Sample records for 1949-2012 composite refiner

  1. A posteriori error estimates with application of adaptive mesh refinement for thermal multiphase compositional flows in porous

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    of diffusive fluxes. Numerical results on an example of real-life thermal oil-recovery in a reservoir refinement, compositional Darcy flow, thermal flow, finite volume method 1 Introduction The thermal under a non-isothermal condition. The governing equations are the conservation of the amount of each

  2. Rietveld Refinement

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Obtain from refinement of calibrant (eg. LaB 6 ) Gives the initial values for the profile function (instrumental only parameters) Add screenshot for previous slide on...

  3. Minimally refined biomass fuel

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Pearson, Richard K. (Pleasanton, CA); Hirschfeld, Tomas B. (Livermore, CA)

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A minimally refined fluid composition, suitable as a fuel mixture and derived from biomass material, is comprised of one or more water-soluble carbohydrates such as sucrose, one or more alcohols having less than four carbons, and water. The carbohydrate provides the fuel source; water solubilizes the carbohydrates; and the alcohol aids in the combustion of the carbohydrate and reduces the vicosity of the carbohydrate/water solution. Because less energy is required to obtain the carbohydrate from the raw biomass than alcohol, an overall energy savings is realized compared to fuels employing alcohol as the primary fuel.

  4. ITP Petroleum Refining: Profile of the Petroleum Refining Industry...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Profile of the Petroleum Refining Industry in California: California Industries of the Future Program ITP Petroleum Refining: Profile of the Petroleum Refining Industry in...

  5. ITP Petroleum Refining: Energy Bandwidth for Petroleum Refining...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Bandwidth for Petroleum Refining Processes ITP Petroleum Refining: Energy Bandwidth for Petroleum Refining Processes bandwidth.pdf More Documents & Publications ITP Petroleum...

  6. Parallel Triangular Decompositions of an Oil Refining Simulation Xiaodong Zhang

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moreno Maza, Marc

    important process in oil refining is to separate the crude oil into various oil products. This process the composition of the various oil products in designed refining columns operated under a given set of conditions oil products. This process is called distilla- tion, which is a thermal separation method

  7. Refinement Modal Logic

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bozzelli, Laura; French, Tim; Hales, James; Pinchinat, Sophie

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper we present refinement modal logic. A refinement is like a bisimulation, except that from the three relational requirements only 'atoms' and 'back' need to be satisfied. Our logic contains a new operator 'forall' in additional to the standard modalities 'Box' for each agent. The operator 'forall' acts as a quantifier over the set of all refinements of a given model. We call it the refinement operator. As a variation on a bisimulation quantifier, it can be seen as a refinement quantifier over a variable not occurring in the formula bound by the operator. The logic combines the simplicity of multi-agent modal logic with some powers of monadic second order quantification. We present a sound and complete axiomatization of multiagent refinement modal logic. We also present an extension of the logic to the modal mu-calculus, and an axiomatization for the single-agent version of this logic. Examples and applications are also discussed: to software verification and design (the set of agents can also be s...

  8. Refiners get petchems help

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wood, A.; Cornitius, T.

    1997-06-11T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S.Refining Industry is facing hard times. Slow growth, tough environmental regulations, and fierce competition - especially in retail gasoline - have squeezed margins and prompted a series of mergers and acquisitions. The trend has affected the smallest and largest players, and a series of transactions over the past two years has created a new industry lineup. Among the larger companies, Mobil and Amoco are the latest to consider a refining merger. That follows recent plans by Ashland and Marathon to merge their refining businesses, and the decision by Shell, Texaco, and Saudi Aramco to combine some U.S. operations. Many of the leading independent refiners have increased their scale by acquiring refinery capacity. With refining still in the doldrums, more independents are taking a closer look at boosting production of petrochemicals, which offer high growth and, usually, better margins. That is being helped by the shift to refinery processes that favor the increased production of light olefins for alkylation and the removal of aromatics, providing opportunity to extract these materials for the petrochemical market. 5 figs., 3 tabs.

  9. Issues in adaptive mesh refinement

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dai, William Wenlong [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper, we present an approach for a patch-based adaptive mesh refinement (AMR) for multi-physics simulations. The approach consists of clustering, symmetry preserving, mesh continuity, flux correction, communications, and management of patches. Among the special features of this patch-based AMR are symmetry preserving, efficiency of refinement, special implementation offlux correction, and patch management in parallel computing environments. Here, higher efficiency of refinement means less unnecessarily refined cells for a given set of cells to be refined. To demonstrate the capability of the AMR framework, hydrodynamics simulations with many levels of refinement are shown in both two- and three-dimensions.

