biofuel production on greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions, soil erosion, nutrient loading, and water quality. In this study, we describe a spatially explicit integrative modeling framework (SEIMF) to understand and quantify the environmental impacts of different biomass cropping systems. This SEIMF consists of three major components: (1) a geographic information system (GIS)-based data analysis system to define spatial modeling units with resolution of 56 m to address spatial variability, (2) the biophysical and biogeochemical model Environmental Policy Integrated Climate (EPIC) applied in a spatially-explicit way to predict biomass yield, GHG emissions, and other environmental impacts of different biofuel crops production systems, and (3) an evolutionary multiobjective optimization algorithm for exploring the trade-offs between biofuel energy production and unintended ecosystem-service responses. Simple examples illustrate the major functions of the SEIMF when applied to a nine-county Regional Intensive Modeling Area (RIMA) in SW Michigan to (1) simulate biofuel crop production, (2) compare impacts of management practices and local ecosystem settings, and (3) optimize the spatial configuration of different biofuel production systems by balancing energy production and other ecosystem-service variables. Potential applications of the SEIMF to support life cycle analysis and provide information on biodiversity evaluation and marginal-land identification are also discussed. The SEIMF developed in this study is expected to provide a useful tool for scientists and decision makers to understand sustainability issues associated with the production of biofuels at local, regional, and national scales.

  4. Wilts of the Watermelon and Related Crops: Fusarium Wilts of Cucurbits.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Taubenhaus, J. J. (Jacob Joseph)

    1920-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of water- melon., and related crops. The other diseases of cucurbits are now being studied and the results obtained will be presented in a later pub- lication of the Texas Agricultixral Experiment Station. The field ex- periments on this project mere... to watermelons. Plot C was divided in oqual llalrea, one part of which was fertilized with manure and the other half wit11 commercial fertilizers. At the end of the summer season all the oid watermelon vines arlcl frnit culls in both parts of the plot were...

  5. EIS-0481: Engineered High Energy Crop Programs Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This Programmatic EIS (PEIS) will evaluate the potential environmental impacts of implementing one or more programs to catalyze the deployment of engineered high energy crops (EHECs). A main component of the proposed EHEC programs would be providing financial assistance to evaluate the performance of EHECs. This PEIS will assess the potential environmental impacts of such confined field trials in the southeastern United States. DOE’s proposed action under this PEIS will be limited to the states of Alabama, Florida (excluding the Everglades/Southern Florida coastal plain ecoregion), Georgia, Kentucky, Mississippi, North Carolina, South Carolina, Tennessee, and Virginia.

  6. Climate Change Impacts for the Conterminous USA: An Integrated Assessment Part 5. Irrigated Agriculture and National Grain Crop Production

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thomson, Allison M.; Rosenberg, Norman J.; Izaurralde, Roberto C.; Brown, Robert A.

    2005-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Over the next century global warming will lead to changes in weather patterns, affecting many aspects of our environment. In the United States, the one sector of the economy most likely to be directly impacted by the changes in climate is agriculture. We have examined potential changes in dryland agriculture (Part 2) and in water resources necessary for crop production (Part 3). Here we assess to what extent, under a set of climate change scenarios, water supplies will be sufficient to meet the irrigation requirement of major grain crops in the U.S. In addition, we assess the overall impacts of changes in water supply on national grain production. We applied 12 climate change scenarios based on the predictions of General Circulation Models to a water resources model and a crop growth simulator for the conterminous United States. We calculate national production in current crop growing regions by applying irrigation where it is necessary and water is available. Irrigation declines under all climate change scenarios employed in this study. In certain regions and scenarios, precipitation declines so much that water supplies are too limited; in other regions it plentiful enough that little value is derived from irrigation. Total crop production is greater when irrigation is applied, but corn and soybean production declines under most scenarios. Winter wheat production responds significantly to elevated atmospheric CO2 and appears likely to increase under climate change.

  7. Mulching as a countermeasure for crop contamination within the 30 km zone of Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yera, T.S.; Vallejo, R.; Tent, J.; Rauret, G. [Univ. de Barcelona (Spain); Omelyanenko, N.; Ivanov, Y. [Ukrainian Inst. of Agricultural Radiology, Kiev (Ukraine)

    1999-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The effect of mulch soil cover on crop contamination by {sup 137}Cs was studied within the 30 km zone of Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant. Experiments were performed with oats (Avena sativa) over a three year period. In 1992 soil surface was covered by a plastic net. In 1993 two straw mulch treatments were applied at a dose rate of 200 g m{sup {minus}2} using {sup 137}Cs contaminated and clean straw, respectively. A similar mulch treatment was applied in 1994, and two mulch doses of clean straw were tested. Protection of the soil with a plastic net significantly increased crop yield and reduced crop contamination. When clean straw was used as a mulch layer, a significant decrease of about 30--40% in {sup 137}Cs activity concentration was observed. Mulching with {sup 137}Cs contaminated straw did not reduce crop contamination, probably due to an increase in soil available {sup 137}Cs released from the contaminated mulch. Mulching has been shown to be an effective treatment both for reducing {sup 137}Cs plant contamination and improving crop yield. Therefore, it can be considered as a potential countermeasure in a post-accident situation.

  8. Soil type, crop and irrigation technique affect nitrogen leaching to groundwater

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Letey, John; Vaughan, Peter

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Addressing Nitrates in Groundwater. Report to theSources and Loading to Groundwater, Technical Report 2,nitrogen leaching to groundwater by John Letey and Peter

  9. Guidelines for Report Writing Reports (seminar reports, thesis reports, technical reports) are very important documents

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Narayanan, H.

    Guidelines for Report Writing Reports (seminar reports, thesis reports, technical reports) are very. The guidelines presented here are about the latter. Do follow these tips to make your report free of the most acknowledgment! 3. Make sure your paragraphs have some indentation and that it is not too large. Refer to some

  10. Atmospheric inversion of surface carbon flux with consideration of the spatial distribution of US crop production and consumption

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Chen, J. M.; Fung, J. W.; Mo, G.; Deng, F.; West, T. O.

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In order to improve quantification of the spatial distribution of carbon sinks and sources in the conterminous US, we conduct a nested global atmospheric inversion with detailed spatial information on crop production and consumption. County-level cropland net primary productivity, harvested biomass, soil carbon change, and human and livestock consumption data over the conterminous US are used for this purpose. Time-dependent Bayesian synthesis inversions are conducted based on CO2 observations at 210 stations to infer CO2 fluxes globally at monthly time steps with a nested focus on 30 regions in North America. Prior land surface carbon fluxes are first generated usingmore »a biospheric model, and the inversions are constrained using prior fluxes with and without adjustments for crop production and consumption over the 2002–2007 period. After these adjustments, the inverted regional carbon sink in the US Midwest increases from 0.25 ± 0.03 to 0.42 ± 0.13 Pg C yr-1, whereas the large sink in the US southeast forest region is weakened from 0.41 ± 0.12 to 0.29 ± 0.12 Pg C yr-1. These adjustments also reduce the inverted sink in the west region from 0.066 ± 0.04 to 0.040 ± 0.02 Pg C yr-1 because of high crop consumption and respiration by humans and livestock. The general pattern of sink increases in crop production areas and sink decreases (or source increases) in crop consumption areas highlights the importance of considering the lateral carbon transfer in crop products in atmospheric inverse modeling, which provides a reliable atmospheric perspective of the overall carbon balance at the continental scale but is unreliable for separating fluxes from different ecosystems.« less

  11. Atmospheric inversion of surface carbon flux with consideration of the spatial distribution of US crop production and consumption

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, J. M. [Nanjing Univ., Jiangsu (China); Univ. of Toronto, ON (Canada); Fung, J. W. [Univ. of Toronto, ON (Canada); Mo, G. [Univ. of Toronto, ON (Canada); Deng, F. [Univ. of Toronto, ON (Canada); West, T. O. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In order to improve quantification of the spatial distribution of carbon sinks and sources in the conterminous US, we conduct a nested global atmospheric inversion with detailed spatial information on crop production and consumption. County-level cropland net primary productivity, harvested biomass, soil carbon change, and human and livestock consumption data over the conterminous US are used for this purpose. Time-dependent Bayesian synthesis inversions are conducted based on CO? observations at 210 stations to infer CO? fluxes globally at monthly time steps with a nested focus on 30 regions in North America. Prior land surface carbon fluxes are first generated using a biospheric model, and the inversions are constrained using prior fluxes with and without adjustments for crop production and consumption over the 2002–2007 period. After these adjustments, the inverted regional carbon sink in the US Midwest increases from 0.25 ± 0.03 to 0.42 ± 0.13 Pg C yr?ą, whereas the large sink in the US southeast forest region is weakened from 0.41 ± 0.12 to 0.29 ± 0.12 Pg C yr?ą. These adjustments also reduce the inverted sink in the west region from 0.066 ± 0.04 to 0.040 ± 0.02 Pg C yr?ą because of high crop consumption and respiration by humans and livestock. The general pattern of sink increases in crop production areas and sink decreases (or source increases) in crop consumption areas highlights the importance of considering the lateral carbon transfer in crop products in atmospheric inverse modeling, which provides a reliable atmospheric perspective of the overall carbon balance at the continental scale but is unreliable for separating fluxes from different ecosystems.

  12. Annual Report 2013 Annual Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rambaut, Andrew

    Responsibility 36 Audit Committee Report 39 Independent Auditors' Report 41 Consolidated Statement of Financial scientists from the Universities of Oxford and Reading and researchers at the Pirbright Institute, which and Technology Facilities Council and the Wellcome Trust. Diamond generates high-energy beams of electrons

  13. Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DeTar, Carleton [P.I.

    2012-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

    This document constitutes the Final Report for award DE-FC02-06ER41446 as required by the Office of Science. It summarizes accomplishments and provides copies of scientific publications with significant contribution from this award.

  14. Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Biros, George

    2014-08-18T23:59:59.000Z

    This the final report for the project "Large-Scale Optimization for Bayesian Inference in Complex Systems," for the work in the group of the co-PI George Biros.

  15. Books and book chapters (last 10 years only) 16. Clark, E. Ann. 2009. Ch. 5 (invited). Forages in Organic Crop-Livestock Systems. pp. 85-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Clark, E. Ann

    ). GM crops are uncontainable: so what? pp. 139-152 In: R.H. Gulden and C.J. Swanton (eds) the First Service, Cooperative Extension, Ithaca, N.Y. (Peer-reviewed book chapter) 11. Clark, E. Ann. 2004 . GM Crops Are Not Containable. pp. 91-108 In: B. Breckling.and R. Verhoeven (eds) Risk Hazard Damage

  16. Hyperspectral remote sensing analysis of short rotation woody crops grown with controlled nutrient and irrigation treatments.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Im, Jungho; Jensen, John R.; Coleman, Mark; Nelson, Eric

    2009-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Abstract - Hyperspectral remote sensing research was conducted to document the biophysical and biochemical characteristics of controlled forest plots subjected to various nutrient and irrigation treatments. The experimental plots were located on the Savannah River Site near Aiken, SC. AISA hyperspectral imagery were analysed using three approaches, including: (1) normalized difference vegetation index based simple linear regression (NSLR), (2) partial least squares regression (PLSR) and (3) machine-learning regression trees (MLRT) to predict the biophysical and biochemical characteristics of the crops (leaf area index, stem biomass and five leaf nutrients concentrations). The calibration and cross-validation results were compared between the three techniques. The PLSR approach generally resulted in good predictive performance. The MLRT approach appeared to be a useful method to predict characteristics in a complex environment (i.e. many tree species and numerous fertilization and/or irrigation treatments) due to its powerful adaptability.

