National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for 1957-2012 nuclear electricity

  1. NASA's nuclear electric propulsion technology project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stone, J.R.; Sovey, J.S. (NASA, Lewis Research Center, Cleveland, OH (United States))

    1992-07-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) has initiated a program to establish the readiness of nuclear electric propulsion (NEP) technology for relatively near-term applications to outer planet robotic science missions with potential future evolution to system for piloted Mars vehicles. This program was initiated in 1991 with a very modest effort identified with nuclear thermal propulsion (NTP); however, NEP is also an integral part of this program and builds upon NASA's Base Research and Technology Program in power and electric propulsion as well as the SP-100 space nuclear power program. The NEP Program will establish the feasibility and practicality of electric propulsion for robotic and piloted solar system exploration. The performance objectives are high specific impulse (200 greater than I(sub sp) greater than 10000 s), high efficiency (over 0.50), and low specific mass. The planning for this program was initially focussed on piloted Mars missions, but has since been redirected to first focus on 100-kW class systems for relatively near-term robotic missions, with possible future evolution to megawatt-and multi-megawatt-class systems applicable to cargo vehicles supporting human missions as well as to the piloted vehicles. This paper reviews current plans and recent progress for the overall nuclear electric propulsion project and closely related activities. 33 refs.

  2. Carbon pricing, nuclear power and electricity markets

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cameron, R.; Keppler, J. H. [OECD Nuclear Energy Agency, 12, boulevard des Iles, 92130 Issy-les-Moulineaux (France)

    2012-07-01

    In 2010, the NEA in conjunction with the International Energy Agency produced an analysis of the Projected Costs of Electricity for almost 200 power plants, covering nuclear, fossil fuel and renewable electricity generation. That analysis used lifetime costs to consider the merits of each technology. However, the lifetime cost analysis is less applicable in liberalised markets and does not look specifically at the viewpoint of the private investor. A follow-up NEA assessment of the competitiveness of nuclear energy against coal- and gas-fired generation under carbon pricing has considered just this question. The economic competition in electricity markets is today between nuclear energy and gas-fired power generation, with coal-fired power generation not being competitive as soon as even modest carbon pricing is introduced. Whether nuclear energy or natural gas comes out ahead in their competition depends on a number of assumptions, which, while all entirely reasonable, yield very different outcomes. The analysis in this study has been developed on the basis of daily data from European power markets over the last five-year period. Three different methodologies, a Profit Analysis looking at historic returns over the past five years, an Investment Analysis projecting the conditions of the past five years over the lifetime of plants and a Carbon Tax Analysis (differentiating the Investment Analysis for different carbon prices) look at the issue of competitiveness from different angles. They show that the competitiveness of nuclear energy depends on a number of variables which in different configurations determine whether electricity produced from nuclear power or from CCGTs generates higher profits for its investors. These are overnight costs, financing costs, gas prices, carbon prices, profit margins (or mark-ups), the amount of coal with carbon capture and electricity prices. This paper will present the outcomes of the analysis in the context of a liberalised electricity market, looking at the impact of the seven key variables and provide conclusions on the portfolio that a utility would be advised to maintain, given the need to limit risks but also to move to low carbon power generation. Such portfolio diversification would not only limit financial investor risk, but also a number of non-financial risks (climate change, security of supply, accidents). (authors)

  3. Electric heater for nuclear fuel rod simulators

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McCulloch, Reginald W. (Knoxville, TN); Morgan, Jr., Chester S. (Oak Ridge, TN); Dial, Ralph E. (Concord, TN)

    1982-01-01

    The present invention is directed to an electric cartridge-type heater for use as a simulator for a nuclear fuel pin in reactor studies. The heater comprises an elongated cylindrical housing containing a longitudinally extending helically wound heating element with the heating element radially inwardly separated from the housing. Crushed cold-pressed preforms of boron nitride electrically insulate the heating element from the housing while providing good thermal conductivity. Crushed cold-pressed preforms of magnesia or a magnesia-15 percent boron nitride mixture are disposed in the cavity of the helical heating element. The coefficient of thermal expansion of the magnesia or the magnesia-boron nitride mixture is higher than that of the boron nitride disposed about the heating element for urging the boron nitride radially outwardly against the housing during elevated temperatures to assure adequate thermal contact between the housing and the boron nitride.

  4. Electric Power Produced from Nuclear Reactor | National Nuclear Security

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration would like submitKansas Nuclear ProfileMultiferroic Electric FieldAdministration

  5. NASA's progress in nuclear electric propulsion technology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stone, J.R.; Doherty, M.P.; Peecook, K.M.

    1993-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) has established a requirement for Nuclear Electric Propulsion (NEP) technology for robotic planetary science mission applications with potential future evolution to systems for piloted Mars vehicles. To advance the readiness of NEP for these challenging missions, a near-term flight demonstration on a meaningful robotic science mission is very desirable. The requirements for both near-term and outer planet science missions are briefly reviewed, and the near-term baseline system established under a recent study jointly conducted by the Lewis Research Center (LeRC) and the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) is described. Technology issues are identified where work is needed to establish the technology for the baseline system, and technology opportunities which could provide improvement beyond baseline capabilities are discussed. Finally, the plan to develop this promising technology is presented and discussed. 19 refs.

  6. NASA's progress in nuclear electric propulsion technology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stone, J.R.; Doherty, M.P.; Peecook, K.M.

    1993-06-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) has established a requirement for Nuclear Electric Propulsion (NEP) technology for robotic planetary science mission applications with potential future evolution to systems for piloted Mars vehicles. To advance the readiness of NEP for these challenging missions, a near-term flight demonstration on a meaningful robotic science mission is very desirable. The requirements for both near-term and outer planet science missions are briefly reviewed, and the near-term baseline system established under a recent study jointly conducted by the Lewis Research Center (LeRC) and the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) is described. Technology issues are identified where work is needed to establish the technology for the baseline system, and technology opportunities which could provide improvement beyond baseline capabilities are discussed. Finally, the plan to develop this promising technology is presented and discussed.

  7. Nuclear-renewables energy system for hydrogen and electricity production

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haratyk, Geoffrey

    2011-01-01

    Climate change concerns and expensive oil call for a different mix of energy technologies. Nuclear and renewables attract attention because of their ability to produce electricity while cutting carbon emissions. However ...

  8. EXTENDING NUCLEAR ENERGY TO NON-ELECTRICAL APPLICATIONS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    R. Boardman; M. McKellar; D. Ingersoll; Z. Houghton; , R. Bromm; C. Desportes

    2014-09-01

    Electricity represents less than half of all energy consumed in the United States and globally. Although a few commercial nuclear power plants world-wide provide energy to non-electrical applications such as district heating and water desalination, nuclear energy has been largely relegated to base-load electricity production. A new generation of smaller-sized nuclear power plants offers significant promise for extending nuclear energy to many non-electrical applications. The NuScale small modular reactor design is especially well suited for these non-traditional customers due to its small unit size, very robust reactor protection features and a highly flexible and scalable plant design. A series of technical and economic evaluation studies have been conducted to assess the practicality of using a NuScale plant to provide electricity and heat to a variety of non-electrical applications, including water desalination, oil refining, and hydrogen production. The studies serve to highlight the unique design features of the NuScale plant for these applications and provide encouraging conclusions regarding the technical and economic viability of extending clean nuclear energy to a broad range of non-electrical energy consumers.

  9. Use of electric field to increase nuclear emulsion sensitivity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Didenko, A.Y.; Lemeshko, B.D.; Moroz, I.N.

    1985-11-01

    The possibility of increasing the sensitivity of type-R nuclear emulsion by means of an electric field of 4X10/sup 6/ V/cm is investigated. In model experiments, an emulsion (10 micrometers thick on a Dacron base 50 micrometers thick) is irradiated by a pulsed light source with an illumination duration of 10/sup -6/ sec. Application of 10/sup 3/ electric pulses to the emulsion does not change fogging. The memory time of the nuclear emulsion was determined by increasing the delay of the electric field relative to the light flash.

  10. Nuclear Hydrogen for Peak Electricity Production and Spinning Reserve

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Forsberg, C.W.

    2005-01-20

    Nuclear energy can be used to produce hydrogen. The key strategic question is this: ''What are the early markets for nuclear hydrogen?'' The answer determines (1) whether there are incentives to implement nuclear hydrogen technology today or whether the development of such a technology could be delayed by decades until a hydrogen economy has evolved, (2) the industrial partners required to develop such a technology, and (3) the technological requirements for the hydrogen production system (rate of production, steady-state or variable production, hydrogen purity, etc.). Understanding ''early'' markets for any new product is difficult because the customer may not even recognize that the product could exist. This study is an initial examination of how nuclear hydrogen could be used in two interconnected early markets: the production of electricity for peak and intermediate electrical loads and spinning reserve for the electrical grid. The study is intended to provide an initial description that can then be used to consult with potential customers (utilities, the Electric Power Research Institute, etc.) to better determine the potential real-world viability of this early market for nuclear hydrogen and provide the starting point for a more definitive assessment of the concept. If this set of applications is economically viable, it offers several unique advantages: (1) the market is approximately equivalent in size to the existing nuclear electric enterprise in the United States, (2) the entire market is within the utility industry and does not require development of an external market for hydrogen or a significant hydrogen infrastructure beyond the utility site, (3) the technology and scale match those of nuclear hydrogen production, (4) the market exists today, and (5) the market is sufficient in size to justify development of nuclear hydrogen production techniques independent of the development of any other market for hydrogen. These characteristics make it an ideal early market for nuclear hydrogen.

  11. Scoping calculations of power sources for nuclear electric propulsion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Difilippo, F.C. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)] [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

    1994-05-01

    This technical memorandum describes models and calculational procedures to fully characterize the nuclear island of power sources for nuclear electric propulsion. Two computer codes were written: one for the gas-cooled NERVA derivative reactor and the other for liquid metal-cooled fuel pin reactors. These codes are going to be interfaced by NASA with the balance of plant in order to making scoping calculations for mission analysis.

  12. Nuclear Electric Propulsion Technology Panel findings and recommendations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Doherty, M.P.

    1992-01-01

    Summarized are the findings and recommendations of a triagency (NASA/DOE/DOD) panel on Nuclear Electric Propulsion (NEP) Technology. NEP has been identified as a candidate nuclear propulsion technology for exploration of the Moon and Mars as part of the Space Exploration Initiative (SEI). The findings are stated in areas of system and subsystem considerations, technology readiness, and ground test facilities. Recommendations made by the panel are summarized concerning: (1) existing space nuclear power and propulsion programs, and (2) the proposed multiagency NEP technology development program.

  13. Nuclear electromagnetic pulse (EMP) and electric power systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barnes, P.R.; Vance, E.F.; Askins, H.W. Jr.

    1984-04-01

    A nuclear detonation at high altitudes produces a transient electromagnetic pulse (EMP) of high-intensity electromagnetic fields. A single high-altitude burst can subject most of the continental United States to a strong EMP. These intense fields induce voltage and current transients in electrical conductors. Surges would be induced by EMP in transmission and distribution circuits and in control and communication elements in electric power systems throughout the national grid. Such widespread disturbances could upset the stability of electrical energy systems and result in massive power failures. The extent and nature of EMP-caused damages are not well known for utility electric power systems. Failures are likely to be associated with insulation damage and failures of low-voltage and solid-state components. It is concluded from a review of past studies that EMP may pose a serious threat to the nation's electrical energy supply.

  14. On shielding of nuclear electric dipole moments in atoms

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    V. F. Dmitriev; I. B. Khriplovich; R. A. Sen'kov

    2005-04-08

    We demonstrate explicitly that some recent calculations of atomic electric dipole moments (EDM) are incomplete. A contribution overlooked therein is pointed out. When included, it cancels exactly the result of those calculations, and thus restores the standard conclusions for nuclear EDM in atoms.

  15. Nuclear electric propulsion: An integral part of NASA's nuclear propulsion project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stone, J.R.

    1992-01-01

    NASA has initiated a technology program to establish the readiness of nuclear propulsion technology for the Space Exploration Initiative (SEI). This program was initiated with a very modest effort identified with nuclear thermal propulsion (NTP); however, nuclear electric propulsion (NEP) is also an integral part of this program and builds upon NASA's Base Research and Technology Program in power and electric propulsion as well as the SP-100 space nuclear power program. Although the Synthesis Group On America's SEI has identified NEP only as an option for cargo missions, recent studies conducted by NASA-Lewis show that NEP offers the potential for early manned Mars missions as well. Lower power NEP is also of current interest for outer planetary robotic missions. Current plans are reviewed for the overall nuclear propulsion project, with emphasis on NEP and those elements of NTP program which have synergism with NEP.

  16. Nuclear electromagnetic pulse and the electric power system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Legro, J.R.; Reed, T.J.

    1985-01-01

    A single, high-altitude nuclear detonation over the continental United States can expose large geographic areas to transient, electromagnetic pulse (EMP). The initial electromagnetic fields produced by this event have been defined as high-altitude electromagnetic pulse (HEMP). Later-time, low frequency fields have been defined as magnetohydrodynamic-electromagnetic pulse (MHD-EMP). Nuclear detonations at, or near the surface of the earth can also produce transient EMP. These electromagnetic phenomena have been defined as source region electromagnetic pulse (SREMP). The Division of Electric Energy Systems (EES) of the United States Department of Energy (DOE) has formulated and implemented a Program Plan to assess the possible effects of the above nuclear EMP on civilian electric power systems. This unclassified research effort is under the technical leadership of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory. This paper presents a brief perspective of EMP phenomenology and important interaction issues for power systems based on research performed by Westinghouse Advanced Systems Technology as a principal subcontractor in the research effort.

  17. Nuclear reactor power for an electrically powered orbital transfer vehicle

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jaffe, L.; Beatty, R.; Bhandari, P.; Chow, E.; Deininger, W.; Ewell, R.; Fujita, T.; Grossman, M.; Kia, T.; Nesmith, B.

    1987-01-01

    To help determine the systems requirements for a 300-kWe space nuclear reactor power system, a mission and spacecraft have been examined which utilize electric propulsion and this nuclear reactor power for multiple transfers of cargo between low Earth orbit (LEO) and geosynchronous Earth orbit (GEO). A propulsion system employing ion thrusters and xenon propellant was selected. Propellant and thrusters are replaced after each sortie to GEO. The mass of the Orbital Transfer Vehicle (OTV), empty and dry, is 11,000 kg; nominal propellant load is 5000 kg. The OTV operates between a circular orbit at 925 km altitude, 28.5 deg inclination, and GEO. Cargo is brought to the OTV by Shuttle and an Orbital Maneuvering Vehicle (OMV); the OTV then takes it to GEO. The OTV can also bring cargo back from GEO, for transfer by OMV to the Shuttle. OTV propellant is resupplied and the ion thrusters are replaced by the OMV before each trip to GEO. At the end of mission life, the OTV's electric propulsion is used to place it in a heliocentric orbit so that the reactor will not return to Earth. The nominal cargo capability to GEO is 6000 kg with a transit time of 120 days; 1350 kg can be transferred in 90 days, and 14,300 kg in 240 days. These capabilities can be considerably increased by using separate Shuttle launches to bring up propellant and cargo, or by changing to mercury propellant.

  18. Definition, Expansion and Screening of Architectures for Planetary Exploration Class Nuclear Electric Propulsion and Power Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Definition, Expansion and Screening of Architectures for Planetary Exploration Class Nuclear, expansion and screening of Nuclear Electric Propulsion and Power concepts capable of achieving planetary left blank 2 #12;Definition, Expansion and Screening of Architectures for Planetary Exploration Class

  19. Critical technologies for reactors used in nuclear electric propulsion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bhattacharyya, S.K. (Argonne National Lab., IL (United States))

    1993-01-01

    Nuclear electric Propulsion (NEP) systems are expected to play a significant role in the exploration and exploitation of space. Unlike nuclear thermal propulsion (NTP) systems in which the hot reactor coolant is directly discharged from nozzles to provide the required thrust, NEP systems include electric power generation and conditioning units that in turn are used to drive electric thrusters. These thrusters accelerate sub atomic particles to produce thrust. The major advantage of NEP systems is the ability to provide very high specific impulses ([approximately]5000 s) that minimize the requirement for propellants. In addition, the power systems used in NEP could pro vide the dual purpose of also providing power for the missions at the destination. This synergism can be exploited in shared development costs. The NEP systems produce significantly lower thrust that NTP systems and are generally more massive. Both systems have their appropriate roles in a balanced space program. The technology development needs of NEP systems differ in many important ways from the development needs for NTP systems because of the significant differences in the operating conditions of the systems. The NEP systems require long-life reactor power systems operating at power levels that are considerably lower than those for NTP systems. In contrast, the operational lifetime of an NEP system (years) is orders of magnitude longer than the operational lifetime of NTP systems (thousands of second). Thus, the critical issue of NEP is survivability and reliable operability for very long times at temperatures that are considerably more modest than the temperatures required for effective NTP operations but generally much higher than those experienced in terrestrial reactors.

  20. The atomic electric dipole moment induced by the nuclear electric dipole moment; the magnetic moment effect

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Porsev, S G; Flambaum, V V

    2010-01-01

    We have considered a mechanism for inducing a time-reversal violating electric dipole moment (EDM) in atoms through the interaction of a nuclear EDM (d_N) with the hyperfine interaction, the "magnetic moment effect". We have derived the operator for this interaction and presented analytical formulas for the matrix elements between atomic states. Induced EDMs in the diamagnetic atoms 129Xe, 171Yb, 199Hg, 211Rn, and 225Ra have been calculated numerically. From the experimental limits on the atomic EDMs of 129Xe and 199Hg, we have placed the following constraints on the nuclear EDMs, |d_N(129Xe)|< 1.1 * 10^{-21} |e|cm and |d_N(199Hg)|< 2.8 * 10^{-24} |e|cm.

  1. The atomic electric dipole moment induced by the nuclear electric dipole moment; the magnetic moment effect

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. G. Porsev; J. S. M. Ginges; V. V. Flambaum

    2011-03-02

    We have considered a mechanism for inducing a time-reversal violating electric dipole moment (EDM) in atoms through the interaction of a nuclear EDM (d_N) with the hyperfine interaction, the "magnetic moment effect". We have derived the operator for this interaction and presented analytical formulas for the matrix elements between atomic states. Induced EDMs in the diamagnetic atoms 129Xe, 171Yb, 199Hg, 211Rn, and 225Ra have been calculated numerically. From the experimental limits on the atomic EDMs of 129Xe and 199Hg, we have placed the following constraints on the nuclear EDMs, |d_N(129Xe)|< 1.1 * 10^{-21} |e|cm and |d_N(199Hg)|< 2.8 * 10^{-24} |e|cm.

  2. ELECTRIC

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    you nay give us will be greatly uppreckted. VPry truly your23, 9. IX. Sin0j3, Mtinager lclectronics and Nuclear Physics Dept. omh , WESTINGHOUSE-THE NAT KING IN ELECTRICITY...

  3. Nuclear electric propulsion for future NASA space science missions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yen, Chen-wan L.

    1993-07-20

    This study has been made to assess the needs, potential benefits and the applicability of early (circa year 2000) Nuclear Electric Propulsion (NEP) technology in conducting NASA science missions. The study goals are: to obtain the performance characteristics of near term NEP technologies; to measure the performance potential of NEP for important OSSA missions; to compare NEP performance with that of conventional chemical propulsion; to identify key NEP system requirements; to clarify and depict the degree of importance NEP might have in advancing NASA space science goals; and to disseminate the results in a format useful to both NEP users and technology developers. This is a mission performance study and precludes investigations of multitudes of new mission operation and systems design issues attendant in a NEP flight.

  4. Nuclear electric propulsion operational reliability and crew safety study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Karns, J.J.; Fragola, J.R.; Kahan, L.; Pelaccio, D. (Science Applications International Corporation, 8 W 40th St., 14th Floor, New York, New York 10018 (United States))

    1993-01-20

    The central purpose of this analysis is to assess the achievability'' of a nuclear electric propulsion (NEP) system in a given mission. Achievability'' is a concept introduced to indicate the extent to which a system that meets or achieves its design goals might be implemented using the existing technology base. In the context of this analysis, the objective is to assess the achievability of an NEP system for a manned Mars mission as it pertains to operational reliability and crew safety goals. By varying design parameters, then examining the resulting system achievability, the design and mission risk drivers can be identified. Additionally, conceptual changes in design approach or mission strategy which are likely to improve overall achievability of the NEP system can be examined.

  5. Innovation Dynamics in the Development of Nuclear Energy and Electric Vehicles in France

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    de Weck, Olivier L.

    Innovation Dynamics in the Development of Nuclear Energy and Electric Vehicles in France Abdelkrim-- innovation processes; nuclear energy; electric vehicles ; technological trajectory. I. INTRODUCTION of national energy security policy in France after the 1973 oil crisis that catalyzed a shift from dependence

  6. Version 2.0 Finite nuclear mass corrections to electric and magnetic

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pachucki, Krzysztof

    for the leading corrections to the relativistic contribution to energy, the transition electric dipole moment to rovibrational energies in diatomic molecules. 2 #12; Further examples are finite nuclear mass correctionsVersion 2.0 Finite nuclear mass corrections to electric and magnetic interactions in diatomic

  7. Nuclear electric propulsion for planetary science missions: NASA technology program planning

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Doherty, M.P.

    1993-05-01

    This paper presents the status of technology program planning to develop those Nuclear Electric Propulsion technologies needed to meet the advanced propulsion system requirements for planetary science missions in the next century. The technology program planning is based upon technologies with significant development heritage: ion electric propulsion and the SP-100 space nuclear power technologies. Detailed plans are presented for the required ion electric propulsion technology development and demonstration. Closer coordination between space nuclear power and space electric propulsion technology programs is a necessity as technology plans are being further refined in light of NEP concept definition and possible early NEP flight activities.

  8. Nuclear qualified in-containment electrical connectors and method of connecting electrical conductors

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Powell, J. G. (Clifton Park, NY)

    1991-01-01

    A nuclear qualified in-containment electrical connection comprises an insulated, sheathed instrument lead having electrical conductors extending from one end thereof to provide two exposed lead wires, a watertight cable having electrical conducting wires therein and extending from one end of the cable to provide two lead wires therefrom, two butt splice connectors each connecting the ends of respective ones of the lead wires from the instrument lead and cable, a length of heat shrinkable plastic tubing positioned over each butt splice connector and an adjacent portion of a respective lead wire from the cable and heat shrunk into position, a length of heat shrinkable plastic tubing on the end portion of the instrument lead adjacent the lead wires therefrom and heat shrunk thereon and a length of outer heat shrinkable plastic tubing extending over the end portion of the instrument lead and the heat shrinkable tubing thereon and over the butt splice connectors and a portion of the cable adjacent the cable lead lines, the outer heat shrinkable tubing being heat shrunk into sealing position on the instrument lead and cable.

  9. RADIOLOGICAL HEALTH AND RELATED STANDARDS FOR NUCLEAR POWER PLANTS. VOLUME 2 OF HEALTH AND SAFETY IMPACTS OF NUCLEAR, GEOTHERMAL, AND FOSSIL-FUEL ELECTRIC GENERATION IN CALIFORNIA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nero, A.V.

    2010-01-01

    the possible risk from nuclear power . it . is sufficient tothe Cancer Risk Due to Nuclear-Electric Power Generation",of Accident Risks in U.S. Commercial Nuclear Power Plants",

  10. Technology Survey and Performance Scaling for the Design of High Power Nuclear Electric Power and Propulsion Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 Technology Survey and Performance Scaling for the Design of High Power Nuclear Electric Power OF HIGH POWER NUCLEAR ELECTRIC POWER AND PROPULSION SYSTEMS by Daniel B. White Jr. Submitted for the degree of Doctor of Philosophy in Aeronautics and Astronautics ABSTRACT High power nuclear electric

  11. Nuclear electric propulsion for planetary science missions: NASA technology program planning

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Doherty, M.P. (NASA Lewis Research Center, 21000 Brookpark Rd., Cleveland, Ohio 44135 (United States))

    1993-01-10

    This paper presents the status of technology program planning to achieve readiness of Nuclear Electric Propulsion technologies needed to meet the advanced propulsion system requirements for planetary science missions in the next century. The technology program planning is based upon technologies of significant maturity: ion electric propulsion and the SP-100 space nulcear power technologies. Detailed plans are presented herein for the required ion electric propulsion technology development and demonstration. Closer coordination between space nuclear power and space electric propulsion technology programs is a necessity as technology plans are being further refined in light of NEP concept definition and possible early NEP flight activities.

  12. Nuclear-Renewable Hybrid System Economic Basis for Electricity, Fuel, and Hydrogen

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Charles Forsberg; Steven Aumeier

    2014-04-01

    Concerns about climate change and altering the ocean chemistry are likely to limit the use of fossil fuels. That implies a transition to a low-carbon nuclear-renewable electricity grid. Historically variable electricity demand was met using fossil plants with low capital costs, high operating costs, and substantial greenhouse gas emissions. However, the most easily scalable very-low-emissions generating options, nuclear and non-dispatchable renewables (solar and wind), are capital-intensive technologies with low operating costs that should operate at full capacities to minimize costs. No combination of fully-utilized nuclear and renewables can meet the variable electricity demand. This implies large quantities of expensive excess generating capacity much of the time. In a free market this results in near-zero electricity prices at times of high nuclear renewables output and low electricity demand with electricity revenue collapse. Capital deployment efficiency—the economic benefit derived from energy systems capital investment at a societal level—strongly favors high utilization of these capital-intensive systems, especially if low-carbon nuclear renewables are to replace fossil fuels. Hybrid energy systems are one option for better utilization of these systems that consumes excess energy at times of low prices to make some useful product.The economic basis for development of hybrid energy systems is described for a low-carbon nuclear renewable world where much of the time there are massivequantities of excess energy available from the electric sector.Examples include (1) high-temperature electrolysis to generate hydrogen for non-fossil liquid fuels, direct use as a transport fuel, metal reduction, etc. and (2) biorefineries.Nuclear energy with its concentrated constant heat output may become the enabling technology for economically-viable low-carbon electricity grids because hybrid nuclear systems may provide an economic way to produce dispatachable variable electricity with economic base-load operation of the reactor.

  13. Nuclear economics 2000: Deterministic and probabilistic projections of nuclear and coal electric power generation costs for the year 2000

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Williams, K.A.; Delene, J.G.; Fuller, L.C.; Bowers, H.I.

    1987-06-01

    The total busbar electric generating costs were estimated for locations in ten regions of the United States for base-load nuclear and coal-fired power plants with a startup date of January 2000. For the Midwest region a complete data set that specifies each parameter used to obtain the comparative results is supplied. When based on the reference set of input variables, the comparison of power generation costs is found to favor nuclear in most regions of the country. Nuclear power is most favored in the northeast and western regions where coal must be transported over long distances; however, coal-fired generation is most competitive in the north central region where large reserves of cheaply mineable coal exist. In several regions small changes in the reference variables could cause either option to be preferred. The reference data set reflects the better of recent electric utility construction cost experience (BE) for nuclear plants. This study assumes as its reference case a stable regulatory environment and improved planning and construction practices, resulting in nuclear plants typically built at the present BE costs. Today's BE nuclear-plant capital investment cost model is then being used as a surrogate for projected costs for the next generation of light-water reactor plants. An alternative analysis based on today's median experience (ME) nuclear-plant construction cost experience is also included. In this case, coal is favored in all ten regions, implying that typical nuclear capital investment costs must improve for nuclear to be competitive.

  14. Nuclear electric propulsion : assessing the design of Project Prometheus.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goycoolea, Martin

    2013-01-01

    The high fuel efficiency of electric propulsion makes it a viable alternative for long-distance space travel. Project Prometheus was a NASA-led project that sought to demonstrate that distant electric propulsion missions ...

  15. NRC (Nuclear Regulatory Commission) staff evaluation of the General Electric Company Nuclear Reactor Study (''Reed Report'')

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1987-07-01

    In 1975, the General Electric Company (GE) published a Nuclear Reactor Study, also referred to as ''the Reed Report,'' an internal product-improvement study. GE considered the document ''proprietary'' and thus, under the regulations of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), exempt from mandatory public disclosure. Nonetheless, members of the NRC staff reviewed the document in 1976 and determined that it did not raise any significant new safety issues. The staff also reached the same conclusion in subsequent reviews. However, in response to recent inquiries about the report, the staff reevaluated the Reed Report from a 1987 perspective. This re-evaluation, documented in this staff report, concluded that: (1) there are no issues raised in the Reed Report that support a need to curtail the operation of any GE boiling water reactor (BWR); (2) there are no new safety issues raised in the Reed Report of which the staff was unaware; and (3) although certain issues addressed by the Reed Report are still being studied by the NRC and the industry, there is no basis for suspending licensing and operation of GE BWR plants while these issues are being resolved.

  16. Nuclear electric dipole moment of light nuclei in the gaussian expansion method

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yamanaka, Nodoka

    2015-01-01

    The nuclear electric dipole moment is a very sensitive probe of CP violation beyond the standard model, and for light nuclei, it can be evaluated accurately using few-body calculational methods. In this talk, we present the result of the calculation of the electric dipole moment of the deuteron, $^3$He, $^3$H, $^6$Li, and $^9$Be in the Gaussian expansion method with the realistic nuclear force, and assuming the one-meson exchange model for the P, CP-odd nuclear force. We then give future prospects for models beyond standard model such as the supersymmetry.

  17. Technology survey and performance scaling for the design of high power nuclear electric power and propulsion systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    White, Daniel B., Jr

    2011-01-01

    High power nuclear electric propulsion systems have the capability to enable many next-generation space exploration applications. To date, use of electric primary propulsion in flight systems has been limited to low-power, ...

  18. A nuclear wind/solar oil-shale system for variable electricity and liquid fuels production

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Forsberg, C.

    2012-07-01

    The recoverable reserves of oil shale in the United States exceed the total quantity of oil produced to date worldwide. Oil shale contains no oil, rather it contains kerogen which when heated decomposes into oil, gases, and a carbon char. The energy required to heat the kerogen-containing rock to produce the oil is about a quarter of the energy value of the recovered products. If fossil fuels are burned to supply this energy, the greenhouse gas releases are large relative to producing gasoline and diesel from crude oil. The oil shale can be heated underground with steam from nuclear reactors leaving the carbon char underground - a form of carbon sequestration. Because the thermal conductivity of the oil shale is low, the heating process takes months to years. This process characteristic in a system where the reactor dominates the capital costs creates the option to operate the nuclear reactor at base load while providing variable electricity to meet peak electricity demand and heat for the shale oil at times of low electricity demand. This, in turn, may enable the large scale use of renewables such as wind and solar for electricity production because the base-load nuclear plants can provide lower-cost variable backup electricity. Nuclear shale oil may reduce the greenhouse gas releases from using gasoline and diesel in half relative to gasoline and diesel produced from conventional oil. The variable electricity replaces electricity that would have been produced by fossil plants. The carbon credits from replacing fossil fuels for variable electricity production, if assigned to shale oil production, results in a carbon footprint from burning gasoline or diesel from shale oil that may half that of conventional crude oil. The U.S. imports about 10 million barrels of oil per day at a cost of a billion dollars per day. It would require about 200 GW of high-temperature nuclear heat to recover this quantity of shale oil - about two-thirds the thermal output of existing nuclear reactors in the United States. With the added variable electricity production to enable renewables, additional nuclear capacity would be required. (authors)

  19. Nuclear electric propulsion: A better, safer, cheaper transportation system for human exploration of Mars

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Clark, J.S.; George, J.A.; Gefert, L.P.; Doherty, M.P.; Sefcik, R.J.

    1994-03-01

    NASA has completed a preliminary mission and systems study of nuclear electric propulsion (NEP) systems for split-sprint' human exploration and related robotic cargo missions to Mars. This paper describes the study, the mission architecture selected, the NEP system and technology development needs, proposed development schedules, and estimated development costs. Since current administration policy makers have delayed funding for key technology development activities that could make Mars exploration missions a reality in the near future, NASA will have time to evaluate various alternate mission options, and it appears prudent to ensure that Mars mission plans focus on astronaut and mission safety, while reducing costs to acceptable levels. The split-sprint nuclear electric propulsion system offers trip times comparable to nuclear thermal propulsion (NTP) systems, while providing mission abort opportunities that are not possible with reference' mission architectures. Thus, NEP systems offer short transit times for the astronauts, reducing the exposure of the crew to intergalactic cosmic radiation. The high specific impulse of the NEP system, which leads to very low propellant requirements, results in significantly lower initial mass in low earth orbit' (IMLEO). Launch vehicle packaging studies show that the NEP system can be launched, assembled, and deployed, with about one less 240-metric-ton heavy lift launch vehicle (HLLV) per mission opportunity - a very Technology development cost of the nuclear reactor for an NEP system would be shared with the proposed nuclear surface power systems, since nuclear systems will be required to provide substantial electrical power on the surface of Mars. The NEP development project plan proposed includes evolutionary technology development for nuclear electric propulsion systems that expands upon SP-100 (Space Power - 100 kw(e)) technology that has been developed for lunar and Mars surface nuclear power.

  20. Application of the enabler to nuclear electric propulsion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pierce, B.L. (Westinghouse Electric Corporation Advanced Energy Systems P.O Box 158 Madison, PA 15663-0158 (US))

    1991-01-01

    This paper describes a power system concept that provides the electric power for a baseline electric propulsion system for a piloted mission to Mars. A 10-MWe space power system is formed by coupling an Enabler reactor with a simple non-recuperated closed Brayton cycle. The Enabler reactor is a gas-cooled reactor based on proven reactor technology developed under the NERVA/Rover programs. The selected power cycle, which uses a helium-xenon mixture at 1920 K at the turbine inlet, is diagramed and described. The specific mass of the power system over the power range from 5 to 70 MWe is given. The impact of operating life on the specific mass of a 10-MWe system is also shown.