  10. Towards automated crystallographic structure refinement with phenix.refine

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Afonine, Pavel V., E-mail: pafonine@lbl.gov; Grosse-Kunstleve, Ralf W.; Echols, Nathaniel; Headd, Jeffrey J.; Moriarty, Nigel W. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, One Cyclotron Road, MS64R0121, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Mustyakimov, Marat; Terwilliger, Thomas C. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, M888, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Urzhumtsev, Alexandre [CNRS–INSERM–UdS, 1 Rue Laurent Fries, BP 10142, 67404 Illkirch (France); Université Henri Poincaré, Nancy 1, BP 239, 54506 Vandoeuvre-lès-Nancy (France); Zwart, Peter H. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, One Cyclotron Road, MS64R0121, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Adams, Paul D. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, One Cyclotron Road, MS64R0121, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); University of California Berkeley, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States)

    2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    phenix.refine is a program within the PHENIX package that supports crystallographic structure refinement against experimental data with a wide range of upper resolution limits using a large repertoire of model parameterizations. This paper presents an overview of the major phenix.refine features, with extensive literature references for readers interested in more detailed discussions of the methods. phenix.refine is a program within the PHENIX package that supports crystallographic structure refinement against experimental data with a wide range of upper resolution limits using a large repertoire of model parameterizations. It has several automation features and is also highly flexible. Several hundred parameters enable extensive customizations for complex use cases. Multiple user-defined refinement strategies can be applied to specific parts of the model in a single refinement run. An intuitive graphical user interface is available to guide novice users and to assist advanced users in managing refinement projects. X-ray or neutron diffraction data can be used separately or jointly in refinement. phenix.refine is tightly integrated into the PHENIX suite, where it serves as a critical component in automated model building, final structure refinement, structure validation and deposition to the wwPDB. This paper presents an overview of the major phenix.refine features, with extensive literature references for readers interested in more detailed discussions of the methods.

  11. A Theory of Program Refinement 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Denney, Ewen WKC

    We give a canonical program refinement calculus based on the lambda calculus and classical first-order predicate logic, and study its proof theory and semantics. The intention is to construct a metalanguage for refinement in which basic principles...

  12. Refiner Acquisition Cost of Crude Oil - Composite

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122Commercial ConsumersThousand CubicCubic Feet) Yeara 436INCIDENCE OF AN2009 2010

  13. Refiner Acquisition Cost of Crude Oil - Composite

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro IndustriesTownDells,1Stocks Nov-14 Dec-14Table 4.April 25, 20137a.

  14. Refines Efficiency Improvement

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    WRI

    2002-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Refinery processes that convert heavy oils to lighter distillate fuels require heating for distillation, hydrogen addition or carbon rejection (coking). Efficiency is limited by the formation of insoluble carbon-rich coke deposits. Heat exchangers and other refinery units must be shut down for mechanical coke removal, resulting in a significant loss of output and revenue. When a residuum is heated above the temperature at which pyrolysis occurs (340 C, 650 F), there is typically an induction period before coke formation begins (Magaril and Aksenova 1968, Wiehe 1993). To avoid fouling, refiners often stop heating a residuum before coke formation begins, using arbitrary criteria. In many cases, this heating is stopped sooner than need be, resulting in less than maximum product yield. Western Research Institute (WRI) has developed innovative Coking Index concepts (patent pending) which can be used for process control by refiners to heat residua to the threshold, but not beyond the point at which coke formation begins when petroleum residua materials are heated at pyrolysis temperatures (Schabron et al. 2001). The development of this universal predictor solves a long standing problem in petroleum refining. These Coking Indexes have great potential value in improving the efficiency of distillation processes. The Coking Indexes were found to apply to residua in a universal manner, and the theoretical basis for the indexes has been established (Schabron et al. 2001a, 2001b, 2001c). For the first time, a few simple measurements indicates how close undesired coke formation is on the coke formation induction time line. The Coking Indexes can lead to new process controls that can improve refinery distillation efficiency by several percentage points. Petroleum residua consist of an ordered continuum of solvated polar materials usually referred to as asphaltenes dispersed in a lower polarity solvent phase held together by intermediate polarity materials usually referred to as resins. The Coking Indexes focus on the amount of these intermediate polarity species since coke formation begins when these are depleted. Currently the Coking Indexes are determined by either titration or solubility measurements which must be performed in a laboratory. In the current work, various spectral, microscopic, and thermal techniques possibly leading to on-line analysis were explored for measuring the Coking Indexes.