  17. Vegetable Oil from Leaves and Stems: Vegetative Production of Oil in a C4 Crop

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    PETRO Project: Arcadia Biosciences, in collaboration with the University of California-Davis, is developing plants that produce vegetable oil in their leaves and stems. Ordinarily, these oils are produced in seeds, but Arcadia Biosciences is turning parts of the plant that are not usually harvested into a source of concentrated energy. Vegetable oil is a concentrated source of energy that plants naturally produce and is easily separated after harvest. Arcadia Biosciences will isolate traits that control oil production in seeds and transfer them into leaves and stems so that all parts of the plants are oil-rich at harvest time. After demonstrating these traits in a fast-growing model plant, Arcadia Biosciences will incorporate them into a variety of dedicated biofuel crops that can be grown on land not typically suited for food production

  18. Enhanced Carbon Concentration in Camelina: Development of a Dedicated, High-value Biofuels Crop

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    PETRO Project: UMass is developing an enhanced, biofuels-producing variant of Camelina, a drought-resistant, cold-tolerant oilseed crop that can be grown in many places other plants cannot. The team is working to incorporate several genetic traits into Camelina that increases its natural ability to produce oils and add the production of energy-dense terpene molecules that can be easily converted into liquid fuels. UMass is also experimenting with translating a component common in algae to Camelina that should allow the plants to absorb higher levels of carbon dioxide (CO2), which aids in enhancing photosynthesis and fuel conversion. The process will first be demonstrated in tobacco before being applied in Camelina.

  19. The cost of silage harvest and transport systems for herbaceous crops

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Turhollow, A.; Downing, M.; Butler, J.

    1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Some of the highest yielding herbaceous biomass crops are thick-stemmed species such as energy cane (Saccharum ssp.), Napiergrass (Pennisetum purpureum), and forage sorghum (Sorghum bicolor). Their relatively high moisture content necessitates they be handled and stored as silage rather than hay bales or modules. This paper presents estimated costs of harvesting and transporting herbaceous crops as silage. Costs are based on an engineering-economic approach. Equipment costs are estimated by combining per-hour costs with the hours required to complete the operation. Harvest includes severing, chopping, and blowing stalks into a wagon or track. For 50% moisture content, in-field costs using trucks in the field (options 0 and 1) are $3.72-$5.99/dry Mg ($3.37-$5.43/dt) for a farmer and $3.09-$3.64/dry Mg ($2.81- $3.30/dt) for custom operators. However, slopes and wet field conditions may not permit trucks to enter the field. Direct-cut harvest systems using wagons to haul silage to trucks waiting at the field edge (option 2) are $8.52-$11.94/dry Mg ($7.73-$10.83/dt) for farmers and $7.20-$7.36/dry Mg ($6.53-$6.68/dt) for custom operators. Based on four round trips per 8-hour day, 50% and 70% moisture silage, truck transport costs are $8.37/dry Mg ($ 7.60/dt) and $13.98/dry Mg ($12.68/dt), respectively. Lower yields, lower hours of machine use, or a higher discount rate result in higher costs.

  20. Short-term nitrogen-15 recovery vs. long-term total soil N gains in conventional and alternative cropping systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    van Kessel, Chris

    -term 15 N tracer experiments did not reŻect known long- term trends of increased total soil N with conventional cropping systems that use high quantities of external energy in the form of fuel, fertilizers to sequester soil C and N and renew the ability of soil to sustain long-term nutrient availability. Studies

  1. Analysis of the effect of climate change on the yield of crops in Turkey using a statistical

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kurnaz, Levent

    Analysis of the effect of climate change on the yield of crops in Turkey using a statistical, Boaziçi University, 34342, Istanbul, Turkey 2 Institute of Environmental Sciences, Boaziçi University, 34342, Istanbul, Turkey *corresponding author e-mail: hamza.altinsoy@boun.edu.tr Abstract In this study

  2. BIOENERGY PROGRAM Agronomics is the science of soil management and the production of field crops. Key ele-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Processing To meet United States Department of Energy projections, 110, 000 truckloads per day of feedstocksAgronomics BIOENERGY PROGRAM Agronomics is the science of soil management and the production of field crops. Key ele- ments of a production and delivery system include high-tonnage feedstocks, proven

  3. Second International Symposium on Integrated Crop-Livestock Systems Porto Alegre, Brazil -8-12 October 2012

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    agricultural development and conservation of biodiversity at the landscape scale remain to be identified. We the inclusion of grasslands in the cropping system (in time, space and according to management practices at the landscape scale gives them a status of common good: a good that should be collectively managed to maximize

  4. CHAPTER IN -Crop Ferality and Volunteerism: A Threat to Food Security in the Transgenic Era? Edited by J. Gressel.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Snow, Allison A.

    investigations will help elucidate the answer to this question. Second, many feral populations of Raphanus sativus have resulted from hybrids between the crop and a closely related weed, R. raphanistrum. In this chapter, we ask whether feral R. sativus can occur as weedy or invasive populations, as defined above

  5. An image-based four-source surface energy balance model to estimate crop evapotranspiration from solar

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    An image-based four-source surface energy balance model to estimate crop evapotranspiration from solar reflectance/thermal emission data (SEB-4S) Olivier Merlin,a , Jonas Chirouzea , Albert Oliosob, 84000 Avignon, France Abstract A remote sensing-based surface energy balance model is developed

  6. Department of Crop and Soil Sciences PhD Graduate Research Assistantship: Soil Science/Soil Quality/Soil Physics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Flury, Markus

    Department of Crop and Soil Sciences PhD Graduate Research Assistantship: Soil Science/Soil Quality/Soil Physics Position Summary: Plastic mulches are used in agriculture to conserve water, suppress weeds, and increase soil temperatures. However, plastic mulches need to be disposed off at the end

  7. Evaluation of Herbicides For Weed Control and Crop Injury in Snap Beans: 2004 Russell W. Wallace, Ph.D.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mukhtar, Saqib

    Evaluation of Herbicides For Weed Control and Crop Injury in Snap Beans: 2004 Russell W. Wallace and potential phytotoxicity on snap beans (Phaseolus vulgaris) grown in the Pearsall, Texas region. Materials, then disking the field and planting beans in 5-row beds. Snap beans (var. "BBL 156") were planted on February

  8. The Plant Genome [A Supplement to Crop Science] March 2008 No. 1 S-27 Genomic Origins of Potato

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Spooner, David

    The Plant Genome [A Supplement to Crop Science] March 2008 No. 1 S-27 Genomic Origins of Potato., and Shelley H. Jansky Abstract Chromosome pairing relationships within cultivated potato (Solanum tuberosum we reexamine potato genome hypotheses with the first phylogenetic analysis of all major genomes

  9. DEVELOPMENT OF GENOMIC AND GENETIC TOOLS FOR FOXTAIL MILLET, AND USE OF THESE TOOLS IN THE IMPROVEMENT OF BIOMASS PRODUCTION FOR BIOENERGY CROPS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, Xinlu; Zale, Janice; Chen, Feng

    2013-01-22T23:59:59.000Z

    Foxtail millet (Setaria italica L.) is a warm-season, C4 annual crop commonly grown for grain and forage worldwide. It has a relatively short generation time, yet produces hundreds of seeds per inflorescence. The crop is inbred and it has a small-size genome (~500 Mb). These features make foxtail millet an attractive grass model, especially for bioenergy crops. While a number of genomic tools have been established for foxtail millet, including a fully sequenced genome and molecular markers, the objectives of this project were to develop a tissue culture system, determine the best explant(s) for tissue culture, optimize transient gene expression, and establish a stable transformation system for foxtail millet cultivar Yugu1. In optimizing a tissue culture medium for the induction of calli and somatic embryos from immature inflorescences and mature seed explants, Murashige and Skoog medium containing 2.5 mg l-1 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid and 0.6 mg l-1 6- benzylaminopurine was determined to be optimal for callus induction of foxtail millet. The efficiency of callus induction from explants of immature inflorescences was significantly higher at 76% compared to that of callus induction from mature seed explants at 68%. The calli induced from this medium were regenerated into plants at high frequency (~100%) using 0.2 mg l-1 kinetin in the regeneration media. For performing transient gene expression, immature embryos were first isolated from inflorescences. Transient expression of the GUS reporter gene in immature embryos was significantly increased after sonication, a vacuum treatment, centrifugation and the addition of L-cysteine and dithiothreitol, which led to the efficiency of transient expression at levels greater than 70% after Agrobacterium inoculation. Inoculation with Agrobacterium was also tested with germinated seeds. The radicals of germinated seeds were pierced with needles and dipped into Agrobacterium solution. This method achieved a 10% transient expression efficiency. Throughout these analyses, using plasmids with the hygromycin selectable marker, it was determined that 1.5 mg l-1 hygromycin was the optimal dose for genetic transformation of foxtail millet. In contrast, the nptII selectable marker appeared to yield many escapes. Three methods of transformation were employed in an attempt to produce stable transformants. An in planta transformation experiment, similar to the floral dip method used in Arabidopsis, which utilized a red fluorescent protein pporRFP from coral Porites porites and the hygromycin selectable marker, was tested using immature inflorescences. Although several plants were PCR positive using endpoint and Real-Time PCR and there was transient expression using pporRFP and GUS reporters, no plants were positive on Southern blot. Dipping in Agrobacterium may damage the anther or the pistil because seed production was significantly reduced. Agrobacterium transformation using embryogenic calli was also tested. Although hundreds of plants were regenerated from selection, none were positive using PCR. The third method was to wound germinated seeds with an Agrobacterium coated needle, but none of the plants were PCR positive. Although the Yugu1 genotype was recalcitrant to genetic transformation, several avenues of future research should be considered for foxtail millet. Calli from different foxtail millet genotypes should be screened and selected for regeneration potential, and some genotypes may be more amenable to transformation. Additional selectable markers should also be tested as hygromycin appears to be too stringent and there are too many escapes with nptII. This project has provided training for the following personnel: Dr. Xinlu Chen (postdoc), Xiaomei Liu (postdoc), Jayashree Desai (postdoc) and Kyle Berk (Undergraduate researcher). Conference presentations and peer-reviewed journal articles partly supported by this grant includes the following: 1. Baxter H., Equi R., Chen X, Berk K. and Zale J. Establishing Efficient in vitro Protocols For Foxtail Millet (Setaria italica L. cv. Yu

  10. Biomass power for rural development. Technical progress report, April 1, 1997--June 30, 1997

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Neuhauser, E.

    1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Detailed task progress reports and schedules are provided for the DOE/USDA sponsored Biomass Power for Rural Development project. The focus of the project is on developing commercial energy crops for power generation by the year 2000. The New York based Salix Consortium project is a multi-partner endeavor, implemented in three stages. Phase-I, Final Design and Project Development, will conclude with the preparation of construction and/or operating permits, feedstock production plans, and contracts ready for signature. Field trials of willow (Salix) have been initiated at several locations in New York (Tully, Lockport, King Ferry, La Fayette, Massena, and Himrod) and co-firing tests are underway at Greenidge Station (NYSEG) and Dunkirk Station (NMPC). Phase-H of the project will focus on scale-up of willow crop acreage, construction of co-firing facilities at Dunkirk Station (NMPC), and final modifications for Greenidge Station. Cofiring willow is also under consideration for GPU`s Seward Station where testing is under way. There will be an evaluation of the energy crop as part of the gasification trials occurring at BED`s McNeill power station. Phase-III will represent fullscale commercialization of the energy crop and power generation on a sustainable basis.

  11. The virtual absence of refereed information on potential risks of GM crops has been documented by Domingo (2000) for human health and by Wolfenbarger and Phifer (2000) for the environment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Clark, E. Ann

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    1 The virtual absence of refereed information on potential risks of GM crops has been documented) is a technology which has been released prematurely into the marketplace. As a result, GM crops are vulnerable and longevity of ag biotech have been fatally compromised by a) misrepresenting GM crops as solutions to real

  12. International Energy Agency (IEA) Task 40 — Sustainable International Energy Trade: Securing Supply and Demand -- Country Report 2009 for the United States

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J. Richard Hess; Jacob J. Jacobson; Richard Nelson; Carl Wolf

    2009-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report outlines the status of U.S. biomass resources currently and future potentials for domestic and export markets of residues, energy crops, and woody resources. Includes energy and fuel production and consumption statistics, driving policies, targets, and government investment in bioenergy industry development.

  13. International Energy Agency (IEA) Task 40 — Sustainable International Energy Trade: Securing Supply and Demand -- Country Report 2010 for the United States

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J. Richard Hess; Jacob J. Jacobson; Richard Nelson; Carl Wolf

    2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report updates the status of U.S. biomass resources currently and future potentials for domestic and export markets of residues, energy crops, and woody resources. Includes energy and fuel production and consumption statistics, driving policies, targets, and government investment in bioenergy industry development.