  1. Electrically driven nuclear spin resonance in a single-molecule magnet

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vallette, Bruno

    Electrically driven nuclear spin resonance in a single-molecule magnet Institut Néel : Nanospin Institut Néel, CNRS-UJF, Grenoble NanoSpin #12;· Molecular magnets are characterised by : a magnetic moment a strong uniaxial anisotropy Mn12 Molecular magnets Fe8 #12;· Molecular magnets are characterised

  2. ELEC0018-1 Energy markets -Assignement: Impact of a nuclear power phase-out on the electricity price.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ernst, Damien

    ELEC0018-1 Energy markets - Assignement: Impact of a nuclear power phase-out on the electricity of the energy markets in order to get a reasoned conclusion about the impact that a nuclear power phase care should be given to the following aspects: · Put the nuclear power sector into perspective

  3. The nuclear electromagnetic pulse and the electric power grid: A different perspective: Special report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rabinowitz, M.

    1987-10-01

    This report primarily considers the potential effects of a single high-altitude nuclear burst on the US power grid. It describes various types of electromagnetic pulses (EMP) from a nuclear explosion and provides a brief historical overview of EMP. A comparison is made between EMP and natural phenomena such as lightning and solar storms. This report concludes that EMP effects are exaggerated because of an unrealistic assumption of the pulse that can be seen by the power system. An upper limit of the electric field of the very fast, high-amplitude EMP is derived from first principles. The resulting values indicate that although electric fields approaching 50 kV/m might be obtained locally, the energy content is significantly lower than the commonly presented values, and the electric field decreases rapidly with distance. Additional calculations show that the ionization produced by a nuclear burst severely attenuates the EMP. These findings all indicate that EMP damage to the US power grid in equipment flashovers and line flashovers from a high-altitude nuclear bomb will be negligible, except for localized damage to some unshielded electronic control systems. Since it is difficult to make accurate calculations of the coupling of EMP into complex electronic systems, this report relies on the results of other studies which indicate the possibility of minimal damage. 42 refs., 23 figs., 6 tabs.

  4. Nuclear Electric Dipole Moments in Chiral Effective Field Theory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. Bsaisou; J. de Vries; C. Hanhart; S. Liebig; Ulf-G. Meißner; D. Minossi; A. Nogga; A. Wirzba

    2015-04-30

    We provide a consistent and complete calculation of the electric dipole moments of the deuteron, helion, and triton in the framework of chiral effective field theory. The CP-conserving and CP-violating interactions are treated on equal footing and we consider CP-violating one-, two-, and three-nucleon operators up to next-to-leading-order in the chiral power counting. In particular, we calculate for the first time EDM contributions induced by the CP-violating three-pion operator. We find that effects of CP-violating nucleon-nucleon contact interactions are larger than those found in previous studies based on phenomenological models for the CP-conserving nucleon-nucleon interactions. Our results which apply to any model of CP violation in the hadronic sector can be used to test various scenarios of CP violation. As examples, we study the implications of our results on the QCD $\\theta$-term and the minimal left-right symmetric model.

  5. Effect of the fast nuclear electromagnetic pulse on the electric power grid nationwide: A different view

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rabinowitz, M.

    1987-01-01

    This paper primarily considers the potential effects of a single high-altitude nuclear burst on the US power grid. A comparison is made between electromagnetic pulse(EMP) and natural phenomena such as lightning. This paper concludes that EMP is no more harmful to the power grid than its counterparts in nature. An upper limit of the electric field of the very fast, high-amplitude EMP is derived from first principles. The resulting values are significantly lower than the commonly presented values. Additional calculations show that the ionization produced by a nuclear burst severely attenuates the EMP. 21 refs., 2 figs., 6 tabs.

  6. Potential Applications for Nuclear Energy besides Electricity Generation: AREVA Global Perspective of HTR Potential Market

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Soutworth, Finis; Gauthier, Jean-Claude; Lecomte, Michel; Carre, Franck

    2007-07-01

    Energy supply is increasingly showing up as a major issue for electricity supply, transportation, settlement, and process heat industrial supply including hydrogen production. Nuclear power is part of the solution. For electricity supply, as exemplified in Finland and France, the EPR brings an immediate answer; HTR could bring another solution in some specific cases. For other supply, mostly heat, the HTR brings a solution inaccessible to conventional nuclear power plants for very high or even high temperature. As fossil fuels costs increase and efforts to avoid generation of Greenhouse gases are implemented, a market for nuclear generated process heat will develop. Following active developments in the 80's, HTR have been put on the back burner up to 5 years ago. Light water reactors are widely dominating the nuclear production field today. However, interest in the HTR technology was renewed in the past few years. Several commercial projects are actively promoted, most of them aiming at electricity production. ANTARES is today AREVA's response to the cogeneration market. It distinguishes itself from other concepts with its indirect cycle design powering a combined cycle power plant. Several reasons support this design choice, one of the most important of which is the design flexibility to adapt readily to combined heat and power applications. From the start, AREVA made the choice of such flexibility with the belief that the HTR market is not so much in competition with LWR in the sole electricity market but in the specific added value market of cogeneration and process heat. In view of the volatility of the costs of fossil fuels, AREVA's choice brings to the large industrial heat applications the fuel cost predictability of nuclear fuel with the efficiency of a high temperature heat source free of greenhouse gases emissions. The ANTARES module produces 600 MWth which can be split into the required process heat, the remaining power drives an adapted prorated electric plant. Depending on the process heat temperature and power needs, up to 80 % of the nuclear heat is converted into useful power. An important feature of the design is the standardization of the heat source, as independent as possible of the process heat application. This should expedite licensing. The essential conditions for success include: 1. Timely adapted licensing process and regulations, codes and standards for such application and design; 2. An industry oriented R and D program to meet the technological challenges making the best use of the international collaboration. Gen IV could be the vector; 3. Identification of an end user (or a consortium of) willing to fund a FOAK. (authors)

  7. Enhancement of the CP-odd effect in the nuclear electric dipole moment of $^6$Li

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nodoka Yamanaka; Emiko Hiyama

    2015-03-15

    We calculate for the first time the electric dipole moment (EDM) of the $^6$Li nucleus within the alpha + p + n three-body cluster model using the Gaussian expansion method, assuming the one meson exchange P, CP-odd nuclear forces. It is found that the EDM of the $^6$Li is 2 times more sensitive on the isovector pion exchange P, CP-odd nuclear force than the deuteron EDM, due to the CP-odd interaction between the nucleons and the alpha cluster. The $^9$Be EDM is also calculated in the same framework as an alpha + alpha + n three-body system. We also test the ab initio calculation of the EDM of the deuteron, $^3$H and $^3$He nuclei using the realistic Argonne $v18$ nuclear force. In the ab initio calculations, good agreements with previous studies are obtained. We finally discuss the prospects for the new physics beyond the standard model.

  8. The effects of solar-geomagnetically induced currents on electrical systems in nuclear power stations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Subudhi, M. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States)] [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States); Carroll, D.P. [Florida Univ., Gainesville, FL (United States)] [Florida Univ., Gainesville, FL (United States); Kasturi, S. [MOS, Inc., Melville, NY (United States)] [MOS, Inc., Melville, NY (United States)

    1994-01-01

    This report presents the results of a study to evaluate the potential effects of geomagnetically induced currents (GICs) caused by the solar disturbances on the in-plant electrical distribution system and equipment in nuclear power stations. The plant-specific electrical distribution system for a typical nuclear plant is modeled using the ElectroMagnetic Transient Program (EMTP). The computer model simulates online equipment and loads from the station transformer in the switchyard of the power station to the safety-buses at 120 volts to which all electronic devices are connected for plant monitoring. The analytical model of the plant`s electrical distribution system is studied to identify the transient effects caused by the half-cycle saturation of the station transformers due to GIC. This study provides results of the voltage harmonics levels that have been noted at various electrical buses inside the plant. The emergency circuits appear to be more susceptible to high harmonics due to the normally light load conditions. In addition to steady-state analysis, this model was further analyzed simulating various plant transient conditions (e.g., loss of load or large motor start-up) occurring during GIC events. Detail models of the plant`s protective relaying system employed in bus transfer application were included in this model to study the effects of the harmonic distortion of the voltage input. Potential harmonic effects on the uniterruptable power system (UPS) are qualitatively discussed as well.

  9. The development of the time dependence of the nuclear EMP electric field

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eng, C

    2009-10-30

    The nuclear electromagnetic pulse (EMP) electric field calculated with the legacy code CHAP is compared with the field given by an integral solution of Maxwell's equations, also known as the Jefimenko equation, to aid our current understanding on the factors that affect the time dependence of the EMP. For a fair comparison the CHAP current density is used as a source in the Jefimenko equation. At first, the comparison is simplified by neglecting the conduction current and replacing the standard atmosphere with a constant density air slab. The simplicity of the resultant current density aids in determining the factors that affect the rise, peak and tail of the EMP electric field versus time. The three dimensional nature of the radiating source, i.e. sources off the line-of-sight, and the time dependence of the derivative of the current density with respect to time are found to play significant roles in shaping the EMP electric field time dependence. These results are found to hold even when the conduction current and the standard atmosphere are properly accounted for. Comparison of the CHAP electric field with the Jefimenko electric field offers a direct validation of the high-frequency/outgoing wave approximation.

  10. Hydrogen-or-Fossil-Combustion Nuclear Combined-Cycle Systems for Base- and Peak-Load Electricity Production

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Forsberg, Charles W; Conklin, Jim

    2007-09-01

    A combined-cycle power plant is described that uses (1) heat from a high-temperature nuclear reactor to meet base-load electrical demands and (2) heat from the same high-temperature reactor and burning natural gas, jet fuel, or hydrogen to meet peak-load electrical demands. For base-load electricity production, fresh air is compressed; then flows through a heat exchanger, where it is heated to between 700 and 900 C by heat provided by a high-temperature nuclear reactor via an intermediate heat-transport loop; and finally exits through a high-temperature gas turbine to produce electricity. The hot exhaust from the Brayton-cycle gas turbine is then fed to a heat recovery steam generator that provides steam to a steam turbine for added electrical power production. To meet peak electricity demand, the air is first compressed and then heated with the heat from a high-temperature reactor. Natural gas, jet fuel, or hydrogen is then injected into the hot air in a combustion chamber, combusts, and heats the air to 1300 C-the operating conditions for a standard natural-gas-fired combined-cycle plant. The hot gas then flows through a gas turbine and a heat recovery steam generator before being sent to the exhaust stack. The higher temperatures increase the plant efficiency and power output. If hydrogen is used, it can be produced at night using energy from the nuclear reactor and stored until needed. With hydrogen serving as the auxiliary fuel for peak power production, the electricity output to the electric grid can vary from zero (i.e., when hydrogen is being produced) to the maximum peak power while the nuclear reactor operates at constant load. Because nuclear heat raises air temperatures above the auto-ignition temperatures of the various fuels and powers the air compressor, the power output can be varied rapidly (compared with the capabilities of fossil-fired turbines) to meet spinning reserve requirements and stabilize the electric grid. This combined cycle uses the unique characteristics of high-temperature reactors (T>700 C) to produce electricity for premium electric markets whose demands can not be met by other types of nuclear reactors. It may also make the use of nuclear reactors economically feasible in smaller electrical grids, such as those found in many developing countries. The ability to rapidly vary power output can be used to stabilize electric grid performance-a particularly important need in small electrical grids.

  11. Summary and recommendations on nuclear electric propulsion technology for the space exploration initiative

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Doherty, M.P.; Holcomb, R.S.

    1993-04-01

    A project in Nuclear Electric Propulsion (NEP) technology is being established to develop the NEP technologies needed for advanced propulsion systems. A paced approach has been suggested which calls for progressive development of NEP component and subsystem level technologies. This approach will lead to major facility testing to achieve TRL-5 for megawatt NEP for SEI mission applications. This approach is designed to validate NEP power and propulsion technologies from kilowatt class to megawatt class ratings. Such a paced approach would have the benefit of achieving the development, testing, and flight of NEP systems in an evolutionary manner. This approach may also have the additional benefit of synergistic application with SEI extraterrestrial surface nuclear power applications.

  12. Method and apparatus for improving the performance of a nuclear power electrical generation system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Tsiklauri, Georgi V. (Richland, WA); Durst, Bruce M. (Kennewick, WA)

    1995-01-01

    A method and apparatus for improving the efficiency and performance a of nuclear electrical generation system that comprises the addition of steam handling equipment to an existing plant that results in a surprising increase in plant performance. More particularly, a gas turbine electrical generation system with heat recovery boiler is installed along with a high pressure and a low pressure mixer superheater. Depending upon plant characteristics, the existing moisture separator reheater (MSR) can be either augmented or done away with. The instant invention enables a reduction in T.sub.hot without a derating of the reactor unit, and improves efficiency of the plant's electrical conversion cycle. Coupled with this advantage is a possible extension of the plant's fuel cycle length due to an increased electrical conversion efficiency. The reduction in T.sub.hot further allows for a surprising extension of steam generator life. An additional advantage is the reduction in erosion/corrosion of secondary system components including turbine blades and diaphragms. The gas turbine generator used in the instant invention can also replace or augment existing peak or emergency power needs.

  13. Method and apparatus for steam mixing a nuclear fueled electricity generation system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Tsiklauri, Georgi V. (Richland, WA); Durst, Bruce M. (Kennewick, WA)

    1996-01-01

    A method and apparatus for improving the efficiency and performance of a nuclear electrical generation system that comprises the addition of steam handling equipment to an existing plant that results in a surprising increase in plant performance. More particularly, a gas turbine electrical generation system with heat recovery boiler is installed along with a micro-jet high pressure and a low pressure mixer superheater. Depending upon plant characteristics, the existing moisture separator reheater (MSR) can be either augmented or done away with. The instant invention enables a reduction in T.sub.hot without a derating of the reactor unit, and improves efficiency of the plant's electrical conversion cycle. Coupled with this advantage is a possible extension of the plant's fuel cycle length due to an increased electrical conversion efficiency. The reduction in T.sub.hot further allows for a surprising extension of steam generator life. An additional advantage is the reduction in erosion/corrosion of secondary system components including turbine blades and diaphragms. The gas turbine generator used in the instant invention can also replace or augment existing peak or emergency power needs. Another benefit of the instant invention is the extension of plant life and the reduction of downtime due to refueling.

  14. Nuclear EMP simulation for large-scale urban environments. FDTD for electrically large problems.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, William S.; Bull, Jeffrey S.; Wilcox, Trevor; Bos, Randall J.; Shao, Xuan-Min; Goorley, John T.; Costigan, Keeley R.

    2012-08-13

    In case of a terrorist nuclear attack in a metropolitan area, EMP measurement could provide: (1) a prompt confirmation of the nature of the explosion (chemical or nuclear) for emergency response; and (2) and characterization parameters of the device (reaction history, yield) for technical forensics. However, urban environment could affect the fidelity of the prompt EMP measurement (as well as all other types of prompt measurement): (1) Nuclear EMP wavefront would no longer be coherent, due to incoherent production, attenuation, and propagation of gamma and electrons; and (2) EMP propagation from source region outward would undergo complicated transmission, reflection, and diffraction processes. EMP simulation for electrically-large urban environment: (1) Coupled MCNP/FDTD (Finite-difference time domain Maxwell solver) approach; and (2) FDTD tends to be limited to problems that are not 'too' large compared to the wavelengths of interest because of numerical dispersion and anisotropy. We use a higher-order low-dispersion, isotropic FDTD algorithm for EMP propagation.

  15. A low-alpha nuclear electric propulsion system for lunar and Mars missions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Coomes, E.P.; Dagle, J.E.

    1992-01-01

    The advantages of using electric propulsion are well-known in the aerospace community. The high specific impulse and, therefore, lower propellant requirements make it a very attractive propulsion option for the Space Exploration Initiative (SEI). Recent studies have shown that nuclear electric propulsion (NEP) is not only attractive for the transport of cargo but that fast piloted missions to Mars are possible as well, with alphas on the order of 7.5 kg/kW. An advanced NEP system with a specific power (alpha) of 2.5 kg/kW or less would significantly enhance the manned mission option of NEP by reducing the trip time even further. This paper describes an advanced system that combines the PEGASUS Drive with systems of the Rotating Multimegawatt Boiling Liquid Metal (RMBLR) power system that was developed as part of the DOE multimegawatt program and just recently declassified. In its original configuration, the PEGASUS Drive was a 10-MWe propulsion system. The RMBLR was a 20-MW electric system. By combining the two, a second-generation PEGASUS Drive can be developed with an alpha less than 2.5 kg/kW. This paper will address the technology advancements incorporated into the PEGASUS Drive, the analysis of a fast piloted mission and an unmanned cargo transport Mars mission, and the integration of laser power beaming to provide surface power.

  16. Multi-reactor power system configurations for multimegawatt nuclear electric propulsion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    George, J.A.

    1991-09-01

    A modular, multi-reactor power system and vehicle configuration for piloted nuclear electric propulsion (NEP) missions to Mars is presented. Such a design could provide enhanced system and mission reliability, allowing a comfortable safety margin for early manned flights, and would allow a range of piloted and cargo missions to be performed with a single power system design. Early use of common power modules for cargo missions would also provide progressive flight experience and validation of standardized systems for use in later piloted applications. System and mission analysis are presented to compare single and multi-reactor configurations for piloted Mars missions. A conceptual design for the Hydra modular multi-reactor NEP vehicle is presented.

  17. Preliminary Design of a Manned Nuclear Electric Propulsion Vehicle Using Genetic Algorithms

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Irwin, Ryan W. [School of Aeronautics and Astronautics, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN 47907 (United States); Tinker, Michael L. [Spacecraft and Vehicle Systems Department, NASA Marshall Space Flight Center, Huntsville, AL 35812 (United States)

    2005-02-06

    Nuclear electric propulsion (NEP) vehicles will be needed for future manned missions to Mars and beyond. Candidate designs must be identified for further detailed design from a large array of possibilities. Genetic algorithms have proven their utility in conceptual design studies by effectively searching a large design space to pinpoint unique optimal designs. This research combined analysis codes for NEP subsystems with a genetic algorithm. The use of penalty functions with scaling ratios was investigated to increase computational efficiency. Also, the selection of design variables for optimization was considered to reduce computation time without losing beneficial design search space. Finally, trend analysis of a reference mission to the asteroids yielded a group of candidate designs for further analysis.

  18. MOA: Magnetic Field Oscillating Amplified Thruster and its Application for Nuclear Electric and Thermal Propulsion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Frischauf, Norbert [QASAR Technologie(s) GmbH, Johann Gottekgasse 39, A-1230, Vienna (Austria); Hettmer, Manfred; Grassauer, Andreas; Bartusch, Tobias [QASAR Technologie(s) GmbH, Johann Gottekgasse 39, A-1230, Vienna (Austria); Koudelka, Otto [Institute of Communication Networks and Satellite Communication, Graz University of Technology, Inffeldgasse 12/I, A-8010 Graz (Austria)

    2006-07-01

    More than 60 years after the later Nobel laureate Hannes Alfven had published a letter stating that oscillating magnetic fields can accelerate ionised matter via magneto-hydrodynamic interactions in a wave like fashion, the technical implementation of Alfven waves for propulsive purposes has been proposed, patented and examined for the first time by a group of inventors. The name of the concept, utilising Alfven waves to accelerate ionised matter for propulsive purposes, is MOA - Magnetic field Oscillating Amplified thruster. Alfven waves are generated by making use of two coils, one being permanently powered and serving also as magnetic nozzle, the other one being switched on and off in a cyclic way, deforming the field lines of the overall system. It is this deformation that generates Alfven waves, which are in the next step used to transport and compress the propulsive medium, in theory leading to a propulsion system with a much higher performance than any other electric propulsion system. Based on computer simulations, which were conducted to get a first estimate on the performance of the system, MOA is a highly flexible propulsion system, whose performance parameters might easily be adapted, by changing the mass flow and/or the power level. As such the system is capable to deliver a maximum specific impulse of 13116 s (12.87 mN) at a power level of 11.16 kW, using Xe as propellant, but can also be attuned to provide a thrust of 236.5 mN (2411 s) at 6.15 kW of power. While space propulsion is expected to be the prime application for MOA and is supported by numerous applications such as Solar and/or Nuclear Electric Propulsion or even as an 'afterburner system' for Nuclear Thermal Propulsion, other terrestrial applications can be thought of as well, making the system highly suited for a common space-terrestrial application research and utilisation strategy. (authors)

  19. Aging and condition monitoring of electric cables in nuclear power plants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lofaro, R.J.; Grove, E.; Soo, P.

    1998-05-01

    There are a variety of environmental stressors in nuclear power plants that can influence the aging rate of components; these include elevated temperatures, high radiation fields, and humid conditions. Exposure to these stressors over long periods of time can cause degradation of components that may go undetected unless the aging mechanisms are identified and monitored. In some cases the degradation may be mitigated by maintenance or replacement. However, some components receive neither and are thus more susceptible to aging degradation, which might lead to failure. One class of components that falls in this category is electric cables. Cables are very often overlooked in aging analyses since they are passive components that require no maintenance. However, they are very important components since they provide power to safety related equipment and transmit signals to and from instruments and controls. This paper will look at the various aging mechanisms and failure modes associated with electric cables. Condition monitoring techniques that may be useful for monitoring degradation of cables will also be discussed.

  20. Impacts of a nominal nuclear electromagnetic pulse on electric power systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kruse, V.J.; Nickel, D.L.; Bonk, J.J.; Taylor, E.R. Jr. (ABB Power Systems, Inc., Pittsburgh, PA (USA))

    1991-04-01

    A high-altitude nuclear detonation several hundred kilometers above the central United States will subject much of the nation to an electromagnetic pulse (EMP) consisting of intense steep-front short- duration transient electromagnetic fields followed by a geomagnetic disturbance with a duration of tens of seconds. Since 1983, the Department of Energy has been actively pursuing a research program to assess the potential impacts of one or more EMP events on the nation's electric energy supply. A nominal EMP environmental suitable for assessing geographically large systems has been used to provide an indication of EMP impacts on electric power systems. It was found that a single high-altitude burst, which significantly disturbs the geomagnetic field, could cause significant load and generation loss, but permanent damage would be isolated. Multiple bursts would increase the disturbance. Nevertheless, based on the effects of a nominal EMP environment, a long-term blackout is not expected since major components such as power transformers are not likely to be damaged. 60 refs., 10 figs., 8 tabs.

  1. Impacts of a nominal nuclear electromagnetic pulse on electric power systems; A probabilistic approach

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kruse, V.J.; Nickel, D.L.; Taylor, E.R. Jr. (ABB Power Systems Inc., Pittsburgh, PA (US)); Barnes, P.R. (Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States))

    1991-07-01

    This paper reports on a high-altitude nuclear detonation several hundred kilometers above the central United States that will subject much of the nation to an electromagnetic pulse (EMP) consisting of intense steep-front short-duration transient electromagnetic fields followed by a geomagnetic disturbance with a duration of tens of seconds. Since 1983, the Department of energy has been actively pursuing a research program to assess the potential impacts of one or more EMP events on the nation's electric energy supply. A nominal EMP environment suitable for assessing geographically large systems has been used to provide an indication of EMP impacts on electric power systems. It was found that a single high-altitude burst, which significantly disturbs the geomagnetic field, could cause significant load and generation loss, but permanent damage would be isolated. Multiple bursts would increase the disturbance. Nevertheless, based on the effects of a nominal EMP environment, a long term blackout is not expected since major components such as power transformers are not likely to be damaged.

  2. Heat pipe cooled heat rejection subsystem modelling for nuclear electric propulsion. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moriarty, M.P.

    1993-11-01

    NASA LeRC is currently developing a FORTRAN based computer model of a complete nuclear electric propulsion (NEP) vehicle that can be used for piloted and cargo missions to the Moon or Mars. Proposed designs feature either a Brayton or a K-Rankine power conversion cycle to drive a turbine coupled with rotary alternators. Both ion and magnetoplasmodynamic (MPD) thrusters will be considered in the model. In support of the NEP model, Rocketdyne is developing power conversion, heat rejection, and power management and distribution (PMAD) subroutines. The subroutines will be incorporated into the NEP vehicle model which will be written by NASA LeRC. The purpose is to document the heat pipe cooled heat rejection subsystem model and its supporting subroutines. The heat pipe cooled heat rejection subsystem model is designed to provide estimate of the mass and performance of the equipment used to reject heat from Brayton and Rankine cycle power conversion systems. The subroutine models the ductwork and heat pipe cooled manifold for a gas cooled Brayton; the heat sink heat exchanger, liquid loop piping, expansion compensator, pump and manifold for a liquid loop cooled Brayton; and a shear flow condenser for a K-Rankine system. In each case, the final heat rejection is made by way of a heat pipe radiator. The radiator is sized to reject the amount of heat necessary.

  3. Nuclear electric propulsion /NEP/ spacecraft for the outer planet orbiter mission

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Garrison, P.W.; Nock, K.T.

    1982-01-01

    The design, operating features, and a possible Neptune orbit for the spacecraft powered by the SP-100 nuclear electric propulsion (NEP) system under study by NASA and the DOE are described. The system features a reactor and a payload situated on opposite ends of a 0.5 m diam, 11 m long astromast. Mercury-ion thrusters are located beneath the reactor for side thrusting, and no contamination of the payload or obstruction of the viewing angles for scientific objectives occurs with the system, which would not degrade in performance even under high insolation during near-sun maneuvers. Results of a theoretical study of earth escapes are presented to show that an NEP powered spiral trajectory out of a 700 km Shuttle orbit and using a Triton gravity assist would be superior to departing from a 300 km orbit with a Centaur boost. The mission profile includes a 1249 kg Galileo payload. The SP-100 has a 1.4 MWth reactor with UO2 fuel tiles and weighs 19,904 kg.

  4. Study of a heat rejection system for the Nuclear Electric Propulsion (NEP) spacecraft. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ernest, D.M.

    1982-11-01

    Two different heat pipe radiator elements, one intended for use with the power conversion subsystem of the NASA funded nuclear electric propulsion (NEP) spacecraft, and one intended for use with the DOE funded space power advanced reactor (SPAR) system were tested and evaluated. The NEP stainless steel/sodium heat pipe was 4.42 meters long and had a 1 cm diameter. Thermal performance testing at 920 K showed a non-limited power level of 3560 watts, well in excess of the design power of 2600 watts. This test verified the applicability of screen arteries for use in long radiator heat pipes. The SPAR titanium/potassium heat pipe was 5.5 meters long and had a semicircular crossection with a 4 cm diameter. Thermal performance testing at 775 K showed a maximum power level of 1.86 kW, somewhat short of the desired 2.6 kW beginning of life design requirement. The reduced performance was shown to be the result of the inability of the evaporator wall wick (shot blasted evaporator wall) to handle the required liquid flow.

  5. Brayton power conversion system parametric design modelling for nuclear electric propulsion. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ashe, T.L.; Otting, W.D.

    1993-11-01

    The parametrically based closed Brayton cycle (CBC) computer design model was developed for inclusion into the NASA LeRC overall Nuclear Electric Propulsion (NEP) end-to-end systems model. The code is intended to provide greater depth to the NEP system modeling which is required to more accurately predict the impact of specific technology on system performance. The CBC model is parametrically based to allow for conducting detailed optimization studies and to provide for easy integration into an overall optimizer driver routine. The power conversion model includes the modeling of the turbines, alternators, compressors, ducting, and heat exchangers (hot-side heat exchanger and recuperator). The code predicts performance to significant detail. The system characteristics determined include estimates of mass, efficiency, and the characteristic dimensions of the major power conversion system components. These characteristics are parametrically modeled as a function of input parameters such as the aerodynamic configuration (axial or radial), turbine inlet temperature, cycle temperature ratio, power level, lifetime, materials, and redundancy.

  6. Intern experience at Arkansas Nuclear One Steam Electric Station: an internship report 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Miller, William Bruce, 1953-

    2013-03-13

    FGo- NDGLFOW R)eU)FFWU)e INTERN EXPERIENCE AT ARKANSAS NUCLEAR ONE STEAM ELECTRIC STATION I) T)oFW).iUa XFatWo cf SULLUOM BWDGF (ULLFW IaaWt8Fn O. ot .ofLF O)n Gt)oF)o cf- i t - (ey& tiu . l(FMcFW12 I 7 N T N E l(FMcFW1 l(FMcFW1 (Of rsms ABSTRACT... T)oFW) RVaFWUF)GF Oo IW4O).O. NDGLFOW K)F PoFOM RLFGoWUG PoOoUt) l(Of rsms1 SULLUOM BWDGF (ULLFW6 B2P26 5)U8FW.Uof td (U..tDWUvXtLLOy (2R)e26 EFVO. I * ( 5)U8FW.Uof uiOUWMO) td In8U.tWf utMMUooFF- wW2 gti) w2 XO)nOLL EiU. WFatWo U. O .DW8Ff td...

  7. The path to clean energy: direct coupling of nuclear and renewable technologies for thermal and electrical applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bragg-Sitton, Shannon; Boardman, Richard; Ruth, Mark

    2015-07-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) recognizes the need to transform the energy infrastructure of the U.S. and elsewhere to systems that can significantly reduce environmental impacts in an efficient and economically viable manner while utilizing both clean energy generation sources and hydrocarbon resources. Thus, DOE is supporting research and development that could lead to more efficient utilization of clean nuclear and renewable energy generation sources. A concept being advanced by the DOE Offices of Nuclear Energy (NE) and Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) is tighter coupling of nuclear and renewable energy sources in a manner that better optimizes energy use for the combined electricity, industrial manufacturing, and the transportation sectors. This integration concept has been referred to as a “hybrid system” that is capable of providing energy (thermal or electrical) where it is needed, when it is needed. For the purposes of this work, the hybrid system would integrate two or more energy resources to generate two or more products, one of which must be an energy commodity, such as electricity or transportation fuel. This definition requires coupling of subsystems ‘‘behind’’ the electrical transmission bus, where energy flows are dynamically apportioned as necessary to meet demand and the system has a single connection to the grid that provides dispatchable electricity as required while capital intensive generation assets operate at full capacity. Development of integrated energy systems for an “energy park” must carefully consider the intended location and the associated regional resources, traditional industrial processes, energy delivery infrastructure, and markets to identify viable region-specific system configurations. This paper will provide an overview of the current status of regional hybrid energy system design, development and application of dynamic analysis tools to assess technical and economic performance, and roadmap development to identify and prioritize component, subsystem and system testing that will lead to prototype demonstration.

  8. US Central Station Nuclear Electric Generating Units: significant milestones. (Status as of April 1, 1980)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1980-06-01

    Construction and operational milestones are tabulated for US nuclear power plants. Data are presented on nuclear steam supply system orders. A schedule of commercial operation through 1990 is given.

  9. Testing of T-odd, P-even interactions by nonpolarized neutron transmission through a nonpolarized nuclear target placed into electric field

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    V. G. Baryshevsky

    2003-12-01

    A new possibility for the study of time-reversal violation is described. It consists in measurement of nonpolarized neutron transmission through nonpolarized nuclear target placed into electric field

  10. Investment in nuclear generation in a restricted electricity market : an analysis of risks and financing options

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Berger, Raphael

    2006-01-01

    Since the late 1970s, the US electric power industry has been undergoing major changes. The electric utility industry had mainly consisted of highly regulated, vertically integrated, local monopolies, providing customers ...

  11. Radioactive waste shipments to Hanford Retrievable Storage from the General Electric Vallecitos Nuclear Center, Pleasanton, California

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vejvoda, E.J.; Pottmeyer, J.A.; DeLorenzo, D.S.; Weyns-Rollosson, M.I. [Los Alamos Technical Associates, Inc., NM (United States); Duncan, D.R. [Westinghouse Hanford Co., Richland, WA (United States)

    1993-10-01

    During the next two decades the transuranic (TRU) wastes now stored in the burial trenches and storage facilities at the Hanford Site are to be retrieved, processed at the Waste Receiving and Processing Facility, and shipped to the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant near Carlsbad, New Mexico for final disposal. Approximately 3.8% of the TRU waste to be retrieved for shipment to WIPP was generated at the General Electric (GE) Vallecitos Nuclear Center (VNC) in Pleasanton, California and shipped to the Hanford Site for storage. The purpose of this report is to characterize these radioactive solid wastes using process knowledge, existing records, and oral history interviews. The waste was generated almost exclusively from the activities, of the Plutonium Fuels Development Laboratory and the Plutonium Analytical Laboratory. Section 2.0 provides further details of the VNC physical plant, facility operations, facility history, and current status. The solid radioactive wastes were associated with two US Atomic Energy Commission/US Department of Energy reactor programs -- the Fast Ceramic Reactor (FCR) program, and the Fast Flux Test Reactor (FFTR) program. These programs involved the fabrication and testing of fuel assemblies that utilized plutonium in an oxide form. The types and estimated quantities of waste resulting from these programs are discussed in detail in Section 3.0. A detailed discussion of the packaging and handling procedures used for the VNC radioactive wastes shipped to the Hanford Site is provided in Section 4.0. Section 5.0 provides an in-depth look at this waste including the following: weight and volume of the waste, container types and numbers, physical description of the waste, radiological components, hazardous constituents, and current storage/disposal locations.

  12. Accepted for publication in Energy Policy Greenhouse-gas Emissions from Solar Electric-and Nuclear Power: A Life-cycle

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Accepted for publication in Energy Policy Greenhouse-gas Emissions from Solar Electric- and Nuclear., 2002). However, all anthropogenic means of energy production, including solar and nuclear, generate Power: A Life-cycle Study Vasilis M. Fthenakis1,2, * and Hyung Chul Kim1 1 Energy Sciences

  13. ELECTRIC

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefield Municipal Gas &SCE-SessionsSouth DakotaRobbins and Myers CoMadison -T: Designation ofSEPE.ELECTRIC

  14. Financing arrangements and industrial organisation for new nuclear build in electricity markets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Finon, Dominique; Roques, Fabien A.

    acceptability on plant sitting and nuclear waste management. 3 From this perspective, governments and regulatory and safety agencies have a critical role to play in the setting of clear and consistent procedures for licensing design and authorisation... cycles could undermine the commitment to nuclear power and the development of nuclear waste disposal facilities; and iii) the construction and operation risks associated with the necessary “re-learning” of the technology. Moreover, the large size of a...

  15. RADIOLOGICAL HEALTH AND RELATED STANDARDS FOR NUCLEAR POWER PLANTS. VOLUME 2 OF HEALTH AND SAFETY IMPACTS OF NUCLEAR, GEOTHERMAL, AND FOSSIL-FUEL ELECTRIC GENERATION IN CALIFORNIA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nero, A.V.