  15. Crystal structure refinement with SHELXL

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sheldrick, George M., E-mail: gsheldr@shelx.uni-ac.gwdg.de [Department of Structural Chemistry, Georg-August Universität Göttingen, Tammannstraße 4, Göttingen 37077 (Germany)

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    New features added to the refinement program SHELXL since 2008 are described and explained. The improvements in the crystal structure refinement program SHELXL have been closely coupled with the development and increasing importance of the CIF (Crystallographic Information Framework) format for validating and archiving crystal structures. An important simplification is that now only one file in CIF format (for convenience, referred to simply as ‘a CIF’) containing embedded reflection data and SHELXL instructions is needed for a complete structure archive; the program SHREDCIF can be used to extract the .hkl and .ins files required for further refinement with SHELXL. Recent developments in SHELXL facilitate refinement against neutron diffraction data, the treatment of H atoms, the determination of absolute structure, the input of partial structure factors and the refinement of twinned and disordered structures. SHELXL is available free to academics for the Windows, Linux and Mac OS X operating systems, and is particularly suitable for multiple-core processors.

  16. ITP Petroleum Refining: Energy and Environmental Profile of the...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Energy Bandwidth for Petroleum Refining Processes ITP Petroleum Refining: Technology Roadmap for the Petroleum Industry ITP Petroleum Refining: Profile of the Petroleum Refining...

  17. Influence of Alloy and Solidification Parameters on Grain Refinement in Aluminum Weld Metal due to Inoculation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schempp, Philipp [BAM, Germany; Tang, Z. [BIAS, Germany; Cross, Carl E. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Seefeld, T. [BIAS, Germany; Pittner, A. [BAM, Germany; Rethmeier, M. [BAM, Germany

    2012-06-28T23:59:59.000Z

    The goals are: (1) Establish how much Ti/B grain refiner is need to completely refine aluminum weld metal for different alloys and different welding conditions; (2) Characterize how alloy composition and solidification parameters affect weld metal grain refinement; and (3) Apply relevant theory to understand observed behavior. Conclusions are: (1) additions of Ti/B grain refiner to weld metal in Alloys 1050, 5083, and 6082 resulted in significant grain refinement; (2) grain refinement was more effective in GTAW than LBW, resulting in finer grains at lower Ti content - reason is limited time available for equiaxed grain growth in LBW (inability to occlude columnar grain growth); (3) welding travel speed did not markedly affect grain size within GTAW and LBW clusters; and (4) application of Hunt CET analysis showed experimental G to be on the order of the critical G{sub CET}; G{sub CET} was consistently higher for GTAW than for LBW.

  18. Conformal refinement of unstructured quadrilateral meshes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Garmella, Rao [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a multilevel adaptive refinement technique for unstructured quadrilateral meshes in which the mesh is kept conformal at all times. This means that the refined mesh, like the original, is formed of only quadrilateral elements that intersect strictly along edges or at vertices, i.e., vertices of one quadrilateral element do not lie in an edge of another quadrilateral. Elements are refined using templates based on 1:3 refinement of edges. We demonstrate that by careful design of the refinement and coarsening strategy, we can maintain high quality elements in the refined mesh. We demonstrate the method on a number of examples with dynamically changing refinement regions.

  19. Zone refining of plutonium metal

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Blau, M.S.

    1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The zone refining process was applied to Pu metal containing known amounts of impurities. Rod specimens of plutonium metal were melted into and contained in tantalum boats, each of which was passed horizontally through a three-turn, high-frequency coil in such a manner as to cause a narrow molten zone to pass through the Pu metal rod 10 times. The impurity elements Co, Cr, Fe, Ni, Np, U were found to move in the same direction as the molten zone as predicted by binary phase diagrams. The elements Al, Am, and Ga moved in the opposite direction of the molten zone as predicted by binary phase diagrams. As the impurity alloy was zone refined, {delta}-phase plutonium metal crystals were produced. The first few zone refining passes were more effective than each later pass because an oxide layer formed on the rod surface. There was no clear evidence of better impurity movement at the slower zone refining speed. Also, constant or variable coil power appeared to have no effect on impurity movement during a single run (10 passes). This experiment was the first step to developing a zone refining process for plutonium metal.

  20. ITP Petroleum Refining: Impacts of Condition Assessment on Energy...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ITP Petroleum Refining: Impacts of Condition Assessment on Energy Use: Selected Applications in Chemicals Processing and Petroleum Refining ITP Petroleum Refining: Impacts of...