  14. State of Georgia quarterly AIP Implementation Report: October--December 1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-01-19T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this report is to ensure the citizens of Georgia that health, safety and the environment are being protected through existing DOE programs at the Savannah River Site (SRS), through a vigorous program of independent monitoring and oversight by Georgia officials. SRS emergency plans will be annually reviewed and updated. Environmental monitoring will be conducted of surface water and related media, ground water, air, crops, milk, drinking water, soils and vegetation.

  15. Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant environmental report for 1991

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Williams, M.F. (ed.)

    1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This calendar year (CY) 1991 annual report on environmental surveillance of the US Department of Energy's (DOE's) Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PORTS) and its environs consists of two parts: narrative, summaries, and conclusions (Part 1), and data presentation (Part 2). Environmental-monitoring systems at PORTS include emission-monitoring networks for air and surface water discharges; waste sampling and characterization; and ambient-sampling networks for air, surface water, groundwater, drinking water, vegetation (cattle forage), food crops, fish, soil, creek and river sediments, and direct (gamma) radiation levels.

  16. ANNUAL REPORT RESEARCH PROGRAM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rock, Chris

    .................................................................................... 18 Development of Winter Safflower as a New Biomass Energy Crop for the Lower Great Plains of North............................................25 Estimating Dynamic Models of Price and Non-Price Competition in a Differentiated Products...........................................................................................................29 Curb Appeal Impact on the Price of Single-Family Houses

  17. ANNUAL REPORT RESEARCH PROGRAM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rock, Chris

    on the Price of Single-Family Houses........................ . Supplemental Biomass for a Multi............................................................................................. Development of Winter Safflower as a New Biomass Energy Crop for the Lower Great Plains ofNorth America .................................................. Profit Risk ofa Dryland Cattle Ranching System as a Function ofPrice and Precipitation Risk

  18. ANNUAL REPORT RESEARCH PROGRAM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rock, Chris

    Winter Safflower as a New Biomass Energy Crop for the Lower Great Plains ofNorth America...................................16 Cotton Price Risk Management across Different Countries......................... 17 Brand-Supermarket Price Competition with Nested Logit Demand.................18 Supermarket Price Competition: The Case of

  19. AGRICULTURAL REPORT MAY 2008

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    supply will shape the future of the agricultural industry. We will discuss each in turn. Ethanol and energy Ethanol will be using almost 30% of the U.S. corn crop by 2009 with total ethanol production reaching almost 14 billion gallons. Numerous analysts have suggested that total demand for ethanol longer

  20. Occurrence Reporting

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    1995-09-25T23:59:59.000Z

    To establish and maintain a system for reporting operations information related to DOE-owned or -operated facilities and processing that information to identify the root causes of Unusual, Off-Normal, and Emergency Occurrences and provide for appropriate corrective action. Cancels DOE 5000.3B.

  1. Activity report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yu, S W

    2008-08-11T23:59:59.000Z

    This report is aimed to show the author's activities to support the LDRD. The title is 'Investigation of the Double-C Behavior in the Pu-Ga Time-Temperature-Transformation Diagram' The sections are: (1) Sample Holder Test; (2) Calculation of x-ray diffraction patterns; (3) Literature search and preparing publications; (4) Tasks Required for APS Experiments; and (5) Communications.

  2. Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Leclerc, Monique Y.

    2014-11-17T23:59:59.000Z

    This final report presents the main activities and results of the project “A Carbon Flux Super Site: New Insights and Innovative Atmosphere-Terrestrial Carbon Exchange Measurements and Modeling” from 10/1/2006 to 9/30/2014. It describes the new AmeriFlux tower site (Aiken) at Savanna River Site (SC) and instrumentation, long term eddy-covariance, sodar, microbarograph, soil and other measurements at the site, and intensive field campaigns of tracer experiment at the Carbon Flux Super Site, SC, in 2009 and at ARM-CF site, Lamont, OK, and experiments in Plains, GA. The main results on tracer experiment and modeling, on low-level jet characteristics and their impact on fluxes, on gravity waves and their influence on eddy fluxes, and other results are briefly described in the report.

  3. Modeled Impacts of Cover Crops and Vegetative Barriers on Corn Stover Availability and Soil Quality

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ian J. Bonner; David J. Muth Jr.; Joshua B. Koch; Douglas L. Karlen

    2014-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Environmentally benign, economically viable, and socially acceptable agronomic strategies are needed to launch a sustainable lignocellulosic biofuel industry. Our objective was to demonstrate a landscape planning process that can ensure adequate supplies of corn (Zea mays L.) stover feedstock while protecting and improving soil quality. The Landscape Environmental Assessment Framework (LEAF) was used to develop land use strategies that were then scaled up for five U.S. Corn Belt states (Nebraska, Iowa, Illinois, Indiana, and Minnesota) to illustrate the impact that could be achieved. Our results show an annual sustainable stover supply of 194 million Mg without exceeding soil erosion T values or depleting soil organic carbon [i.e., soil conditioning index (SCI)?>?0] when no-till, winter cover crop, and vegetative barriers were incorporated into the landscape. A second, more rigorous conservation target was set to enhance soil quality while sustainably harvesting stover. By requiring erosion to be <1/2 T and the SCI-organic matter (OM) subfactor to be >?0, the annual sustainable quantity of harvestable stover dropped to148 million Mg. Examining removal rates by state and soil resource showed that soil capability class and slope generally determined the effectiveness of the three conservation practices and the resulting sustainable harvest rate. This emphasizes that sustainable biomass harvest must be based on subfield management decisions to ensure soil resources are conserved or enhanced, while providing sufficient biomass feedstock to support the economic growth of bioenergy enterprises.

  4. Hardwoods for Woody Energy Crops in the Southeast United States:Two Centuries of Practitioner Experience

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kline, Keith L [ORNL; Coleman, Mark [USDA Forest Service

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper summarizes opinions from forest industry experts on the potential for hardwood tree species to serve as feedstock for bioenergy in the Southeast United States. Hardwoods are of interest for bioenergy because of desirable physical qualities, genetic research advances, and growth potential. Experts observe that high productivity rates in southeastern plantations are confined to limited site conditions or require costly inputs. Eastern cottonwood and American sycamore grow quickly on rich bottomlands where they compete with higher-value crops. These species are also prone to pests and disease. Sweetgum is frost hardy, has few pest or disease problems, and grows across a broad range of sites, yet growth rates are relatively low. Eucalypts require few inputs and offer high potential productivity, but are limited by frost to the lower coastal plain and Florida. More time and investment in silviculture, selection, and breeding will be needed to develop hardwoods as competitive biofuel feedstock species. Loblolly pine has robust site requirements, growth rates rivaling hardwoods and lower costs of production. Because of existing stands and know-how, the forestry community considers loblolly pine to be a prime candidate for plantation bioenergy in the Southeast. Further research is required to study naturally regenerated hardwood biomass resources.

  5. Salt index of potassium phosphate fertilizers and its relation to germination and early plant growth of field crops

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Freeouf, Jerry Allen

    1975-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    determined by the displacement of soil solutions that are in equilibrium with applied fertilizer salts. This procedure is time consuming and requires extraction of large quantities of soil in leaching columns to obtain the soil solution. Although... SALT INDEX OF POTASSIUM PHOSPHATE FERTILIZERS AND ITS RELATION TO GERMINATION AND EARLY PLANT GROWTH OF FIELD CROPS A Thesis by JERRY ALLEN FREEOUF Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment...

  6. 1973 projections of consumption, production, prices and crop values for Texas winter lettuce and early spring onions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Furrh, Samuel Roger

    1970-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ved as to style and content by Ch irman of Committee) / (Head of epartment) (Member n (Member) Mem r (Member) August, 1970 ABSTRACT 1973 Projections of Consumption, Production, Prices and Crop Values for Texas Winter Lettuce and Early Spring... On' ons. (August 1970) Samuel Roger Furrh, B. S. , Texas A&M University Directed by: Dr. Marshall R. Godwin The purpose of this study was to provide information to Texas winter lettuce and early spring oni. on producers that would aid them...

  7. Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    R Paul Drake

    2004-01-12T23:59:59.000Z

    OAK-B135 This is the final report from the project Hydrodynamics by High-Energy-Density Plasma Flow and Hydrodynamics and Radiation Hydrodynamics with Astrophysical Applications. This project supported a group at the University of Michigan in the invention, design, performance, and analysis of experiments using high-energy-density research facilities. The experiments explored compressible nonlinear hydrodynamics, in particular at decelerating interfaces, and the radiation hydrodynamics of strong shock waves. It has application to supernovae, astrophysical jets, shock-cloud interactions, and radiative shock waves.

  8. Comparison Report

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 1112011AT&T, Inc.'sEnergyTexas1.Space DataEnergy Superior EnergyReport 2009

  9. CIP Report

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742Energy China U.S. Department ofJune 2,The BigSidingState6Report, March 2013CIGNLFeatured in this

  10. Special Report

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33Frequently AskedEnergyIssues DOE's Nuclear EnergySmartOverview -Special Report 1501 MACY DRIVE

  11. Report2

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Scienceand Requirements Recently ApprovedReliability TechnologyRenewalReport Period: EIA

  12. Annual Report

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directed offOCHCO Overview OCHCOSystemsProgram OverviewAdvocate -AmirAnnual Report Fiscal Year 2011 Office of

  13. Reporting Requirements

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's PossibleRadiation Protection Technical s o Freiberge s 3 % A PB 2 7 7 2 x>1 of 5Reporting

  14. Find Reports

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC) Environmental Assessments (EA)Budget »Travel andFifthDepartmentPatentsReports Find

  15. Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Webb, Robert C. [Texas A& M University] [Texas A& M University; Kamon, Teruki [Texas A& M University] [Texas A& M University; Toback, David [Texas A& M University] [Texas A& M University; Safonov, Alexei [Texas A& M University] [Texas A& M University; Dutta, Bhaskar [Texas A& M University] [Texas A& M University; Dimitri, Nanopoulos [Texas A& M University] [Texas A& M University; Pope, Christopher [Texas A& M University] [Texas A& M University; White, James [Texas A& M University] [Texas A& M University

    2013-11-18T23:59:59.000Z

    Overview The High Energy Physics Group at Texas A&M University is submitting this final report for our grant number DE-FG02-95ER40917. This grant has supported our wide range of research activities for over a decade. The reports contained here summarize the latest work done by our research team. Task A (Collider Physics Program): CMS & CDF Profs. T. Kamon, A. Safonov, and D. Toback co-lead the Texas A&M (TAMU) collider program focusing on CDF and CMS experiments. Task D: Particle Physics Theory Our particle physics theory task is the combined effort of Profs. B. Dutta, D. Nanopoulos, and C. Pope. Task E (Underground Physics): LUX & NEXT Profs. R. Webb and J. White(deceased) lead the Xenon-based underground research program consisting of two main thrusts: the first, participation in the LUX two-phase xenon dark matter search experiment and the second, detector R&D primarily aimed at developing future detectors for underground physics (e.g. NEXT and LZ).

  16. Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yelton, John Martin [UF; Mitselmakher, Guenakh [UF; Korytov, Andrey [UF; Avery, Paul [UF; Furic, Ivan [UF; Acosta, Darin [UF; Konigsberg, Jacobo [UF; Field, Richard [UF; Matchev, Konstantin [UF; Ramond, Pierre [UF; Thorn, Richard [UF; Sikivie, Pierre [UF; Ray, Heather [UF; Tanner, David [UF

    2013-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

    We report on progress in a series of different directions within high energy physics research. 1. Neutrino research in hardware and software on the Minerva and MiniBooNE experiments 2. Experimental particle physics at the hadron colliders, with emphasis on research and development and data analysis on the CMS experiment operating at the CERN LHC. This includes research on the discovery and properties on the Higgs Boson. 3. Educational outreach through the Quarknet program, taking physics research into High School classrooms. 4. Theoretical and Phenomenological High Energy research, covering a broad range of activities ranging from fundamental theoretical issues to areas of immediate phenomenological importance. 5. Experiment searches for the Axion, as part of the ADMX experiment.