    2010-01-01

    Measurements - Nuclear Regulatory Commission - protectiveand by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) as a basisplants. The Nuclear Regulatory Commission is the agency

  16. RADIOLOGICAL HEALTH AND RELATED STANDARDS FOR NUCLEAR POWER PLANTS. VOLUME 2 OF HEALTH AND SAFETY IMPACTS OF NUCLEAR, GEOTHERMAL, AND FOSSIL-FUEL ELECTRIC GENERATION IN CALIFORNIA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nero, A.V.

    2010-01-01

    the entire area of nuclear safety. A portion of the safetypeaceful uses of nuclear energy; health and safety measuresU. S. Nuclear Regulatory Conunission, "Reactor Safety Study:

  17. Climate Change, Nuclear Power and Nuclear

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Climate Change, Nuclear Power and Nuclear Proliferation: Magnitude Matters Rob Goldston MIT IAP biomass wind hydro coal CCS coal nat gas CCS nat gas nuclear Gen IV nuclear Gen III nuclear Gen II 5-1 Electricity Generation: CCS and Nuclear Power Technology Options Available Global Electricity Generation WRE

  18. Innovation Dynamics in the Development of Nuclear Energy and Electric Vehicles in France

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Doufene, Abdelkrim

    Technological change is shaped by a confluence of processes that are governed by socio-political, economic, and regulatory factors within a region. In this paper we describe the transformation of the electricity generation ...

  19. The portfolio diversification value of nuclear power in liberalized electricity markets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bean, Malcolm (Malcolm K.)

    2012-01-01

    The key difference between a regulated and a liberalized electricity market is the establishment of a competitive generation marketplace via spot markets, day-ahead auctions, and over-the-counter trading activity. In a ...

  20. Modelling the Effects of Nuclear Fuel Reservoir Operation in a Competitive Electricity Market

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lykidi, Maria

    In many countries, the electricity systems are quitting the vertically integrated monopoly organization for an operation framed by competitive markets. In such a competitive regime one can ask what the optimal management ...

  1. POWER PLANT RELIABILITY-AVAILABILITY AND STATE REGULATION. VOLUME 7 OF THE FINAL REPORT ON HEALTH AND SAFETY IMPACTS OF NUCLEAR, GEOTHERMAL, AND FOSSIL-FUEL ELECTRIC GENERATION IN CALIFORNIA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nero, A.V.

    2010-01-01

    and Related Standards for Fossil-Fuel and Geo- thermal Powerposed Nuclear, Geothermal, and Fossil-Fuel Sites and Facili-NUCLEAR, GEOTHERMAL, AND FOSSIL-FUEL ELECTRIC GENERATION IN

  2. Use of High-Power Brayton Nuclear Electric Propulsion (NEP) for a 2033 Mars Round-Trip Mission

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McGuire, Melissa L. [Space Propulsion and Mission Analysis Office (Code: PBM), NASA Glenn Research Center, MS 500-103, 21000 Brookpark Rd., Cleveland, Ohio 44135 (United States); Martini, Michael C.; Packard, Thomas W. [Space Propulsion and Mission Analysis Office (Code: PBM), NASA Glenn Research Center, MS 500-103, 21000 Brookpark Rd., Cleveland, Ohio 44135 (United States); Analex Corporation, 1100 Apollo Drive, Brook Park, OH 44142 (United States); Weglian, John E. [Space Propulsion and Mission Analysis Office (Code: PBM), NASA Glenn Research Center, MS 500-103, 21000 Brookpark Rd., Cleveland, Ohio 44135 (United States); Ohio Aerospace Institute, 22800 Cedar Point Rd., Brook Park, OH 44142 (United States); Gilland, James H. [Ohio Aerospace Institute, 22800 Cedar Point Rd., Brook Park, OH 44142 (United States)

    2006-01-20

    The Revolutionary Aerospace Systems Concepts (RASC) team, led by the NASA Langley Research Center, is tasked with exploring revolutionary new approaches to enabling NASA to achieve its strategic goals and objectives in future missions. This paper provides the details from the 2004-2005 RASC study of a point-design that uses a high-power nuclear electric propulsion (NEP) based space transportation architecture to support a manned mission to Mars. The study assumes a high-temperature liquid-metal cooled fission reactor with a Brayton power conversion system to generate the electrical power required by magnetoplasmadynamic (MPD) thrusters. The architecture includes a cargo vehicle with an NEP system providing 5 MW of electrical power and a crewed vehicle with an NEP system with two reactors providing a combined total of 10 MW of electrical power. Both vehicles use a low-thrust, high-efficiency (5000 sec specific impulse) MPD system to conduct a spiral-out of the Earth gravity well, a low-thrust heliocentric trajectory, and a spiral-in at Mars with arrival late in 2033. The cargo vehicle carries two moon landers to Mars and arrives shortly before the crewed vehicle. The crewed vehicle and cargo vehicle rendezvous in Mars orbit and, over the course of the 60-day stay, the crew conducts nine-day excursions to Phobos and Deimos with the landers. The crewed vehicle then spirals out of Martian orbit and returns via a low-thrust trajectory to conduct an Earth flyby. The crew separates from the vehicle prior to Earth flyby and aerobrakes for a direct-entry landing.

  3. Electrical and electronic subsystems of a nuclear waste tank annulus inspection system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Evenson, R.J.

    1981-06-01

    The nuclear waste tank annulus inspection system is designed specifically for use at the Nuclear Regulatory Commission's Nuclear Fuel Services Facility at West Valley, New York. This system sends a television and photographic camera into the space between the walls of a double-shell nuclear waste tank to obtain images of the inner and outer walls at precisely known locations. The system is capable of inspecting a wall section 14 ft wide by 27 ft high. Due to the high temperature and radiation of the annulus environment, the operating life for the inspection device is uncertain, but is expected to be at least 100 h, with 1000 R/h at 82/sup 0/C. The film camera is shielded with 1/2 in. of lead to minimize radiation fogging of the film during a 25-min picture taking excursion. The operation of the inspection system is semiautomated with remote manual prepositioning of the camera, followed by a computer controlled wall scan. This apparatus is currently set up to take an array of contiguous pictures, but is adaptable to other modes of operation.

  4. Nuclear Fuel Recycling - the Value of the Separated Transuranics and the Levelized Cost of Electricity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Parsons, John E.

    We analyze the levelized cost of electricity (LCOE) for three different fuel cycles: a Once-Through Cycle, in which the spent fuel is sent for disposal after one use in a reactor, a Twice-Through Cycle, in which the spent ...

  5. Feasibility of search for nuclear electric dipole moments at ion storage rings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    I. B. Khriplovich

    1998-09-11

    The sensitivity much better than $10^{-24} e$ cm may be expected in the searches for electric dipole moments (EDM) of $\\beta$-active nuclei at ion storage rings. It would be a serious progress in studies of the CP-violation problem.

  6. Numerical Simulation of Plasma Behavior in a Magnetic Nozzle of a Laser-plasma Driven Nuclear Electric Propulsion System

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kajimura, Y. [Research Institute for Sustainable Humanosphere (RISH), Kyoto University, Gokasho, Uji, Kyoto 611-0011 (Japan); Japan Science and Technology Agency (JST), CREST 4-1-8 Hon-chou, Kawaguchi, Saitama 332-0012 (Japan); Matsuda, N.; Hayashida, K.; Maeno, A.; Nakashima, H. [Department of Advanced Energy Engineering Science, Interdisciplinary Graduate school of Engineering Sciences, Kyushu University, Kasugakouen 6-1, Kasuga, Fukuoka 816-580 (Japan)

    2008-12-31

    Numerical simulations of plasma behavior in a magnetic nozzle of a Laser-Plasma Driven Nuclear Electric Propulsion System are conducted. The propellant is heated and accelerated by the laser and expanded isotropically. The magnetic nozzle is a combination of solenoidal coils and used to collimate and guide the plasma to produce thrust. Simulation calculations by a three-dimensional hybrid code are conducted to examine the plasma behaviors in the nozzle and to estimate the thrust efficiency. We also estimate a fraction ({alpha}) of plasma particles leaking in the forward (spacecraft) direction. By a combination of a few coils, we could decrease {alpha} value without degrading the thrust efficiency. Finally, the shaped propellant is proposed to increase the thrust efficiency.

  7. RADIOLOGICAL HEALTH AND RELATED STANDARDS FOR NUCLEAR POWER PLANTS. VOLUME 2 OF HEALTH AND SAFETY IMPACTS OF NUCLEAR, GEOTHERMAL, AND FOSSIL-FUEL ELECTRIC GENERATION IN CALIFORNIA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nero, A.V.

    2010-01-01

    in U. S. Conunercial Nuclear Power Plants", Report WASH-Related Standards for Nuclear Power Plants," by A.V. NeroResponse Planning for Nuclear Power Plants in California,"

  8. Risk perception & strategic decision making :general insights, a framework, and specific application to electricity generation using nuclear energy.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brewer, Jeffrey D.

    2005-11-01

    The objective of this report is to promote increased understanding of decision making processes and hopefully to enable improved decision making regarding high-consequence, highly sophisticated technological systems. This report brings together insights regarding risk perception and decision making across domains ranging from nuclear power technology safety, cognitive psychology, economics, science education, public policy, and neural science (to name a few). It forms them into a unique, coherent, concise framework, and list of strategies to aid in decision making. It is suggested that all decision makers, whether ordinary citizens, academics, or political leaders, ought to cultivate their abilities to separate the wheat from the chaff in these types of decision making instances. The wheat includes proper data sources and helpful human decision making heuristics; these should be sought. The chaff includes ''unhelpful biases'' that hinder proper interpretation of available data and lead people unwittingly toward inappropriate decision making ''strategies''; obviously, these should be avoided. It is further proposed that successfully accomplishing the wheat vs. chaff separation is very difficult, yet tenable. This report hopes to expose and facilitate navigation away from decision-making traps which often ensnare the unwary. Furthermore, it is emphasized that one's personal decision making biases can be examined, and tools can be provided allowing better means to generate, evaluate, and select among decision options. Many examples in this report are tailored to the energy domain (esp. nuclear power for electricity generation). The decision making framework and approach presented here are applicable to any high-consequence, highly sophisticated technological system.

  9. Constraining the density slope of nuclear symmetry energy at subsaturation densities using electric dipole polarizability in $^{208}$Pb

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhen Zhang; Lie-Wen Chen

    2014-12-11

    Nuclear structure observables usually most effectively probe the properties of nuclear matter at subsaturation densities rather than at saturation density. We demonstrate that the electric dipole polarizibility $\\alpha _ {\\text{D}}$ in $^{208}$Pb is sensitive to both the magnitude $E_{\\text{sym}}(\\rho_{\\text{c}})$ and density slope $L(\\rho_{\\text{c}})$ of the symmetry energy at a subsaturation cross density $\\rho_{\\text{c}} = 0.11$ fm$^{-3}$. Using the experimental data of $\\alpha _ {\\text{D}}$ in $^{208}$Pb from RCNP and the recent accurate constraint of $E_{\\text{sym}}(\\rho_{\\text{c}})$ from the binding energy difference of heavy isotope pairs, we extract a value of $L(\\rho_{\\text{c}}) = 47.3 \\pm 7.8$ MeV. The implication of the present constraint of $L(\\rho_{\\text{c}})$ to the symmetry energy at saturation density, the neutron skin thickness of $^{208}$Pb and the core-crust transition density in neutron stars is discussed.

  10. Participation of the Nuclear Power Plants in the New Brazilian Electric Energy Market

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mathias, S.G.

    2004-10-06

    A new regulation framework has been established for the Brazilian electric energy market by a law put into effect on March 15,2004. The main overall goals of this new regulation are: to allow the lowest possible tariffs for end users, while providing the necessary economic incentives for the operation of present installations (generating plants, transmission lines, distribution networks) and the expansion of the system; long-term planning of the extension of the installations required to meet the demand growth; separation of the generation, transmission and distribution activities by allocating them into different companies; new contracts between generating and distribution companies must result from bidding processes based on lowest-tariff criteria; and energy from new generating units required to meet the demand growth must be contracted by all distributing companies integrated to the National Interconnected Grid, in individual amounts proportional to their respective markets.

  11. RADIOLOGICAL HEALTH AND RELATED STANDARDS FOR NUCLEAR POWER PLANTS. VOLUME 2 OF HEALTH AND SAFETY IMPACTS OF NUCLEAR, GEOTHERMAL, AND FOSSIL-FUEL ELECTRIC GENERATION IN CALIFORNIA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nero, A.V.

    2010-01-01

    Report LBL-5287. "Power Plant Reliability-Availability andConunercial Nuclear Power Plants", Report WASH-1400 (NUREG-Standards for Nuclear Power Plants," by A.V. Nero and Y.C.

  12. Birefringence effect in the nuclear pseudoelectric field of matter and an external electric field for a deuteron (nucleus) rotating in a storage ring

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    V. G. Baryshevsky

    2005-04-08

    The birefringence effect in the nuclear pseudoelectric field of matter and an external electric field for a particle (deuteron, nucleus) moving in a storage ring is discussed. The influence of the birefringence effect on the EDM measurement experiments is considered. The attention is drawn to the possibility to measure the spin-dependent amplitude of the elastic coherent scattering of a deuteron by a nucleus, the electric polarizability of a deuteron (nucleus). Using a gas target with polarized nuclei also allows to study P-,T-odd interactions.

  13. Microsoft PowerPoint - 7_GARY_LANGLIE_NMMSS 2014 NRC HEU Report...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    2012 Kilograms Figure 1: Exports of U.S. HEU 1957 - 2012 used as fuel or targets in a nuclear research or test reactor HEU Exports HEU exports began in the 1957 time frame...

  14. Atoms to electricity. [Booklet

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1987-11-01

    This booklet explains the basic technology of nuclear fission power reactors, the nuclear fuel cycle and the role of nuclear energy as one of the domestic energy resources being developed to help meet our national energy demand. Nuclear power accounted for over 16 percent of the US electric energy supply in 1986 and was second only to coal as a source of our electric power. In the 1990s, nuclear energy is expected to provide almost 20 percent of the Nation's electricity. 38 figs., 5 tabs.

  15. RADIOLOGICAL EMERGENCY RESPONSE PLANNING FOR NUCLEAR POWER PLANTS IN CALIFORNIA. VOLUME 4 OF THE FINAL REPORT ON HEALTH AND SAFETY IMPACTS OF NUCLEAR, GEOTHERMAL, AND FOSSIL-FUEL ELECTRIC GENERATION IN CALIFORNIA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yen, W.W.S.

    2010-01-01

    EMERGENCY PLANNING FOR NUCLEAR POWER PLANTS: THE LICENSINGEmergency Planning for Nuclear Power Plants Determination ofproposed nuclear power plants . . . . . . . . . • . . . .

  16. Interagency Advanced Power Group, Joint Electrical and Nuclear Working Group, meeting minutes, November 16--17, 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-12-31

    Reports on soldier power R&D review, N-MCT power electronic building blocks, silicon carbide power semiconductor work, and ground based radar were made to the Power Conditioning Panel. An introduction to high temperature electronics needs, research and development was made to the High Temperature Electronics Subcommittee. The Pulse Power Panel received reports on the navy ETC gun, and army pulse power. The Superconductivity Panel received reports on high-tc superconducting wires, superconducting magnetic energy storage, and superconducting applications. The Nuclear Working Group received presentations on the Topaz nuclear power program, and space nuclear work in the Department of Energy.

  17. Using Electricity",,,"Electricity Consumption",,,"Electricity...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    . Total Electricity Consumption and Expenditures, 2003" ,"All Buildings* Using Electricity",,,"Electricity Consumption",,,"Electricity Expenditures" ,"Number of Buildings...

  18. -Supplementary Material -Electrical read-out of individual nuclear spin trajectories in a single-molecule magnet

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . Terbium Double-Decker 1 S3. Nuclear Spin Read-Out 2 S4. Quantum Tunnelling of Magnetization 3 S5. Quantum magnetic field sweeps in three dimensions at field sweep rates up to 0.2 T/s. S2. TERBIUM DOUBLE-DECKER We

  19. ELSEVIER Journal of Nuclear Materials 239 (1996) 245-252 In situ measurement of electrical conductivity of alumina under

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Howlader, Matiar R

    1996-01-01

    the effects of flux, electric field and temperature and may lessen their performance in fusion reactors affect the performance of ct-A1203 in fusion reactors. A significant surface conductivity is confirmed, it is emphasized that RIC and RIED of et-A1203 are not severe for insulators in the International Thermonuclear

  20. RADIOLOGICAL EMERGENCY RESPONSE PLANNING FOR NUCLEAR POWER PLANTS IN CALIFORNIA. VOLUME 4 OF THE FINAL REPORT ON HEALTH AND SAFETY IMPACTS OF NUCLEAR, GEOTHERMAL, AND FOSSIL-FUEL ELECTRIC GENERATION IN CALIFORNIA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yen, W.W.S.

    2010-01-01

    DENSITIES AROUND CALIFORNIA NUCLEAR POWER PLANT. le Iil _. .AROUND CALIFORNIA NUCLEAR POWER PLANTS Miles San OnofreIN CALIFORNIA The California Nuclear Power Plant Emergency

  1. CONTROL OF POPULATION DENSITIES SURROUNDING NUCLEAR POWER PLANTS. VOLUME 5 OF THE FINAL REPORT ON HEALTH AND SAFETY IMPACTS OF NUCLEAR, GEOTHERMAL, AND FOSSIL-FUEL ELECTRIC GENERATION IN CALIFORNIA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nero, jA.V.

    2010-01-01

    the actual risk presented by nuclear power plants. Dependingyears): Average risk from a nuclear power plant during itssocietal risks from a system of 100 nuclear power plants due

  2. RADIOLOGICAL EMERGENCY RESPONSE PLANNING FOR NUCLEAR POWER PLANTS IN CALIFORNIA. VOLUME 4 OF THE FINAL REPORT ON HEALTH AND SAFETY IMPACTS OF NUCLEAR, GEOTHERMAL, AND FOSSIL-FUEL ELECTRIC GENERATION IN CALIFORNIA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yen, W.W.S.

    2010-01-01

    of radiological risk from nuclear power plants, One suchreservation in risk assessment for nuclear power plants isrisks to populations surrounding a nuclear power plant by

  3. RADIOLOGICAL EMERGENCY RESPONSE PLANNING FOR NUCLEAR POWER PLANTS IN CALIFORNIA. VOLUME 4 OF THE FINAL REPORT ON HEALTH AND SAFETY IMPACTS OF NUCLEAR, GEOTHERMAL, AND FOSSIL-FUEL ELECTRIC GENERATION IN CALIFORNIA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yen, W.W.S.

    2010-01-01

    6, November~ U. S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission. Title 10,1974·. U. S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission. Office ofJanuary 1977. U. S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission. Office of

  4. CONTROL OF POPULATION DENSITIES SURROUNDING NUCLEAR POWER PLANTS. VOLUME 5 OF THE FINAL REPORT ON HEALTH AND SAFETY IMPACTS OF NUCLEAR, GEOTHERMAL, AND FOSSIL-FUEL ELECTRIC GENERATION IN CALIFORNIA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nero, jA.V.

    2010-01-01

    report on HEALTH AND SAFETY IMPACTS OF NUCLEAR, GEOTHERMAL,5 of HEALTH AND SAFETY IMPACTS OF NUCLEAR, GEOTHERMAL, ANDHealth and Safety Impacts of Nuclear, Geo- thermal, and

  5. Supporting Our Nation's Nuclear Industry

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Lyons, Peter

    2013-05-29

    On the 60th anniversary of the world's first nuclear power plant to produce electricity, Assistant Secretary for Nuclear Energy Peter Lyons discusses the Energy Department's and the Administration's commitment to promoting a nuclear renaissance in the United States.

  6. Registration of Electric Generators (Connecticut)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    All electric generating facilities operating in the state, with the exception of hydroelectric and nuclear facilities, must obtain a certificate of registration from the Department of Public...

  7. Modeling the Capacity and Emissions Impacts of Reduced Electricity Demand. Part 1. Methodology and Preliminary Results.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Coughlin, Katie

    2013-01-01

    refrigeration generation type coal nuclear ngcc renewableby fuel type. %TWh Reduction Commercial coal ngcc nuclearType and Technology : Electricity : Electric Power Electric Power Projections for EMM Region : Electricity : Emissions Quantity Liquid Fuels Natural Gas Steam Coal

  8. Using Electricity",,,"Electricity Consumption",,,"Electricity...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    A. Total Electricity Consumption and Expenditures for All Buildings, 2003" ,"All Buildings Using Electricity",,,"Electricity Consumption",,,"Electricity Expenditures" ,"Number of...

  9. Electricity",,,"Electricity Consumption",,,"Electricity Expenditures...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    C9. Total Electricity Consumption and Expenditures, 1999" ,"All Buildings Using Electricity",,,"Electricity Consumption",,,"Electricity Expenditures" ,"Number of Buildings...

  10. Electricity",,,"Electricity Consumption",,,"Electricity Expenditures...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    DIV. Total Electricity Consumption and Expenditures by Census Division, 1999" ,"All Buildings Using Electricity",,,"Electricity Consumption",,,"Electricity Expenditures" ,"Number...

  11. Performance testing and Bayesian Reliability Analysis of small diameter, high power electric heaters for the simulation of nuclear fuel rod temperatures 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    O'Kelly, David Sean

    2000-01-01

    The conversion of plutonium from a nuclear weapon to nuclear reactor fuel requires an evaluation of the residual gallium as a potential corrosive material within an operating nuclear fuel element. Homogeneous trace levels of gallium may remain...

  12. CONTROL OF POPULATION DENSITIES SURROUNDING NUCLEAR POWER PLANTS. VOLUME 5 OF THE FINAL REPORT ON HEALTH AND SAFETY IMPACTS OF NUCLEAR, GEOTHERMAL, AND FOSSIL-FUEL ELECTRIC GENERATION IN CALIFORNIA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nero, jA.V.

    2010-01-01

    Standards for Nuclear Power Plants," by A.V. Nero and Y.C.Planning for Nuclear Power Plants in California," by W.W.S.Surrounding Nuclear Power Plants," by A.V. Nero, C.H.

  13. CONTROL OF POPULATION DENSITIES SURROUNDING NUCLEAR POWER PLANTS. VOLUME 5 OF THE FINAL REPORT ON HEALTH AND SAFETY IMPACTS OF NUCLEAR, GEOTHERMAL, AND FOSSIL-FUEL ELECTRIC GENERATION IN CALIFORNIA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nero, jA.V.

    2010-01-01

    Related Standards for Nuclear Power Plants," by A.V. NeroResponse Planning for Nuclear Power Plants in California,"Densities Surrounding Nuclear Power Plants," by A.V. Nero,

  14. CONTROL OF POPULATION DENSITIES SURROUNDING NUCLEAR POWER PLANTS. VOLUME 5 OF THE FINAL REPORT ON HEALTH AND SAFETY IMPACTS OF NUCLEAR, GEOTHERMAL, AND FOSSIL-FUEL ELECTRIC GENERATION IN CALIFORNIA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nero, jA.V.

    2010-01-01

    Distribution." U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission. Office ofBranch, U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission. U.S. WaterLBL-5287. U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission Standard Review

  15. RADIOLOGICAL EMERGENCY RESPONSE PLANNING FOR NUCLEAR POWER PLANTS IN CALIFORNIA. VOLUME 4 OF THE FINAL REPORT ON HEALTH AND SAFETY IMPACTS OF NUCLEAR, GEOTHERMAL, AND FOSSIL-FUEL ELECTRIC GENERATION IN CALIFORNIA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yen, W.W.S.

    2010-01-01

    Effect of Engineered Nuclear Safety, Volume 7, Number d I U.on Reactor Siting," Nuclear Safety, Vol. 7,No, 3, Springto Population," Nuclear Safety, Vol. 14, No.6, November-

  16. International Nuclear Energy Research Initiative: 2013 Annual...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    electricity generated and over 60 percent of our low-carbon production. Worldwide, nuclear power generates 14 percent of global electricity. Continually increasing demand for...

  17. RADIOLOGICAL EMERGENCY RESPONSE PLANNING FOR NUCLEAR POWER PLANTS IN CALIFORNIA. VOLUME 4 OF THE FINAL REPORT ON HEALTH AND SAFETY IMPACTS OF NUCLEAR, GEOTHERMAL, AND FOSSIL-FUEL ELECTRIC GENERATION IN CALIFORNIA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yen, W.W.S.

    2010-01-01

    PLANNING FOR NUCLEAR POWER PLANTS: THE LICENSING PROCESSPlanning for Nuclear Power Plants Determination of Accidentnuclear power plants . . . . . . . . . • . . . . .2.2.4.3.

  18. CONTROL OF POPULATION DENSITIES SURROUNDING NUCLEAR POWER PLANTS. VOLUME 5 OF THE FINAL REPORT ON HEALTH AND SAFETY IMPACTS OF NUCLEAR, GEOTHERMAL, AND FOSSIL-FUEL ELECTRIC GENERATION IN CALIFORNIA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nero, jA.V.

    2010-01-01

    AND FOSSIL-FUEL ELECTRIC GENERATION IN CALIFORNIA Energy andELECTRIC GENERATION IN CALIFORNIA A project performed for the California Energy

  19. Nuclear Science & Engineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    % of world electricity. #12;. 3 Nuclear Science & Engineering New Plants are coming on line Nuclear Power, Germany, Spain -1GW Construction initiation: · Olkiluoto 3 (1600 MW(e), EPR, Finland) - construction China: 2nd largest energy consumer 2004 Electricity growth 9% generation 16% demand so still... 30GW

  20. Douglas M. Chapin, Ph.D., NAE, Fellow, American Nuclear Society is a Principal of MPR Associates, Inc. He holds a B.S. in Electrical

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aydilek, Ahmet

    Douglas M. Chapin, Ph.D., NAE, Fellow, American Nuclear Society is a Principal of MPR Associates.D. in Nuclear Studies in Chemical Engineering and Nuclear Engineering from Princeton University. Dr. Chapin has worked in the nuclear industry since 1962, beginning with four years in the Naval Reactors design group

  1. Environmental consequences of postulated plutonium releases from General Electric Company Vallecitos Nuclear Center, Vallecitos, California, as a result of severe natural phenomena

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jamison, J.D.; Watson, E.C.

    1980-11-01

    Potential environmental consequences in terms of radiation dose to people are presented for postulated plutonium releases caused by severe natural phenomena at the General Electric Company Vallecitos Nuclear Center, Vallecitos, California. The severe natural phenomena considered are earthquakes, tornadoes, and high straight-line winds. Maximum plutonium deposition values are given for significant locations around the site. All important potential exposure pathways are examined. The most likely 50-year committed dose equivalents are given for the maximum-exposed individual and the population within a 50-mile radius of the plant. The maximum plutonium deposition values likely to occur offsite are also given. The most likely calculated 50-year collective committed dose equivalents are all much lower than the collective dose equivalent expected from 50 years of exposure to natural background radiation and medical x-rays. The most likely maximum residual plutonium contamination estimated to be deposited offsite following the earthquakes, and the 180-mph and 230-mph tornadoes are above the Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA) proposed guideline for plutonium in the general environment of 0.2 ..mu..Ci/m/sup 2/. The deposition values following the 135-mph tornado are below the EPA proposed guidelines.

  2. Technical and Political Assessment of Peaceful Nuclear Power Program Prospects in North Africa and the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Summary.........................................................................5 Country Reports Egypt and application of resources towards developing nuclear-generated electricity and nuclear-powered desalination

  3. Electric sales and revenue 1997

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1998-10-01

    The Electric Sales and Revenue is prepared by the Electric Power Division; Office of Coal, Nuclear, Electric and Alternate Fuels; Energy Information Administration (EIA); US Department of Energy. Information is provided on electricity sales, associated revenue, average revenue per kilowatthour sold, and number of consumers throughout the US. The data provided in the Electric Sales and Revenue are presented at the national, Census division, State, and electric utility levels. The information is based on annual data reported by electric utilities for the calendar year ending December 31, 1997. 16 figs., 17 tabs.

  4. Electric sales and revenue 1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1995-11-01

    The Electric Sales and Revenue is prepared by the Coal and Electric Data and Renewables Division; Office of Coal, Nuclear, Electric and Alternate Fuels; Energy Information Administration (EIA); US Department of Energy. Information is provided on electricity sales, associated revenue, average revenue per kilowatthour sold, and number of consumers throughout the United States. The data provided in the Electric Sales and Revenue are presented at the national, Census division, State, and electric utility levels. The information is based on annual data reported by electric utilities for the calendar year ending December 31, 1994.

  5. Feasibility Study of Supercritical Light Water Cooled Reactors for Electric Power Production, Nuclear Energy Research Initiative Project 2001-001, Westinghouse Electric Co. Grant Number: DE-FG07-02SF22533, Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Philip E. MacDonald

    2005-01-01

    The supercritical water-cooled reactor (SCWR) is one of the six reactor technologies selected for research and development under the Generation IV program. SCWRs are promising advanced nuclear systems because of their high thermal efficiency (i.e., about 45% versus about 33% efficiency for current Light Water Reactors [LWRs]) and considerable plant simplification. SCWRs are basically LWRs operating at higher pressure and temperatures with a direct once-through cycle. Operation above the critical pressure eliminates coolant boiling, so the coolant remains single-phase throughout the system. Thus, the need for a pressurizer, steam generators, steam separators, and dryers is eliminated. The main mission of the SCWR is generation of low-cost electricity. It is built upon two proven technologies: LWRs, which are the most commonly deployed power generating reactors in the world, and supercritical fossil-fired boilers, a large number of which are also in use around the world. The reference SCWR design for the U.S. program is a direct cycle system operating at 25.0 MPa, with core inlet and outlet temperatures of 280 and 500 C, respectively. The coolant density decreases from about 760 kg/m3 at the core inlet to about 90 kg/m3 at the core outlet. The inlet flow splits with about 10% of the inlet flow going down the space between the core barrel and the reactor pressure vessel (the downcomer) and about 90% of the inlet flow going to the plenum at the top of the rector pressure vessel, to then flow down through the core in special water rods to the inlet plenum. Here it mixes with the feedwater from the downcomer and flows upward to remove the heat in the fuel channels. This strategy is employed to provide good moderation at the top of the core. The coolant is heated to about 500 C and delivered to the turbine. The purpose of this NERI project was to assess the reference U.S. Generation IV SCWR design and explore alternatives to determine feasibility. The project was organized into three tasks: Task 1. Fuel-cycle Neutronic Analysis and Reactor Core Design Task 2. Fuel Cladding and Structural Material Corrosion and Stress Corrosion Cracking Task 3. Plant Engineering and Reactor Safety Analysis. moderator rods. materials.

  6. Design and Transient Analysis of Passive Safety Cooling Systems for Advanced Nuclear Reactors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Galvez, Cristhian

    2011-01-01

    heat transfer. Nuclear Technology 163 (2008) 344- [18] V.and Electricity . Nuclear Technology 144 [5] D. F. Williams,Vessel Technology . Nuclear Technology, 78 (1987) 245- [5

  7. Assessment of the Effect of Different Isolation Systems on Seismic Response of a Nuclear Power Plant

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wong, Jenna

    2014-01-01

    Diesel Generators." Nuclear Power International MagazineIsolation Structure for Nuclear Power Plant, Japan ElectricIsolation System for Nuclear Power Plants, JEAG 4614-2000,

  8. Nuclear Power Trends Energy Economics and Sustainability

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nuclear Power Trends Energy Economics and Sustainability L. H. Tsoukalas Purdue University Nuclear Nuclear Today · 439 nuclear power reactors (31 countries) · Over 12,000 years of operating experience · Nuclear reactors supply 16% of the world's electricity as base-load power (372,000 MWe of total capacity

  9. Electric power monthly

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, Sandra R.; Johnson, Melvin; McClevey, Kenneth; Calopedis, Stephen; Bolden, Deborah

    1992-05-01

    The Electric Power Monthly is prepared by the Survey Management Division; Office of Coal, Nuclear, Electric and Alternate Fuels, Energy Information Administration (EIA), Department of Energy. This publication provides monthly statistics at the national, Census division, and State levels for net generation, fuel consumption, fuel stocks, quantity and quality of fuel, cost of fuel, electricity sales, revenue, and average revenue per kilowatthour of electricity sold. Data on net generation, fuel consumption, fuel stocks, quantity and cost of fuel are also displayed for the North American Electric Reliability Council (NERC) regions. Additionally, statistics by company and plant are published in the EPM on capability of new plants, new generation, fuel consumption, fuel stocks, quantity and quality of fuel, and cost of fuel.

  10. State Renewable Electricity Profiles

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2012-01-01

    Presents a summary of current and recent historical data for the renewable electric power industry. The data focuses on net summer capacity and net generation for each type of renewable generator, as well as fossil-fired and nuclear power plant types, for the period 2006 through 2010.

  11. Electric power annual 1992

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-01-06

    The Electric Power Annual presents a summary of electric utility statistics at national, regional and State levels. The objective of the publication is to provide industry decisionmakers, government policymakers, analysts and the general public with historical data that may be used in understanding US electricity markets. The Electric Power Annual is prepared by the Survey Management Division; Office of Coal, Nuclear, Electric and Alternate Fuels; Energy Information Administration (EIA); US Department of Energy. ``The US Electric Power Industry at a Glance`` section presents a profile of the electric power industry ownership and performance, and a review of key statistics for the year. Subsequent sections present data on generating capability, including proposed capability additions; net generation; fossil-fuel statistics; retail sales; revenue; financial statistics; environmental statistics; electric power transactions; demand-side management; and nonutility power producers. In addition, the appendices provide supplemental data on major disturbances and unusual occurrences in US electricity power systems. Each section contains related text and tables and refers the reader to the appropriate publication that contains more detailed data on the subject matter. Monetary values in this publication are expressed in nominal terms.

  12. Electric power monthly, May 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-05-25

    The Electric Power Monthly (EPM) is prepared by the Survey Management Division; Office of Coal, Nuclear, Electric and Alternate Fuels, Energy Information Administration (EIA), Department of Energy. This publication provides monthly statistics at the US, Census division, and State levels for net generation, fossil fuel consumption and stocks, quantity and quality of fossil fuels, cost of fossil fuels, electricity sales, revenue, and average revenue per kilowatthour of electricity sold. Data on net generation, fuel consumption, fuel stocks, quantity and cost of fossil fuels are also displayed for the North American Electric Reliability Council (NERC) regions.