  1. Firing of pulverized solvent refined coal

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Derbidge, T. Craig (Sunnyvale, CA); Mulholland, James A. (Chapel Hill, NC); Foster, Edward P. (Macungie, PA)

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An air-purged burner for the firing of pulverized solvent refined coal is constructed and operated such that the solvent refined coal can be fired without the coking thereof on the burner components. The air-purged burner is designed for the firing of pulverized solvent refined coal in a tangentially fired boiler.

  2. Zone refining of plutonium metal

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1997-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this study was to investigate zone refining techniques for the purification of plutonium metal. The redistribution of 10 impurity elements from zone melting was examined. Four tantalum boats were loaded with plutonium impurity alloy, placed in a vacuum furnace, heated to 700{degrees}C, and held at temperature for one hour. Ten passes were made with each boat. Metallographic and chemical analyses performed on the plutonium rods showed that, after 10 passes, moderate movement of certain elements were achieved. Molten zone speeds of 1 or 2 inches per hour had no effect on impurity element movement. Likewise, the application of constant or variable power had no effect on impurity movement. The study implies that development of a zone refining process to purify plutonium is feasible. Development of a process will be hampered by two factors: (1) the effect on impurity element redistribution of the oxide layer formed on the exposed surface of the material is not understood, and (2) the tantalum container material is not inert in the presence of plutonium. Cold boat studies are planned, with higher temperature and vacuum levels, to determine the effect on these factors. 5 refs., 1 tab., 5 figs.

  3. Reaping Energy Savings from Petroleum Refining

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Deng, A.; Cascone, R.

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    REAPING ENERGY SAVINGS FROM PETROLEUM REFINING Alan Deng, Project Manager, San Francisco, CA, Ron Cascone, Project Manager, White Plains, NY, Nexant, Inc. ABSTRACT The refining industry is one of the largest energy users in Pacific Gas... years’ energy conservation and demand-side management program participation. The PG&E’s refinery energy efficiency program (REEP) is designed to address key market barriers and tap into the savings potential from energy-intensive refining processes...

  4. Minimally refined biomass fuel. [carbohydrate-water-alcohol mixture

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pearson, R.K.; Hirschfeld, T.B.

    1981-03-26T23:59:59.000Z

    A minimally refined fluid composition, suitable as a fuel mixture and derived from biomass material, is comprised of one or more water-soluble carbohydrates such as sucrose, one or more alcohols having less than four carbons, and water. The carbohydrate provides the fuel source; water-solubilizes the carbohydrate; and the alcohol aids in the combustion of the carbohydrate and reduces the viscosity of the carbohydrate/water solution. Because less energy is required to obtain the carbohydrate from the raw biomass than alcohol, an overall energy savings is realized compared to fuels employing alcohol as the primary fuel.

  5. Firing of pulverized solvent refined coal

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lennon, Dennis R. (Allentown, PA); Snedden, Richard B. (McKeesport, PA); Foster, Edward P. (Macungie, PA); Bellas, George T. (Library, PA)

    1990-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A burner for the firing of pulverized solvent refined coal is constructed and operated such that the solvent refined coal can be fired successfully without any performance limitations and without the coking of the solvent refined coal on the burner components. The burner is provided with a tangential inlet of primary air and pulverized fuel, a vaned diffusion swirler for the mixture of primary air and fuel, a center water-cooled conical diffuser shielding the incoming fuel from the heat radiation from the flame and deflecting the primary air and fuel steam into the secondary air, and a watercooled annulus located between the primary air and secondary air flows.

  6. North Dakota Refining Capacity Study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dennis Hill; Kurt Swenson; Carl Tuura; Jim Simon; Robert Vermette; Gilberto Marcha; Steve Kelly; David Wells; Ed Palmer; Kuo Yu; Tram Nguyen; Juliam Migliavacca