  17. Effects of Irrigating with Treated Oil and Gas Product Water on Crop Biomass and Soil Permeability

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Terry Brown; Jeffrey Morris; Patrick Richards; Joel Mason

    2010-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Demonstrating effective treatment technologies and beneficial uses for oil and gas produced water is essential for producers who must meet environmental standards and deal with high costs associated with produced water management. Proven, effective produced-water treatment technologies coupled with comprehensive data regarding blending ratios for productive long-term irrigation will improve the state-of-knowledge surrounding produced-water management. Effective produced-water management scenarios such as cost-effective treatment and irrigation will discourage discharge practices that result in legal battles between stakeholder entities. The goal of this work is to determine the optimal blending ratio required for irrigating crops with CBNG and conventional oil and gas produced water treated by ion exchange (IX), reverse osmosis (RO), or electro-dialysis reversal (EDR) in order to maintain the long term physical integrity of soils and to achieve normal crop production. The soils treated with CBNG produced water were characterized with significantly lower SAR values compared to those impacted with conventional oil and gas produced water. The CBNG produced water treated with RO at the 100% treatment level was significantly different from the untreated produced water, while the 25%, 50% and 75% water treatment levels were not significantly different from the untreated water. Conventional oil and gas produced water treated with EDR and RO showed comparable SAR results for the water treatment technologies. There was no significant difference between the 100% treated produced water and the control (river water). The EDR water treatment resulted with differences at each level of treatment, which were similar to RO treated conventional oil and gas water. The 100% treated water had SAR values significantly lower than the 75% and 50% treatments, which were similar (not significantly different). The results of the greenhouse irrigation study found the differences in biomass production between each soil were significant for Western Wheatgrass and Alfafla. The Sheridan sandy loam soil resulted in the highest production for western wheatgrass and alfalfa while the X-ranch sandy loam had the lowest production rate for both plants. Plant production levels resulting from untreated CBNG produced water were significantly higher compared to untreated conventional oil and gas produced water. However, few differences were found between water treatments. The biomass produced from the greenhouse study was analyzed for elemental composition and for forage value. Elemental composition indentified several interesting findings. Some of the biomass was characterized with seemly high boron and sodium levels. High levels of boron found in some of the biomass was unexpected and may indicate that alfalfa and western wheatgrass plants may have been impacted by either soil or irrigation water containing high boron levels. Plants irrigated with water treated using EDR technology appeared to contain higher levels of boron with increased levels of treatment. Forage evaluations were conducted using near infrared reflectance spectroscopy. The data collected show small differences, generally less than 10%, between produced water treatments including the no treatment and 100% treatment conditions for each plant species studied. The forage value of alfalfa and western wheatgrass did not show significant tendencies dependent on soil, the amount of produced water treatment, or treatment technology.

  18. Technical Report Documentation Page 1. Report No.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Texas at Austin, University of

    Technical Report Documentation Page 1. Report No. 1732-S 2. Government Accession No. 3. Recipients, geometric design, entrance ramps, exit ramps 18. Distribution Statement No restrictions. This document

  19. Novel enabling technologies of gene isolation and plant transformation for improved crop protection

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Torok, Tamas

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    CRADA  Final  Report   v2010  Aug  24   Date:   February  Tamas  Torok,  Ph.D.   CRADA  No.       UFCRA006535   LBNL  software developed under the CRADA: N/A A  final  abstract  

  20. Report 1: JISC Good APIs Management Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rzepa, Henry S.

    Report 1: JISC Good APIs Management Report A review of good practice in the provision of machine) Document Name: good_api_JISC_report_v0.8.doc Notes: Acknowledgements UKOLN is funded by the MLA to all those who gave up time to help with the report. Vital to this work were the people who filled

  1. Journal Citation Reports Journal Citation Reports

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wu, Yih-Min

    Journal Citation Reports® 1 #12;· · Journal Citation Reports · Journal Citation Reports · Journal Citation Reports · 2 #12;JCR 3 #12; Web of Science (SCIE, SSCI, AHCI) EndNote Journal Citation;· · · · · · JCR 5 #12;JCR 6 #12;· ­ JCR Science Edition170 8005 ­ JCR Social Sciences Edition 502678 Journal

  2. Technical Report Documentation Page 1. Report No.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Texas at Austin, University of

    Technical Report Documentation Page 1. Report No. FHWA/TX-0-1747-2 2. Government Accession No. 3 of Transportation. 16. Abstract This report documents an assessment of needs for TxDOT divisions, districts of existing TxDOT base maps and points out the potential shortcomings of those maps. The report documents

  3. Soil loss and leaching, habitat destruction, land and water demand in energy-crop monoculture: some quantitative limits

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gutschick, V.P.

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The environmental impacts of growing biomass for energy, especially for liquid automotive fuels, are potentially large. They are sensitive to the low power production per unit area (high land requirement) and to net energy balances. Initial quantitative estimates were made for impacts per unit power within several classes of impacts, and conversely, for limits to power produced if one avoids worst-class impacts. The following types of biomass energy technologies are considered: ethanol and methanol from grains and residues (temperate zone); jojoba wax (semi-tropical); ethanol from sugar cane and root crops (tropics); and silviculture for methanol via gasification.

  4. Hairy Vetch, Bur Clover and Oats as Soil-Building Crops for Cotton and Corn in Texas.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Morris, H. F. (Harry Forest); Johnson, P. R. (Paul Rufus); Reynolds, E. B. (Elbert Brunner)

    1950-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    for soil improvement increased the average yields of cot- ton ancl corn about 40 percent at College Station for the 11 years, 1937-47. Vetch increased the average yield of cotton 75 to 84 percent and practically doubled the yield of corn at Tyler... yields of cotton than the use of 400 pounds of a 4-8-4 fertilizer per acre at Tyler and Nacog- doches. Hairy vetch was a better green-manure crop than oats at Tyler and oats or bur clover at Nacogdoches. The effects of plowing under hairy vetch lasted...

  5. Improving Biomass Yields: High Biomass, Low Input Dedicated Energy Crops to Enable a Full Scale Bioenergy Industry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Broad Funding Opportunity Announcement Project: Ceres is developing bigger and better grasses for use in biofuels. The bigger the grass yield, the more biomass, and more biomass means more biofuel per acre. Using biotechnology, Ceres is developing grasses that will grow bigger with less fertilizer than current grass varieties. Hardier, higher-yielding grass also requires less land to grow and can be planted in areas where other crops can’t grow instead of in prime agricultural land. Ceres is conducting multi-year trials in Arizona, Texas, Tennessee, and Georgia which have already resulted in grass yields with as much as 50% more biomass than yields from current grass varieties.

  6. Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hameed A. Naseem, Husam H. Abu-Safe

    2007-02-09T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this project was to investigate metal-induced crystallization of amorphous silicon at low temperatures using excitation sources such as laser and rapid thermal annealing, as well as, electric field. Deposition of high quality crystalline silicon at low temperatures allows the use of low cost soda-lime glass and polymeric films for economically viable photovoltaic solar cells and low cost large area flat panel displays. In light of current and expected demands on Si supply due to expanding use of consumer electronic products throughout the world and the incessant demand for electric power the need for developing high grade Si thin films on low cost substrate becomes even more important. We used hydrogenated and un-hydrogenated amorphous silicon deposited by plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition and sputtering techniques (both of which are extensively used in electronic and solar cell industries) to fabricate nano-crystalline, poly-crystalline (small as well as large grain), and single-crystalline (epitaxial) films at low temperatures. We demonstrated Si nanowires on flat surfaces that can be used for fabricating nanometer scale transistors. We also demonstrated lateral crystallization using Al with and without an applied electric field. These results are critical for high mobility thin film transistors (TFT) for large area display applications. Large grain silicon (~30-50 µm grain size for < 0.5 µm thick films) was demonstrated on glass substrates at low temperatures. We also demonstrated epitaxial growth of silicon on (100) Si substrates at temperatures as low as 450?C. Thin film Si solar cells are being projected as the material of choice for low cost high efficiency solar cells when properly coupled with excellent light-trapping schemes. Ar ion laser (CW) was shown to produce dendritic nanowire structures at low power whereas at higher powers yielded continuous polycrystalline films. The power density required for films in contact with Al was demonstrated to be at least two orders of magnitude lower that that reported in the literature before. Polysilicon was successfully achieved on polyimide (Kapton©) films. Thin film Si solar cells on lightweight stoable polymer offer great advantage for terrestrial and space power applications. In summary we have demonstrated through this research the viability of producing low cost nano-, poly-, and epitaxial Si material on substrates of choice for applications in economically viable environmentally friendly sustainable solar power systems. This truly enabling technology has widespread applications in multibillion dollar electronic industry and consumer products.

  7. 7/3/13 3:56 PMHow DNA Finds its Match-Crop Biotech Update ( 2/10/2012 ) | ISAAA.org/KC Page 1 of 2http://www.isaaa.org/kc/cropbiotechupdate/article/default.asp?ID=9148

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kowalczykowski, Stephen C.

    Biofuels Supplement RSS Article Search: Go ISAAA in Brief ISAAA Programs Knowledge Center Biotech Center | Biotech Information Resources Biotech Information Centers | Crop Biotech Update | Biofuels

  8. Recursive Programming Model for Crop Production on the Texas High Plains

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reneau, D. R.; Lacewell, R. D.; Ellis, J. R.

    , the model will loop through up to 20 iterations, rebuilding the LP matrix for each iteration and writing a report for each period. The feedback section of the recursive model is used to update the groundwater situation after solution of each iteration...

  9. Illinois Water Resources Center Annual Technical Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    is to promote research, education, and information transfer towards that objective. Introduction 1 #12;Research to price incentives for second-generation bioenergy crop cultivation, and carbon and nitrogen fertilizer and second-generation bioenergy crops, Submitted for review. 2. An Agent-Based Model of Nitrogen and Carbon

  10. Economic development through biomass system integration: Summary report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DeLong, M.M. [Northern States Power Co., Minneapolis, MN (United States)

    1995-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Alfalfa is a well-known and widely-planted crop that offers environmental and soil conservation advantages when grown as a 4-year segment in a 7-year rotation with corn and soybeans. Alfalfa fixes nitrogen from the air, thereby enhancing soil nitrogen and decreasing the need for manufactured nitrogen fertilizer. With alfalfa yields of 4 dry tons per acre per year and the alfalfa leaf fraction sold as a high-value animal feed the remaining alfalfa stem fraction can be economically viable fuel feedstock for a gasifier combined cycle power plant. This report is a feasibility study for an integrated biomass power system, where an energy crop (alfalfa) is the feedstock for a processing plant and a power power plant (integrated gasification combined cycle) in a way that benefits the facility owners. The sale of an animal feed co-product and electricity both help cover the production cost of alfalfa and the feedstock processing cost, thereby requiring neither the electricity or leaf meal to carry the total cost. The power plant provides an important continous demand for the feedstock and results in continous supply of leaf product to provide a reliable supply needed for the leaf meal product.

  11. Technical Report Documentation Page 1. Report No.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Glover, and Nicolas Norboge 8. Performing Organization Report No. Report 5-6395-01-1 9. Performing Brianne Glover, J.D. Associate Transportation Researcher Texas Transportation Institute and Nicolas

  12. Technical Report Documentation Page 1. Report No.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . Report Date April 2009 6. Performing Organization Code 7. Author(s) Jennifer Bennett and Tracy McMillan 8 Sector's Role in Public School Facility Planning by Jennifer Bennett Tracy McMillan Research Report SWUTC

  13. Technical Report Documentation Page 1. Report No.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Texas at Austin, University of

    Technical Report Documentation Page 1. Report No. FHWA/TX-02/1884-2 2. Government Accession No. 3, paratransit systems 18. Distribution Statement No restrictions. This document is available to the public

  14. Technical Report Documentation Page 1. Report No.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Texas at Austin, University of

    Technical Report Documentation Page 1. Report No. FHWA/TX-09/0-5367-1 2. Government Accession No. 3, deck, slab, shear, fatigue 18. Distribution Statement No restrictions. This document is available

  15. Technical Report Documentation Page 1. Report No.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Texas at Austin, University of

    Technical Report Documentation Page 1. Report No. FHWA/TX-00-1795-S 2. Government Accession No. 3. Distribution Statement No restrictions. This document is available to the public through the National Technical

  16. Technical Report Documentation Page 1. Report No.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Texas at Austin, University of

    Technical Report Documentation Page 1. Report No. FHWA/TX-03/4382-1 2. Government Accession No. 3, concrete pavement, sensitivity, fatigue, distress 18. Distribution Statement No restrictions. This document

  17. Technical Report Documentation Page 1. Report No.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zornberg, Jorge G.