  13. Electric power monthly, April 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-05-07

    The Electric Power Monthly is prepared by the Survey Management Division; Office of Coal, Nuclear, Electric and Alternate Fuels, Energy Information Administration (EIA), Department of Energy. This publication provides monthly statistics at the US, Census division, and State levels for net generation, fossil fuel consumption and stocks, quantity and quality of fossil fuels, cost of fossil fuels, electricity sales, revenue, and average revenue per kilowatthour of electricity sold. Data on net generation, fuel consumption, fuel stocks, quantity and cost of fossil fuels are also displayed for the North American Electric Reliability Council (NERC) regions.

  14. EFFECTS OF ELECTRICITY DEREGULATION ON

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sheridan, Jennifer

    #12;EFFECTS OF ELECTRICITY DEREGULATION ON NUCLEAR POWER SAFETY Vicki Bier, University of Wisconsin-Madison (608) 262-2064, bier@engr.wisc.edu James Joosten, Connect USA David Glyer, Jennifer Tracey, Michael.K. electricity industry Purpose: ­ Develop a complete list of changes relevant to safety ­ Emphasize changes

  15. The Fifth Northwest Electric Power

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    on an effort to build major new generating resources, including several nuclear power plants. Many- generating resources would soon be unable to keep up with the demand for electricity. In the 1970s of under-investment in generation and conservation; a deeply flawed electricity market design in Califor

  16. How Green Will Electricity beHow Green Will Electricity be When Electric Vehicles Arrive?When Electric Vehicles Arrive?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Transportation (a) End-Use Energy Sectors PercentofU.S.CO2Emissions Coal Petroleum Natural Gas Electricity 20, Carnegie Mellon 800Natural Gas (turbines) 0Wind 0Hydro 0Nuclear 400Natural Gas (comb. cycle) 800Coal (new · How "green" is U.S. electricity today in terms of greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions? · What has been

  17. Nuclear power generation and fuel cycle report 1997

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1997-09-01

    Nuclear power is an important source of electric energy and the amount of nuclear-generated electricity continued to grow as the performance of nuclear power plants improved. In 1996, nuclear power plants supplied 23 percent of the electricity production for countries with nuclear units, and 17 percent of the total electricity generated worldwide. However, the likelihood of nuclear power assuming a much larger role or even retaining its current share of electricity generation production is uncertain. The industry faces a complex set of issues including economic competitiveness, social acceptance, and the handling of nuclear waste, all of which contribute to the uncertain future of nuclear power. Nevertheless, for some countries the installed nuclear generating capacity is projected to continue to grow. Insufficient indigenous energy resources and concerns over energy independence make nuclear electric generation a viable option, especially for the countries of the Far East.

  18. Electricity Reliability

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Post, Wilfred M.

    Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability High Temperature Superconductivity (HTS) Visualization in the future because they have virtually no resistance to electric current, offering the possibility of new electric power equipment with more energy efficiency and higher capacity than today's systems

  19. Transactions of the fourth symposium on space nuclear power systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    El-Genk, M.S.; Hoover, M.D.

    1987-01-01

    This paper contains the presented papers at the fourth symposium on space nuclear power systems. Topics of these papers include: space nuclear missions and applications, reactors and shielding, nuclear electric and nuclear propulsion, refractory alloys and high-temperature materials, instrumentation and control, energy conversion and storage, space nuclear fuels, thermal management, nuclear safety, simulation and modeling, and multimegawatt system concepts. (LSP)

  20. Transactions of the fifth symposium on space nuclear power systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    El-Genk, M.S.; Hoover, M.D.

    1988-01-01

    This paper contains the presented papers at the fourth symposium on space nuclear power systems. Topics of these paper include: space nuclear missions and applications, reactors and shielding, nuclear electric and nuclear propulsion, high-temperature materials, instrumentation and control, energy conversion and storage, space nuclear fuels, thermal management, nuclear safety, simulation and modeling, and multimegawatt system concepts. (LSP)

  1. A REVIEW OF LIGHT-WATER REACTOR SAFETY STUDIES. VOLUME 3 OF THE FINAL REPORT ON HEALTH AND SAFETY IMPACTS OF NUCLEAR, GEOTHERMAL, AND FOSSIL-FUEL ELECTRIC GENERATION IN CALIFORNIA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nero, A.V.

    2010-01-01

    Charges Relating to Nuclear Reactor Safety," 1976, availablestudies of light-water nuclear reactor safety, emphasizingstudies of overall nuclear reactor safety have been

  2. A REVIEW OF LIGHT-WATER REACTOR SAFETY STUDIES. VOLUME 3 OF THE FINAL REPORT ON HEALTH AND SAFETY IMPACTS OF NUCLEAR, GEOTHERMAL, AND FOSSIL-FUEL ELECTRIC GENERATION IN CALIFORNIA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nero, A.V.

    2010-01-01

    Testimony from the Nuclear Regulatory Commission indivi­ ofPlants", U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission Report WASH-Yellin, "The Nuclear Regulatory Commission's Reactor Safety

  3. A REVIEW OF AIR QUALITY MODELING TECHNIQUES. VOLUME 8 OF THE FINAL REPORT ON HEALTH AND SAFETY IMPACTS OF NUCLEAR, GEOTHERMAL, AND FOSSIL-FUEL ELECTRIC GENERATION IN CALIFORNIA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rosen, L.C.

    2010-01-01

    report on HEALTH AND SAFETY IMPACTS OF NUCLEAR, GEOTHERMAL,8 of HEALTH AND SAFETY IMPACTS OF NUCLEAR, GEOTHERMAL, ANDHealth and Safety Impacts of Nuclear, Geo- thermal, and

  4. A REVIEW OF LIGHT-WATER REACTOR SAFETY STUDIES. VOLUME 3 OF THE FINAL REPORT ON HEALTH AND SAFETY IMPACTS OF NUCLEAR, GEOTHERMAL, AND FOSSIL-FUEL ELECTRIC GENERATION IN CALIFORNIA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nero, A.V.

    2010-01-01

    discussed, between the Nuclear safety assurance and riskCharges Relating to Nuclear Reactor Safety," 1976, availableof light-water nuclear reactor safety, emphasizing the

  5. Inferring nuclear movements from fixed material Charless Fowlkes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fowlkes, Charless

    Inferring nuclear movements from fixed material Charless Fowlkes Jitendra Malik Electrical prior specific permission. #12;Inferring nuclear movements from fixed material Charless C. Fowlkes using nuclear positions extracted from a large number of images of fixed embryos. Embryos are sorted

  6. Richmond Electric Vehicle Initiative Electric Vehicle Readiness...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Richmond Electric Vehicle Initiative Electric Vehicle Readiness Plan Richmond Electric Vehicle Initiative Electric Vehicle Readiness Plan The REVi plan addresses the electric...

  7. A REVIEW OF LIGHT-WATER REACTOR SAFETY STUDIES. VOLUME 3 OF THE FINAL REPORT ON HEALTH AND SAFETY IMPACTS OF NUCLEAR, GEOTHERMAL, AND FOSSIL-FUEL ELECTRIC GENERATION IN CALIFORNIA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nero, A.V.

    2010-01-01

    Risks In U.S. Commercial Nuclear Power Plants", U.S. NuclearCommission, "The, Safety of Nuclear Power Reactors (Light-October 1, 1976. "Nuclear Power and the Environment," a

  8. Analysis of Nuclear Reconstitution, Nuclear

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Forbes, Douglass

    CHAPTER Analysis of Nuclear Reconstitution, Nuclear Envelope Assembly, and Nuclear Pore Assembly ....................................................................... 180 8.5 Assaying Assembly and Integrity of the Nuclear Envelope................................... 182 8.6 A Nuclear Pore Complex Assembly Assay Using pore-free Nuclear Intermediates

  9. Suppression of electric and magnetic fluctuations and improvement of confinement due to current profile modification by biased electrode in Saha Institute of Nuclear Physics tokamak

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Basu, Debjyoti; Pal, Rabindranath [Saha Institute of Nuclear Physics, 1/AF-Bidhannagar, Kolkata 700064 (India); Ghosh, Joydeep; Chattopadhyay, Prabal K. [Institute for Plasma Research, Bhat, Gandhinagar 382428 (India)

    2012-07-15

    Improvement of plasma confinement is achieved in normal q{sub a} discharges of SINP-tokamak by introducing a biased electrode inside the last closed flux surface. All the important features of high confinement mode are observed biasing the electrode negatively with respect to the vacuum vessel. Arrays of electric and magnetic probes introduced in the edge plasma region reveal suppression of electric and magnetic fluctuations over distinct frequency ranges as well as modification of the toroidal current profile due to biasing. Further analysis identifies the electrostatic fluctuations to be due to drift mode and the magnetic fluctuations may be of slow compressional Alfven waves. Both get suppressed due to current profile modification during biasing, hence leading to the improvement of plasma confinement.

  10. Electrical + Engineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cafarella, Michael J.

    Electrical + Computer Engineering Electrical + Computer Engineering 2013 PROFILE PEOPLE Faculty Students Electrical Engineering - 330 Computer Engineering - 224 Graduate Students EE and EE:Systems MSE - 301 EE and EE:Systems PhD - 296 Degrees Awarded Electrical Engineering BSE - 123 Computer Engineering

  11. Quarterly Nuclear Deployment Scorecard - January 2015 | Department...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    January 2015 Quarterly Nuclear Deployment Scorecard - January 2015 News Updates The NRC has scheduled a public Commissioner's hearing for February 4 on DTE Electric's...

  12. Electric power monthly, September 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-09-17

    The Electric Power Monthly (EPM) presents monthly electricity statistics. The purpose of this publication is to provide energy decisionmakers with accurate and timely information that may be used in forming various perspectives on electric issues that lie ahead. The EPM is prepared by the Survey Management Division; Office of Coal, Nuclear, Electric and Alternate Fuels, Energy Information Administration (EIA), Department of Energy. This publication provides monthly statistics at the US, Census division, and State levels for net generation, fossil fuel consumption and stocks, quantity and quality of fossil fuels, cost of fossil fuels, electricity sales, revenue, and average revenue per kilowatthour of electricity sold. Data on net generation, fuel consumption, fuel stocks, quantity and cost of fossil fuels are also displayed for the North American Electric Reliability Council (NERC) regions.

  13. Electric power monthly, August 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-08-13

    The Electric Power Monthly (EPM) presents monthly electricity statistics. The purpose of this publication is to provide energy decisionmakers with accurate and timely information that may be used in forming various perspectives on electric issues that lie ahead. The EPM is prepared by the Survey Management Division; Office of Coal, Nuclear, Electric and Alternate Fuels, Energy Information Administration (EIA), Department of Energy. This publication provides monthly statistics at the US, Census division, and State levels for net generation, fossil fuel consumption and stocks, quantity and quality of fossil fuels, cost of fossil fuels, electricity sales, revenue, and average revenue per kilowatthour of electricity sold. Data on net generation, fuel consumption, fuel stocks, quantity and cost of fossil fuels are also displayed for the North American Electric Reliability Council (NERC) regions.

  14. A REVIEW OF LIGHT-WATER REACTOR SAFETY STUDIES. VOLUME 3 OF THE FINAL REPORT ON HEALTH AND SAFETY IMPACTS OF NUCLEAR, GEOTHERMAL, AND FOSSIL-FUEL ELECTRIC GENERATION IN CALIFORNIA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nero, A.V.

    2010-01-01

    GEOTHERMAL, AND ELECTRIC GENERATION IN CALIFORNIA Energy andELECTRIC GENERATION IN CALIFORNIA A project performed for the California Energy

  15. Electric Power Annual 2010

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home PageMonthly","10/2015"4,"Ames5 Tables July 1996 Energy Information Administration Office of Coal, Nuclear, ElectricRhode Island ElectricityYear JanFeet) YearTobagoA.

  16. REGULATION AND SYSTEM INTERDEPENDENCE: EFFECTS ON THE SITING OF CALIFORNIA ELECTRICAL ENERGY FACILITIES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kooser, J.C.

    2013-01-01

    Going to SQecific End Uses Hydroelectricity 100% electricity58% transportation Hydroelectricity ! Nuclear Geothermalsupply relied on hydroelectricity, the severe droughts,

  17. Promoting electricity from renewable energy sources -- lessons learned from the EU, U.S. and Japan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haas, Reinhard

    2008-01-01

    cost disadvantage compared to electricity generated from fossil or nuclear fuels 2 . A significant switch to a renewable energy

  18. Electric Power Monthly

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration would like submitKansas Nuclear ProfileMultiferroic Electric Field

  19. Electric power annual 1997. Volume 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1998-07-01

    The Electric Power Annual presents a summary of electric power industry statistics at national, regional, and State levels. The objective of the publication is to provide industry decisionmakers, government policy-makers, analysts, and the general public with data that may be used in understanding US electricity markets. The Electric Power Annual is prepared by the Electric Power Division; Office of Coal, Nuclear, Electric and Alternate Fuels; Energy Information Administration (EIA); US Department of Energy. Volume 1 -- with a focus on US electric utilities -- contains final 1997 data on net generation and fossil fuel consumption, stocks, receipts, and cost; preliminary 1997 data on generating unit capability, and retail sales of electricity, associated revenue, and the average revenue per kilowatthour of electricity sold (based on a monthly sample: Form EIA-826, ``Monthly Electric Utility Sales and Revenue Report with State Distributions``). Additionally, information on net generation from renewable energy sources and on the associated generating capability is included in Volume 1 of the EPA.

  20. METHODOLOGIES FOR REVIEW OF THE HEALTH AND SAFETY ASPECTS OF PROPOSED NUCLEAR, GEOTHERMAL, AND FOSSIL-FUEL SITES AND FACILITIES. VOLUME 9 OF THE FINAL REPORT ON HEALTH AND SAFETY IMPACTS OF NUCLEAR, GEOTHERMAL, AND FOSSIL-FUEL ELECTRIC GENERATION IN CALIFORNIA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nero, A.V.

    2010-01-01

    and Related Standards for Nuclear Power Plants", LawrenceDensities Surrounding Nuclear Power Plants", LawrenceResponse Planning for Nuclear Power Plants in California",

  1. METHODOLOGIES FOR REVIEW OF THE HEALTH AND SAFETY ASPECTS OF PROPOSED NUCLEAR, GEOTHERMAL, AND FOSSIL-FUEL SITES AND FACILITIES. VOLUME 9 OF THE FINAL REPORT ON HEALTH AND SAFETY IMPACTS OF NUCLEAR, GEOTHERMAL, AND FOSSIL-FUEL ELECTRIC GENERATION IN CALIFORNIA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nero, A.V.

    2010-01-01

    No. 73-900, 1973. Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Regula toryJan. 1, 1977. Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Regulatorywith the Nuclear Regulatory Commission,will have a decided

  2. METHODOLOGIES FOR REVIEW OF THE HEALTH AND SAFETY ASPECTS OF PROPOSED NUCLEAR, GEOTHERMAL, AND FOSSIL-FUEL SITES AND FACILITIES. VOLUME 9 OF THE FINAL REPORT ON HEALTH AND SAFETY IMPACTS OF NUCLEAR, GEOTHERMAL, AND FOSSIL-FUEL ELECTRIC GENERATION IN CALIFORNIA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nero, A.V.

    2010-01-01

    considering the Nuclear Regulatory Commission safety reviewof the Nuclear Regulatory Commission safety review has onlyc..1 HEALTH AND SAFETY IMPACTS OF NUCLEAR, GEOTHERMAL, AND

  3. Argonne nuclear pioneer: Leonard Koch

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Koch, Leonard

    2012-01-01

    Leonard Koch joined Argonne National Laboratory in 1948. He helped design and build Experimental Breeder Reactor-1 (EBR-1), the first reactor to generate useable amounts of electricity from nuclear energy.

  4. Facts and Lessons of the Fukushima Nuclear Accident and Safety Improvement- The Operator Viewpoints

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presenter: Akira Kawano, General Manager, Nuclear International Relations and Strategy Group, Nuclear Power and Plant Siting Administrative Department, Tokyo Electric Power Company

  5. DOE Fundamentals Handbook: Electrical Science, Volume 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-06-01

    The Electrical Science Fundamentals Handbook was developed to assist nuclear facility operating contractors provide operators, maintenance personnel, and the technical staff with the necessary fundamentals training to ensure a basic understanding of electrical theory, terminology, and application. The handbook includes information on alternating current (AC) and direct current (DC) theory, circuits, motors, and generators; AC power and reactive components; batteries; AC and DC voltage regulators; transformers; and electrical test instruments and measuring devices. This information will provide personnel with a foundation for understanding the basic operation of various types of DOE nuclear facility electrical equipment.

  6. A REVIEW OF LIGHT-WATER REACTOR SAFETY STUDIES. VOLUME 3 OF THE FINAL REPORT ON HEALTH AND SAFETY IMPACTS OF NUCLEAR, GEOTHERMAL, AND FOSSIL-FUEL ELECTRIC GENERATION IN CALIFORNIA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nero, A.V.

    2010-01-01

    examination of the risk from nuclear power based on this ap­available of the risk from nuclear power. As a result, ais perform­ of the risk from nuclear power plants. In of the

  7. POWER PLANT RELIABILITY-AVAILABILITY AND STATE REGULATION. VOLUME 7 OF THE FINAL REPORT ON HEALTH AND SAFETY IMPACTS OF NUCLEAR, GEOTHERMAL, AND FOSSIL-FUEL ELECTRIC GENERATION IN CALIFORNIA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nero, A.V.

    2010-01-01

    No. 75-50 (Ref. 1). Nuclear Safety, September 1975 to Augustreport on HEALTH AND SAFETY IMPACTS OF NUCLEAR, GEOTHERMAL,7 of HEAL TH AND SAFETY IMPACTS OF NUCLEAR, GEOTHERMAL, AND

  8. POWER PLANT RELIABILITY-AVAILABILITY AND STATE REGULATION. VOLUME 7 OF THE FINAL REPORT ON HEALTH AND SAFETY IMPACTS OF NUCLEAR, GEOTHERMAL, AND FOSSIL-FUEL ELECTRIC GENERATION IN CALIFORNIA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nero, A.V.

    2010-01-01

    and Control Reactor Protection - Inst. and Control NuclearNUCLEAR REACTOR General Primary Cooling System (without steam gen. ) Steam generator Control

  9. POWER PLANT RELIABILITY-AVAILABILITY AND STATE REGULATION. VOLUME 7 OF THE FINAL REPORT ON HEALTH AND SAFETY IMPACTS OF NUCLEAR, GEOTHERMAL, AND FOSSIL-FUEL ELECTRIC GENERATION IN CALIFORNIA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nero, A.V.

    2010-01-01

    AND FOSSIL-FUEL ELECTRIC GENERATION IN CALIFORNIA Energy andELECTRIC GENERATION IN CALIFORNIA A project performed for the California Energy

  10. A REVIEW OF AIR QUALITY MODELING TECHNIQUES. VOLUME 8 OF THE FINAL REPORT ON HEALTH AND SAFETY IMPACTS OF NUCLEAR, GEOTHERMAL, AND FOSSIL-FUEL ELECTRIC GENERATION IN CALIFORNIA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rosen, L.C.

    2010-01-01

    AND FOSSIL-FUEL ELECTRIC GENERATION IN CALIFORNIA Energy andELECTRIC GENERATION IN CALIFORNIA A project performed for the California Energy

  11. Electric sales and revenue: 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1995-01-01

    The Electric Sales and Revenue is prepared by the Survey Management Division, Office of Coal, Nuclear, Electric and Alternate Fuels; Energy Information Administration (EIA); US Department of Energy. This publication provides information about sales of electricity, its associated revenue, and the average revenue per kilowatthour sold to residential, commercial, industrial, and other consumers throughout the United States. The sales, revenue, and average revenue per kilowatthour data provided in the Electric Sales and Revenue are based on annual data reported by electric utilities for the calendar year ending December 31, 1993. Operating revenue includes energy charges, demand charges, consumer service charges, environmental surcharges, fuel adjustments, and other miscellaneous charges. The revenue does not include taxes, such as sales and excise taxes, that are assessed on the consumer and collected through the utility. Average revenue per kilowatthour is defined as the cost per unit of electricity sold and is calculated by dividing retail sales into the associated electric revenue. Because electric rates vary based on energy usage, average revenue per kilowatthour are affected by changes in the volume of sales. The sales of electricity, associated revenue, and average revenue per kilowatthour data provided in this report are presented at the national, Census division, State, and electric utility levels.

  12. World nuclear outlook 1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1995-09-29

    As part of the EIA program to provide energy information, this analysis report presents the current status and projections through 2015 of nuclear capacity, generation, and fuel cycle requirements for all countries in the world using nuclear power to generate electricity for commercial use. It also contains information and forecasts of developments in the uranium market. Long-term projections of US nuclear capacity, generation, and spent fuel discharges for two different scenarios through 2040 are developed for the Department of Energy`s Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM). In turn, the OCRWM provides partial funding for preparation of this report. The projections of uranium requirements are provided to the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) for preparation of the Nuclear Energy Agency/OECD report, Summary of Nuclear Power and Fuel Cycle Data in OECD Member Countries.

  13. World nuclear outlook 1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1994-12-01

    As part of the EIA program to provide energy information, this analysis report presents the current status and projections through 2010 of nuclear capacity, generation, and fuel cycle requirements for all countries in the world using nuclear power to generate electricity for commercial use. It also contains information and forecasts of developments in the uranium market. Long-term projections of US nuclear capacity, generation, and spent fuel discharges for three different scenarios through 2040 are developed for the Department of Energy`s Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM). In turn, the OCRWM provides partial funding for preparation of this report. The projections of uranium requirements are provided to the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) for preparation of the Nuclear Energy Agency/OECD report, Summary of Nuclear Power and Fuel Cycle Data in OECD Member Countries.

  14. Model documentation: Electricity Market Module, Electricity Capacity Planning submodule

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-04-07

    The National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) is a computer modeling system developed by the Energy Information Administration (EIA). The NEMS produces integrated forecasts for energy markets in the United States by achieving a general equilibrium solution for energy supply and demand. Currently, for each year during the period from 1990 through 2010, the NEMS describes energy supply, conversion, consumption, and pricing. The Electricity Market Module (EMM) is the electricity supply component of the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS). The supply of electricity is a conversion activity since electricity is produced from other energy sources (e.g., fossil, nuclear, and renewable). The EMM represents the generation, transmission, and pricing of electricity. The EMM consists of four main submodules: Electricity Capacity Planning (ECP), Electricity Fuel Dispatching (EFD), Electricity Finance and Pricing (EFP), and Load and Demand-Side Management (LDSM). The ECP evaluates changes in the mix of generating capacity that are necessary to meet future demands for electricity and comply with environmental regulations. The EFD represents dispatching (i.e., operating) decisions and determines how to allocate available capacity to meet the current demand for electricity. Using investment expenditures from the ECP and operating costs from the EFD, the EFP calculates the price of electricity, accounting for state-level regulations involving the allocation of costs. The LDSM translates annual demands for electricity into distributions that describe hourly, seasonal, and time-of-day variations. These distributions are used by the EFD and the ECP to determine the quantity and types of generating capacity that are required to insure reliable and economical supplies of electricity. The EMM also represents nonutility suppliers and interregional and international transmission and trade. These activities are included in the EFD and the ECP.

  15. Electric Vehicles

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Ozpineci, Burak

    2014-07-23

    Burak Ozpineci sees a future where electric vehicles charge while we drive them down the road, thanks in part to research under way at ORNL.

  16. Electric Vehicles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ozpineci, Burak

    2014-05-02

    Burak Ozpineci sees a future where electric vehicles charge while we drive them down the road, thanks in part to research under way at ORNL.

  17. Nuclear Energy's Renaissance Andrew C. Kadak

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    23% 22% 3% 8% 3% 41% Electricity Production Source: EIA Gas 15% Hydro 8% Coal 51% Oil 3% Other 2 (1) Beaver Valley (2) 103 Nuclear Power Plants Totaling 97,018 MWe Columbia (1) Diablo Canyon (2) San Nuclear Power Plants Totaling 97,018 MWe 103 Nuclear Power Plants Totaling 97,018 MWe National Energy

  18. Electric machine

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    El-Refaie, Ayman Mohamed Fawzi (Niskayuna, NY); Reddy, Patel Bhageerath (Madison, WI)

    2012-07-17

    An interior permanent magnet electric machine is disclosed. The interior permanent magnet electric machine comprises a rotor comprising a plurality of radially placed magnets each having a proximal end and a distal end, wherein each magnet comprises a plurality of magnetic segments and at least one magnetic segment towards the distal end comprises a high resistivity magnetic material.

  19. Nuclear Resonance Fluorescence for Nuclear Materials Assay

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Quiter, Brian Joseph

    2010-01-01

    Potential of Nuclear Resonance Fluorescence . . . . . . . .2.9.1 Nuclear ThomsonSections . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Nuclear Resonance

  20. Nuclear hydrogen: An assessment of product flexibility and market viability Audun Botterud a,, Bilge Yildiz b

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yildiz, Bilge

    for nuclear energy technologies in general, ranging from waste management to proliferation. HoweverNuclear hydrogen: An assessment of product flexibility and market viability Audun Botterud a Available online 27 August 2008 Keywords: Nuclear hydrogen and electricity production Product flexibility

  1. Electrical connector

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dilliner, Jennifer L.; Baker, Thomas M.; Akasam, Sivaprasad; Hoff, Brian D.

    2006-11-21

    An electrical connector includes a female component having one or more receptacles, a first test receptacle, and a second test receptacle. The electrical connector also includes a male component having one or more terminals configured to engage the one or more receptacles, a first test pin configured to engage the first test receptacle, and a second test pin configured to engage the second test receptacle. The first test receptacle is electrically connected to the second test receptacle, and at least one of the first test pin and the second test pin is shorter in length than the one or more terminals.

  2. Electric Storage Water Heaters

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration would like submitKansas Nuclear ProfileMultiferroic ElectricAdministration

  3. Electricity Monthly Update

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration would like submitKansas Nuclear ProfileMultiferroic 2015 Chevrolet‹ See all Electricity

  4. Electricity Monthly Update

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration would like submitKansas Nuclear ProfileMultiferroic 2015 Chevrolet‹ SeeElectric Power

  5. Electricity Monthly Update

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration would like submitKansas Nuclear ProfileMultiferroic 2015 Chevrolet‹ SeeElectric

  6. A Lifecycle Emissions Model (LEM): Lifecycle Emissions from Transportation Fuels, Motor Vehicles, Transportation Modes, Electricity Use, Heating and Cooking Fuels, and Materials

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Delucchi, Mark

    2003-01-01

    in nuclear-power and hydro-power case are g/MMBtu of netmethanol, nuclear, and hydro power plants, individually orvehicles]) H = Hydro power (% of electricity generation [

  7. electrical, engineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    school of electrical, computer and energy engineering Annual Report 2012-2013 Breaking the final systems engineering Marco Santello, School Director enrollment 930 undergraduate 771 graduate 159 DEGREE PROGRAM biomedical engineering (Harrington Bioengineering program) school of computing, informatics

  8. Electrical, Engineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    School of Electrical, Computer and Energy Engineering 2009-2010 Annual Report #12;Organizational Structure for Ira A. Fulton Schools of Engineering Schools (Director) Lead These Engineering Undergraduate Degree Programs Coordinate Across Engineering for These Grand Challenge Areas... Biological & Health

  9. Engineering Electrical &

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hickman, Mark

    Computer Engineering Electrical & Electronic Engineering Mechatronics Engineering Mechanical Engineering Civil Engineering Natural Resources Engineering Forest Engineering Chemical & Process Engineering ELECTIVE 2 Required Engineering Intermediate Year 2011 Eight Required Courses Chart: 120 points College

  10. Engineering Electrical &

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hickman, Mark

    Computer Engineering Electrical & Electronic Engineering Mechatronics Engineering Mechanical Engineering Civil Engineering Natural Resources Engineering Forest Engineering Chemical & Process Engineering ELECTIVE 2 Required Engineering Intermediate Year 2012 Eight Required Courses Chart: 120 points College

  11. Overview of the nuclear fuel cycle

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Leuze, R.E.

    1981-01-01

    The use of nuclear reactors to provide electrical energy has shown considerable growth since the first nuclear plant started commercial operation in the mid 1950s. Although the main purpose of this paper is to review the fuel cycle capabilities in the United States, the introduction is a brief review of the types of nuclear reactors in use and the world-wide nuclear capacity.

  12. Energy Praises the Nuclear Regulatory Commission Approval of...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    way we power this nation - nuclear power will play an increasingly important role as the demand for electricity grows worldwide. "Government's role is to create an environment in...

  13. Energy Deputy Secretary Poneman Co-Chairs Nuclear Meeting in...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    and decontamination efforts at the Tokyo Electric Power Company's (TEPCO) Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power Station. "These meetings contribute significantly to our...

  14. Electric generator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Foster, Jr., John S. (Pleasanton, CA); Wilson, James R. (Livermore, CA); McDonald, Jr., Charles A. (Danville, CA)

    1983-01-01

    1. In an electrical energy generator, the combination comprising a first elongated annular electrical current conductor having at least one bare surface extending longitudinally and facing radially inwards therein, a second elongated annular electrical current conductor disposed coaxially within said first conductor and having an outer bare surface area extending longitudinally and facing said bare surface of said first conductor, the contiguous coaxial areas of said first and second conductors defining an inductive element, means for applying an electrical current to at least one of said conductors for generating a magnetic field encompassing said inductive element, and explosive charge means disposed concentrically with respect to said conductors including at least the area of said inductive element, said explosive charge means including means disposed to initiate an explosive wave front in said explosive advancing longitudinally along said inductive element, said wave front being effective to progressively deform at least one of said conductors to bring said bare surfaces thereof into electrically conductive contact to progressively reduce the inductance of the inductive element defined by said conductors and transferring explosive energy to said magnetic field effective to generate an electrical potential between undeformed portions of said conductors ahead of said explosive wave front.

  15. EEE 463 Electrical Power Plants (3) [F] Course (Catalog) Description

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Junshan

    . Environmental impact of electric generation (3 lectures) 9. Advanced energy conversion systems (geothermalEEE 463 Electrical Power Plants (3) [F] Course (Catalog) Description: Generation of electric power using fossil, nuclear and renewable, including solar, geothermal, wind, hydroelectric, biomass and ocean

  16. Volume I, Summary Report: A Roadmap to Deploy New Nuclear Power Plants in the United States by 2010:

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Nuclear power plants in the United States currently produce about 20 percent of the nation’s electricity. This nuclear-generated electricity is safe, clean and economical, and does not emit...

  17. Perspectives of Nuclear Physics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Amand Faessler

    2002-12-06

    The organizers of this meeting have asked me to present perspectives of nuclear physics. This means to identify the areas where nuclear physics will be expanding in the next future. In six chapters a short overview of these areas will be given, where I expect that nuclear physics willdevelop quite fast: A. Quantum Chromodynamics and effective field theories in the confinement region; B. Nuclear structure at the limits; C. High energy heavy ion collisions; D. Nuclear astrophysics; E. Neutrino physics; F. Test of physics beyond the standard model by rare processes. After a survey over these six points I will pick out a few topics where I will go more in details. There is no time to give for all six points detailed examples. I shall discuss the following examples of the six topics mentionned above: 1. The perturbative chiral quark model and the nucleon $\\Sigma$-term, 2. VAMPIR (Variation After Mean field Projection In Realistic model spaces and with realistic forces) as an example of the nuclear structure renaissance, 3. Measurement of important astrophysical nuclear reactions in the Gamow peak, 4. The solar neutrino problem. As examples for testing new physics beyond the standard model by rare processes I had prepared to speak about the measurement of the electric neutron dipole moment and of the neutrinoless double beta decay. But the time is limited and so I have to skip these points, although they are extremely interesting.

  18. U.S. Nuclear Generation of Electricity

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet)Decade Year-0Proved ReservesData2009 2010YearDiscoveriesRevision(BillionU.S.

  19. THE BIRTH OF NUCLEAR-GENERATED ELECTRICITY

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power AdministrationRobust,Field-effectWorking With LivermoreSustainable

  20. Electric trade in the United States 1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1998-08-01

    Wholesale trade in electricity plays an important role for the US electric utility industry. Wholesale, or bulk power, transactions allow electric utilities to reduce power costs, increase power supply options, and improve reliability. In 1994, the wholesale trade market totaled 1.9 trillion kilowatthours, about 66% of total sales to ultimate consumers. This publication, Electric Trade in the United States 1994 (ELECTRA), is the fifth in a series of reports on wholesale power transactions prepared by the Office of Coal, Nuclear, Electric and Alternate Fuels, Energy Information Administration (EIA). The electric trade data are published biennially. The first report presented 1986 data, and this report provides information on the electric power industry during 1994.

  1. Electrically powered hand tool

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Myers, Kurt S.; Reed, Teddy R.

    2007-01-16

    An electrically powered hand tool is described and which includes a three phase electrical motor having a plurality of poles; an electrical motor drive electrically coupled with the three phase electrical motor; and a source of electrical power which is converted to greater than about 208 volts three-phase and which is electrically coupled with the electrical motor drive.

  2. Nuclear Matter and Nuclear Dynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M Colonna

    2009-02-26

    Highlights on the recent research activity, carried out by the Italian Community involved in the "Nuclear Matter and Nuclear Dynamics" field, will be presented.

  3. Electric Power Monthly, July 1990

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1990-10-12

    The Electric Power Monthly (EPM) is prepared by the Electric Power Division; Office of Coal, Nuclear, Electric and Alternate Fuels, Energy Information Administration (EIA), Department of Energy. This publication provides monthly statistics at the national, Census division, and State levels for net generation, fuel consumption, fuel stocks, quantity and quality of fuel, cost of fuel, electricity sales, and average revenue per kilowatthour of electricity sold. Data on net generation are also displayed at the North American Electric Reliability Council (NERC) region level. Additionally, company and plant level information are published in the EPM on capability of new plants, net generation, fuel consumption, fuel stocks, quantity and quality of fuel, and cost in fuel. Quantity, quality, and cost of fuel data lag the net generation, fuel consumption, fuel stocks, electricity sales, and average revenue per kilowatthour data by 1 month. This difference in reporting appears in the national, Census division, and State level tables. However, at the plant level, all statistics presented are for the earlier month for the purpose of comparison. 12 refs., 4 figs., 48 tabs.

  4. Electric Power Monthly, August 1990. [Glossary included

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1990-11-29

    The Electric Power Monthly (EPM) presents monthly summaries of electric utility statistics at the national, Census division, and State level. The purpose of this publication is to provide energy decisionmakers with accurate and timely information that may be used in forming various perspectives on electric issues that lie ahead. Data includes generation by energy source (coal, oil, gas, hydroelectric, and nuclear); generation by region; consumption of fossil fuels for power generation; sales of electric power, cost data; and unusual occurrences. A glossary is included.

  5. A REVIEW OF LIGHT-WATER REACTOR SAFETY STUDIES. VOLUME 3 OF THE FINAL REPORT ON HEALTH AND SAFETY IMPACTS OF NUCLEAR, GEOTHERMAL, AND FOSSIL-FUEL ELECTRIC GENERATION IN CALIFORNIA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nero, A.V.

    2010-01-01

    Nuclear Power Reactors PROTECTION AGAINST SABOTAGE Protection Against Industrial Sabotage I1C-4 Decominarion and Decommissioning of Reactors a Design Features to Control

  6. POWER PLANT RELIABILITY-AVAILABILITY AND STATE REGULATION. VOLUME 7 OF THE FINAL REPORT ON HEALTH AND SAFETY IMPACTS OF NUCLEAR, GEOTHERMAL, AND FOSSIL-FUEL ELECTRIC GENERATION IN CALIFORNIA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nero, A.V.

    2010-01-01

    Power Plant Reliability-Availability and State Regulation,"Report on Equipment Availability: Fossil and NuclearBasic Definitions* Availability: Reliability: Base Loading:

  7. Fusion Nuclear Science | ORNL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Fusion Nuclear Science Isotope Development and Production Nuclear Security Science & Technology Nuclear Systems Modeling, Simulation & Validation Nuclear Systems Technology...

  8. POWER PLANT RELIABILITY-AVAILABILITY AND STATE REGULATION. VOLUME 7 OF THE FINAL REPORT ON HEALTH AND SAFETY IMPACTS OF NUCLEAR, GEOTHERMAL, AND FOSSIL-FUEL ELECTRIC GENERATION IN CALIFORNIA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nero, A.V.

    2010-01-01

    of electric generating plants usefully begins with anmatters, a plant's position within the generating networkthe plant may be divided into a steam generating system and

  9. Electric Power System Asset Optimization

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration would like submitKansas Nuclear ProfileMultiferroic Electric

  10. Electric power monthly, July 1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-07-01

    The Electric Power Monthly (EPM) presents monthly electricity statistics. The purpose of this publication is to provide energy decisionmakers with accurate and timely information that may be used in forming various perspectives on electric issues that lie ahead. Data in this report are presented for a wide audience including Congress, Federal and State agencies, the electric utility industry, and the general public. The EIA collected the information in this report to fulfill its data collection and dissemination responsibilities as specified in the Federal Energy Administration Act of 1974 (Public Law 93-275) as amended. The EPM is prepared by the Survey Management Division; Office of Coal, Nuclear, Electric and Alternate Fuels, Energy Information Administration (EIA), Department of Energy. This publication provides monthly statistics at the US, Census division, and State levels for net generation, fossil fuel consumption and stocks, quantity and quality of fossil fuels, cost of fossil fuels, electricity sales, revenue, and average revenue per kilowatthour of electricity sold. Data on net generation, fuel consumption, fuel stocks, quantity and cost of fossil fuels are also displayed for the North American Electric Reliability Council (NERC) regions. Statistics by company and plant are published in the EPM on the capability of new generating units, net generation, fuel consumption, fuel stocks, quantity and quality of fuel, and cost of fossil fuels. Data on quantity, quality, and cost of fossil fuels lag data on net generation, fuel consumption, fuel stocks, electricity sales, and average revenue per kilowatthour by 1 month. This difference in reporting appears in the US, Census division, and State level tables. However, for purposes of comparison, plant-level data are presented for the earlier month.

  11. Nuclear power generation and fuel cycle report 1996

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1996-10-01

    This report presents the current status and projections through 2015 of nuclear capacity, generation, and fuel cycle requirements for all countries using nuclear power to generate electricity for commercial use. It also contains information and forecasts of developments in the worldwide nuclear fuel market. Long term projections of U.S. nuclear capacity, generation, and spent fuel discharges for two different scenarios through 2040 are developed. A discussion on decommissioning of nuclear power plants is included.

  12. Electric trade in the United States 1992

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-09-01

    This publication, Electric Trade in the US 1992 (ELECTRA), is the fourth in a series of reports on wholesale power transactions prepared by the Electric Data Systems Branch, Survey Management Division, Office of Coal, Nuclear, Electric and Alternate Fuels, Energy Information Administration (EIA). The electric trade data are published biennially. The first report presented 1986 data, and this report provides information on the electric power industry during 1992. The electric trade data collected and presented in this report furnish important information on the wholesale structure found within the US electric power industry. The patterns of interutility trade in the report support analyses of wholesale power transactions and provide input for a broader understanding of bulk power market issues that define the emerging national electric energy policies. The report includes information on the quantity of power purchased, sold, exchanged, and wheeled; the geographical locations of transactions and ownership classes involved; and the revenues and costs. Information on the physical transmission system are being included for the first time in this publication. Transmission data covering investor-owned electric utilities were shifted from the Financial Statistics of Selected Investor-Owned Electric Utilities to the ELECTRA publication. Some of the prominent features of this year`s report include information and data not published before on transmission lines for publicly owned utilities and transmission lines added during 1992 by investor-owned electric utilities.

  13. Electric sales and revenue 1992, April 1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-04-20

    The Electric Sales and Revenue is prepared by the Survey Management Division, Office of Coal, Nuclear, Electric and Alternate Fuels; Energy Information Administration (EIA); US Department of Energy. This publication provides information about sales of electricity, its associated revenue, and the average revenue per kilowatthour sold to residential, commercial, industrial, and other consumers throughout the United States. The sales, revenue, and average revenue per kilowatthour provided in the Electric Sales and Revenue are based on annual data reported by electric utilities for the calendar year ending December 31, 1992. The electric revenue reported by each electric utility includes the applicable revenue from kilowatthours sold; revenue from income; unemployment and other State and local taxes; energy, demand, and consumer service charges; environmental surcharges; franchise fees; fuel adjustments; and other miscellaneous charges. The revenue does not include taxes, such as sales and excise taxes, that are assessed on the consumer and collected through the utility. Average revenue per kilowatthour is defined as the cost per unit of electricity sold and is calculated by dividing retail sales into the associated electric revenue. The sales of electricity, associated revenue, and average revenue per kilowatthour provided in this report are presented at the national, Census division, State, and electric utility levels.

  14. Electric power annual 1996. Volume 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1997-08-01

    The Electric Power Annual presents a summary of electric power industry statistics at national, regional, and State levels. The objective of the publication is to provide industry decisionmakers, government policy-makers, analysts, and the general public with data that may be used in understanding US electricity markets. The Electric Power Annual is prepared by the Coal and Electric Data and Renewables Division; Office of Coal, Nuclear, Electric and Alternate Fuels; Energy Information Administration (EIA); US Department of Energy. Volume 1--with a focus on US electric utilities--contains final 1996 data on net generation and fossil fuel consumption, stocks, receipts, and cost; preliminary 1996 data on generating unit capability, and retail sales of electricity, associated revenue, and the average revenue per kilowatthour of electricity sold. Additionally, information on net generation from renewable energy sources and on the associated generating capability is included in Volume 1 of the EPA. Data published in the Electric Power Annual Volume 1 are compiled from three statistical forms filed monthly and two forms filed annually by electric utilities. These forms are described in detail in the Technical Notes. 5 figs., 30 tabs.

  15. Nuclear Resonance Fluorescence for Nuclear Materials Assay

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Quiter, Brian Joseph

    2010-01-01

    to Journal of Nuclear Technology. [46] C.J. Hagmann and J.Library for Nuclear Science and Technology,” Nuclear Dataof Standards and Technology daughter nuclear data processing

  16. High Temperatures & Electricity Demand

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    High Temperatures & Electricity Demand An Assessment of Supply Adequacy in California Trends.......................................................................................................1 HIGH TEMPERATURES AND ELECTRICITY DEMAND.....................................................................................................................7 SECTION I: HIGH TEMPERATURES AND ELECTRICITY DEMAND ..........................9 BACKGROUND

  17. Capacity Markets for Electricity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Creti, Anna; Fabra, Natalia

    2004-01-01

    England and Wales Electricity Market”, Power Working PaperFelder (1996), “Should Electricity Markets Have a Capacityand Competitive Electricity Markets”, mimeo, IDEI, available

  18. Capacity Markets for Electricity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Creti, Anna; Fabra, Natalia

    2004-01-01

    and design of electricity capacity markets. Our work has twoMarkets for Electricity capacity markets, and so, when thesemain features of electricity capacity markets. We have used

  19. Retail Electricity Competition

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Joskow, Paul; Tirole, Jean

    2004-01-01

    Reliability and Competitive Electricity Markets” mimeo, MITCSEM WP 130 Retail Electricity Competition * Paul Joskow andwww.ucei.org Retail Electricity Competition ? Paul Joskow †

  20. Designing Electricity Auctions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fabra, Natalia; von der Fehr, Nils-Henrik; Harbord, David

    2004-01-01

    market performance in electricity auctions, it appears thatMcSorely (2001) “Regulating Electricity Markets: Experiencethe United Kingdom,” The Electricity Journal, December, 81-

  1. Electric Power Monthly, June 1990

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1990-09-13

    The EPM is prepared by the Electric Power Division; Office of Coal, Nuclear, Electric and Alternate Fuels, Energy Information Administration (EIA), Department of Energy. This publication provides monthly statistics at the national, Census division, and State levels for net generation, fuel consumption, fuel stocks, quantity and quality of fuel, electricity sales, and average revenue per kilowatthour of electricity sold. Data on net generation are also displayed at the North American Electric Reliability Council (NERC) region level. Additionally, company and plant level information are published in the EPM on capability of new plants, net generation, fuel consumption, fuel stocks, quantity and quality of fuel, and cost of fuel. Quantity, quality, and cost of fuel data lag the net generation, fuel consumption, fuel stocks, electricity sales, and average revenue per kilowatthour data by 1 month. This difference in reporting appears in the national, Census division, and State level tables. However, at the plant level, all statistics presented are for the earlier month for the purpose of comparison. 40 tabs.

  2. Electrical Safety

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:FinancingPetroleum Based|DepartmentStatementofApril 25,EVtheEnergyPreparedElectricalNOT

  3. Electrical, Computer and Energy Engineering S C H O O L O F

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Electrical, Computer and Energy Engineering S C H O O L O F 2008-2009 Annual Report #12 policy Electrical, Computer & Energy Engineering (Stephen Phillips) Electrical Engineering Nuclear Engineering certificate Electric Power/Energy concentration Arts, Media and Engineering concentration Energy

  4. Nuclear Energy Response in the EMF27 Study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kim, Son H.; Wada, Kenichi; Kurosawa, Atsushi; Roberts, Matthew

    2014-03-25

    The nuclear energy response for mitigating global climate change across eighteen participating models of the EMF27 study is investigated. Diverse perspectives on the future role of nuclear power in the global energy system are evident in the broad range of nuclear power contributions from participating models of the study. In the Baseline scenario without climate policy, nuclear electricity generation and shares span 0 – 66 EJ/ year and 0 - 25% in 2100 for all models, with a median nuclear electricity generation of 39 EJ/year (1,389 GWe at 90% capacity factor) and median share of 9%. The role of nuclear energy increased under the climate policy scenarios. The median of nuclear energy use across all models doubled in the 450 ppm CO2e scenario with a nuclear electricity generation of 67 EJ/year (2,352 GWe at 90% capacity factor) and share of 17% in 2100. The broad range of nuclear electricity generation (11 – 214 EJ/year) and shares (2 - 38%) in 2100 of the 450 ppm CO2e scenario reflect differences in the technology choice behavior, technology assumptions and competitiveness of low carbon technologies. Greater clarification of nuclear fuel cycle issues and risk factors associated with nuclear energy use are necessary for understanding the nuclear deployment constraints imposed in models and for improving the assessment of the nuclear energy potential in addressing climate change.

  5. Nuclear Power PROS -`No' greenhouse gas emissions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Toohey, Darin W.

    Nuclear Power PROS -`No' greenhouse gas emissions -Fuel is cheep -High energy density (1 ton U = 16 abundant elements found in natural crustal rocks) Nuclear Power CONS -High capital cost due to meeting,000 tons of coal to produce same amount of electricity) -Natural abundance of U (48th among the most

  6. Electric power monthly, September 1990. [Glossary included

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1990-12-17

    The purpose of this report is to provide energy decision makers with accurate and timely information that may be used in forming various perspectives on electric issues. The power plants considered include coal, petroleum, natural gas, hydroelectric, and nuclear power plants. Data are presented for power generation, fuel consumption, fuel receipts and cost, sales of electricity, and unusual occurrences at power plants. Data are compared at the national, Census division, and state levels. 4 figs., 52 tabs. (CK)

  7. Nuclear Navy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-01-01

    This video tells the story of the Navy's development of nuclear power and its application in long-range submarines and the growing nuclear surface force. Narrated by Frank Blair.

  8. Nuclear Navy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1994-12-31

    This video tells the story of the Navy`s development of nuclear power and its application in long-range submarines and the growing nuclear surface force. Narrated by Frank Blair.

  9. Nuclear Power 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2010-01-01

    be inherently safe and environmentally benign. These realities of today's world are among the reasons that lead to serious interest in deploying nuclear power as a sustainable energy source. Today's nuclear reactors are safe and highly efficient energy systems...

  10. Nuclear Engineer

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This position is located in the Nuclear Safety Division (NSD) which has specific responsibility for managing the development, analysis, review, and approval of non-reactor nuclear facility safety...

  11. Renewable Electricity Futures Study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Renewable Electricity Futures Study Renewable Electricity Generation and Storage Technologies for Sustainable Energy, LLC. #12;Renewable Electricity Futures Study Edited By Hand, M.M. National Renewable;Suggested Citations Renewable Electricity Futures Study (Entire Report) National Renewable Energy Laboratory

  12. ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING EECS Department

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING EECS Department The Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS) Department at WSU offers undergraduate degrees in electrical engineering, computer engineering and computer science. The EECS Department offers master of science degrees in computer science, electrical engineering

  13. World nuclear fuel cycle requirements 1991

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1991-10-10

    The nuclear fuel cycle consists of mining and milling uranium ore, processing the uranium into a form suitable for generating electricity, burning'' the fuel in nuclear reactors, and managing the resulting spent nuclear fuel. This report presents projections of domestic and foreign requirements for natural uranium and enrichment services as well as projections of discharges of spent nuclear fuel. These fuel cycle requirements are based on the forecasts of future commercial nuclear power capacity and generation published in a recent Energy Information Administration (EIA) report. Also included in this report are projections of the amount of spent fuel discharged at the end of each fuel cycle for each nuclear generating unit in the United States. The International Nuclear Model is used for calculating the projected nuclear fuel cycle requirements. 14 figs., 38 tabs.

  14. A REVIEW OF LIGHT-WATER REACTOR SAFETY STUDIES. VOLUME 3 OF THE FINAL REPORT ON HEALTH AND SAFETY IMPACTS OF NUCLEAR, GEOTHERMAL, AND FOSSIL-FUEL ELECTRIC GENERATION IN CALIFORNIA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nero, A.V.

    2010-01-01

    of Michigan for the Atomic Power Development Association).light-water power plants now the Atomic Energy resides withU.S. Atomic Energy Commission, "The, Safety of Nuclear Power

  15. POWER PLANT RELIABILITY-AVAILABILITY AND STATE REGULATION. VOLUME 7 OF THE FINAL REPORT ON HEALTH AND SAFETY IMPACTS OF NUCLEAR, GEOTHERMAL, AND FOSSIL-FUEL ELECTRIC GENERATION IN CALIFORNIA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nero, A.V.

    2010-01-01

    generate steam to drive a steam turbine, giving rise to theValves and Pi~ing STEAM TURBINE COMPONENT OUTAGE CAUSESbasically of a steam-driven turbine, an electric generator

  16. Electrical receptacle

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Leong, R.

    1993-06-22

    The invention is a receptacle for a three prong electrical plug which has either a tubular or U-shaped grounding prong. The inventive receptacle has a grounding prong socket which is sufficiently spacious to prevent the socket from significantly stretching when a larger, U-shaped grounding prong is inserted into the socket, and having two ridges to allow a snug fit when a smaller tubular shape grounding prong is inserted into the socket. The two ridges are made to prevent the socket from expanding when either the U-shaped grounding prong or the tubular grounding prong is inserted.

  17. Electric trade in the United States, 1996

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1998-12-01

    Wholesale trade in electricity plays an important role for the US electric utility industry. Wholesale, or bulk power, transactions allow electric utilities to reduce power costs, increase power supply options, and improve reliability. In 1996, the wholesale trade market totaled 2.3 trillion kilowatthours, over 73% of total sales to ultimate consumers. This publication, Electric Trade in the United States 1996 (ELECTRA), is the sixth in a series of reports on wholesale power transactions prepared by the Office of Coal, Nuclear, Electric and Alternate Fuels, Energy Information Administration (EIA). The electric trade data are published biennially. The first report presented 1986 data, and this report provides information on the electric power industry during 1996. The electric trade data collected and presented in this report furnish important information on the wholesale structure found within the US electric power industry. The patterns of interutility trade in the report support analyses of wholesale power transactions and provide input for a broader understanding of bulk power market issues that define the emerging national electric energy policies. The report includes information on the quantity of power purchased, sold, exchanged, and wheeled; the geographical locations of transactions and ownership classes involved; and the revenues and costs. 1 fig., 43 tabs.

  18. PROBING DENSE NUCLEAR MATTER VIA NUCLEAR COLLISIONS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stocker, H.

    2012-01-01

    shocked nuclear matter during the compression and expansionand isentropic expansion were valid in nuclear collisions.

  19. Electric Power Monthly, September 1995: With data for June 1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1995-09-01

    The Electric Power Monthly (EPM) presents monthly electricity statistics for a wide audience including Congress, Federal and State agencies, the electric utility industry, and the general public. The purpose of this publication is to provide energy decisionmakers with accurate and timely information that may be used in forming various perspectives on electric issues that lie ahead. The Coal and Electric Data and Renewables Division; Office of Coal, Nuclear, Electric and Alternate Fuels, Energy Information Administration (EIA), Department of Energy prepares the EPM. This publication provides monthly statistics at the State, Census division, and US levels for net generation, fossil fuel consumption and stocks, quantity and quality of fossil fuels, cost of fossil fuels, electricity sales, revenue, and average revenue per kilowatthour of electricity sold. Data on net generation, fuel consumption, fuel stocks, quantity and cost of fossil fuels are also displayed for the North American Electric Reliability Council (NERC) regions.

  20. Electric power monthly: April 1996, with data for January 1996

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1996-04-01

    The Electric Power Monthly (EPM) presents monthly electricity statistics for a wide audience including Congress, Federal and State agencies, the electric utility industry, and the general public. The purpose of this publication is to provide energy decision makers with accurate and timely information that may be used in forming various perspectives on electric issues that lie ahead. The Coal and Electric Data and Renewables Division; Office of Coal, Nuclear, Electric and Alternate Fuels, Energy Information Administration (EIA), Department of Energy prepares the EPM. This publication provides monthly statistics at the State, Census division, and US levels for net generation, fossil fuel consumption and stocks, quantity and quality of fossil fuels, cost of fossil fuels, electricity sales, revenue, and average revenue per kilowatt hour of electricity sold. Data on net generation, fuel consumption, fuel stocks, quantity and cost of fossil fuels are also displayed for the North American Electric Reliability Council (NERC) regions. 64 tabs.

  1. Mo Supply Chain for Nuclear Medicine Ladimer S. Nagurney

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nagurney, Anna

    of considering waste management. Ladimer S. Nagurney The 99 Mo Supply Chain #12;Nuclear Medicine To createThe 99 Mo Supply Chain for Nuclear Medicine Ladimer S. Nagurney Department of Electrical November 13, 2012 #12;Nuclear Medicine: Meeting Patient Needs with 99 Mo Ladimer S. Nagurney The 99 Mo

  2. The Washington Post, April 16, 2006 Going Nuclear

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bilbao Arrese, Jesús Mario

    with their starring roles in "The China Syndrome," a fictional evocation of nuclear disaster in which a reactor nuclear reactors quietly delivering just 20 percent of America's electricity. Eighty percent of the people Lovelock, father of the Gaia theory, believes that nuclear energy is the only way to avoid catastrophic

  3. Office of Nuclear Energy, Science and Technology Executive Summary

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    the second most important source of electric energy in the United States and at the same time, the most method of generating energy from nuclear fission in both the United States and the world. A key mission system using nuclear energy by 2015; and developing a next-generation nuclear system for deployment after

  4. An Underwater Robotic Network for Monitoring Nuclear Waste Storage Pools

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Murawski, Andrzej

    , there are 19 nuclear power plants generating electricity for civilian use and 25 old power plants associated with nuclear power is the genera- tion of radioactive waste which must be managed and stored overAn Underwater Robotic Network for Monitoring Nuclear Waste Storage Pools Sarfraz Nawaz1 , Muzammil

  5. ORIGINAL PAPER Climate Change, Nuclear Economics, and Conflicts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shrader-Frechette, Kristin

    , nuclear power is ``the most cost-effective power source'' (European Atomic Forum 2006). Nuclear. Attempting to show that increased atomic energy can help address climate change, some industry advocates claim nuclear power is an inexpensive way to generate low-carbon electricity. Surveying 30 recent

  6. Can Nuclear Power Be Flexible? Laurent POURET + William J. NUTTALL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aickelin, Uwe

    1 Can Nuclear Power Be Flexible? Laurent POURET + William J. NUTTALL Judge Business School the issue of whether nuclear power can play a flexible role within an electricity system. It does not deal with the issue of whether nuclear power should play such a role, but it does examine why in most cases it does

  7. Financial and ratepayer impacts of nuclear power plant regulatory reform

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Turpin, A.G.

    1985-01-01

    Three reports - ''The Future Market for Electric Generating Capacity,'' ''Quantitative Analysis of Nuclear Power Plant Licensing Reform,'' and ''Nuclear Rate Increase Study'' are recent studies performed by the Los Alamos National Laboratory that deal with nuclear power. This presents a short summary of these three studies. More detail is given in the reports.

  8. 60 Years Since Nuclear Turned on the Lights

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    On the 60th anniversary of the world’s first nuclear power plant to produce electricity, Assistant Secretary for Nuclear Energy Peter Lyons discusses the Energy Department's and the Administration's commitment to promoting a nuclear renaissance in the United States.

  9. Simulated nuclear reactor fuel assembly

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Berta, Victor T. (Idaho Falls, ID)

    1993-01-01

    An apparatus for electrically simulating a nuclear reactor fuel assembly. It includes a heater assembly having a top end and a bottom end and a plurality of concentric heater tubes having electrical circuitry connected to a power source, and radially spaced from each other. An outer target tube and an inner target tube is concentric with the heater tubes and with each other, and the outer target tube surrounds and is radially spaced from the heater tubes. The inner target tube is surrounded by and radially spaced from the heater tubes and outer target tube. The top of the assembly is generally open to allow for the electrical power connection to the heater tubes, and the bottom of the assembly includes means for completing the electrical circuitry in the heater tubes to provide electrical resistance heating to simulate the power profile in a nuclear reactor. The embedded conductor elements in each heater tube is split into two halves for a substantial portion of its length and provided with electrical isolation such that each half of the conductor is joined at one end and is not joined at the other end.

  10. Simulated nuclear reactor fuel assembly

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Berta, V.T.

    1993-04-06

    An apparatus for electrically simulating a nuclear reactor fuel assembly. It includes a heater assembly having a top end and a bottom end and a plurality of concentric heater tubes having electrical circuitry connected to a power source, and radially spaced from each other. An outer target tube and an inner target tube is concentric with the heater tubes and with each other, and the outer target tube surrounds and is radially spaced from the heater tubes. The inner target tube is surrounded by and radially spaced from the heater tubes and outer target tube. The top of the assembly is generally open to allow for the electrical power connection to the heater tubes, and the bottom of the assembly includes means for completing the electrical circuitry in the heater tubes to provide electrical resistance heating to simulate the power profile in a nuclear reactor. The embedded conductor elements in each heater tube is split into two halves for a substantial portion of its length and provided with electrical isolation such that each half of the conductor is joined at one end and is not joined at the other end.

  11. Risk Management Strategies for Electric Utilities 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sheets, E.

    1986-01-01

    , utility forecasters were predicting brownouts or worse in the mid 1980s in the Pacific Northwest. Today, the Pacific Northwest has a surplus of electricity that could last five to twenty years. Two of the nuclear plants have been completed, two are on hold...

  12. Nuclear Technology & Canadian Oil Sands: Integration of Nuclear Power with In-Situ Oil Extraction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nuclear Technology & Canadian Oil Sands: Integration of Nuclear Power with In-Situ Oil Extraction A for a Canadian oil sands extraction facility using Steam-Assisted Gravity Drainage (SAGD) technology. The energy to produce steam as well as electricity for the oil sands facility; and (3) using the reactor to produce

  13. Advanced safeguards for the nuclear renaissance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miller, Michael C [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Menlove, Howard O [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2008-01-01

    The global expansion of nuclear energy provides not only the benefit of carbon-neutral electricity, but also the potential for proliferation concern as well. Nuclear safeguards implemented at the state level (domestic) and at the international level by the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) are essential for ensuring that nuclear materials are not misused and are thereby a critical component of the increased usage of nuclear energy. In the same way that the 1950's Atoms for Peace initiative provided the foundation for a robust research and development program in nuclear safeguards, the expansion of nuclear energy that is underway today provides the impetus to enter a new era of technical development in the safeguards community. In this paper, we will review the history of nuclear safeguards research and development as well future directions.

  14. 2013 Nuclear Workforce Development ...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Nuclear Workforce Development Day Tuesday, October 22, 2013 Nuclear Medicine Topics: Pathways of Practice in Nuclear Medicine Radiopharmacy Patient Care ...

  15. Nuclear Counterterrorism

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2013-08-26

    The Order defines requirements for the protection of sensitive improvised nuclear device information and provides a framework to support DOE activities related to nuclear counterterrorism. (A supplemental DOE Manual, Control of and Access to Improvised Nuclear Device Information, provides requirements and procedures for protecting Sigma 20 information.) Appendices A and B are Official Use Only. Point of contact is Adam Boyd (NA-82), 202-586-0010. Supersedes DOE O 457.1 and DOE M 457.1-1.

  16. California wins by collaborating with China on electric vehicle market

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Davis, University of

    and strengthened policies. The motivation is clean air, as well as energy security and enhancing the domestic auto, renewable electricity and nuclear energy. #12;California can also benefit by learning from China's electric for climate policy. It is very likely the success of PEVs, along with renewable energy, played a role in China

  17. Nuclear shadowing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    N. Armesto

    2006-07-05

    The phenomenon of shadowing of nuclear structure functions at small values of Bjorken-$x$ is analyzed. First, multiple scattering is discussed as the underlying physical mechanism. In this context three different but related approaches are presented: Glauber-like rescatterings, Gribov inelastic shadowing and ideas based on high-density Quantum Chromodynamics. Next, different parametrizations of nuclear partonic distributions based on fit analysis to existing data combined with Dokshitzer-Gribov-Lipatov-Altarelli-Parisi evolution, are reviewed. Finally, a comparison of the different approaches is shown, and a few phenomenological consequences of nuclear shadowing in high-energy nuclear collisions are presented.

  18. Incremental costs and optimization of in-core fuel management of nuclear power plants

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Watt, Hing Yan

    1973-01-01

    This thesis is concerned with development of methods for optimizing the energy production and refuelling decision for nuclear power plants in an electric utility system containing both nuclear and fossil-fuelled stations. ...

  19. An examination of the pursuit of nuclear power plant construction projects in the United States

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Guyer, Brittany (Brittany Leigh)

    2011-01-01

    The recent serious reconsideration of nuclear power as a means for U.S. electric utilities to increase their generation capacity provokes many questions regarding the achievable success of future nuclear power plant ...

  20. Climate Change and the Nuclear Wedge Climate change frames the issue

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    the world's nuclear electricity capacity by 2055 The rate of installation required for a wedge from nuclear% by 2030", p, 96 #12;Issues with Wind: Variability Wind/solar resource inherently intermittent (mitigated

  1. EIA - State Nuclear Profiles

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration would like submitKansas Nuclear Profile 2010 Kansas profile Kansas total electric power

  2. EIA - State Nuclear Profiles

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration would like submitKansas Nuclear Profile 2010 Kansas profile Kansas total electric powerLouisiana

  3. EIA - State Nuclear Profiles

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration would like submitKansas Nuclear Profile 2010 Kansas profile Kansas total electric

  4. EIA - State Nuclear Profiles

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration would like submitKansas Nuclear Profile 2010 Kansas profile Kansas total electricMassachusetts

  5. University of Strathclyde Dpt of Electric Electrical Engineering...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Strathclyde Dpt of Electric Electrical Engineering Institute for Energy and Enviro Jump to: navigation, search Name: University of Strathclyde, Dpt of Electric & Electrical...

  6. Electrical Generation for More-Electric Aircraft using Solid...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Electrical Generation for More-Electric Aircraft using Solid Oxide Fuel Cells Electrical Generation for More-Electric Aircraft using Solid Oxide Fuel Cells This study, completed by...

  7. Estimating the Value of Electricity Storage Resources in Electricity...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Value of Electricity Storage Resources in Electricity Markets - EAC 2011 Estimating the Value of Electricity Storage Resources in Electricity Markets - EAC 2011 The purpose of this...

  8. PROBING DENSE NUCLEAR MATTER VIA NUCLEAR COLLISIONS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stocker, H.

    2012-01-01

    University of California. LBL-12095 Probing Dense NuclearMatter Nuclear Collisions* v~a H. Stocker, M.Gyulassy and J. Boguta Nuclear Science Division Lawrence

  9. Nuclear Systems Modeling, Simulation & Validation | Nuclear Science...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Research Areas Fuel Cycle Science & Technology Fusion Nuclear Science Isotope Development and Production Nuclear Security Science & Technology Nuclear Systems Modeling, Simulation...

  10. Nuclear Resonance Fluorescence for Nuclear Materials Assay

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Quiter, Brian Joseph

    2010-01-01

    130] International Nuclear Safety Center, Available onlinefrom Inter- national Nuclear Safety Center (INSC) website(from International Nuclear Safety Center (INSC) website(

  11. The Future of Energy from Nuclear Fission

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kim, Son H.; Taiwo, Temitope

    2013-04-13

    Nuclear energy is an important part of our current global energy system, and contributes to supplying the significant demand for electricity for many nations around the world. There are 433 commercial nuclear power reactors operating in 30 countries with an installed capacity of 367 GWe as of October 2011 (IAEA PRIS, 2011). Nuclear electricity generation totaled 2630 TWh in 2010 representing 14% the world’s electricity generation. The top five countries of total installed nuclear capacity are the US, France, Japan, Russia and South Korea at 102, 63, 45, 24, and 21 GWe, respectively (WNA, 2012a). The nuclear capacity of these five countries represents more than half, 68%, of the total global nuclear capacity. The role of nuclear power in the global energy system today has been motivated by several factors including the growing demand for electric power, the regional availability of fossil resources and energy security concerns, and the relative competitiveness of nuclear power as a source of base-load electricity. There is additional motivation for the use of nuclear power because it does not produce greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions or local air pollutants during its operation and contributes to low levels of emissions throughout the lifecycle of the nuclear energy system (Beerten, J. et. al., 2009). Energy from nuclear fission primarily in the form of electric power and potentially as a source of industrial heat could play a greater role for meeting the long-term growing demand for energy worldwide while addressing the concern for climate change from rising GHG emissions. However, the nature of nuclear fission as a tremendously compact and dense form of energy production with associated high concentrations of radioactive materials has particular and unique challenges as well as benefits. These challenges include not only the safety and cost of nuclear reactors, but proliferation concerns, safeguard and storage of nuclear materials associated with nuclear fuel cycles. In March of 2011, an unprecedented earthquake of 9 magnitude and ensuing tsunami off the east coast of Japan caused a severe nuclear accident in Fukushima, Japan (Prime Minister of Japan and His Cabinet, 2011). The severity of the nuclear accident in Japan has brought about a reinvestigation of nuclear energy policy and deployment activities for many nations around the world, most notably in Japan and Germany (BBC, 2011; Reuter, 2011). The response to the accident has been mixed and its full impact may not be realized for many years to come. The nuclear accident in Fukushima, Japan has not directly affected the significant on-going nuclear deployment activities in many countries. China, Russia, India, and South Korea, as well as others, are continuing with their deployment plans. As of October 2011, China had the most reactors under construction at 27, while Russia, India, and South Korea had 11, 6, and 5 reactors under construction, respectively (IAEA PRIS, 2011). Ten other nations have one or two reactors currently under construction. Many more reactors are planned for future deployment in China, Russia, and India, as well as in the US. Based on the World Nuclear Association’s data, the realization of China’s deployment plan implies that China will surpass the US in total nuclear capacity some time in the future.