    Technical Report Documentation Page 1. Report No. FHWA/TX-10/5-4829-01-1 2. Government Accession No, stiffness 18. Distribution Statement No restrictions. This document is available to the public through

  18. Technical Report Documentation Page 1. Report No.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Texas at Austin, University of

    Technical Report Documentation Page 1. Report No. FHWA/TX-05/0-4485-1 2. Government Accession No. 3 No restrictions. This document is available to the public through the National Technical Information Service

  19. Technical Report Documentation Page 1. Report No.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Texas at Austin, University of

    Technical Report Documentation Page 1. Report No. FHWA/TX-00/0-1843-1 2. Government Accession No. 3 No restrictions. This document is available to the public through the National Technical Information Service

  20. Technical Report Documentation Page 1. Report No.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Texas at Austin, University of

    Technical Report Documentation Page 1. Report No. 1747-3 2. Government Accession No. 3. Recipient, Information Technology 18. Distribution Statement No restrictions. This document is available to the public

  1. Technical Report Documentation Page 1. Report No.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Texas at Austin, University of

    Technical Report Documentation Page 1. Report No. FHWA/TX-03/4083-2 2. Government Accession No. 3. This document is available to the public through the National Technical Information Service, Springfield

  2. Technical Report Documentation Page 1. Report No.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zornberg, Jorge G.

    Technical Report Documentation Page 1. Report No. FHWA/TX-12/5-4829-01-3 2. Government Accession No No restrictions. This document is available to the public through the National Technical Information Service

  3. Technical Report Documentation Page 1. Report No.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zornberg, Jorge G.

    Technical Report Documentation Page 1. Report No. FHWA/TX-10/5-5517-01-1 2. Government Accession No, field monitoring 18. Distribution Statement No restrictions. This document is available to the public

  4. Technical Report Documentation Page 1. Report No.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Texas at Austin, University of

    Technical Report Documentation Page 1. Report No. FHWA/TX-0-1814-1 2. Government Accession No. 3 No restrictions. This document is available to the public through the National Technical Information Service

  5. Technical Report Documentation Page 1. Report No.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Texas at Austin, University of

    Technical Report Documentation Page 1. Report No. FHWA/TX-0-2122-1 2. Government Accession No. 3, regulations, vehicle characteristics 18. Distribution Statement No restrictions. This document is available

  6. Technical Report Documentation Page 1. Report No.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Texas at Austin, University of

    Technical Report Documentation Page 1. Report No. FWHA/TX-05/0-1774-3 2. Government Accession No. 3, rehabilitation, encapsulation 18. Distribution Statement No restrictions. This document is available

  7. Technical Report Documentation Page 1. Report No.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Texas at Austin, University of

    Technical Report Documentation Page 1. Report No. FHWA/TX-09/0-5197-4 2. Government Accession No. 3 consolidating concrete, microcracking 18. Distribution Statement No restrictions. This document is available

  8. Technical Report Documentation Page 1. Report No.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Texas at Austin, University of

    Technical Report Documentation Page 1. Report No. FHWA/TX-03/1892-1 2. Government Accession No. 3, nondestructive testing 18. Distribution Statement No restrictions. This document is available to the public

  9. Technical Report Documentation Page 1. Report No.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Texas at Austin, University of

    Technical Report Documentation Page 1. Report No. FHWA/TX-05/9-580/589-1 2. Government Accession No resistance, creep, shrinkage 18. Distribution Statement No restrictions. This document is available

  10. Technical Report Documentation Page 1. Report No.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zornberg, Jorge G.

    Technical Report Documentation Page 1. Report No. FHWA/TX-10/0-5812-1 2. Government Accession No. 3. This document is available to the public through the National Technical Information Service, Springfield

  11. Technical Report Documentation Page 1. Report No.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Texas at Austin, University of

    Technical Report Documentation Page 1. Report No. FHWA/TX-08/0-4562-2 2. Government Accession No. 3 concrete 18. Distribution Statement No restrictions. This document is available to the public through

  12. Technical Report Documentation Page 1. Report No.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Texas at Austin, University of

    Technical Report Documentation Page 1. Report No. FHWA/TX-04/0-1405-9 2. Government Accession No. 3 joints, reinforcement coatings 18. Distribution Statement No restrictions. This document is available

  13. Technical Report Documentation Page 1. Report No.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Texas at Austin, University of

    Technical Report Documentation Page 1. Report No. FHWA/TX-03-1838-8 2. Government Accession No. 3. Distribution Statement No restrictions. This document is available to the public through the National Technical

  14. Technical Report Documentation Page 1. Report No.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Texas at Austin, University of

    Technical Report Documentation Page 1. Report No. FHWA/TX-03/1898-1 2. Government Accession No. 3 after the deck had hardened. 17. Key Words 18. Distribution Statement No restrictions. This document

  15. Technical Report Documentation Page 1. Report No.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Texas at Austin, University of

    Technical Report Documentation Page 1. Report No. FHWA/TX-00/1754-1 2. Government Accession No. 3 No restrictions. This document is available to the public through the National Technical Information Service

  16. Technical Report Documentation Page 1. Report No.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Texas at Austin, University of

    Technical Report Documentation Page 1. Report No. FHWA/TX-05/9-580/589-2 2. Government Accession No. Distribution Statement No restrictions. This document is available to the public through the National Technical

  17. Technical Report Documentation Page 1. Report No.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Texas at Austin, University of

    Technical Report Documentation Page 1. Report No. FHWA/TX-04/1778-4 2. Government Accession No. 3 No restrictions. This document is available to the public through the National Technical Information Service

  18. Technical Report Documentation Page 1. Report No.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Texas at Austin, University of

    Technical Report Documentation Page 1. Report No. FHWA/TX-04/0-1734-S 2. Government Accession No. 3 No restrictions. This document is available to the public through the National Technical Information Service

  19. Technical Report Documentation Page 1. Report No.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Texas at Austin, University of

    Technical Report Documentation Page 1. Report No. FHWA/TX-00/1795-1 2. Government Accession No. 3 strategies 18. Distribution Statement No restrictions. This document is available to the public through

  20. Technical Report Documentation Page 1. Report No.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Texas at Austin, University of

    Technical Report Documentation Page 1. Report No. FHWA/TX-11/0-6348-1 2. Government Accession No. 3. Distribution Statement No restrictions. This document is available to the public through the National Technical

  1. Technical Report Documentation Page 1. Report No.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Texas at Austin, University of

    Technical Report Documentation Page 1. Report No. FHWA/TX-00/1785-2 2. Government Accession No. 3 No restrictions. This document is available to the public through the National Technical Information Service

  2. Technical Report Documentation Page 1. Report No.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Texas at Austin, University of

    Technical Report Documentation Page 1. Report No. FHWA/TX-03/4386-1 2. Government Accession No. 3. Distribution Statement No restrictions. This document is available to the public through the National Technical

  3. Technical Report Documentation Page 1. Report No.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Texas at Austin, University of

    Technical Report Documentation Page 1. Report No. FHWA/TX-06/0-4085-5 2. Government Accession No. 3. Distribution Statement No restrictions. This document is available to the public through the National Technical

  4. Technical Report Documentation Page 1. Report No.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Texas at Austin, University of

    Technical Report Documentation Page 1. Report No. FHWA/TX-06/0-1401-2 2. Government Accession No. 3. Distribution Statement No restrictions. This document is available to the public through the National Technical

  5. Technical Report Documentation Page 1. Report No.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Texas at Austin, University of

    Technical Report Documentation Page 1. Report No. FHWA/TX-10/0-5974-1 2. Government Accession No. 3. Distribution Statement No restrictions. This document is available to the public through the National Technical

  6. Technical Report Documentation Page 1. Report No.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Texas at Austin, University of

    Technical Report Documentation Page 1. Report No. FHWA/TX-02/1395-2F 2. Government Accession No. 3 Bracing, Brace Forces, Torsional Stiffness 18. Distribution Statement No restrictions. This document

  7. Technical Report Documentation Page 1. Report No.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Texas at Austin, University of

    Technical Report Documentation Page 1. Report No. FHWA/TX-04/0-1471-4 2. Government Accession No. 3. Distribution Statement No restrictions. This document is available to the public through the National Technical

  8. Technical Report Documentation Page 1. Report No.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Texas at Austin, University of

    Technical Report Documentation Page 1. Report No. FHWA/TX-0-1748-2 2. Government Accession No. 3. This document is available to the public through the National Technical Information Service, Springfield

  9. Technical Report Documentation Page 1. Report No.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Texas at Austin, University of

    Technical Report Documentation Page 1. Report No. FHWA/TX-04/0-4808-1 2. Government Accession No. 3. This document is available to the public through the National Technical Information Service, Springfield

  10. Technical Report Documentation Page 1. Report No.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Texas at Austin, University of

    Technical Report Documentation Page 1. Report No. FHWA/TX-04/5-3933-01-P1-4 2. Government Accession No restrictions. This document is available to the public through the National Technical Information Service

  11. Technical Report Documentation Page 1. Report No.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Texas at Austin, University of

    Technical Report Documentation Page 1. Report No. FHWA/TX-06/0-4437-1 2. Government Accession No. 3. This document is available to the public through the National Technical Information Service, Springfield

  12. Technical Report Documentation Page 1. Report No.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Texas at Austin, University of

    Technical Report Documentation Page 1. Report No. FHWA/TX-02-1810-2 2. Government Accession No. 3 in Texas 18. Distribution Statement No restrictions. This document is available to the public through

  13. Technical Report Documentation Page 1. Report No.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Texas at Austin, University of

    Technical Report Documentation Page 1. Report No. FHWA/TX-06/5-4975-01-1 2. Government Accession No. This document is available to the public through the National Technical Information Service, Springfield

  14. Technical Report Documentation Page 1. Report No.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Texas at Austin, University of

    Technical Report Documentation Page 1. Report No. FHWA/TX-06/0-4185-4 2. Government Accession No. 3. This document is available to the public through the National Technical Information Service, Springfield

  15. Technical Report Documentation Page 1. Report No.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Texas at Austin, University of

    Technical Report Documentation Page 1. Report No. FHWA/TX-04/5-1291-01-1 2. Government Accession No),PASSER II, GEOPAK, Vehicle Turn Templates 18. Distribution Statement No restrictions. This document

  16. Technical Report Documentation Page 1. Report No.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Texas at Austin, University of

    i Technical Report Documentation Page 1. Report No. FHWA/TX-07 / 0-1774-4 2. Government Accession, encapsulation 18. Distribution Statement No restrictions. This document is available to the public through

  17. Technical Report Documentation Page 1. Report No.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Texas at Austin, University of

    Technical Report Documentation Page 1. Report No. FHWA/TX-10/0-5185-3 2. Government Accession No. 3 Pavement. 18. Distribution Statement No restrictions. This document is available to the public through

  18. Technical Report Documentation Page 1. Report No.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Texas at Austin, University of

    Technical Report Documentation Page 1. Report No. FHWA/TX-06/0-4958-1 2. Government Accession No. 3 No restrictions. This document is available to the public through the National Technical Information Service

  19. Technical Report Documentation Page 1. Report No.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Texas at Austin, University of

    Technical Report Documentation Page 1. Report No. FHWA/TX-11/0-6095-2 2. Government Accession No. 3 Statement No restrictions. This document is available to the public through the National Technical

  20. Technical Report Documentation Page 1. Report No.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Texas at Austin, University of

    Technical Report Documentation Page 1. Report No. FHWA/TX-02/1852-1 2. Government Accession No. 3 concrete mix design 18. Distribution Statement No restrictions. This document is available to the public

  1. Technical Report Documentation Page 1. Report No.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Texas at Austin, University of

    Technical Report Documentation Page 1. Report No. FHWA/TX-07/0-1700-7 2. Government Accession No. 3. Distribution Statement No restrictions. This document is available to the public through the National Technical

  2. Technical Report Documentation Page 1. Report No.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Texas at Austin, University of

    Technical Report Documentation Page 1. Report No. FHWA/TX-07/0-5410-1 2. Government Accession No. 3 No restrictions. This document is available to the public through the National Technical Information Service

  3. Technical Report Documentation Page 1. Report No.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Texas at Austin, University of

    Technical Report Documentation Page 1. Report No. FHWA/TX-05/0-4661-1 2. Government Accession No. 3. This document is available to the public through the National Technical Information Service, Springfield

  4. Technical Report Documentation Page 1. Report No.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Texas at Austin, University of

    Technical Report Documentation Page 1. Report No. FHWA/TX-04/0-1700-1 2. Government Accession No. 3. Distribution Statement No restrictions. This document is available to the public through the National Technical

  5. Technical Report Documentation Page 1. Report No.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Texas at Austin, University of

    Technical Report Documentation Page 1. Report No. FHWA/TX-08/5-4958-01-1 2. Government Accession No lens 18. Distribution Statement No restrictions. This document is available to the public through

  6. Technical Report Documentation Page 1. Report No.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Texas at Austin, University of

    Technical Report Documentation Page 1. Report No. FHWA/TX-03-1810-3 2. Government Accession No. 3, Highway user taxes, Highway finance 18. Distribution Statement No restrictions. This document is available

  7. Technical Report Documentation Page 1. Report No.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Texas at Austin, University of

    Technical Report Documentation Page 1. Report No. FHWA/TX-04/4576-3 2. Government Accession No. 3 Statement No restrictions. This document is available to the public through the National Technical

  8. Technical Report Documentation Page 1. Report No.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Texas at Austin, University of

    Technical Report Documentation Page 1. Report No. FHWA/TX-09/0-5799-1 2. Government Accession No. 3 Statement No restrictions. This document is available to the public through the National Technical

  9. Technical Report Documentation Page 1. Report No.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Texas at Austin, University of

    Technical Report Documentation Page 1. Report No. FHWA/TX-7-4957-1 2. Government Accession No. 3 No restrictions. This document is available to the public through the National Technical Information Service

  10. Technical Report Documentation Page 1. Report No.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Texas at Austin, University of

    FINAL COPY Technical Report Documentation Page 1. Report No. FHWA/TX-05/0-1700-2 2. Government-based specifications. 18. Distribution Statement No restrictions. This document is available to the public through

  11. Technical Report Documentation Page 1. Report No.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Texas at Austin, University of

    Technical Report Documentation Page 1. Report No. FHWA/TX-05/0-4416-1 2. Government Accession No. 3 No restrictions. This document is available to the public through the National Technical Information Service

  12. Technical Report Documentation Page 1. Report No.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Texas at Austin, University of

    Technical Report Documentation Page 1. Report No. FHWA/TX-07/0-1895-1 2. Government Accession No. 3. Distribution Statement No restrictions. This document is available to the public through the National Technical

  13. Technical Report Documentation Page 1. Report No.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Texas at Austin, University of

    Technical Report Documentation Page 1. Report No. FHWA/TX-0-2129-1 2. Government Accession No. 3. Distribution Statement No restrictions. This document is available to the public through the National Technical

  14. Technical Report Documentation Page 1. Report No.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Texas at Austin, University of

    Technical Report Documentation Page 1. Report No. FHWA/TX-07/0-5068-2 2. Government Accession No. 3 No restrictions. This document is available to the public through the National Technical Information Service

  15. Technical Report Documentation Page 1. Report No.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Texas at Austin, University of

    Technical Report Documentation Page 1. Report No. FHWA/TX-05/0-4410-2 2. Government Accession No. 3. Distribution Statement No restrictions. This document is available to the public through the National Technical

  16. Technical Report Documentation Page 1. Report No.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zornberg, Jorge G.

    Technical Report Documentation Page 1. Report No. FHWA/TX-07/0-5202-3 2. Government Accession No. 3 Shale, Paris Clay, Beaumont Clay. 18. Distribution Statement No restrictions. This document is available

  17. Technical Report Documentation Page 1. Report No.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Texas at Austin, University of

    Technical Report Documentation Page 1. Report No. FHWA/TX-09/0-5830-1 2. Government Accession No. 3 No restrictions. This document is available to the public through the National Technical Information Service

  18. Technical Report Documentation Page 1. Report No.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Texas at Austin, University of

    Technical Report Documentation Page 1. Report No. FHWA/TX-05/0-4069-1 2. Government Accession No. 3. This document is available to the public through the National Technical Information Service, Springfield

  19. Technical Report Documentation Page 1. Report No.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Texas at Austin, University of

    Technical Report Documentation Page 1. Report No. FHWA/TX-07/0-4080-8 2. Government Accession No. 3 frameworks, econometric models, empirical results 18. Distribution Statement No restrictions. This document

  20. Technical Report Documentation Page 1. Report No.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Texas at Austin, University of

    Technical Report Documentation Page 1. Report No. 0-4080-1 2. Government Accession No. 3. Recipient modeling 18. Distribution Statement No restrictions. This document is available to the public through

  1. Technical Report Documentation Page 1. Report No.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Texas at Austin, University of

    Technical Report Documentation Page 1. Report No. 9-572-1 2. Government Accession No. 3. Recipient Statement No restrictions. This document is available to the public through the National Technical

  2. Technical Report Documentation Page 1. Report No.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Texas at Austin, University of

    Technical Report Documentation Page 1. Report No. FHWA/TX-06/0-4661-2 2. Government Accession No. 3. Distribution Statement No restrictions. This document is available to the public through the National Technical

  3. Technical Report Documentation Page 1. Report No.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Texas at Austin, University of

    Technical Report Documentation Page 1. Report No. FHWA/TX-05/0-1713-1 2. Government Accession No. 3 No restrictions. This document is available to the public through the National Technical Information Service

  4. Technical Report Documentation Page 1. Report No.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zornberg, Jorge G.

    Technical Report Documentation Page 1. Report No. FHWA/TX-07/0-5202-2 2. Government Accession No. 3 No restrictions. This document is available to the public through the National Technical Information Service

  5. Technical Report Documentation Page 1. Report No.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Texas at Austin, University of

    Technical Report Documentation Page 1. Report No. FHWA/TX-05/0-4185-3 2. Government Accession No. 3 Statement No restrictions. This document is available to the public through the National Technical

  6. Technical Report Documentation Page 1. Report No.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Texas at Austin, University of

    Technical Report Documentation Page 1. Report No. FHWA/TX-10/0-5973-2 2. Government Accession No. 3. Distribution Statement No restrictions. This document is available to the public through the National Technical

  7. Technical Report Documentation Page 1. Report No.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zornberg, Jorge G.

    Technical Report Documentation Page 1. Report No. FHWA/TX-13/5-4829-01-2 2. Government Accession No. This document is available to the public through the National Technical Information Service, Springfield

  8. Technical Report Documentation Page 1. Report No.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Texas at Austin, University of

    Technical Report Documentation Page 1. Report No. FHWA/TX-7-2957-2 2. Government Accession No. 3/pavement interaction, pavement noise, noise level. 18. Distribution Statement No restrictions. This document

  9. Technical Report Documentation Page 1. Report No.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Texas at Austin, University of

    Technical Report Documentation Page 1. Report No. FHWA/TX-05/0-1713-2 2. Government Accession No. 3. Distribution Statement No restrictions. This document is available to the public through the National Technical

  10. Technical Report Documentation Page 1. Report No.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Texas at Austin, University of

    Technical Report Documentation Page 1. Report No. FHWA/TX-07/0-5176-2 2. Government Accession No. 3. Distribution Statement No restrictions. This document is available to the public through the National Technical

  11. Technical Report Documentation Page 1. Report No.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Texas at Austin, University of

    Technical Report Documentation Page 1. Report No. FHWA/TX-05/5-1924-01-1 2. Government Accession No No restrictions. This document is available to the public through the National Technical Information Service

  12. Technical Report Documentation Page 1. Report No.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Texas at Austin, University of

    Technical Report Documentation Page 1. Report No. FHWA/TX-09/0-5668-1 2. Government Accession No. 3. Distribution Statement No restrictions. This document is available to the public through the National Technical

  13. Genome Biology 2007, 8:308 Meeting report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gent, Universiteit

    and has helped create genetically modified (GM) crops that are cultivated throughout the world. Marc Van, it will be absolutely necessary for Europe to embrace the use of GM crops, as has already happened in large parts of the world. The strong reaction of consumer-rights groups and environmentalists against the use of GM crops

  14. Radiological and Environmental Research Division annual report, January-December 1981: ecology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1982-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Highlights of progress accomplished during the year ending December 1981 are presented. Some of the subjects discussed are: the effects of acid deposition on crop-soil systems; the effects of energy-related pollutants on crops, including field corn, which was found to be quite resistant to both O/sub 3/ and SO/sub 2/; the synergistic effects of SO/sub 2/ and NO/sub x/ on soybean productivity; the impact of acid rain on food crops and the dependence of these effects on the chemical composition of rain; the effects of acid rain on soil systems; /sup 239/ /sup 240/Pu, /sup 241/Am, and /sup 243/ /sup 244/Am in a core from the Saquenay Fjord, Quebec; rate of removal of natural thorium isotopes from Lake Michigan water; influence of colloidal dissolved organic carbon on the sorption of plutonium on natural sediments; the behavior of americium in natural waters; and near-bottom currents and sediment resuspension in Lake Michigan. Separate abstracts have been prepared for 12 reports for inclusion in the Energy Data Base. (RJC)

  15. Bioenergy Feedstock Development Program Status Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kszos, L.A.

    2001-02-09T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) Bioenergy Feedstock Development Program (BFDP) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) is a mission-oriented program of research and analysis whose goal is to develop and demonstrate cropping systems for producing large quantities of low-cost, high-quality biomass feedstocks for use as liquid biofuels, biomass electric power, and/or bioproducts. The program specifically supports the missions and goals of DOE's Office of Fuels Development and DOE's Office of Power Technologies. ORNL has provided technical leadership and field management for the BFDP since DOE began energy crop research in 1978. The major components of the BFDP include energy crop selection and breeding; crop management research; environmental assessment and monitoring; crop production and supply logistics operational research; integrated resource analysis and assessment; and communications and outreach. Research into feedstock supply logistics has recently been added and will become an integral component of the program.

  16. Technical Report Documentation Page 1. Report No.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Texas at Austin, University of

    Technical Report Documentation Page 1. Report No. FHWA/TX-05 / 0-4562-1 2.Government accession No and Friction Losses in Multi-Strand Post- Tensioning Tendons Including the Effects of Emulsifiable Oils 6 Austin, TX 78705-2650 11. Contract or Grant No. 0-4562 13. Type of Report and Period Covered Technical

  17. Technical Report Documentation Page 1. Report No.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Texas at Austin, University of

    Technical Report Documentation Page 1. Report No. FHWA/TX-05/0-1778-3 2. Government Accession No. 3, and others. A number of reports, tables, and queries have been prepared and documented herein showing example. This document is available to the public through the National Technical Information Service, Springfield

  18. Technical Report Documentation Page 1. Report No.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Texas at Austin, University of

    Technical Report Documentation Page 1. Report No. FHWA/TX-05/0-1778-6 2. Government Accession No. 3 summarizes the tasks conducted under TxDOT Project 0-1778 "TxDOT Rigid Pavement Database." This document report is the final technical document prepared for the project. Additional information is provided

  19. Technical Report Documentation Page 1. Report No.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Texas at Austin, University of

    Technical Report Documentation Page 1. Report No. FWHA/TX-04/0-1741-4 2. Government Accession No. 3 Administration, and the Texas Department of Transportation. 16. Abstract This report documents the results, rehabilitation, evaluation 18. Distribution Statement No restrictions. This document is available to the public

  20. Technical Report Documentation Page 1. Report No.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Texas at Austin, University of

    Technical Report Documentation Page 1. Report No. FHWA/TX-04/0-1405-7 2. Government Accession No. 3 researchers, after an extensive literature review. This report documents the final evaluation of the long No restrictions. This document is available to the public through the National Technical Information Service

  1. The effect of cover crop and fertilizer rate on the growth and survival of loblolly pine in East Texas mine spoil

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kee, David Dwayne

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    /ha/year, fertilized with 0, 25 or 50 kg P/ha, were evaluated in the P study. CcnIpetition between cover crops and trees for light, water and nutrients influenced survival and growth of trees. Tree survival, after three years, was greatest in the subterranean... clover (42%), Coastal bermudagrass + 50 kg N/ha/year (45%) and Coastal bermudagrass + 0 kg N/ha (39%) plots. The highly competitive crops, Coastal bermudagrass + 100 kg N/ha/year and arrowleaf clover, had the lowest tree survival (14% and 13...