  12. Reduces electric energy consumption

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    BENEFITS · Reduces electric energy consumption · Reduces peak electric demand · Reduces natural gas consumption · Reduces nonhazardous solid waste and wastewater generation · Potential annual savings products for the automotive industry, electrical equipment, and miscellaneous other uses nationwide. ALCOA

  13. Superconductivity for Electric Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Superconductivity Program Oak Ridge National Laboratory For: Department of Energy Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability ­ Superconductivity for Electric Systems #12;3 Control Milestones and Status ControlSuperconductivity for Electric Systems Superconductivity Program Quarterly Progress Report

  14. State electricity profiles, March 1999

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1999-03-01

    Due to the role electricity plays in the Nation`s economic and social well-being, interested parties have been following the electric power industry`s transition by keeping abreast of the restructuring and deregulation events that are taking place almost daily. Much of the attention centers around the States and how they are restructuring the business of electricity supply within their respective jurisdictions. This report is designed to profile each State and the District of Columbia regarding not only their current restructuring activities, but also their electricity generation and concomitant statistics from 1986 through 1996. Included are data on a number of subject areas including generating capability, generation, revenues, fuel use, capacity factor for nuclear plants, retail sales, and pollutant emissions. Although the Energy Information Administration (EIA) publishes this type of information, there is a lack of a uniform overview for each individual State. This report is intended to help fill that gap and also to serve as a framework for more detailed studies. In addition to basic statistics in tables and graphs, a textual section is provided for each State, discussing some of the points relative to electricity production that are noteworthy in, or unique to, that particular State. Also, each State is ranked according to the place it holds, as compared to the rest of the states, in various relevant areas, such as its average price of electricity per kilowatthour, its population, and its emissions of certain atmospheric pollutants. The final chapter covers the Nation as a whole. 451 figs., 520 tabs.

  15. LABORATORY II ELECTRIC FIELDS AND ELECTRIC POTENTIALS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Minnesota, University of

    Lab II - 1 LABORATORY II ELECTRIC FIELDS AND ELECTRIC POTENTIALS In this lab you will continue the concepts of field and potential are abstract and difficult to visualize, this laboratory uses a computer and electric potential at any point in space. OBJECTIVES After successfully completing this laboratory, you

  16. Electrical safety guidelines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-09-01

    The Electrical Safety Guidelines prescribes the DOE safety standards for DOE field offices or facilities involved in the use of electrical energy. It has been prepared to provide a uniform set of electrical safety standards and guidance for DOE installations in order to affect a reduction or elimination of risks associated with the use of electrical energy. The objectives of these guidelines are to enhance electrical safety awareness and mitigate electrical hazards to employees, the public, and the environment.

  17. DOE handbook electrical safety

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1998-01-01

    Electrical Safety Handbook presents the Department of Energy (DOE) safety standards for DOE field offices or facilities involved in the use of electrical energy. It has been prepared to provide a uniform set of electrical safety guidance and information for DOE installations to effect a reduction or elimination of risks associated with the use of electrical energy. The objectives of this handbook are to enhance electrical safety awareness and mitigate electrical hazards to employees, the public, and the environment.

  18. Electricity Monthly Update

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    as collected via the Form EIA-923. Nuclear Outages: Reflects the average daily outage amount for the month as reported by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission's Power Reactor...

  19. METHODOLOGIES FOR REVIEW OF THE HEALTH AND SAFETY ASPECTS OF PROPOSED NUCLEAR, GEOTHERMAL, AND FOSSIL-FUEL SITES AND FACILITIES. VOLUME 9 OF THE FINAL REPORT ON HEALTH AND SAFETY IMPACTS OF NUCLEAR, GEOTHERMAL, AND FOSSIL-FUEL ELECTRIC GENERATION IN CALIFORNIA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nero, A.V.

    2010-01-01

    the reactor shut- down control rod system of a nuclear powernuclear core (and its interaction with the reactor coolant system) and reactivity controlnuclear design, thermal and hydraulic design, reactor materials, and the design of the reactivity control

  20. Electricity Monthly Update

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    The Electric Power Sector comprises electricity-only and combined heat and power (CHP) plants within the North American Industrial Classification System 22 category whose...

  1. California's electricity crisis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Joskow, Paul L.

    2001-01-01

    The collapse of California's electricity restructuring and competition program has attracted attention around the world. Prices in California's competitive wholesale electricity market increased by 500% between the second ...

  2. Edison Electric Institute Update

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation—given at the Fall 2011 Federal Utility Partnership Working Group (FUPWG) meeting—discusses the Edison Electric Institute (EEI) and the current electricity landscape.

  3. Electricity Monthly Update

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    West having a 1.1 percent decrease in electricity generation compared to last February. Electricity generation from coal increased in all regions of the country, with Florida...

  4. Random Walks and Electrical

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jonathon Peterson

    2008-01-30

    Feb 4, 2008 ... Electrical Network Calculations in Random Walks in. Random ... Markov Chains. 2. Electrical Networks and Reversible Markov Chains. 3.

  5. Electricity Monthly Update

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    End Use: December 2014 Retail ratesprices and consumption In this section, we look at what electricity costs and how much is purchased. Charges for retail electric service are...

  6. Electricity Monthly Update

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    See all Electricity Reports Electricity Monthly Update With Data for November 2014 | Release Date: Jan. 26, 2015 | Next Release Date: Feb. 24, 2015 Previous Issues Issue:...

  7. ELECTRICAL, COMPUTER, & ENERGY ENGINEERING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mojzsis, Stephen J.

    ELECTRICAL, COMPUTER, & ENERGY ENGINEERING GRADUATE STUDY GUIDE FALL 2014 ­ SPRING 2015 University of Colorado at Boulder Department of Electrical, Computer & Energy Engineering Graduate Office Campus Box 425

  8. 2012 National Electricity Forum

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    U.S. Department of Energy U.S. Department of Energy National Electric Transmission Congestion Study Workshop - December 6, 2011 National Electric Transmission Congestion Study...

  9. New Modes of Nuclear Excitations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nadia Tsoneva; Horst Lenske

    2013-10-01

    We present a theoretical approach based on density functional theory supplemented by a microscopic multi-phonon model which is applied for investigations of pygmy resonances and other excitations of different multipolarities in stable and exotic nuclei. The possible relation of low-energy modes to the properties of neutron or proton skins is systematically studied in isotonic and isotopic chains. The fine structure of nuclear electric and magnetic response functions is analyzed and compared to experimental data. Their relevance to nuclear astrophysics is discussed.

  10. RADIOCHEMISTRY, AND NUCLEAR CHEMISTRY; NUCLEAR MEDICINE; HISTORICAL

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    The early days Richards, P. 38 RADIATION CHEMISTRY, RADIOCHEMISTRY, AND NUCLEAR CHEMISTRY; NUCLEAR MEDICINE; HISTORICAL ASPECTS; TECHNETIUM 99; COLLOIDS; MOLYBDENUM...

  11. National Nuclear Security Administration | National Nuclear Security...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    National Nuclear Security Administration | National Nuclear Security Administration Facebook Twitter Youtube Flickr RSS People Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing...

  12. Nuclear cargo detector

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Christo, Steven Basil

    2006-12-19

    Apparatus for the inspection of cargo containers for nuclear materials comprising one or more arrays of modules comprising grounded, closed conductive tubes filled with an ionizing gas mixture such as, but not limited to, Argon:CO.sub.2. A wire is suspended along each tube axis and electrically connected at both ends of the tube. A positive, dc high voltage is supplied to one end of the wire and an amplifier is attached to the other end through a capacitance to decouple the amplifier from the high voltage. X-rays, gamma rays or neutrons produced by nuclear material and passing through the tube ionize the gas. The electrons from the gas ionization process are accelerated toward the wire surface due to the wire's electrical potential. The acceleration of the electrons near the wire's surface is sufficient to ionize more gas and produce an amplification of electrons/ions that create a surge of current large enough to be detectable by the amplifier. Means are also provided for a warning device coupled to the amplifier.

  13. Nuclear Counterterrorism

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2006-02-07

    The Order defines requirements for the protection of sensitive improvised nuclear device information and provides a framework to support DOE activities related to nuclear counterterrorism. (A supplemental DOE Manual, Control of and Access to Improvised Nuclear Device Information, provides requirements and procedures for protecting Sigma 20 information. The Manual is Official Use Only, and is not available on the Directives Portal. The point of contact for the Manual is Randall Weidman, NA-121.2, 202-586-4582.) Canceled by DOE O 457.1A

  14. Nuclear Science and Engineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bahler, Dennis R.

    Nuclear Science and Engineering Education Sourcebook 2014 American Nuclear Society US Department of Energy #12;Nuclear Science & Engineering Education Sourcebook 2014 North American Edition American Nuclear Society Education, Training, and Workforce Division US Department of Energy Office of Nuclear

  15. Role of nuclear power in the Philippine power development program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aleta, C.R.

    1994-12-31

    The reintroduction of nuclear power in the Philippines is favored by several factors such as: the inclusion of nuclear energy in the energy sector of the science and technology agenda for national development (STAND); the Large gap between electricity demand and available local supply for the medium-term power development plan; the relatively lower health risks in nuclear power fuel cycle systems compared to the already acceptable power systems; the lower environmental impacts of nuclear power systems compared to fossil fuelled systems and the availability of a regulatory framework and trained personnel who could form a core for implementing a nuclear power program. The electricity supply gap of 9600 MW for the period 1993-2005 could be partly supplied by nuclear power. The findings of a recent study are described, as well as the issues that have to be addressed in the reintroduction of nuclear power.

  16. Long-Term Nuclear Industry Outlook - 2004

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reichmuth, Barbara A.; Wood, Thomas W.; Johnson, Wayne L.

    2004-09-30

    The nuclear industry has become increasingly efficient and global in nature, but may now be poised at a crossroads between graceful decline and profound growth as a viable provider of electrical energy. Predicted population and energy-demand growth, an increased interest in global climate change, the desire to reduce the international dependence on oil as an energy source, the potential for hydrogen co-generation using nuclear power reactors, and the improved performance in the nuclear power industry have raised the prospect of a “nuclear renaissance” in which nuclear power would play an increasingly more important role in both domestic and international energy market. This report provides an assessment of the role nuclear-generated power will plan in the global energy future and explores the impact of that role on export controls.

  17. Renewable Electricity Futures Study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Renewable Electricity Futures Study Exploration of High-Penetration Renewable Electricity Futures PDF Volume 4 PDF #12;Renewable Electricity Futures Study Edited By Hand, M.M. National Renewable Citations Renewable Electricity Futures Study (Entire Report) National Renewable Energy Laboratory. (2012

  18. Renewable Electricity Futures Study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Renewable Electricity Futures Study Bulk Electric Power Systems: Operations and Transmission by the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC. #12;Renewable Electricity Futures Study Edited By Hand, M.M. National Suggested Citations Renewable Electricity Futures Study (Entire Report) National Renewable Energy Laboratory

  19. Renewable Electricity Futures Study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Renewable Electricity Futures Study End-use Electricity Demand Volume 3 of 4 Volume 2 PDF Volume 3;Renewable Electricity Futures Study Edited By Hand, M.M. National Renewable Energy Laboratory Baldwin, S. U Sandor, D. National Renewable Energy Laboratory Suggested Citations Renewable Electricity Futures Study

  20. ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING Curriculum Notes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mohan, Chilukuri K.

    ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING Curriculum Notes 2013-2014 1. Electrical Engineering (EE) students must/programs/electrical_engineering) and minors are used to regulate technical electives. A student must complete four technical elective courses in Electrical Engineering or Computer Engineering. At a minimum

  1. Electrical & Computer Engineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Electrical & Computer Engineering 2014-2015AcademicYearHandbook Doctor of Philosophy in Electrical is for the internal use of the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering at Carnegie Mellon University only permission of the Department Head of Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering. #12;2 Table

  2. ELECTRICAL & COMPUTER ENGINEERING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ELECTRICAL & COMPUTER ENGINEERING SEMINAR "Agile Sensing Systems: Analysis, Design and Implementation" by Prof. Jun (Jason) Zhang Electrical and Computer Engineering University of Denver Tuesday of Electrical and Computer Engineering at the University of Denver. He was with the School of Electrical

  3. Introduction Computational Efficiency Electricity Portfolio Planning Electricity Portfolios

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Introduction Computational Efficiency Electricity Portfolio Planning Electricity Portfolios 2009/11/30­12/01 István Maros Electricity Portfolio #12;Introduction Computational Efficiency Electricity Portfolio Outline 1 Introduction 2 Computational Efficiency 3 Electricity Portfolio Approximate

  4. nuclear navy

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    7%2A en Powering the Nuclear Navy http:www.nnsa.energy.govourmissionpoweringnavy

    Page...

  5. Nuclear Celebrations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hacker, Randi; Tsutsui, William

    2006-11-01

    Broadcast Transcript: The North Korean situation is frightening for many reasons but none, perhaps, more eerily disturbing than images of North Koreans celebrating in brightly colored costumes just days after the nation's underground nuclear test...

  6. Nuclear Nonproliferation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Atkins-Duffin, C E

    2008-12-10

    With an explosion equivalent of about 20kT of TNT, the Trinity test was the first demonstration of a nuclear weapon. Conducted on July 16, 1945 in Alamogordo, NM this site is now a Registered National Historic Landmark. The concept and applicability of nuclear power was demonstrated on December 20, 1951 with the Experimental Breeder Reactor Number One (EBR-1) lit four light bulbs. This reactor is now a Registered National Historic Landmark, located near Arco, ID. From that moment forward it had been clearly demonstrated that nuclear energy has both peaceful and military applications and that the civilian and military fuel cycles can overlap. For the more than fifty years since the Atoms for Peace program, a key objective of nuclear policy has been to enable the wider peaceful use of nuclear energy while preventing the spread of nuclear weapons. Volumes have been written on the impact of these two actions on the world by advocates and critics; pundits and practioners; politicians and technologists. The nations of the world have woven together a delicate balance of treaties, agreements, frameworks and handshakes that are representative of the timeframe in which they were constructed and how they have evolved in time. Collectively these vehicles attempt to keep political will, nuclear materials and technology in check. This paper captures only the briefest abstract of the more significant aspects on the Nonproliferation Regime. Of particular relevance to this discussion is the special nonproliferation sensitivity associated with the uranium isotope separation and spent fuel reprocessing aspects of the nuclear fuel cycle.

  7. Nuclear Data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    White, Morgan C.

    2014-01-23

    PowerPoint presentation targeted for educational use. Nuclear data comes from a variety of sources and in many flavors. Understanding where the data you use comes from and what flavor it is can be essential to understand and interpret your results. This talk will discuss the nuclear data pipeline with particular emphasis on providing links to additional resources that can be used to explore the issues you will encounter.

  8. Supporting Organizations | Nuclear Science | ORNL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Nuclear Science Engineering Fusion & Materials for Nuclear Systems Nuclear Science Home | Science & Discovery | Nuclear Science | Supporting Organizations SHARE Supporting...

  9. Nuclear Science/Nuclear Chemistry

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefieldSulfateSciTechtail.Theory ofDid you notHeatMaRIEdioxideUser Work FeaturedNuclearNP Home NuclearNuclear

  10. Global warming and nuclear power

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wood, L., LLNL

    1998-07-10

    Nuclear fission power reactors represent a potential solution to many aspects of global change possibly induced by inputting of either particulate or carbon or sulfur oxides into the Earth`s atmosphere. Of proven technological feasibility, they presently produce high-grade heat for large-scale electricity generation, space heating and industrial process-energizing around the world, without emitting greenhouse gases or atmospheric particulates; importantly, electricity production costs from the best nuclear plants presently are closely comparable with those of the best fossil-fired plants. However, a substantial number of issues currently stand between nuclear power and widespread substitution for large stationary fossil fuel-fired systems. These include perceptual ones regarding both long-term and acute operational safety, plant decommissioning, fuel reprocessing, radwaste disposal, fissile materials diversion to military purposes and - perhaps most seriously- readily quantifiable concerns regarding long-term fuel supply and total unit electrical energy cost. We sketch a road-map for proceeding from the present situation toward a nuclear power-intensive world, addressing along the way each of the concerns which presently impede widespread nuclear substitution for fossil fuels, particularly for coal in the most populous and rapidly developing portions of the world, e.g., China and India. This `design to societal specifications` approach to large-scale nuclear fission power systems may lead to energy sources meeting essentially all stationary demands for high-temperature heat. Such advanced options offer a human population of ten billion the electricity supply levels currently enjoyed by Americans for 10,000 years. Nuclear power systems tailored to local needs-and-interests and having a common advanced technology base could reduce present-day world-wide C0{sub 2} emissions by two-fold, if universally employed. By application to small mobile demands, a second two-fold reduction might be attained. Even the first such halving of carbon intensivity of stationary-source energy production world-wide might permit continued slow power-demand growth in the highly developed countries and rapid development of the other 80% of the world, both without active governmental suppression of fossil fuel usage - while also stabilizing carbon input-rates into the Earth`s atmosphere. The second two-fold reduction might obviate most global warming concerns.

  11. PEBBLE-BED NUCLEAR REACTOR SYSTEM PHYSICS AND FUEL UTILIZATION 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kelly, Ryan 1989-

    2011-04-20

    The Generation IV Pebble Bed Modular Reactor (PMBR) design may be used for electricity production, co-generation applications (industrial heat, hydrogen production, desalination, etc.), and could potentially eliminate some high level nuclear wastes...

  12. Secretary Chu's Remarks at Vogtle Nuclear Power Plant -- As Prepared...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    60 years ago, scientists in Arco, Idaho successfully used nuclear energy to power four light bulbs. They laid the groundwork for decades of clean electricity and put the U.S. at...

  13. Preliminary Notice of Violation, Savannah River Nuclear Solutions...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    to Savannah River Nuclear Solutions, LLC related to a Nitric Acid Spill Event and an Electrical Arc Flash Injury Event at the Savannah River Site On October 7, 2010, the U.S....

  14. Extra-terrestrial nuclear power stations : transportation and operation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kane, Susan Christine

    2005-01-01

    Many challenges exist when considering nuclear power to provide electricity for bases on the Moon or Mars, including launch safety, landing safety, deployment, control, and protecting the astronauts from radiation. Examples ...

  15. Nuclear energy is an important source of power, supplying 20

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    source of power, supplying 20 percent of the nation's electricity. More than 100 nuclear power plants are operating in the U.S., and countries around the world are...

  16. ECE 438 Electric and Hybrid Vehicles Catalog Description: History of electric traction. Introduction to electric and hybrid-electric

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ECE 438 ­ Electric and Hybrid Vehicles Catalog Description: History of electric traction. Introduction to electric and hybrid-electric vehicle configurations. Vehicle mechanics. Energy sources and storage. Range prediction. Motor for HEVs. Electric drive components. Vehicle transmission system. Credits

  17. Climate Change, Nuclear Power and Nuclear Proliferation: Magnitude Matters

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robert J. Goldston

    2010-03-03

    Integrated energy, environment and economics modeling suggests electrical energy use will increase from 2.4 TWe today to 12 TWe in 2100. It will be challenging to provide 40% of this electrical power from combustion with carbon sequestration, as it will be challenging to provide 30% from renewable energy sources. Thus nuclear power may be needed to provide ~30% by 2100. Calculations of the associated stocks and flows of uranium, plutonium and minor actinides indicate that the proliferation risks at mid-century, using current light-water reactor technology, are daunting. There are institutional arrangements that may be able to provide an acceptable level of risk mitigation, but they will be difficult to implement. If a transition is begun to fast-spectrum reactors at mid-century, without a dramatic change in the proliferation risks of such systems, at the end of the century proliferation risks are much greater, and more resistant to mitigation. The risks of nuclear power should be compared with the risks of the estimated 0.64oC long-term global surface-average temperature rise predicted if nuclear power were replaced with coal-fired power plants without carbon sequestration. Fusion energy, if developed, would provide a source of nuclear power with much lower proliferation risks than fission.

  18. Public opinion and nuclear energy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nealey, S.M.; Melber, B.D.; Rankin, W.L.

    1983-01-01

    Public acceptance of a nuclear power plant (NPP) built near one's residence has declined steadily since the early 1970's. Following the TMI accident, this acceptance decreased dramatically. There has been some attitude rebound, however, and through mid-1981, the % who supported continued NPP construction in USA was 5 to 10% more than those in opposition. Men's and women's attitudes are different and were differentially affected by the TMI accident. Beliefs and attitudes about specific nuclear power issues were explored using questionnaires. Reactor-safety concerns were found to be more important than nuclear-waste concerns. Nuclear fuel-supply considerations are believed to be a major advantage of nuclear power. The public was largely unaware of the breeder-reactor concept. The US public generally does not favor selling US reactors abroad. It also greatly underestimates how long it takes to build a NPP. Most people believed solar-generated electricity is cheapest. The public has little information or has misinformation about some areas of nuclear power. (DLC)

  19. Central Hudson Gas & Electric (Electric) - Residential Energy...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    residential electric customers who upgrade heating, cooling or ventilation systems with specific types of energy efficient equipment. These rebates include efficient central air...

  20. Baltimore Gas & Electric Company (Electric) - Residential Energy...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    DuctAir sealing Building Insulation Other EE LED Lighting Maximum Rebate Contact Baltimore Gas and Electric Program Info Sector Name Utility Website http:...

  1. Regulatory Challenges to European Electricity Liberalisation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Newbery, David

    2004-06-16

    , the attractions of de-linking coal subsidies from electricity prices and allowing large consumers in high- priced countries access to low-price suppliers abroad, were considerable. The end of the Cold War combined with the collapse of energy demand in the former... to reduce oil import dependence, as with the British and French nuclear investment programme, or to defend local coal-mining interests). Under the Electricity Directives there is no longer any automatic way in which this reserve adequacy can be ensured...

  2. Nuclear Energy Governance and the Politics of Social Justice: Technology, Public Goods, and Redistribution in Russia and France

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grigoriadis, Theocharis N

    2009-01-01

    Electricity Markets" OECD/IEA Report 2000. OECD/IEA. "Nuclear Power in the OECD" OECD/IEA Report 2001.OECD/IEA. "Nuclear Power". IEA Energy Technology Essentials,

  3. Electric arc saw apparatus

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Deichelbohrer, Paul R [Richland, WA

    1986-01-01

    A portable, hand held electric arc saw has a small frame for supporting an electrically conducting rotary blade which serves as an electrode for generating an electric arc to erode a workpiece. Electric current is supplied to the blade by biased brushes and a slip ring which are mounted in the frame. A pair of freely movable endless belts in the form of crawler treads stretched between two pulleys are used to facilitate movement of the electric arc saw. The pulleys are formed of dielectric material to electrically insulate the crawler treads from the frame.

  4. NUCLEAR PROXIMITY FORCES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Randrup, J.

    2011-01-01

    One might summarize of nuclear potential energy has beendegree of freedom) for the nuclear interaction between anyUniversity of California. Nuclear Proximity Forces 'I< at

  5. Nuclear Waste: Forever Contaminated?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Andrew

    2015-01-01

    Impacts of the Fukushima nuclear power plants on marineAccident at the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant. Epidemiologicand projected nuclear power. Environ. Sci. Technol. , 47,

  6. Nuclear Science | ORNL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    and Reports News and Awards Supporting Organizations Home | Science & Discovery | Nuclear Science Nuclear Science | Nuclear Science SHARE In World War II's Manhattan Project,...

  7. Nuclear Waste: Forever Contaminated?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Andrew

    2015-01-01

    Impacts of the Fukushima nuclear power plants on marineBeyond Fukushima: Disasters, nuclear energy, and energy law.Nuclear Energy, and Energy Law (December 20, 2011). Brigham

  8. Nuclear Science & Technology

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Nuclear Science & Technology Nuclear Science & Technology1354608000000Nuclear Science & TechnologySome of these resources are LANL-only and will require Remote Access. No...

  9. Nuclear Reactions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    C. A. Bertulani

    2010-07-14

    Nuclear reactions generate energy in nuclear reactors, in stars, and are responsible for the existence of all elements heavier than hydrogen in the universe. Nuclear reactions denote reactions between nuclei, and between nuclei and other fundamental particles, such as electrons and photons. A short description of the conservation laws and the definition of basic physical quantities is presented, followed by a more detailed account of specific cases: (a) formation and decay of compound nuclei; (b)direct reactions; (c) photon and electron scattering; (d) heavy ion collisions; (e) formation of a quark-gluon plasma; (f) thermonuclear reactions; (g) and reactions with radioactive beams. Whenever necessary, basic equations are introduced to help understand general properties of these reactions. Published in Wiley Encyclopedia of Physics, ISBN-13: 978-3-527-40691-3 - Wiley-VCH, Berlin, 2009.

  10. Nuclear Models

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fossion, Ruben [Instituto de Ciencias Nucleares, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Apartado Postal 70-543, Mexico D. F., C.P. 04510 (Mexico)

    2010-09-10

    The atomic nucleus is a typical example of a many-body problem. On the one hand, the number of nucleons (protons and neutrons) that constitute the nucleus is too large to allow for exact calculations. On the other hand, the number of constituent particles is too small for the individual nuclear excitation states to be explained by statistical methods. Another problem, particular for the atomic nucleus, is that the nucleon-nucleon (n-n) interaction is not one of the fundamental forces of Nature, and is hard to put in a single closed equation. The nucleon-nucleon interaction also behaves differently between two free nucleons (bare interaction) and between two nucleons in the nuclear medium (dressed interaction).Because of the above reasons, specific nuclear many-body models have been devised of which each one sheds light on some selected aspects of nuclear structure. Only combining the viewpoints of different models, a global insight of the atomic nucleus can be gained. In this chapter, we revise the the Nuclear Shell Model as an example of the microscopic approach, and the Collective Model as an example of the geometric approach. Finally, we study the statistical properties of nuclear spectra, basing on symmetry principles, to find out whether there is quantum chaos in the atomic nucleus. All three major approaches have been rewarded with the Nobel Prize of Physics. In the text, we will stress how each approach introduces its own series of approximations to reduce the prohibitingly large number of degrees of freedom of the full many-body problem to a smaller manageable number of effective degrees of freedom.

  11. Assessing Vehicle Electricity Demand Impacts on California Electricity Supply

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McCarthy, Ryan W.

    2009-01-01

    24. Renewable and nuclear power plant cost characteristics25. Assumed capacity factors of renewable and nuclear power2003) The Future of Nuclear Power: An Interdisciplinary MIT

  12. Nuclear Energy Governance and the Politics of Social Justice: Technology, Public Goods, and Redistribution in Russia and France

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grigoriadis, Theocharis N

    2009-01-01

    an export partnership between RAO UESR, Russia’s electricityRussia’s nuclear intensity is due to drastic increase of uranium exports

  13. Repowering of the Midland Nuclear Station 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gatlin, C. E. Jr.; Vellender, G. C.; Mooney, J. A.

    1988-01-01

    , Michigan The conversion of the Midland Nuclear Station to a combined cycle power facility is the first of its kind. The eXisting nuclear steam turbine, combined with new, natural-gas-fired gas turbines, will create the largest cogeneration facility... in the midst of a repa..'erin;J that will convert it to a natural gas-fired carbined cycle cogeneration plant. 'Ihe nuclear project started in 1967 as a two unit plant utilizin;J pressurized water reactors to supply 1,357 MW of electric generatin...

  14. Overview of Nuclear Energy: Present and Projected Use

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alexander Stanculescu

    2011-09-01

    Several factors will influence the contribution of nuclear energy to the future energy mix. Among them, the most important are the degree of global commitment to greenhouse gas reduction, continued vigilance in safety and safeguards, technological advances, economic competitiveness and innovative financing arrangements for new nuclear power plant constructions, the implementation of nuclear waste disposal, and, last but not least, public perception, information and education. The paper presents an overview of the current nuclear energy situation, possible development scenarios, of reactor technology, and of non-electric applications of nuclear energy.

  15. Nuclear Astrophysics

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefieldSulfateSciTechtail.Theory ofDid you notHeatMaRIEdioxideUser Work FeaturedNuclear & ParticleNuclear

  16. Nuclear Science

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefieldSulfateSciTechtail.Theory ofDid you notHeatMaRIEdioxideUser Work FeaturedNuclearNP Home Nuclear

  17. Assessing Vehicle Electricity Demand Impacts on California Electricity Supply

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McCarthy, Ryan W.

    2009-01-01

    CEC (2009) Statewide Electricity Rates by Utility, Class andrates if the marginal electricity rate from the LCFS isestimated marginal electricity emissions rate in California’

  18. Electricity Grid: Impacts of Plug-In Electric Vehicle Charging

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yang, Christopher; McCarthy, Ryan

    2009-01-01

    and timing of vehicle electricity demand. As the number ofcontinually changing electricity demands by using a suite ofif local patterns of electricity demand change significantly

  19. Assessing Vehicle Electricity Demand Impacts on California Electricity Supply

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McCarthy, Ryan W.

    2009-01-01

    fuel efficiency and electricity demand assumptions used into added vehicle electricity demand in the BAU (no IGCC)to added vehicle electricity demand in the Mixed technology

  20. Estimating the Value of Electricity Storage Resources in Electricity...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    understanding the role electricity storage resources (storage) can play in wholesale and retail electricity markets, 2) assessing the value of electricity storage in a variety of...

  1. An Underwater Robotic Network for Monitoring Nuclear Waste Storage Pools

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jeavons, Peter

    , there are 19 nuclear power plants generating electricity for civilian use and 25 old power plants spread with grow- ing world population. However, the radioactive waste generated in these power plants demand is likely to make nuclear energy generation more wide spread. However, the biggest issue

  2. Designing electricity transmission auctions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Greve, Thomas; Pollitt, Michael G.

    2012-10-26

    The UK has ambitious plans for exploiting offshore wind for electricity production in order to meet its challenging target under the EU Renewable Energy Directive. This could involve investing up to 20bn in transmission assets to bring electricity...

  3. Renewable Electricity Futures (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mai, T.

    2012-10-01

    This presentation library summarizes findings of NREL's Renewable Electricity Futures study, published in June 2012. RE Futures investigated the challenges and impacts of achieving very high renewable electricity generation levels in the contiguous United States by 2050.

  4. Renewable Electricity Futures (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mai, T.

    2013-04-01

    This presentation summarizes findings of NREL's Renewable Electricity Futures study, published in June 2012. RE Futures investigated the challenges and impacts of achieving very high renewable electricity generation levels in the contiguous United States by 2050.

  5. Renewable Electricity Futures (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hand, M. M.

    2012-09-01

    This presentation summarizes findings of NREL's Renewable Electricity Futures study, published in June 2012. RE Futures investigated the challenges and impacts of achieving very high renewable electricity generation levels in the contiguous United States by 2050.

  6. Renewable Electricity Futures (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mai, T.

    2012-11-01

    This presentation summarizes findings of NREL's Renewable Electricity Futures study, published in June 2012. RE Futures investigated the challenges and impacts of achieving very high renewable electricity generation levels in the contiguous United States by 2050.

  7. Massachusetts Electric Vehicle Efforts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Davis, University of

    ,500 for full battery electric vehicle (BEV) and $5,000 for plug- in hybrid electric vehicle (PHEV) · Financial 39 Tesla 39 BMW 26 Toyota 7 Honda 3 Cadillac 3 Mitsubishi 2 #12;Department of Public Utilities · DPU

  8. Neutrino nuclear response and photo nuclear reaction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    H. Ejiri; A. I. Titov; M. Boswell; A. Young

    2013-11-10

    Photo nuclear reactions are shown to be used for studying neutrino/weak nuclear responses involved in astro-neutrino nuclear interactions and double beta decays. Charged current weak responses for ground and excited states are studied by using photo nuclear reactions through isobaric analog states of those states, while neutral current weak responses for excited states are studied by using photo nuclear reactions through the excited states. The weak interaction strengths are studied by measuring the cross sections of the photo nuclear reactions, and the spin and parity of the state are studied by measuring angular correlations of particles emitted from the photo nuclear reactions. Medium-energy polarized photons obtained from laser photons scattered off GeV electrons are very useful. Nuclear responses studied by photo nuclear reactions are used to evaluate neutrino/weak nuclear responses, i.e. nuclear beta and double beta matrix elements and neutrino nuclear interactions, and to verify theoretical calculations for them.

  9. Electric arc saw apparatus

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Deichelbohrer, P.R.

    1983-08-08

    A portable, hand-held electric arc saw apparatus comprising a small frame for supporting an electrically conducting rotary blade which serves as an electrode for generating an electric arc between the blade and a workpiece of opposite polarity. Electrically conducting means are provided on said frame for transmitting current to said blade. A pair of freely movable endless belts in the form of crawler treads are employed to facilitate movement of the apparatus relative to the workpiece.

  10. Electrical utilities relay settings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    HACHE, J.M.

    1999-02-24

    This document contains the Hanford transmission and distribution system relay settings that are under the control of Electrical Utilities.

  11. National Electric Transmission Congestion Study Webinars | Department...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Services Electricity Policy Coordination and Implementation Transmission Planning National Electric Transmission Congestion Study National Electric Transmission...

  12. Nuclear Golf

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hacker, Randi; Tsutsui, William

    2006-12-06

    Broadcast Transcript: Pay no attention to that nuclear warhead behind the 18th hole; just shout "Fore!" and drive your Titleist down the fairway. In a development that is bizarre even by North Korean standards, the country is making a move to sell...

  13. U.S. electric utility demand-side management 1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1997-01-01

    The US Electric Utility Demand-Side Management report is prepared by the Coal and Electric Data and Renewables Division; Office of Coal, Nuclear, Electric and Alternative Fuels; Energy Information Administration (EIA); US Department of Energy. The report presents comprehensive information on electric power industry demand-side management (DSM) activities in the US at the national, regional, and utility levels. The objective of the publication is to provide industry decision makers, government policy makers, analysts, and the general public with historical data that may be used in understanding DSM as it relates to the US electric power industry. The first chapter, ``Profile: US Electric Utility Demand-Side Management``, presents a general discussion of DSM, its history, current issues, and a review of key statistics for the year. Subsequent chapters present discussions and more detailed data on energy savings, peak load reductions and costs attributable to DSM. 9 figs., 24 tabs.

  14. Electric power monthly, July 1999, with data for April 1999

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1999-07-01

    The Electric Power Division, Office of Coal, Nuclear, Electric and Alternate Fuels, Energy Information Administration (EIA), Department of Energy prepares the Electric Power Monthly (EPM). This publication provides monthly statistics at the State, Census division, and US levels for net generation, fossil fuel consumption and stocks, quantity and quality of fossil fuels, cost of fossil fuels, electricity retail sales, associated revenue, and average revenue per kilowatt hour of electricity sold. In addition, data on net generation, fuel consumption, fuel stocks, quantity and cost of fossil fuels are also displayed for the North American Electric Reliability Council (NERC) regions. The EIA publishes statistics in the EPM on net generation by energy source; consumption, stocks, quantity, quality, and cost of fossil fuels; and capability of new generating units by company and plant. 1 fig., 64 tabs.