  2. 2009 ECR Report

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    from the U.S. Institute for Environmental Conflict Resolution, developed a report template and questionnaire to be used by agencies for this fourth annual report. DOE used...

  3. RMOTC - Library - Test Reports

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Test Reports All non-proprietary project reports that are approved for release are posted here. Many of RMOTC's projects have protection extended through a Cooperative Research and...

  4. NERSC System Reports

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Reports Usage Reports Batch Job Statistics See queue wait times, hours used, top users and other summary statistics for jobs run at NERSC (login required). Read More Parallel...

  5. TESLA Report 1998-28 TESLA Report 1998-28

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    TESLA Report 1998-28 #12;TESLA Report 1998-28 #12;TESLA Report 1998-28TESLA Report 1998-28TESLA Report 1998-28 Page 3 TESLA Report 1998-28 Page 1 #12;TESLA Report 1998-28TESLA Report 1998-28TESLA Report 1998-28 Page 4 TESLA Report 1998-28 Page 2 #12;TESLA Report 1998-28TESLA Report 1998-28TESLA

  6. TESLA Report 1997-22 TESLA Report 1997-22

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    TESLA Report 1997-22 #12;TESLA Report 1997-22 #12;TESLA Report 1997-22 #12;TESLA Report 1997-22 #12;TESLA Report 1997-22 #12;TESLA Report 1997-22 #12;TESLA Report 1997-22 #12;TESLA Report 1997-22 #12;TESLA Report 1997-22 #12;TESLA Report 1997-22 #12;TESLA Report 1997-22 #12;TESLA Report 1997-22 #12

  7. Annual Reports | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    2000 (pdf) Annual Report for 1999 (pdf) Annual Report for 1998 (pdf) Annual Report for 1997 (pdf) Annual Report for 1996 (pdf) Annual Report for 1995 (pdf) Annual Report for 1994...

  8. Watershed Scale Evaluation of the Sustainability and Productivity of Dedicated Energy Crop and Woody Biomass Operations

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your DensityEnergy U.S.-China Electric Vehicle and03/02ReportWaste-to-Energy andAprilWater and

  9. Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant environmental report for 1991

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Williams, M.F. (ed.) (Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc., Oak Ridge, TN (United States))

    1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This two-part report is published annually. It reflects the results of an environmental monitoring program designed to quantify potential increases in the concentration of contaminants and potential doses to the resident human population from the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PGDP). PGDP's overall goal for environmental management is to protect the environment and PGDP's neighbors and to maintain full compliance with all current regulations. The current environmental strategy is to identify any deficiencies and to develop a system to resolve them. The long-range goal of environmental management is to minimize the source of pollutants, to reduce the generation of waste, and to minimize hazardous waste by substitution of materials. Environmental-monitoring systems at PGDP include emission-monitoring networks for airborne and aqueous discharges, groundwater monitoring, solid waste characterization, and ambient-sampling networks for air, surface water, groundwater, vegetation, food crops, fish, wildlife, soil, and surface stream sediments.

  10. Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant environmental report for 1991. Volume 3

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Williams, M.F. [ed.] [Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc., Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This two-part report is published annually. It reflects the results of an environmental monitoring program designed to quantify potential increases in the concentration of contaminants and potential doses to the resident human population from the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PGDP). PGDP`s overall goal for environmental management is to protect the environment and PGDP`s neighbors and to maintain full compliance with all current regulations. The current environmental strategy is to identify any deficiencies and to develop a system to resolve them. The long-range goal of environmental management is to minimize the source of pollutants, to reduce the generation of waste, and to minimize hazardous waste by substitution of materials. Environmental-monitoring systems at PGDP include emission-monitoring networks for airborne and aqueous discharges, groundwater monitoring, solid waste characterization, and ambient-sampling networks for air, surface water, groundwater, vegetation, food crops, fish, wildlife, soil, and surface stream sediments.

  11. STEP Program Benchmark Report

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    STEP Program Benchmark Report, from the Tool Kit Framework: Small Town University Energy Program (STEP).

  12. Quarterly Progress Report

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Quarterly Progress Report, from the Tool Kit Framework: Small Town University Energy Program (STEP).

  13. STEP Participant Survey Report

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    STEP Participant Survey Report, from the Tool Kit Framework: Small Town University Energy Program (STEP).

  14. Technical Consultant Report Template

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Technical Consultant Report Template, from the Tool Kit Framework: Small Town University Energy Program (STEP).

  15. 2008 Annual Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none,

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This annual report includes: a brief overview of Western; FY 2008 operational highlights; and financial data.

  16. Copyright 2012 -Copyright Information, Privacy Statement, and Terms of Use American Society of Agronomy | Crop Science Society of America | Soil Science Society of America

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sparks, Donald L.

    © Copyright 2012 - Copyright Information, Privacy Statement, and Terms of Use American Society of Agronomy | Crop Science Society of America | Soil Science Society of America 5585 Guilford Road | Madison Browse by Section/Division of Interest Author Index Share | 86-4 The Role of Critical Zone Science

  17. Copyright 2012 -Copyright Information, Privacy Statement, and Terms of Use American Society of Agronomy | Crop Science Society of America | Soil Science Society of America

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sparks, Donald L.

    © Copyright 2012 - Copyright Information, Privacy Statement, and Terms of Use American Society of Agronomy | Crop Science Society of America | Soil Science Society of America 5585 Guilford Road | Madison & Environmental Quality See more from this Session: Future Frontiers in Soil Science Monday, October 22, 2012: 1

  18. Study site in Son La Province, Vietnam investigating appropriate soil-water-plant management practices for sustainable crop and livestock production (CRP project

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Richner, Heinz

    Study site in Son La Province, Vietnam investigating appropriate soil-water-plant management Schmitter). To Our Readers The Soil and Water Management and Crop Nutrition (SWMCN) Section and the SWMCN-2013 programme with other FAO Divisions through result-based activities relating to soil and water management

  19. Purdue AgronomyPurdue AgronomyCrop, Soil, and EnvironmEntal SCiEnCES Wastewater Biological Oxygen Demand in Septic Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Holland, Jeffrey

    , commonly called a biomat. This biomat is where the bulk of biological wastewater treatment occursPurdue AgronomyPurdue AgronomyCrop, Soil, and EnvironmEntal SCiEnCES Wastewater Biological Oxygen to surface or groundwater it can result in low dissolved oxygen #12; Wastewater Biological Oxygen Demand

  20. Annual Report 2001 Annual Report 2001

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Habib, Ayman

    The Arctic Institute of North America Annual Report 2001 The Arctic Institute of North America Annual Report 2001 #12;2000 Board of Directors · James Raffan,Seeley's Bay,Ontario (Chair until September 2001) · Murray B. Todd, Calgary,Alberta (Chair as of September 2001) · Luc Bouthillier,Québec City

  1. Technical Report Documentation Page 1. Report No.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Texas at Austin, University of

    Office P.O. Box 5080 Austin, TX 78763-5080 13. Type of Report and Period Covered Technical Report with potentially significant cost implications. This research project is designed to address issues associated, floodplain, Weir equations, culvert, flow, test channel, return channel, Pitot tube 18. Distribution

  2. Environmental Report Page 2 Environmental Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Evans, Paul

    impacts over a wide variety of areas. Environmental actions now span across all university departments Environmental Management System, EcoCampus. This helps us to identify and manage our key environmental impactsEnvironmental Report 2011--2012 #12;Page 2 Environmental Report Introduction N T U h a s a m b i

  3. Technical Report Documentation Page 1. Report No.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Texas at Austin, University of

    and solar panel installation. The Phase II installation utilized a more powerful datalogger at the Mustang. Type of Report and Period Covered Project Summary Report (9/99-12/99) 12. Sponsoring Agency Name ultrasonic sensors mounted on four different bridge piers. Researchers had access to the scour and stage data

  4. Technical Report Documentation Page 1. Report No.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Technical Report Documentation Page 1. Report No. SWUTC/13/600451-00073-1 2. Government Accession in both traditional internal combustion engine vehicles (ICEs) and electric vehicles (EVs) have a strong influence on transportation revenue by reducing fuel consumption per vehicle and ultimately drawing down

  5. Library Annual Report Library Annual Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tobar, Michael

    Library Annual Report 2007 Library Annual Report 2007 #12;www.library.uwa.edu.au Our mission: By delivering excellent information resources and services the Library is integral to the University's mission of advancing, transmitting and sustaining knowledge. Our vision: The Library will continue to be at the heart

  6. Technical Report Documentation Page 1. Report No.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Technical Report Documentation Page 1. Report No. SWUTC/04/167828-1 2. Government Accession No. 3 by incidents which result in great economic losses. In this research a framework for deployment of ITS ELECTRE I is used for selecting the best deployment strategy. The different alternative strategies

  7. Technical Report Documentation Page 1. Report No.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Texas at Austin, University of

    Technical Report Documentation Page 1. Report No. FHWA/TX-04/4178-2 2. Government Accession No. 3 of Transportation 16. Abstract Changes in the AASHTO Standard Specifications for Structural Supports for Highway commonly used connection details exhibit poor fatigue performance. This study was initiated to confirm

  8. Technical Report Documentation Page 1. Report No.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Texas at Austin, University of

    Technical Report Documentation Page 1. Report No. FHWA/TX-09/0-5444-2 2. Government Accession No. 3. Cross stitching is effective for cracks that are still relatively narrow. Details and specifications are included for a section of US 75 near Sherman that exhibited slab faulting and joint separation. 17. Key

  9. Technical Report Documentation Page 1. Report No.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Texas at Austin, University of

    Technical Report Documentation Page 1. Report No. FHWA/TX-04/0-4266-2 2. Government Accession No. 3 significant changes in traffic operation and safety. A review of the design standard documents shows Statement No restrictions. This document is available to the public through the National Technical

  10. Technical Report Documentation Page 1. Report No.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Texas at Austin, University of

    Technical Report Documentation Page 1. Report No. FHWA/TX-05/0-4079-1 2. Government Accession No. 3 estimation tool developed in Excel, accompanied by a supporting document providing instructions on its Estate, Condemnation Rates, Uniform Act 18. Distribution Statement No restrictions. This document

  11. Technical Report Documentation Page 1. Report No.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Texas at Austin, University of

    Technical Report Documentation Page 1. Report No. FHWA/TX-10/0-6655-CT-1 2. Government Accession No presents four documents created by the TxDOT Multi-Tier Pavement Management Workgroup. 17. Key Words System Operation, Preservation Optimization 18. Distribution Statement No restrictions. This document is available

  12. Technical Report Documentation Page 1. Report No.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Texas at Austin, University of

    Technical Report Documentation Page 1. Report No. FHWA/TX-10/0-5517-1 2. Government Accession No. 3 for a series of tire bale case histories. The following document outlines all the work conducted as part Statement No restrictions. This document is available to the public through the National Technical

  13. Technical Report Documentation Page 1. Report No.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Texas at Austin, University of

    Technical Report Documentation Page 1. Report No. FHWA/TX-05/0-1778-5 2. Government Accession No. 3 and funded by the Texas Department of Transportation (TxDOT). Project 0-1778 documents the efforts conducted-Button, Pavement Distress Index (PDI), z-score. 18. Distribution Statement No restrictions. This document

  14. Technical Report Documentation Page 1. Report No.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Texas at Austin, University of

    Technical Report Documentation Page 1. Report No. FHWA/TX-06/0-4085-1 2. Government Accession No. 3-related problems. Research is currently underway to document the performance of concrete using these mitigation Formation (DEF) 18. Distribution Statement No restrictions. This document is available to the public through