  15. Emission Impacts of Electric Vehicles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Quanlu; DeLuchi, Mark A.; Sperling, Daniel

    1990-01-01

    greenhouse effect, and electric vehicles," Proceedingso/9thInternational Electric Vehicles Symposium, 1988. 14. R. M.of 9th International Electric Vehicles Sympo- sium, 1988.

  16. Electric Vehicle Smart Charging Infrastructure

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chung, Ching-Yen

    2014-01-01

    for Multiplexed Electric Vehicle Charging”, US20130154561A1,Chynoweth, ”Intelligent Electric Vehicle Charging System”,of RFID Mesh Network for Electric Vehicle Smart Charging

  17. The Case for Electric Vehicles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sperling, Daniel

    2001-01-01

    land Press, 1995 TESTING ELECTRIC VEHICLE DEMAND IN " HYBRIDThe Case for Electric Vehicles DanieI Sperlmg Reprint UCTCor The Case for Electric Vehicles Darnel Sperling Institute

  18. Renewable Electricity Futures Study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Renewable Electricity Futures Study Executive Summary NREL is a national laboratory of the U for Sustainable Energy, LLC. Volume 2 PDF Volume 3 PDF Volume 1 PDF Volume 4 PDF #12;Renewable Electricity Futures. National Renewable Energy Laboratory Suggested Citations Renewable Electricity Futures Study (Entire Report

  19. Washington State Electric Vehicle

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Davis, University of

    Washington State Electric Vehicle Implementation Bryan Bazard Maintenance and Alternate Fuel Technology Manager #12;Executive Order 14-04 Requires the procurement of electric vehicles where and equipment with electricity or biofuel to the "extent practicable" by June 2015 1. The vehicle is due

  20. Electrical & Computer Engineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Electrical & Computer Engineering 2014-2015StudentHandbook For students entering the Masters of Science in Electrical & Computer Engineering: Pittsburgh, Silicon Valley, Rwanda, or Technology Enhanced, 2014 #12;This document is for the internal use of the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering

  1. LABORATORY V ELECTRIC CIRCUITS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Minnesota, University of

    Lab V -1 LABORATORY V ELECTRIC CIRCUITS Electrical devices are the cornerstones of our modern world understanding of them. In the previous laboratory, you studied the behavior of electric fields and their effect successfully completing this laboratory, you should be able to: · apply the concept of circuit to any

  2. ELECTRICAL & COMPUTER ENGINEERING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ELECTRICAL & COMPUTER ENGINEERING SEMINAR "A Random Walk on Image Patches" by Prof. Francois Meyer Electrical, Computer, and Energy Engineering University of Colorado--Boulder Monday, April 2, 2012, 11:00 a a Ph.D. degree in electrical engineering from INRIA, France, in 1993. Meyer worked on the thermonuclear

  3. Electronics, Electrical Engineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    SCHOOL OF Electronics, Electrical Engineering and Computer Science IS IN YOUR HANDS THE FUTURE #12;SCHOOL OF Electronics, Electrical Engineering and Computer Science2 CAREERS IN ELECTRONICS, ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING AND COMPUTER SCIENCE This is an exciting time to join the School of EEECS at Queen's University

  4. BRITISH COLUMBIA'S ELECTRICITY MARKET

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    REFORMING BRITISH COLUMBIA'S ELECTRICITY MARKET: A WAY FORWARD DR. MARKJACCARD BRITISHCOLUMBIATASKFORCEON ELECTRICITYMARKETREFORM: FINALREPORT JANUARY1998 #12;BRITISH COLUMBIA TASK FORCE ON ELECTRICITY with the mandate to lead a Task Force to bring forward to government a package of electricity market reform

  5. Laser-induced nonresonant nuclear excitation in muonic atoms

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Shahbaz; C. Müller; T. J. Buervenich; C. H. Keitel

    2008-12-13

    Coherent nuclear excitation in strongly laser-driven muonic atoms is calculated. The nuclear transition is caused by the time-dependent Coulomb field of the oscillating charge density of the bound muon. A closed-form analytical expression for electric multipole transitions is derived and applied to various isotopes; the excitation probabilities are in general very small. We compare the process with other nuclear excitation mechanisms through coupling with atomic shells and discuss the prospects to observe it in experiment.

  6. Nuclear Security Summit | National Nuclear Security Administration

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Summit | National Nuclear Security Administration Facebook Twitter Youtube Flickr RSS People Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy...

  7. Nuclear Incident Team | National Nuclear Security Administration

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Incident Team | National Nuclear Security Administration Facebook Twitter Youtube Flickr RSS People Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear...

  8. Nuclear Waste: Forever Contaminated?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Andrew

    2015-01-01

    Beyond Fukushima: Disasters, nuclear energy, and energy law.Nuclear Energy, and Energy Law (December 20, 2011). Brigham

  9. Global Nuclear Energy Partnership Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    R.A. Wigeland

    2008-10-01

    Abstract: The proposed Global Nuclear Energy Partnership (GNEP) Program, which is part of the President’s Advanced Energy Initiative, is intended to support a safe, secure, and sustainable expansion of nuclear energy, both domestically and internationally. Domestically, the GNEP Program would promote technologies that support economic, sustained production of nuclear-generated electricity, while reducing the impacts associated with spent nuclear fuel disposal and reducing proliferation risks. The Department of Energy (DOE) proposed action envisions changing the United States nuclear energy fuel cycle from an open (or once-through) fuel cycle—in which nuclear fuel is used in a power plant one time and the resulting spent nuclear fuel is stored for eventual disposal in a geologic repository—to a closed fuel cycle in which spent nuclear fuel would be recycled to recover energy-bearing components for use in new nuclear fuel. At this time, DOE has no specific proposed actions for the international component of the GNEP Program. Rather, the United States, through the GNEP Program, is considering various initiatives to work cooperatively with other nations. Such initiatives include the development of grid-appropriate reactors and the development of reliable fuel services (to provide an assured supply of fresh nuclear fuel and assist with the management of the used fuel) for nations who agree to employ nuclear energy only for peaceful purposes, such as electricity generation.

  10. Poland becoming a member of the Global Nuclear Energy Partnership, Vol. 2.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Koritarov, V. K.; Conzelmann, G.; Cirillo, R. R.; Goldberg, S. M.

    2007-03-26

    Within a constrained carbon environment, the risks of future natural gas supply, and the need to move to market-based electricity prices, the study team found: (1) the deployment of new nuclear energy in Poland itself is very competitive in the next decade or two; (2) if such generation could be made available to Poland prior to deployment of its own nuclear generation facilities, Poland would benefit from partnering with its Baltic neighbors to import electricity derived from new nuclear generation facilities sited in Lithuania; and (3) Poland appears to be a good candidate for a partnership in the Global Nuclear Energy Partnership (GNEP) as an emerging nuclear energy country.

  11. Poland becoming a member of the Global Nuclear Energy Partnership, Vol. 1.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Koritarov, V. K.; Conzelmann, G.; Cirillo, R. R.; Goldberg, S. M.

    2007-03-26

    Within a constrained carbon environment, the risks of future natural gas supply, and the need to move to market-based electricity prices, the study team found: (1) the deployment of new nuclear energy in Poland itself is very competitive in the next decade or two; (2) if such generation could be made available to Poland prior to deployment of its own nuclear generation facilities, Poland would benefit from partnering with its Baltic neighbors to import electricity derived from new nuclear generation facilities sited in Lithuania; and (3) Poland appears to be a good candidate for a partnership in the Global Nuclear Energy Partnership (GNEP) as an emerging nuclear energy country.

  12. Climate Change, Nuclear Power and Nuclear Proliferation: Magnitude Matters

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robert J. Goldston

    2011-04-28

    Integrated energy, environment and economics modeling suggests that worldwide electrical energy use will increase from 2.4 TWe today to ~12 TWe in 2100. It will be challenging to provide 40% of this electrical power from combustion with carbon sequestration, as it will be challenging to provide 30% from renewable energy sources derived from natural energy flows. Thus nuclear power may be needed to provide ~30%, 3600 GWe, by 2100. Calculations of the associated stocks and flows of uranium, plutonium and minor actinides indicate that the proliferation risks at mid-century, using current light-water reactor technology, are daunting. There are institutional arrangements that may be able to provide an acceptable level of risk mitigation, but they will be difficult to implement. If a transition is begun to fast-spectrum reactors at mid-century, without a dramatic change in the proliferation risks of such systems, at the end of the century global nuclear proliferation risks are much greater, and more resistant to mitigation. Fusion energy, if successfully demonstrated to be economically competitive, would provide a source of nuclear power with much lower proliferation risks than fission.

  13. Nuclear spin dynamics in parabolic quantum wells Ionel Tifrea* and Michael E. Flatte

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Flatte, Michael E.

    Nuclear spin dynamics in parabolic quantum wells Ionel T¸ifrea* and Michael E. Flatte´ Department March 2004 We present a detailed analytical and numerical analysis of the nuclear spin dynamics of the electronic wave function in small electric fields. The nuclear spin relaxation via the hyperfine interaction

  14. Instantaneous electric energy and electric power dissipation in dispersive media

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fan, Shanhui

    Instantaneous electric energy and electric power dissipation in dispersive media Wonseok Shin,1 the instantaneous densities of electric energy and electric power dissipation in lossless and lossy dis- persive average of the electric energy density is [3] ue 1 4 d d jE0j2 . (1) The time average of the electric

  15. Nuclear lamins: building blocks of nuclear architecture

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goldman, Robert D.

    REVIEW Nuclear lamins: building blocks of nuclear architecture Robert D. Goldman,1,3,4 Yosef Biological Laboratory, Woods Hole, Massachusetts 02543, USA Nuclear lamins were initially identified as the major components of the nuclear lamina, a proteinaceous layer found at the interface between chromatin

  16. Criteria for Global Nuclear Energy Development

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lawrence, Michael J.

    2002-07-01

    Global energy consumption will at least double over the next fifty years due to population growth, increased consumption, and an urgent need to improve the standard of living in under-developed countries. Thirty percent of this growth will be for electricity. At the same time, carbon emissions must be significantly reduced to respond to concerns regarding global warming. The use of nuclear energy to meet this growing electricity demand without carbon emissions is an obvious solution to many observers, however real concerns over economics, safety, waste and proliferation must be adequately addressed. The issue is further complicated by the fact that developing countries, which have the most pressing need for additional electricity generation, have the least capability and infrastructure to deploy nuclear energy. Nevertheless, if the specific needs of developing countries are appropriately considered now as new generation reactors are being developed, and institutional arrangements based upon the fundamental principles of President Eisenhower's 1953 Atoms For Peace speech are followed, nuclear energy could be deployed in any country. From a technical perspective, reactor safety and accessibility of special nuclear material are primary concerns. Institutionally, plant and fuel ownership and waste management issues must be addressed. International safety and safeguards authority are prerequisites. While the IAEA's IMPRO program and the United States' Generation IV programs are focusing on technical solutions, institutional issues, particularly with regard to deployment in developing countries, are not receiving corresponding attention. Full-service, cradle-to-grave, nuclear electricity companies that retain custody and responsibility for the plant and materials, including waste, are one possible solution. Small modular reactors such as the Pebble Bed Modular Reactor could be ideal for such an arrangement. While waste disposal remains a major obstacle, this is already true for numerous nuclear programs even in developed countries with limited geologically suitable formations. Fortunately, several organizations are currently pursuing international solutions to the nuclear waste disposal problem. While the capability to deploy nuclear energy in a specific country may not be desirable for a number of reasons, we should not develop nuclear hardware that can only benefit and serve technically and economically advanced countries. The potential benefits of nuclear energy are global, and we should not unduly limit that potential by inattention today to the requirements necessary for global deployment. (authors)

  17. Cost trajectories of low carbon electricity generation technologies: A study of cost uncertainty

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Levi, Peter; Pollitt, Michael

    2015-08-03

    for three important electricity generation technologies for the UK; nuclear, offshore wind and coal with carbon capture and storage. The first analysis composes LCOE estimate trajectories from previous years' DECC estimates and presents them alongside...

  18. The Use of Electricity in Industry and Energy Saving - The Gamma Co-Efficient 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wolf, R.; Froehlich, R.

    1983-01-01

    Use of electricity in manufacturing processes is not only limited to its specific utilizations as motion power, lighting, electrolysis. Worldwide energy troubles involve in France a great voluntee to substitute in industrial processes the nuclear...

  19. Ways Electricity Can Be Used To Replace Fossil Fuels in The French Chemical Industry 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mongon, A.

    1982-01-01

    France energy policy for the year 1990 foresees the following breakdown between various energy sources : renewable sources (including hydraulic) : 11%, coal + natural gas : 30.5%, nuclear : 26.5%, oil : 32%. The electricity will be produced mainly...

  20. 1882 Shortly after establishing his company's first central electric station in Manhattan, Thomas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bergman, Keren

    , Michael Pupin works on submarine detection techniques, while Francis Bacon Crocker emerges from retire-star admiral credited as "father of the nuclear navy," studies electrical engi- neering and receives an MS

  1. The neutron electric form factor to Q² = 1.45 (GeV/c)²

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Plaster, Bradley R. (Bradley Robert), 1976-

    2004-01-01

    The nucleon elastic electromagnetic form factors are fundamental quantities needed for an understanding of nucleon and nuclear electromagnetic structure. The evolution of the Sachs electric and magnetic form factors with ...

  2. The Nuclear Revolution, Relative Gains, and International Nuclear Assistance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kroenig, Matthew

    2006-01-01

    of selective nuclear proliferation. Journal of Conflictmissile and nuclear proliferation: Issues for Congress. CRSSpector, L. 1988. Nuclear proliferation today. Cambridge,

  3. Electrical system architecture

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Algrain, Marcelo C. (Peoria, IL); Johnson, Kris W. (Washington, IL); Akasam, Sivaprasad (Peoria, IL); Hoff, Brian D. (East Peoria, IL)

    2008-07-15

    An electrical system for a vehicle includes a first power source generating a first voltage level, the first power source being in electrical communication with a first bus. A second power source generates a second voltage level greater than the first voltage level, the second power source being in electrical communication with a second bus. A starter generator may be configured to provide power to at least one of the first bus and the second bus, and at least one additional power source may be configured to provide power to at least one of the first bus and the second bus. The electrical system also includes at least one power consumer in electrical communication with the first bus and at least one power consumer in electrical communication with the second bus.

  4. Thermoacoustic magnetohydrodynamic electrical generator

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wheatley, J.C.; Swift, G.W.; Migliori, A.

    1984-11-16

    A thermoacoustic magnetohydrodynamic electrical generator includes an intrinsically irreversible thermoacoustic heat engine coupled to a magnetohydrodynamic electrical generator. The heat engine includes an electrically conductive liquid metal as the working fluid and includes two heat exchange and thermoacoustic structure assemblies which drive the liquid in a push-pull arrangement to cause the liquid metal to oscillate at a resonant acoustic frequency on the order of 1000 Hz. The engine is positioned in the field of a magnet and is oriented such that the liquid metal oscillates in a direction orthogonal to the field of the magnet, whereby an alternating electrical potential is generated in the liquid metal. Low-loss, low-inductance electrical conductors electrically connected to opposite sides of the liquid metal conduct an output signal to a transformer adapted to convert the low-voltage, high-current output signal to a more usable higher voltage, lower current signal.

  5. Thermoacoustic magnetohydrodynamic electrical generator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wheatley, John C. (Los Alamos, NM); Swift, Gregory W. (Los Alamos, NM); Migliori, Albert (Santa Fe, NM)

    1986-01-01

    A thermoacoustic magnetohydrodynamic electrical generator includes an intrinsically irreversible thermoacoustic heat engine coupled to a magnetohydrodynamic electrical generator. The heat engine includes an electrically conductive liquid metal as the working fluid and includes two heat exchange and thermoacoustic structure assemblies which drive the liquid in a push-pull arrangement to cause the liquid metal to oscillate at a resonant acoustic frequency on the order of 1,000 Hz. The engine is positioned in the field of a magnet and is oriented such that the liquid metal oscillates in a direction orthogonal to the field of the magnet, whereby an alternating electrical potential is generated in the liquid metal. Low-loss, low-inductance electrical conductors electrically connected to opposite sides of the liquid metal conduct an output signal to a transformer adapted to convert the low-voltage, high-current output signal to a more usable higher voltage, lower current signal.

  6. Electric power monthly

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1995-08-01

    The Energy Information Administration (EIA) prepares the Electric Power Monthly (EPM) for a wide audience including Congress, Federal and State agencies, the electric utility industry, and the general public. This publication provides monthly statistics for net generation, fossil fuel consumption and stocks, quantity and quality of fossil fuels, cost of fossil fuels, electricity sales, revenue, and average revenue per kilowatthour of electricity sold. Data on net generation, fuel consumption, fuel stocks, quantity and cost of fossil fuels are also displayed for the North American Electric Reliability Council (NERC) regions. The EIA publishes statistics in the EPM on net generation by energy source, consumption, stocks, quantity, quality, and cost of fossil fuels; and capability of new generating units by company and plant. The purpose of this publication is to provide energy decisionmakers with accurate and timely information that may be used in forming various perspectives on electric issues that lie ahead.

  7. Towards consistent nuclear models and comprehensive nuclear data...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Towards consistent nuclear models and comprehensive nuclear data evaluations Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Towards consistent nuclear models and comprehensive nuclear...

  8. Research Areas | Nuclear Science | ORNL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Fuel Cycle Science & Technology Fusion Nuclear Science Isotope Development and Production Nuclear Security Science & Technology Nuclear Systems Modeling, Simulation & Validation...

  9. Electric Power Monthly

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    Electric Power Monthly Data for June 2015 | Release Date: August 26, 2015 | Next Release: September 24, 2015 | full report | Re-release date: August 28, 2015 | Revision Previous...

  10. Electric Utility Industry Update

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation—given at the April 2012 Federal Utility Partnership Working Group (FUPWG) meeting—covers significant electric industry trends and industry priorities with federal customers.

  11. Electricity Monthly Update

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Electric Reliability Council of Texas (ERCOT), and two locations in the California ISO (CAISO). Also shown are wholesale prices at trading hubs in Louisiana (into Entergy),...

  12. Electricity Monthly Update

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    compares coal consumption in November 2013 and November 2014 by region and shows that coal consumption from electricity generation has decreased in all regions, except Florida,...

  13. Electricity Monthly Update

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    fuel costs account for the lion's share. Therefore, we present below, electricity generation output by fuel type and generator type. Since the generatorfuel mix of utilities...

  14. Electricity Monthly Update

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Electricity Monthly Update Explained Highlights The Highlights page features in the center a short article about a major event or an informative topic. The left column contains...

  15. Electricity Monthly Update

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    Wholesale Markets: February 2014 The United States has many regional wholesale electricity markets. Below we look at monthly and annual ranges of on-peak, daily wholesale...

  16. Electricity Monthly Update

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    last winter. Principal Contributor: Peter Wong (Peter.Wong@eia.gov) End Use: December 2014 Retail ratesprices and consumption In this section, we look at what electricity...

  17. Electricity Monthly Update

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Percentage Btu Region map map showing electricity regions The chart above compares coal consumption in February 2014 and February 2015 by region and shows that coal consumption...

  18. Electricity Monthly Update

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Percentage Btu Region map map showing electricity regions The chart above compares coal consumption in March 2014 and March 2015 by region and shows that coal consumption for...

  19. Energy 101: Electric Vehicles

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    This edition of Energy 101 highlights the benefits of electric vehicles, including improved fuel efficiency, reduced emissions, and lower maintenance costs.

  20. Renewable Electricity Generation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2012-09-01

    This document highlights DOE's Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy's advancements in renewable electricity generation technologies including solar, water, wind, and geothermal.

  1. Perforation patterned electrical interconnects

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Frey, Jonathan

    2014-01-28

    This disclosure describes systems and methods for increasing the usable surface area of electrical contacts within a device, such as a thin film solid state device, through the implementation of electrically conductive interconnects. Embodiments described herein include the use of a plurality of electrically conductive interconnects that penetrate through a top contact layer, through one or more multiple layers, and into a bottom contact layer. The plurality of conductive interconnects may form horizontal and vertical cross-sectional patterns. The use of lasers to form the plurality of electrically conductive interconnects from reflowed layer material further aids in the manufacturing process of a device.

  2. 2012 National Electricity Forum

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    U.S. Department of Energy 2012 National Electric Transmission Congestion Study Eastern Regional Workshops December 6, 2011 - Philadelphia, Pennsylvania Hilton Philadelphia Airport...

  3. Electrically conductive cellulose composite

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Evans, Barbara R.; O'Neill, Hugh M.; Woodward, Jonathan

    2010-05-04

    An electrically conductive cellulose composite includes a cellulose matrix and an electrically conductive carbonaceous material incorporated into the cellulose matrix. The electrical conductivity of the cellulose composite is at least 10 .mu.S/cm at 25.degree. C. The composite can be made by incorporating the electrically conductive carbonaceous material into a culture medium with a cellulose-producing organism, such as Gluconoacetobacter hansenii. The composites can be used to form electrodes, such as for use in membrane electrode assemblies for fuel cells.

  4. Nuclear Photonics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    D. Habs; M. M. Guenther; M. Jentschel; P. G. Thirolf

    2012-01-21

    With new gamma-beam facilities like MEGa-ray at LLNL (USA) or ELI-NP at Bucharest with 10^13 g/s and a bandwidth of Delta E_g/E_g ~10^-3, a new era of g-beams with energies <=20 MeV comes into operation, compared to the present world-leading HIGS facility (Duke Univ., USA) with 10^8 g/s and Delta E_g/E_g~0.03. Even a seeded quantum FEL for g-beams may become possible, with much higher brilliance and spectral flux. At the same time new exciting possibilities open up for focused g-beams. We describe a new experiment at the g-beam of the ILL reactor (Grenoble), where we observed for the first time that the index of refraction for g-beams is determined by virtual pair creation. Using a combination of refractive and reflective optics, efficient monochromators for g-beams are being developed. Thus we have to optimize the system of the g-beam facility, the g-beam optics and g-detectors. We can trade g-intensity for band width, going down to Delta E_g/E_g ~ 10^-6 and address individual nuclear levels. 'Nuclear photonics' stresses the importance of nuclear applications. We can address with g-beams individual nuclear isotopes and not just elements like with X-ray beams. Compared to X rays, g-beams can penetrate much deeper into big samples like radioactive waste barrels, motors or batteries. We can perform tomography and microscopy studies by focusing down to micron resolution using Nucl. Reson. Fluorescence for detection with eV resolution and high spatial resolution. We discuss the dominating M1 and E1 excitations like scissors mode, two-phonon quadrupole octupole excitations, pygmy dipole excitations or giant dipole excitations under the new facet of applications. We find many new applications in biomedicine, green energy, radioactive waste management or homeland security. Also more brilliant secondary beams of neutrons and positrons can be produced.

  5. Nuclear Forensics

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefieldSulfateSciTechtail.Theory ofDid you notHeatMaRIEdioxideUser Work FeaturedNuclear

  6. NUCLEAR ENERGY

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustmentsShirleyEnergyTher i nAand DOEDepartment of Energy009At26-2009NSRC_MOU.pdffactsNUCLEAR ENERGY

  7. Reconversion of nuclear weapons

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kapitza, Sergei P

    1993-01-01

    The nuclear predicament or nuclear option. Synopsis of three lectures : 1- The physical basis of nuclear technology. Physics of fission. Chain reaction in reactors and weapons. Fission fragments. Separration of isotopes. Radiochemistry.2- Nuclear reactors with slow and fast neutrons. Power, size, fuel and waste. Plutonium production. Dose rate, shielding and health hazard. The lessons of Chernobyl3- Nuclear weapons. Types, energy, blast and fallout. Fusion and hydrogen bombs. What to do with nuclear weapons when you cannot use them? Testing. Nonmilittary use. Can we get rid of the nuclear weapon? Nuclear proliferation. Is there a nuclear future?

  8. Electric power monthly with data for October 1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1996-01-01

    The Coal and Electric Data and Renewables Division; Office of Coal, Nuclear, Electric and Alternate Fuels, Energy Information Administration (EIA), Department of Energy prepares the EPM. This publication provides monthly statistics at the State, Census division, and U.S. levels for net generation, fossil fuel consumption and stocks, quantity and quality of fossil fuels, cost of fossil fuels, electricity sales, revenue, and average revenue per kilowatthour of electricity sold. Data on net generation, fuel consumption, fuel stocks, quantity and cost of fossil fuels are also displayed for the North American Electric Reliability Council (NERC) regions. The EIA publishes statistics in the EPM on net generation by energy source; consumption, stocks, quantity, quality, and cost of fossil fuels; and capability of new generating units by company and plant.

  9. Electric power monthly, September 1996, with data for June 1996

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1996-09-01

    The Coal and Electric Data and Renewables Division; Office of Coal, Nuclear, Electric and Alternate Fuels, Energy Information Administration (EIA), Department of Energy prepares the EPM. This publication provides monthly statistics at the State, Census division, and U.S. levels for net generation, fossil fuel consumption and stocks, quantity and quality of fossil fuels, cost of fossil fuels, electricity retail sales, associated revenue, and average revenue per kilowatt hour of electricity sold. In addition, data on net generation, fuel consumption, fuel stocks, quantity and cost of fossil fuels are also displayed for the North American Electric Reliability Council (NERC) regions. The EIA publishes statistics in the EPM on net generation by energy source; consumption, stocks, quantity, quality, and cost of fossil fuels; and capability of new generating units by company and plant.

  10. Electric power monthly, June 1995 with data for March 1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1995-06-19

    The Coal and Electric Data and Renewables Division; Office of Coal, Nuclear, Electric and Alternate Fuels, Energy Information Administration (EIA), Department of Energy prepares the EPM. This publication provides monthly statistics at the State, Census division, and US levels for net generation, fossil fuel consumption and stocks, quantity and quality of fossil fuels, cost of fossil fuels, electricity sales, revenue, and average revenue per kilowatthour of electricity sold. Data on net generation, fuel consumption, fuel stocks, quantity and cost of fossil fuels are also displayed for the North American Electric Reliability Council (NERC) regions. The EIA publishes statistics in the EPM on net generation by energy source; consumption, stocks, quantity, quality, and cost of fossil fuels; and capability of new generating units by company and plant. 68 tabs.

  11. Electric power monthly with data for January 1997

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1997-04-01

    The Coal and Electric Data and Renewables Division; Office of Coal, Nuclear, Electric and Alternate Fuels, Energy Information Administration (EIA), Department of Energy prepares the EPM. This publication provides monthly statistics at the State, Census division, and U.S. levels for net generation, fossil fuel consumption and stocks, quantity and quality of fossil fuels, cost of fossil fuels, electricity retail sales, associated revenue, and average revenue per kilowatthour of electricity sold. In addition, data on net generation, fuel consumption, fuel stocks, quantity and cost of fossil fuels are also displayed for the North American Electric Reliability Council (NERC) regions. The EIA publishes statistics in the EPM on net generation by energy source; consumption, stocks, quantity, quality, and cost of fossil fuels; and capability of new generating units by company and plant.

  12. Electric power monthly with data for December 1996

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1997-03-01

    The Coal and Electric Data and Renewables Division; Office of Coal, Nuclear, Electric and Alternate Fuels, Energy Information Administration (EIA), Department of Energy prepares the EPM. This publication provides monthly statistics at the State, Census division, and U.S. levels for net generation, fossil fuel consumption and stocks, quantity and quality of fossil fuels, cost of fossil fuels, electricity retail sales, associated revenue, and average revenue per kilowatthour of electricity sold. In addition, data on net generation, fuel consumption, fuel stocks, quantity and cost of fossil fuels are also displayed for the North American Electric Reliability Council (NERC) regions. The EIA publishes statistics in the EPM on net generation by energy source; consumption, stocks, quantity, quality, and cost of fossil fuels; and capability of new generating units by company and plant.

  13. Nuclear Safety | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Nuclear Safety Nuclear Safety The Office of Nuclear Safety establishes and maintains nuclear safety policy, requirements, and guidance including policy and requirements relating to...

  14. Nuclear Data | More Science | ORNL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Data SHARE Nuclear Data Nuclear Data ORNL is a recognized, international leader in nuclear data research and development (R&D) to support nuclear applications analyses. For more...

  15. Nuclear Sciences | More Science | ORNL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Nuclear Sciences SHARE Nuclear Sciences In World War II's Manhattan Project, ORNL helped usher in the nuclear age. Today, laboratory scientists are leaders in using nuclear...

  16. Human factors in nuclear technology - a history

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jones, D.B. )

    1992-01-01

    Human factors, human factors engineering (HFE), or ergonomics did not receive much formal attention in nuclear technology prior to the Three Mile Island Unit 2 (TMI-2) incident. Three principal reasons exist for this lack of concern. First, emerging technologies show little concern with how people will use a new system. Making the new technology work is considered more important than the people who will use it. Second, the culture of the users of nuclear power did not recognize a need for human factors. Traditional utilities had well established and effective engineering designs for control of electric power generation, while medicine considered the use of nuclear isotopes another useful tool, not requiring special ergonomics. Finally, the nuclear industry owed much to Admiral Rickover. He was definitely opposed.

  17. Graphite in Science and Nuclear Technique

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    E. I. Zhmurikov; I. A. Bubnenkov; V. V. Dremov; S. I. Samarin; A. S. Pokrovsky; D. V. Harkov

    2015-08-14

    The monograph is devoted to the application of graphite and graphite composites in science and technology. The structure and electrical properties, the technological aspects of production of high-strength synthetic graphites, the dynamics of the graphite destruction, traditionally used in the nuclear industry are discussed. It is focuses on the characteristics of graphitization and properties of graphite composites based on carbon isotope 13C. The book is based, generally, on the original results, and concentrated on the actual problems of application and testing of graphite materials in modern nuclear physics, in scientific and technical applications. For scientists and engineers specializing in nuclear physics and engineering, physics of nuclear reactors, condensed matter, for undergraduate, graduate and post-graduate students of universities physical specialties.

  18. World nuclear capacity and fuel cycle requirements, November 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-11-30

    This analysis report presents the current status and projections of nuclear capacity, generation, and fuel cycle requirements for all countries in the world using nuclear power to generate electricity for commercial use. Long-term projections of US nuclear capacity, generation, fuel cycle requirements, and spent fuel discharges for three different scenarios through 2030 are provided in support of the Department of Energy`s activities pertaining to the Nuclear Waste Policy Act of 1982 (as amended in 1987). The projections of uranium requirements also support the Energy Information Administration`s annual report, Domestic Uranium Mining and Milling Industry: Viability Assessment.

  19. Safety management of nuclear waste in Spain

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Echavarri, L.E. (Consejo de Seguridad Nuclear, Madrid (Spain))

    1991-01-01

    For the past two decades, Spain has been consolidating a nuclear program that in the last 3 years has provided between 35 and 40% of the electricity consumed in that country. This program includes nine operating reactor units, eight of them based on US technology and one from Germany, a total of 7,356 MW(electric). There is also a 480-MW(electric) French gas-cooled reactor whose operation recently ceased and which will be decommissioned in the coming years. Spanish industry has participated significantly in this program, and material produced locally has reached 85% of the total. Once the construction program has been completed and operation is proceeding normally, the capacity factor will be {approximately} 80%. It will be very important to complete the nuclear program with the establishment of conditions for safe management and disposal of the nuclear waste generated during the years in which these reactors are in operation and for subsequent decommissioning. To establish the guidelines for the disposal of nuclear waste, the Spanish government approved in october 1987, with a revision in January 1989, the General Plan of Radioactive Wastes proposed by the Ministry of Industry and Energy and prepared by the national company for radioactive waste management, ENRESA.

  20. Electric Propulsion for Cars: New Directions for Energy Research

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Firestone, Jeremy

    a Prius 220 gal/year #12;Substitute Alternative Fuels for Gasoline Electricity Natural gas Methanol ? Bio: CEC, EIA 2003 CA US Natural Gas 37% 17% Large Hydro 16% 7% Coal 21% 51% Nuclear 15% 20% Eligible is used in: US 2005 · petrochemicals 7% · freight and aviation 32% · light vehicles 51% 90% #12;Oil Use vs

  1. Electric Power Costs in Texas in 1985 and 1990 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gordon, J. B.; White, D. M.

    1979-01-01

    since utilities in Texas will be using a mix of fuels. This paper analyzes the cost of generating electricity from nuclear power, out-of-state coal, in-state lignite, fuel oil, natural gas, geothermal, and solar power. These costs are then used...

  2. EIS-0476: Vogtle Electric Generating Plant, Units 3 and 4

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This EIS evaluates the environmental impacts of construction and startup of the proposed Units 3 and 4 at the Vogtle Electric Generating Plant in Burke County, Georgia. DOE adopted two Nuclear Regulatory Commission EISs associated with this project (i.e., NUREG-1872, issued 8/2008, and NUREG-1947, issued 3/2011).

  3. Greater fuel diversity needed to meet growing US electricity demand

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Burt, B.; Mullins, S.

    2008-01-15

    Electricity demand is growing in the USA. One way to manage the uncertainty is to diversity fuel sources. Fuel sources include coal, natural gas, nuclear and renewable energy sources. Tables show actual and planned generation projects by fuel types. 1 fig., 2 tabs.

  4. nuclear@illinois.edu | 217-333-2295 | npre.illinois.edu 216 Talbot Laboratory, MC 234 | 104 S. Wright Street | Urbana, IL 61801-2935

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Tonghun

    nuclear@illinois.edu | 217-333-2295 | npre.illinois.edu 216 Talbot Laboratory, MC 234 | 104 S: · Production, transport and interactions of radiation with matter · Applications of nuclear processes · Nuclear fission for electric power production nuclear power operations and control · Plasma sciences, applied

  5. Economic Conditions and Factors Affecting New Nuclear Power Deployment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harrison, Thomas J.

    2014-10-01

    This report documents work performed in support of the US Department of Energy Office of Nuclear Energy’s Advanced Small Modular Reactor (AdvSMR) program. The report presents information and results from economic analyses to describe current electricity market conditions and those key factors that may impact the deployment of AdvSMRs or any other new nuclear power plants. Thus, this report serves as a reference document for DOE as it moves forward with its plans to develop advanced reactors, including AdvSMRs. For the purpose of this analysis, information on electricity markets and nuclear power plant operating costs will be combined to examine the current state of the nuclear industry and the process required to successfully move forward with new nuclear power in general and AdvSMRs in particular. The current electricity market is generally unfavorable to new nuclear construction, especially in deregulated markets with heavy competition from natural gas and subsidized renewables. The successful and profitable operation of a nuclear power plant (or any power plant) requires the rate at which the electricity is sold to be sufficiently greater than the cost to operate. The wholesale rates in most US markets have settled into values that provide profits for most operating nuclear power plants but are too low to support the added cost of capital recovery for new nuclear construction. There is a strong geographic dependence on the wholesale rate, with some markets currently able to support new nuclear construction. However, there is also a strong geographic dependence on pronuclear public opinion; the areas where power prices are high tend to have unfavorable views on the construction of new nuclear power plants. The use of government-backed incentives, such as subsidies, can help provide a margin to help justify construction projects that otherwise may not seem viable. Similarly, low interest rates for the project will also add a positive margin to the economic analysis. In both cases, the profitable price point is decreased, making more markets open to profitable entry. Overall, the economic attractiveness of a nuclear power construction project is not only a function of its own costs, but a function of the market into which it is deployed. Many of the market characteristics are out of the control of the potential nuclear power plant operators. The decision-making process for the power industry in general is complicated by the short-term market volatility in both the wholesale electricity market and the commodity (natural gas) market. Decisions based on market conditions today may be rendered null and void in six months. With a multiple-year lead time, nuclear power plants are acutely vulnerable to market corrections.

  6. Electric power monthly, June 1999, with data for March 1999

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1999-06-01

    The Electric Power Monthly (EPM) presents monthly electricity statistics for a wide audience including Congress, Federal and State agencies, the electric utility industry, and the general public. The purpose of this publication is to provide energy decisionmakers with accurate and timely information that may be used in forming various perspectives on electric issues that lie ahead. The Electric Power Division; Office of Coal, Nuclear, Electric and Alternate Fuels, Energy Information Administration (EIA), Department of Energy prepares the EPM. This publication provides monthly statistics at the State, Census division, and US levels for net generation, fossil fuel consumption and stocks, quantity and quality of fossil fuels, cost of fossil fuels, electricity retail sales, associated revenue, and average revenue per kilowatthour of electricity sold. In addition, data on net generation, fuel consumption, fuel stocks, quantity and cost of fossil fuels are also displayed for the North American Electric Reliability Council (NERC) regions. The EIA publishes statistics in the EPM on net generation by energy source; consumption, stocks, quantity, quality, and cost of fossil fuels; and capability of new generating units by company and plant. 57 tabs.

  7. Electric power monthly, April 1999 with data for January 1999

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1999-04-01

    The Electric Power Monthly (EPM) presents monthly electricity statistics for a wide audience including Congress, Federal and State agencies, the electric utility industry, and the general public. The purpose of this publication is to provide energy decisionmakers with accurate and timely information that may be used in forming various perspectives on electric issues that lie ahead. The Electric Power Division; Office of Coal, Nuclear, Electric and Alternate Fuels, Energy Information Administration (EIA), Department of Energy prepares the EPM. This publication provides monthly statistics at the State, Census division, and US levels for net generation, fossil fuel consumption and stocks, quantity and quality of fossil fuels, cost of fossil fuels, electricity retail sales, associated revenue, and average revenue per kilowatthour of electricity sold. In addition, data on net generation, fuel consumption, fuel stocks, quantity and cost of fossil fuels are also displayed for the North American Electric Reliability Council (NERC) regions. The EIA publishes statistics in the EPM on net generation by energy source; consumption, stocks, quantity, quality, and cost of fossil fuels; and capability of new generating units by company and plant.

  8. Electric power monthly, October 1998, with data for July 1998

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1998-10-01

    The Electric Power Monthly (EPM) presents monthly electricity statistics for a wide audience including Congress, Federal and State agencies, the electric utility industry, and the general public. The purpose of this publication is to provide energy decisionmakers with accurate and timely information that may be used in forming various perspectives on electric issues that lie ahead. The Electric Power Division; Office of Coal, Nuclear, Electric and Alternate Fuels, Energy Information Administration (EIA), Department of Energy prepares the EPM. This publication provides monthly statistics at the State, Census division, and US levels for net generation, fossil fuel consumption and stocks, quantity and quality of fossil fuels, cost of fossil fuels, electricity retail sales, associated revenue, and average revenue per kilowatthour of electricity sold. In addition, data on net generation, fuel consumption, fuel stocks, quantity and cost of fossil fuels are also displayed for the North American Electric Reliability Council (NERC) regions. The EIA publishes statistics in the EPM on net generation by energy source; consumption, stocks, quantity, quality, and cost of fossil fuels; and capability of new generating units by company and plant. 57 tabs.

  9. Electric power monthly, November 1998, with data for August 1998

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1998-11-01

    The Electric Power Monthly (EPM) presents monthly electricity statistics for a wide audience including Congress, Federal and State agencies, the electric utility industry, and the general public. The purpose of this publication is to provide energy decisionmakers with accurate and timely information that may be used in forming various perspectives on electric issues that lie ahead. The Electric Power Division; Office of Coal, Nuclear, Electric and Alternate fuels, Energy Information Administration (EIA), Department of Energy prepares the EPM. This publication provides monthly statistics at the State, Census division, and US levels for net generation, fossil fuel consumption and stocks, quantity and quality of fossil fuels, cost of fossil fuels, electricity retail sales, associated revenue, and average revenue per kilowatthour of electricity sold. In addition, data on net generation, fuel consumption, fuel stocks, quantity and cost of fossil fuels are also displayed for the North American Electric Reliability Council (NERC) regions. The EIA publishes statistics in the EPM on net generation by energy source; consumption, stocks, quantity, quality, and cost of fossil fuels; and capability of new generating units by company and plant. 57 tabs.

  10. Electric power monthly, September 1998, with data for June 1998

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1998-09-01

    The Electric Power Monthly (EPM) presents monthly electricity statistics for a wide audience including Congress, Federal and State agencies, the electric utility industry, and the general public. The purpose of this publication is to provide energy decisionmakers with accurate and timely information that may be used in forming various perspectives on electric issues that lie ahead. The Electric Power Division; Office of Coal, Nuclear, Electric and Alternate Fuels, Energy Information Administration (EIA), Department of Energy prepares the EPM. This publication provides monthly statistics at the State, Census division, and US levels for net generation, fossil fuel consumption and stocks, quantity and quality of fossil fuels, cost of fossil fuels, electricity retail sales, associated revenue, and average revenue per kilowatthour of electricity sold. In addition, data on net generation, fuel consumption, fuel stocks, quantity and cost of fossil fuels are also displayed for the North American Electric Reliability Council (NERC) regions. The EIA publishes statistics in the EPM on net generation by energy source; consumption, stocks, quantity, quality, and cost of fossil fuels; and capability of new generating units by company and plant.

  11. Electric power monthly: October 1995, with data for July 1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1995-10-19

    The Electric Power Monthly (EPM) presents monthly electricity statistics for a wide audience including Congress, Federal and State agencies, the electric utility industry, and the general public. The purpose of this publication is to provide energy decisionmakers with accurate and timely information that may be used in forming various perspectives on electric issues that lie ahead. The Coal and Electric Data and Renewables Division; Office of Coal, Nuclear, Electric and Alternate Fuels, Energy Information Administration (EIA), Department of Energy prepares the EPM. This publication provides monthly statistics at the State, Census division, and US levels for net generation, fossil fuel consumption and stocks, quantity and quality of fossil fuels, cost of fossil fuels, electricity sales, revenue, and average revenue per kilowatthour of electricity sold. Data on net generation, fuel consumption, fuel stocks, quantity and cost of fossil fuels are also displayed for the North American Electric Reliability Council (NERC) regions. The EIA publishes statistics in the EPM on net generation by energy source; consumption, stocks, quantity, quality, and cost of fossil fuels; and capability of new generating units by company and plant.

  12. Electricity market module: Electricity capacity planning submodule

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-06-01

    The purpose of this report is to describe modifications to the Electricity Capacity Planning Submodule (ECP) for the Annual Energy Outlook 1996. It describes revisions to enhance the representation of planned maintenance, incorporate technological improvements in operating efficiencies, revise the algorithm for determining international firm power imports, and include risk premiums for new plant construction.

  13. Renewable Electricity Futures (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mai, T.

    2012-08-01

    This presentation summarizes findings of NREL's Renewable Electricity Futures study, published in June 2012. RE Futures investigated the challenges and impacts of achieving very high renewable electricity generation levels in the contiguous United States by 2050. This presentation was presented in a Wind Powering America webinar on August 15, 2012 and is now available through the Wind Powering America website.

  14. Renewable Electricity Futures (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hand, M.

    2012-10-01

    This presentation library summarizes findings of NREL's Renewable Electricity Futures study, published in June 2012. RE Futures investigated the challenges and impacts of achieving very high renewable electricity generation levels in the contiguous United States by 2050. It is being presented at the Utility Variable-Generation Integration Group Fall Technical Workshop on October 24, 2012.

  15. Renewable Electricity Futures (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hand, M.; Mai, T.

    2012-08-01

    This presentation library summarizes findings of NREL's Renewable Electricity Futures study, published in June 2012. RE Futures investigated the challenges and impacts of achieving very high renewable electricity generation levels in the contiguous United States by 2050. It was presented in an Union of Concerned Scientists webinar on June 12, 2012.

  16. Renewable Electricity Futures (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mai, T.

    2012-08-01

    This presentation summarizes findings of NREL's Renewable Electricity Futures study, published in June 2012. RE Futures investigated the challenges and impacts of achieving very high renewable electricity generation levels in the contiguous United States by 2050. It was presented in a Power Systems Engineering Research Center webinar on September 4, 2012.

  17. Electrical Demand Management 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fetters, J. L.; Teets, S. J.

    1983-01-01

    The Demand Management Plan set forth in this paper has proven to be a viable action to reduce a 3 million per year electric bill at the Columbus Works location of Western Electric. Measures are outlined which have reduced the peak demand 5% below...

  18. Electrical Demand Control 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eppelheimer, D. M.

    1984-01-01

    Almost every building owner or manager is interested in controlling electrical costs. Since the HVAC system is a large user of electricity, this article will discuss what can be done in the HVAC system to influence parts of the utility bill....

  19. Electrical and computer engineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Berdichevsky, Victor

    Electrical and computer engineering COLLEGE of ENGINEERING DepartmentofElectricalandComputerEngineering CollegeofEngineering 5050AnthonyWayneDrive Detroit,MI48202 College of engineering t Educating future engineers for 80 years t Home to nation's first electric-drive vehicle engineering program and alternative

  20. Electrically conductive diamond electrodes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Swain, Greg (East Lansing, MI); Fischer, Anne (Arlington, VA),; Bennett, Jason (Lansing, MI); Lowe, Michael (Holt, MI)

    2009-05-19

    An electrically conductive diamond electrode and process for preparation thereof is described. The electrode comprises diamond particles coated with electrically conductive doped diamond preferably by chemical vapor deposition which are held together with a binder. The electrodes are useful for oxidation reduction in gas, such as hydrogen generation by electrolysis.

  1. Electricity Real Options Valuation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Broszkiewicz-Suwaj, E

    2006-01-01

    In this paper a real option approach for the valuation of real assets is presented. Two continuous time models used for valuation are described: geometric Brownian motion model and interest rate model. The valuation for electricity spread option under Vasicek interest model is placed and the formulas for parameter estimators are calculated. The theoretical part is confronted with real data from electricity market.

  2. Electricity Real Options Valuation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ewa Broszkiewicz-Suwaj

    2006-08-16

    In this paper a real option approach for the valuation of real assets is presented. Two continuous time models used for valuation are described: geometric Brownian motion model and interest rate model. The valuation for electricity spread option under Vasicek interest model is placed and the formulas for parameter estimators are calculated. The theoretical part is confronted with real data from electricity market.

  3. Superconductivity for Electric Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 Superconductivity for Electric Systems Superconductivity Program Quarterly Progress Report For the Period October 1, 2006, to December 31, 2006 #12;2 Superconductivity Program Quarterly Progress Report Superconductivity Program Oak Ridge National Laboratory For U.S. Department of Energy Office of Electricity Delivery

  4. Superconductivity for Electric Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Superconductivity for Electric Systems Superconductivity Program Quarterly Progress Report For the Period April 1, 2007, to June 30, 2007 #12;2 Superconductivity Program Quarterly Progress Report Superconductivity Program Oak Ridge National Laboratory For: Department of Energy Office of Electricity Delivery

  5. Electrical shock accident investigation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-09-30

    This report documents results of the accident investigation of an electrical shock received by two subcontractor employees on May 13, 1994, at the Pinellas Plant. The direct cause of the electrical shock was worker contact with a cut ``hot`` wire and a grounded panelboard (PPA) enclosure. Workers presumed that all wires in the enclosure were dead at the time of the accident and did not perform thorough Lockout/Tagout (LO/TO). Three contributing causes were identified. First, lack of guidance in the drawing for the modification performed in 1987 allowed the PPA panel to be used as a junction box. The second contributing cause is that Environmental, Safety and Health (ES&H) procedures do not address multiple electrical sources in an enclosure. Finally, the workers did not consider the possibility of multiple electrical sources. The root cause of the electrical shock was the inadequacy of administrative controls, including construction requirement and LO/TO requirements, and subcontractor awareness regarding multiple electrical sources. Recommendations to prevent further reoccurrence of this type of accident include revision of ES&H Standard 2.00, Electrical Safety Program Manual, to document requirements for multiple electrical sources in a single enclosure to specify a thorough visual inspection as part of the voltage check process. In addition, the formality of LO/TO awareness training for subcontractor electricians should be increased.

  6. Hawaii electric system reliability.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Silva Monroy, Cesar Augusto; Loose, Verne William

    2012-09-01

    This report addresses Hawaii electric system reliability issues; greater emphasis is placed on short-term reliability but resource adequacy is reviewed in reference to electric consumers' views of reliability %E2%80%9Cworth%E2%80%9D and the reserve capacity required to deliver that value. The report begins with a description of the Hawaii electric system to the extent permitted by publicly available data. Electrical engineering literature in the area of electric reliability is researched and briefly reviewed. North American Electric Reliability Corporation standards and measures for generation and transmission are reviewed and identified as to their appropriateness for various portions of the electric grid and for application in Hawaii. Analysis of frequency data supplied by the State of Hawaii Public Utilities Commission is presented together with comparison and contrast of performance of each of the systems for two years, 2010 and 2011. Literature tracing the development of reliability economics is reviewed and referenced. A method is explained for integrating system cost with outage cost to determine the optimal resource adequacy given customers' views of the value contributed by reliable electric supply. The report concludes with findings and recommendations for reliability in the State of Hawaii.

  7. ELECTRICAL & COMPUTER ENGINEERING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ELECTRICAL & COMPUTER ENGINEERING SEMINAR "Considerations for Curriculum Planning and Revitalization in Engineering" by Prof. Michael A. de Miranda School of Education and Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering Colorado State University Monday, Feb. 20, 2012, 11:00 a.m. Location: LSC 210 Abstract

  8. Renewable Electricity Futures (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hand, M. M.

    2012-08-01

    This presentation library summarizes findings of NREL's Renewable Electricity Futures study, published in June 2012. RE Futures investigated the challenges and impacts of achieving very high renewable electricity generation levels in the contiguous United States by 2050. It was presented in a webinar given by the California Energy Commission.

  9. Energy 101: Electric Vehicles

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    None

    2013-05-29

    This edition of Energy 101 highlights the benefits of electric vehicles, including improved fuel efficiency, reduced emissions, and lower maintenance costs. For more information on electric vehicles from the Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, visit the Vehicle Technologies Program website: http://www1.eere.energy.gov/vehiclesandfuels/

  10. Calculation of electric dipole hypershieldings at the nuclei in the HellmannFeynman approximation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Helgaker, Trygve

    theorem provide useful criteria for basis-set completeness and for near Hartree­Fock quality of nuclear at the Hartree­Fock level of theory in the Hellmann­Feynman approximation. The nuclear electric hypershieldings on the practicality of the proposed scheme. The best results are obtained with the R12 and R12 basis sets, designed

  11. State-of-Health Aware Optimal Control of Plug-in Electric Vehicles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pedram, Massoud

    , nuclear power and renewable energy such as wind energy, solar energy and tidal energy. The battery storage, USA {yanzhiwa, siyuyue, pedram}@usc.edu Abstract--Plug-in electric vehicles (PEVs) are key new energy) technology in the smart grid infrastructure can exploit the electrical energy storage ability of PEV

  12. Electric turbocompound control system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Algrain, Marcelo C. (Dunlap, IL)

    2007-02-13

    Turbocompound systems can be used to affect engine operation using the energy in exhaust gas that is driving the available turbocharger. A first electrical device acts as a generator in response to turbocharger rotation. A second electrical device acts as a motor to put mechanical power into the engine, typically at the crankshaft. Apparatus, systems, steps, and methods are described to control the generator and motor operations to control the amount of power being recovered. This can control engine operation closer to desirable parameters for given engine-related operating conditions compared to actual. The electrical devices can also operate in "reverse," going between motor and generator functions. This permits the electrical device associated with the crankshaft to drive the electrical device associated with the turbocharger as a motor, overcoming deficient engine operating conditions such as associated with turbocharger lag.

  13. US support for nuclear energy safety and cooperation in the Pacific Basin

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Selin, I.

    1994-12-31

    Nuclear power plays an important role in the energy and economic development of Pacific Rim countries. Concurrent with the construction of commercial nuclear power plants, there is a vital need to develop strong nuclear safety infrastructures in all countries choosing to use nuclear energy for electricity production. One of the most important elements in developing a viable nuclear program is a nuclear safety culture, rigorously applied to nuclear plant siting, design, construction, operation and management. International cooperation provides an important mechanism for raising the level of nuclear safety worldwide. The NRC has recently increased its international efforts in the nuclear safety area, with particular emphasis on Central and Eastern Europe and the New Independent States of the former Soviet Union. The NRC will continue, and is prepared to expand, its cooperation with counterpart organizations in Pacific Rim countries to help establish and nurture a safety culture that will respond to the dynamic process of nuclear energy development over the next few years.

  14. Nuclear Explosive Safety

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2014-07-10

    The Order establishes requirements to implement the nuclear explosive safety (NES) elements of DOE O 452.1E, Nuclear Explosive and Weapon Surety Program, for routine and planned nuclear explosive operations (NEOs).

  15. NUCLEAR DEFORMATION ENERGIES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Blocki, J.

    2009-01-01

    J.R. Nix, Theory of Nuclear Fission and Superheavy Nuclei,energy maps relevant for nuclear fission and nucleus-nucleusof macroscopic aspects of nuclear fission and of collisions

  16. Nuclear Waste: Forever Contaminated?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Andrew

    2015-01-01

    into when undergoing nuclear fission. 175-3000 times higheranother byproduct of nuclear fission, but that will receiveNuclear Energy, and Energy Law (December 20, 2011). Brigham Young University Law Review, Fission

  17. NUCLEAR STRUCTURE DATABASE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Firestone, R.B.

    2010-01-01

    CALIFORNIA NUCLEAR STRUCTURE DATABASE R. B. Firestone and E.11089 NUCLEAR STRUCTURE DATABASE by R.B. Firestone and E.iii- NUCLEAR STRUCTURE DATABASE R.B Firestone and E. Browne

  18. RELATIVISTIC NUCLEAR COLLISIONS: THEORY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gyulassy, M.

    2010-01-01

    Effects in Relativistic Nuclear Collisions", Preprint LBL-Pion Interferometry of Nuclear Collisions. 18.1 M.Gyulassy,was supported by the Office of Nuclear Physics of the U.S.

  19. Nuclear Waste: Forever Contaminated?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Andrew

    2015-01-01

    Went Wrong in Japan’s Nuclear Reactors. Retrieved March 28,went-wrong-in-japans-nuclear-reactors World Statistics. (nuclear disaster since Chernobyl. Chernobyl happened on April 26, 1986, when a reactor

  20. Office of Nuclear Safety

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Office of Nuclear Safety establishes nuclear safety requirements and expectations for the Department to ensure protection of workers and the public from the hazards associated with nuclear operations with all Department operations.

  1. Nuclear Fuel Cycle & Vulnerabilities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boyer, Brian D.

    2012-06-18

    The objective of safeguards is the timely detection of diversion of significant quantities of nuclear material from peaceful nuclear activities to the manufacture of nuclear weapons or of other nuclear explosive devices or for purposes unknown, and deterrence of such diversion by the risk of early detection. The safeguards system should be designed to provide credible assurances that there has been no diversion of declared nuclear material and no undeclared nuclear material and activities.

  2. Hollow nuclear matter

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gao-Chan Yong

    2015-12-18

    It is generally considered that an atomic nucleus is always compact. Based on the isospin-dependent Boltzmann nuclear transport model, here I show that large block nuclear matter or excited nuclear matter may both be hollow. And the size of inner bubble in these matter is affected by the charge number of nuclear matter. Existence of hollow nuclear matter may have many implications in nuclear or atomic physics or astrophysics as well as some practical applications.

  3. Hollow nuclear matter

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yong, Gao-Chan

    2015-01-01

    It is generally considered that an atomic nucleus is always compact. Based on the isospin-dependent Boltzmann nuclear transport model, here I show that large block nuclear matter or excited nuclear matter may both be hollow. And the size of inner bubble in these matter is affected by the charge number of nuclear matter. Existence of hollow nuclear matter may have many implications in nuclear or atomic physics or astrophysics as well as some practical applications.

  4. Assessing Vehicle Electricity Demand Impacts on California Electricity Supply

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McCarthy, Ryan W.

    2009-01-01

    of Plug-in Hybrid Electric Vehicles on Regional PowerTransmission Area, in Electric Vehicle Symposium, Anaheim,of Plug-in Hybrid Electric Vehicles, ANL/ESD/09-2, Argonne

  5. Electricity Grid: Impacts of Plug-In Electric Vehicle Charging

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yang, Christopher; McCarthy, Ryan

    2009-01-01

    mail: ccyang@ucdavis.edu. Electricity Grid Impacts of Plug-by either gasoline or electricity, but unlike hybrids, PHEVsto use very low-carbon electricity resources, such as

  6. Assessing Vehicle Electricity Demand Impacts on California Electricity Supply

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McCarthy, Ryan W.

    2009-01-01

    Designing Markets for Electricity, Wiley-IEEE Press. CEC (in Major Drivers in U.S. Electricity Markets, NREL/CP-620-and fuel efficiency and electricity demand assumptions used

  7. Nuclear's role in 21. century Pacific rim energy use

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Singer, Clifford; Taylor, J'Tia [Department of Nuclear, Plasma, and Radiological Engineering, MC-234, 103 S. Goodwin Ave., University of Illinios at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, IL 61801 (United States)

    2007-07-01

    Extrapolations contrast the future of nuclear energy use in Japan and the Republic of Korea (ROK) to that of the Association of Southeast Asian Nations (ASEAN). Japan can expect a gradual rise in the nuclear fraction of a nearly constant total energy use rate as the use of fossil fuels declines. ROK nuclear energy rises gradually with total energy use. ASEAN's total nuclear energy use rate can rapidly approach that of the ROK if Indonesia and Vietnam make their current nuclear energy targets by 2020, but experience elsewhere suggests that nuclear energy growth may be slower than planned. Extrapolations are based on econometric calibration to a utility optimization model of the impact of growth of population, gross domestic product, total energy use, and cumulative fossil carbon use. Fractions of total energy use from fluid fossil fuels, coal, water-driven electrical power production, nuclear energy, and wind and solar electric energy sources are fit to market fractions data. Where historical data is insufficient for extrapolation, plans for non-fossil energy are used as a guide. Extrapolations suggest much more U.S. nuclear energy and spent nuclear fuel generation than for the ROK and ASEAN until beyond the first half of the twenty-first century. (authors)

  8. Assessment of Nuclear Resonance Fluorescence for Spent Nuclear Fuel Assay

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Quiter, Brian

    2012-01-01

    Security of the National Nuclear Security Administration, USof Energys National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

  9. Nuclear weapons modernizations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kristensen, Hans M. [Federation of American Scientists, Washington, DC (United States)

    2014-05-09

    This article reviews the nuclear weapons modernization programs underway in the world's nine nuclear weapons states. It concludes that despite significant reductions in overall weapons inventories since the end of the Cold War, the pace of reductions is slowing - four of the nuclear weapons states are even increasing their arsenals, and all the nuclear weapons states are busy modernizing their remaining arsenals in what appears to be a dynamic and counterproductive nuclear competition. The author questions whether perpetual modernization combined with no specific plan for the elimination of nuclear weapons is consistent with the nuclear Non-Proliferation Treaty and concludes that new limits on nuclear modernizations are needed.

  10. Nuclear Physics: Campaigns

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Free-Electron Laser (FEL) Medical Imaging Physics Topics Campaigns The Structure of the Nuclear Building Blocks The Structure of Nuclei Symmetry Tests in Nuclear Physics Meetings...

  11. Nuclear Waste: Forever Contaminated?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Andrew

    2015-01-01

    Fallout that spread across Fukushima R eferences Buesseler,M. (2011). Impacts of the Fukushima nuclear power plants onL. L. (2011). Beyond Fukushima: Disasters, nuclear energy,

  12. NUCLEAR DEFORMATION ENERGIES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Blocki, J.

    2009-01-01

    nuclear energies in the absence of a proximity contribution.contributions represent the major part of the potential energy of a nuclear

  13. Advancing Global Nuclear Security

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Today world leaders gathered at The Hague for the Nuclear Security Summit, a meeting to measure progress and take action to secure sensitive nuclear materials.

  14. Nuclear Energy Advisory Committee

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Nuclear Energy Advisory Committee (NEAC), formerly the Nuclear Energy Research Advisory Committee (NERAC), was established on October 1, 1998, to provide independent advice to the Office of...

  15. Nuclear Safeguards | National Nuclear Security Administration

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Twitter Youtube Flickr RSS People Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure...

  16. Nuclear Forensics | National Nuclear Security Administration

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Twitter Youtube Flickr RSS People Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure...

  17. Nuclear Nonproliferation Treaty | National Nuclear Security Administra...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Twitter Youtube Flickr RSS People Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure...

  18. Nuclear Security Summit | National Nuclear Security Administration

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Twitter Youtube Flickr RSS People Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure...

  19. Nuclear & Radiological Material Removal | National Nuclear Security...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    & Radiological Material Removal | National Nuclear Security Administration Facebook Twitter Youtube Flickr RSS People Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation...

  20. Nuclear / Radiological Advisory Team | National Nuclear Security...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Radiological Advisory Team | National Nuclear Security Administration Facebook Twitter Youtube Flickr RSS People Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering...

  1. Effects of the drought on California electricity supply and demand

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Benenson, P.

    2010-01-01

    Acknowledgments SUMMARY Electricity Demand ElectricityAdverse Impacts ELECTRICITY DEMAND . . . .Demand forElectricity Sales Electricity Demand by Major Utility

  2. Nuclear Dynamics at the Particle Threshold

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nadia Tsoneva; Horst Lenske

    2014-10-14

    Recently, new low-energy modes of excitation called pygmy resonances have been observed. Their distinct feature is the close connection to nuclear skin oscillations. A successful description of the pygmy resonances could be achieved in a microscopic theoretical approach which incorporates the density functional theory and QRPA formalism extended with multi-phonon degrees of freedom. The latter is found of crucial importance for the understanding of the fine structure of nuclear electric and magnetic excitations at low energies. Corresponding microscopic multi-phonon response functions are implemented in the studies of s-process of nucleosynthesis.

  3. Nuclear Magnetohydrodynamic EMP, Solar Storms, and Substorms

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rabinowitz, M; Glytsis, E N; Cokkinides, G J; Rabinowitz, Mario; Glytsis, Elias N.; Cokkinides, George J.

    1992-01-01

    In addition to a fast electromagnetic pulse (EMP), a high altitude nuclear burst produces a relatively slow magnetohydrodynarnic EMP (MHD EMP), whose effects are like those from solar storm geomagnetically induced currents (SS GIC). The MHD EMP electric field E 10^-2 V/m and lasts >10^3 sec. Although the solar storm electric field is lower than MHD EMP, the solar storm effects are generally greater due to their much longer duration. Substorms produce much smaller effects than SS GIC, but occur much more frequently. This paper describes the physics of such geomagnetic disturbances and analyzes their effects.

  4. Nuclear Magnetohydrodynamic EMP, Solar Storms, and Substorms

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mario Rabinowitz; A. P. Sakis Meliopoulos; Elias N. Glytsis; George J. Cokkinides

    2003-07-12

    In addition to a fast electromagnetic pulse (EMP), a high altitude nuclear burst produces a relatively slow magnetohydrodynarnic EMP (MHD EMP), whose effects are like those from solar storm geomagnetically induced currents (SS GIC). The MHD EMP electric field E 10^-2 V/m and lasts >10^3 sec. Although the solar storm electric field is lower than MHD EMP, the solar storm effects are generally greater due to their much longer duration. Substorms produce much smaller effects than SS GIC, but occur much more frequently. This paper describes the physics of such geomagnetic disturbances and analyzes their effects.

  5. Plug-In Electric Vehicle Handbook for Electrical Contractors (Brochure)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2012-04-01

    This handbook answers basic questions about plug-in electric vehicles, charging stations, charging equipment, charging equipment installation, and training for electrical contractors.

  6. Assessing Vehicle Electricity Demand Impacts on California Electricity Supply

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McCarthy, Ryan W.

    2009-01-01

    of gasoline, electricity, and hydrogen fuel carbonhybrid, electric and hydrogen fuel cell vehicles, Journal of2005) Switching to a U.S. hydrogen fuel cell vehicle fleet:

  7. Electricity Advisory Committee (EAC) - 2011 Meetings | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Services Electricity Advisory Committee Archived Meetings 2008-2014 Electricity Advisory Committee (EAC) - 2011 Meetings Electricity Advisory Committee (EAC) - 2011...

  8. Electricity Advisory Committee (EAC) - 2014 Meetings | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Services Electricity Advisory Committee Archived Meetings 2008-2014 Electricity Advisory Committee (EAC) - 2014 Meetings Electricity Advisory Committee (EAC) - 2014...

  9. Electricity Advisory Committee (EAC) - 2012 Meetings | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Services Electricity Advisory Committee Archived Meetings 2008-2014 Electricity Advisory Committee (EAC) - 2012 Meetings Electricity Advisory Committee (EAC) - 2012...

  10. Electricity Advisory Committee: 2008 Membership Roster | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Electricity Advisory Committee: 2008 Membership Roster Electricity Advisory Committee: 2008 Membership Roster Membership Roster of the 2008 Electricity Advisory Committee....

  11. North America: Regulation of International Electricity Trade...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    North America: Regulation of International Electricity Trade North America: Regulation of International Electricity Trade North America: Regulation of International Electricity...

  12. Electrical Contacts to Individual Colloidal Semiconductor Nanorods

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Trudeau, Paul-Emile

    2008-01-01

    stable nanostructured electrical devices with interestingElectrical Contacts to Individual Colloidal Semiconductorand its effect on electrical properties has important

  13. Electricity Advisory Committee - Federal Register Notices | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Federal Register Notices Electricity Advisory Committee - Federal Register Notices Electricity Advisory Committee - Federal Register Notices February 17, 2015 Electricity Advisory...

  14. Electricity Restructuring: Deregulation or Reregulation?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Berkeley. University of

    PWP-074 Electricity Restructuring: Deregulation or Reregulation? Severin Borenstein and James;1 Electricity Restructuring: Deregulation or Reregulation? Severin Borenstein and James Bushnell1 Forthcoming from the experience with electricity restructuring to date. The gains from restructuring are most

  15. OVERVIEW OF CAMPUS ELECTRICAL SYSTEMS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    OVERVIEW OF CAMPUS ELECTRICAL SYSTEMS University of Minnesota #12;Energy Management Principles 4 Electrical Engineers Buildings Services (~220) Manholes (~400) Cable Ductbank 130 Generators efficient opportunities and balance upfront investment costs with long-term savings potential 1 #12;Electric

  16. Electrical Properties of Trilayer Graphene

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Yongjin

    2014-01-01

    Bao, W. Z. & Lau, C. N. Electrical transport in high-qualityBao, W. Z. & Lau, C. N. Electrical transport in high-qualityBao, W. Z. & Lau, C. N. Electrical transport in high-quality

  17. The Gas/Electric Partnership 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schmeal, W. R.; Royall, D.; Wrenn, K. F. Jr.

    1997-01-01

    The electric and gas industries are each in the process of restructuring and "converging" toward one mission: providing energy. Use of natural gas in generating electric power and use of electricity in transporting natural gas will increase...

  18. Master's Program Electrical Systems Engineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Noé, Reinhold

    of Electrical Engineering, Computer Science and Mathematics Department of Electrical Engineering and Information...........................................................................3 1.2 Purpose of Module Handbook............................................................................... 33 2.4 Modul Group: Fundamentals of Electrical Systems Engineering ..............35 2

  19. The Joys of Nuclear Engineering

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Jon Carmack

    2010-01-08

    Nuclear fuels researcher Jon Carmack talks about the satisfactions of a career in nuclear engineering.

  20. BEEST: Electric Vehicle Batteries

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2010-07-01

    BEEST Project: The U.S. spends nearly a $1 billion per day to import petroleum, but we need dramatically better batteries for electric and plug-in hybrid vehicles (EV/PHEV) to truly compete with gasoline-powered cars. The 10 projects in ARPA-E’s BEEST Project, short for “Batteries for Electrical Energy Storage in Transportation,” could make that happen by developing a variety of rechargeable battery technologies that would enable EV/PHEVs to meet or beat the price and performance of gasoline-powered cars, and enable mass production of electric vehicles that people will be excited to drive.