  15. Technical Report Documentation Page 1. Report No.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Texas at Austin, University of

    Technical Report Documentation Page 1. Report No. FHWA/TX-04/5-1873-01-1 2. Government Accession No to improve safety and facilitate traffic flow. Finally, they documented these design considerations. This document is available to the public through the National Technical Information Service, Springfield

  16. Technical Report Documentation Page 1. Report No.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mayne, Paul W.

    Technical Report Documentation Page 1. Report No. FHWA-IF-02-034 2. Government Accession No. 3. DiMaggio 16. Abstract This document presents state-of-the-practice information on the evaluation of soil and rock properties for geotechnical design applications. This document addresses the entire range

  17. Technical Report Documentation Page 1. Report No.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Texas at Austin, University of

    Technical Report Documentation Page 1. Report No. FHWA/TX-10/0-6044-1 2. Government Accession No. 3 the researchers' understanding of the general T&R approach used by the industry, (c) documents the research No restrictions. This document is available to the public through the National Technical Information Service

  18. Woody energy crops in the southeastern United States: Two centuries of practitioner experience

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kline, Keith L [ORNL; Coleman, Mark [USDA Forest Service

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Forest industry experts were consulted on the potential for hardwood tree species to serve as feedstock for bioenergy in the southeastern United States. Hardwoods are of interest for bioenergy because of desirable physical qualities, genetic research advances, and growth potential. Yet little data is available regarding potential productivity and costs. This paper describes required operations and provides a realistic estimate of the costs of producing bioenergy feedstock based on commercial experiences. Forestry practitioners reported that high productivity rates in southeastern hardwood plantations are confined to narrow site conditions or require costly inputs. Eastern cottonwood and American sycamore grow quickly on rich bottomlands, but are also prone to pests and disease. Sweetgum is frost hardy, has few pest or disease problems, and grows across a broad range of sites, yet growth rates are relatively low. Eucalypts require fewer inputs than do other species and offer high potential productivity but are limited by frost to the lower Coastal Plain and Florida. Further research is required to study naturally regenerated hardwood biomass resources. Loblolly pine has robust site requirements, growth rates rivaling hardwoods, and lower costs of production. More time and investment in silviculture, selection, and breeding will be needed to develop hardwoods as competitive biofuel feedstock species. Because of existing stands and fully developed operations, the forestry community considers loblolly pine to be a prime candidate for plantation bioenergy in the Southeast.

  19. DOE Joint Genome Institute 2008 Progress Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gilbert, David

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    materi- als into ethanol and other fuels. Developing Pichiais the leading U.S. fuel ethanol crop (sorghum is second).to economic lignocellulosic fuel ethanol. The DOE has made

  20. PRI Annual Report 2004

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maynard-Moody, Steven

    2005-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    research found within the pages of this annual report. To bring you closer to some of our research projects, the 2004 Annual Report focuses on three projects. Two teams of researchers are using innovative methods to examine important international issues...

  1. Refinery Capacity Report

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Capacity Report June 2014 With Data as of January 1, 2014 Independent Statistics & Analysis www.eia.gov U.S. Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 This report was prepared by...

  2. Hazard Analysis Database report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Niemi, B.J.

    1997-08-12T23:59:59.000Z

    This document describes and defines the Hazard Analysis Database for the Tank Waste Remediation System Final Safety Analysis Report.

  3. MMCR Calibration Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mead, D

    2010-03-23T23:59:59.000Z

    Calibration report for the Millimeter Wavelength Cloud Radar performed for the ARM Climate Research Facility by ProSensing Inc.

  4. Hazard analysis results report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Niemi, B.J., Westinghouse Hanford

    1996-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    This document describes and defines the Hazard Analysis Results for the Tank Waste Remediation System Final Safety Analysis Report.

  5. Technical Report Documentation Page 1. Report No.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. Prouty, and Monique H. Head 8. Performing Organization Report No. SWUTC 600451-00009-1 9 is composite with a topping deck. The major objectives of this research included evaluating (1

  6. Organic solvent topical report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cowley, W.L.

    1998-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

    This report is the technical basis for the accident and consequence analyses used in the Hanford Tank Farms Basis for Interim Operation. The report also contains the scientific and engineering information and reference material needed to understand the organic solvent safety issue. This report includes comments received from the Chemical Reactions Subcommittee of the Tank Advisory Panel.

  7. 2011 -2012 Annual Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yang, Zong-Liang

    2011 2012 Annual Report #12;2011 - 2012 Annual Report 2 INTRODUCING CAR SHARING Since the car share,116 Carpools 420 430 430 Car Share Members -- -- 661 #12;2011 - 2012 Annual Report 4 GARAGE PARKING INVENTORY or day, and gives the com- munity yet another reason to leave their cars at home. In its launch

  8. GATEWAY Demonstration Special Reports

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    DOE shares the results of completed GATEWAY demonstration projects, publishing detailed reports that include analysis of data collected, projected energy savings, economic analyses, and user feedback. Report briefs summarize key findings in a quick-scan format. Both the reports and briefs are available as Adobe Acrobat PDFs.

  9. 1995 PVUSA progress report. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Photovoltaics for Utility Scale Applications (PVUSA) is a national public-private partnership that is assessing and demonstrating the viability of utility-scale (US) photovoltaic (PV) electric generation systems and recent developments in PV module technology. This report updates the project`s progress, reviews the status and performance of the various PV installations during 1995, summarizes key accomplishments and conclusions, and serves as the final report under Pacific Gas and Electric Company`s project management.

  10. Assessment of Food Chain Pathway Parameters in Biosphere Models: Annual Progress Report for Fiscal Year 2004

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Napier, Bruce A.; Krupka, Kenneth M.; Fellows, Robert J.; Cataldo, Dominic A.; Valenta, Michelle M.; Gilmore, Tyler J.

    2004-12-02T23:59:59.000Z

    This Annual Progress Report describes the work performed and summarizes some of the key observations to date on the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission’s project Assessment of Food Chain Pathway Parameters in Biosphere Models, which was established to assess and evaluate a number of key parameters used in the food-chain models used in performance assessments of radioactive waste disposal facilities. Section 2 of this report describes activities undertaken to collect samples of soils from three regions of the United States, the Southeast, Northwest, and Southwest, and perform analyses to characterize their physical and chemical properties. Section 3 summarizes information gathered regarding agricultural practices and common and unusual crops grown in each of these three areas. Section 4 describes progress in studying radionuclide uptake in several representative crops from the three soil types in controlled laboratory conditions. Section 5 describes a range of international coordination activities undertaken by Project staff in order to support the underlying data needs of the Project. Section 6 provides a very brief summary of the status of the GENII Version 2 computer program, which is a “client” of the types of data being generated by the Project, and for which the Project will be providing training to the US NRC staff in the coming Fiscal Year. Several appendices provide additional supporting information.

  11. Report number codes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nelson, R.N. (ed.)

    1985-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This publication lists all report number codes processed by the Office of Scientific and Technical Information. The report codes are substantially based on the American National Standards Institute, Standard Technical Report Number (STRN)-Format and Creation Z39.23-1983. The Standard Technical Report Number (STRN) provides one of the primary methods of identifying a specific technical report. The STRN consists of two parts: The report code and the sequential number. The report code identifies the issuing organization, a specific program, or a type of document. The sequential number, which is assigned in sequence by each report issuing entity, is not included in this publication. Part I of this compilation is alphabetized by report codes followed by issuing installations. Part II lists the issuing organization followed by the assigned report code(s). In both Parts I and II, the names of issuing organizations appear for the most part in the form used at the time the reports were issued. However, for some of the more prolific installations which have had name changes, all entries have been merged under the current name.

  12. Relation of the Potash Removed by Crops to the Active, Total, Acid-Soluble, and Acid-Insoluble Potash of the Soil.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fraps, G. S. (George Stronach)

    1927-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    . Save all platinum waste and mix nothing else with it. Acid-Soluble Potash in Soils Weigh 10 grams of soil into a small pyres Erlenmeyer flask provided with a rubber stopper carrying 2...227-A210-GM-L180 TEXAS AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION B. YOUNGBLOOD, DIRECTOR COLLEGE STATION, BRAZOS COUNTY. TEXAS DIVISION OF CHEMISTRY RELATION OF THE POTASH REMOVED BY CROPS TO THE ACTIVE, TOTAL, ACID- SOLUBLE, AND ACID-INSOLUBLE POTASH...

  13. Farm-level simulation of alternative resource-conserving production systems for representative crop farms in the Northern Texas High Plains

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    De Brey, Cristobal J.

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    . 1988). The relative share of dryland farming has increased in recent years leaving land more, susceptible to wind and water erosion. Erosion concerns have increased over the 1980's. Resource-conserving production systems have, gained interest... cotton farms were assessed (Richardson et al. 1989). Conservation compliance scenarios analyzed by Richardson and others included high residue crop rotations and annual wind strips. FLlPSIM has also been used in combination with EPIC (Erosion...

  14. Working group report: Neutrino physics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Working group report: Neutrino physics Acknowledgements TheWorking group report: Neutrino physics Coordinators: SANDHYAthe report of the neutrino physics working group at WHEPP-X.

  15. LANSCE | News & Media | Activity Report

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    background News Multimedia Events Profiles Highlights Activity Reports The Pulse User Program Headlines News & Media dotline Activity Reports 2012 2011 LANSCE Activity Report 2012...

  16. 2012 Hanford Climate Survey Report - WRPS Report

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del(ANL-IN-03-032) -Less isNFebruary 2004August 2011CHPRC Report PreparedWRPS Report

  17. Architecture, Engineering and Construction Sustainability Report Biannual Sustainability Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kamat, Vineet R.

    Architecture, Engineering and Construction Sustainability Report i Biannual Sustainability Report Projects $5 Million and Over August 2012 Active Projects

  18. The effect of various cropping systems upon the stability of aggregates: the rate of water infiltration, and the organic matter content of three soil conditions in the Texas Blacklands.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Quintero, Angel H

    1951-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of the soil snd its relation to water oonserxation and to crop production has been recognised for a long tixm by uorkmrs e~ in agricultural research Soil fertility and plant growth are affected by a nuaber of faotarsx among which structurex organic matter.... . . , ?, ~ . ~ ~ ~ 31 ~ ~ ~ 32 ~ ~ ~ 33 Average pex'oentages of organic carbon in tbe surface layer of three land classes in 6 different cropping systelwl ~ ? ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ? ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ 34 Analysis of varianoe of organic oarbon in tbs...

  19. Advanced concepts in biomass production and biological pretreatment. Annual report, April 1987-March 1988

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hiler, E.A.; Miller, F.R.; McBee, G.G.; Boyle, M.; Boyer, J.

    1988-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The overall objective of the research is to investigate fundamental processes for enhancing the efficiency of methane from sorghum systems. The report provides specifics of research activities in the Texas AandM biomass and biological pretreatment program sponsored by Gas Research Institute and co-funded by Texas Agricultural Experiment Station. Five research groups, each with specific tasks are involved in the project: biomass production, quantity and quality; plant water stress; biological pretreatment and processing; long-term effects of land application of digester effluent; and crop-growth modeling, economics, and systems. Also included is the final report on Electrochemistry for the In-Situ Detection of Volatile Acids in Anaerobic Digesters.

  20. LANSCE Activity Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Amy Robinson; Audrey Archuleta; Barbara Maes; Dan Strottman; Earl Hoffman; Garth Tietjen; Gene Farnum; Geoff Greene; Joyce Roberts; Ken Johnson; Paul Lewis; Roger Pynn; Stan Schriber; Steve Sterbenz; Steve Wender; Sue Harper

    1999-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Los Alamos Neutron Science Center Activity Report describes scientific and technological progress and achievements in LANSCE Division during the period of 1995 to 1998. This report includes a message from the Division Director, an overview of LANSCE, sponsor overviews, research highlights, advanced projects and facility upgrades achievements, experimental and user program accomplishments, news and events, and a list of publications. The research highlights cover the areas of condensed-matter science and engineering, accelerator science, nuclear science, and radiography. This report also contains a compact disk that includes an overview, the Activity Report itself, LANSCE operations progress reports for 1996 and 1997, experiment reports from LANSCE users, as well as a search capability.