    2011-01-05T23:59:59.000Z

    According to a 2008 report issued by the United States Geological Survey, North Dakota and Montana have an estimated 3.0 to 4.3 billion barrels of undiscovered, technically recoverable oil in an area known as the Bakken Formation. With the size and remoteness of the discovery, the question became 'can a business case be made for increasing refining capacity in North Dakota?' And, if so what is the impact to existing players in the region. To answer the question, a study committee comprised of leaders in the region's petroleum industry were brought together to define the scope of the study, hire a consulting firm and oversee the study. The study committee met frequently to provide input on the findings and modify the course of the study, as needed. The study concluded that the Petroleum Area Defense District II (PADD II) has an oversupply of gasoline. With that in mind, a niche market, naphtha, was identified. Naphtha is used as a diluent used for pipelining the bitumen (heavy crude) from Canada to crude markets. The study predicted there will continue to be an increase in the demand for naphtha through 2030. The study estimated the optimal configuration for the refinery at 34,000 barrels per day (BPD) producing 15,000 BPD of naphtha and a 52 percent refinery charge for jet and diesel yield. The financial modeling assumed the sponsor of a refinery would invest its own capital to pay for construction costs. With this assumption, the internal rate of return is 9.2 percent which is not sufficient to attract traditional investment given the risk factor of the project. With that in mind, those interested in pursuing this niche market will need to identify incentives to improve the rate of return.

  7. Source: Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-782A, "Refiners...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Gallons per Day Motor Gasoline No. 2 Distillate Residual Fuel Oil 5. U.S. Refiner Wholesale Petroleum Product Volumes Figure Percentages of Refiner Wholesale Volumes 1995...

  8. Source: Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-782A, "Refiners...

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    Gallons per Day Motor Gasoline No. 2 Distillate Residual Fuel Oil 5. U.S. Refiner Wholesale Petroleum Product Volumes Figure Percentages of Refiner Wholesale Volumes 1997...

  9. Source: Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-782A, "Refiners...

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Gallons per Day Motor Gasoline No. 2 Distillate Residual Fuel Oil 5. U.S. Refiner Wholesale Petroleum Product Volumes Figure Percentages of Refiner Wholesale Volumes 1996...

  10. Improving NMR Protein Structure Quality by Rosetta Refinement...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    NMR Protein Structure Quality by Rosetta Refinement: A Molecular Replacement Study. Improving NMR Protein Structure Quality by Rosetta Refinement: A Molecular Replacement Study....

  11. Introducing Reference Semantics via Refinement Graeme Smith

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Smith, Graeme

    Introducing Reference Semantics via Refinement Graeme Smith Software Verification Research Centre, University of Queensland, Australia smith@svrc.uq.edu.au Abstract. Two types of semantics have been given

  12. Green Petroleum Refining -Mathematical Models for Optimizing Petroleum Refining Under Emission Constraints

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anderson, Charles H.

    Green Petroleum Refining - Mathematical Models for Optimizing Petroleum Refining Under Emission understand that my thesis may be made electronically available to the public. #12;iii Abstract Petroleum and treating options for petroleum refinery waste streams. The performance of the developed model

  13. An independent refiners approach to RFG

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Czeskleba, M.

    1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This report was presented by Mike Czeskleba,Senior Business Analyst for Ashland Petroleum Company in Ashland, Kentucky. Ashland is one of the largest independent refiners and a leading marketer of gasoline and other petroleum products in the U.S. The issues addressed in this report concern the use of ethanol as a gasoline extender and renewable oxygenate, and its use in Reformulated Gasolines (RFG). The impact of Clean Air Act requirements for 1995 and beyond on petroleum refiners and producers is discussed. Some of the strategies which Ashland Petroleum Company is using to meet regulation requirements is also presented.

  14. Biomass Compositional Analysis Laboratory (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2014-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    At the Biomass Compositional Analysis Laboratory, NREL scientists have more than 20 years of experience supporting the biomass conversion industry. They develop, refine, and validate analytical methods to determine the chemical composition of biomass samples before, during, and after conversion processing. These high-quality compositional analysis data are used to determine feedstock compositions as well as mass balances and product yields from conversion processes.

  15. Transforming and Refining Abstract Constraint Specifications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Walsh, Toby

    Transforming and Refining Abstract Constraint Specifications Alan M. Frisch1 , Brahim Hnich2 , Ian choose model transformations to reduce greatly the amount of effort that is required to solve a problem by systematic search. It is a consid- erable challenge to automate such transformations. A problem may be viewed

  16. Sudbury: Nickel Smelting and Refining Nickel Production

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Toohey, Darin W.

    Sudbury: Nickel Smelting and Refining Nickel Production o Toyota buys most of its nickel from Sudbury to produce its nickel- metal hydride batteries Used in cars such as the Toyota Prius SO2 Emissions o The smelting of nickel = large amount of SO2 released as byproduct 4 metric tons of SO2 per

  17. Focus on Venezuelan heavy crude: refining margins

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1984-01-25T23:59:59.000Z

    Of six crudes refined in the US Gulf Coast, heavy Venezuelan crude Lagunillas (15/sup 0/ API) provides the best margin per barrel. Data for end of December 1983 and the first three weeks of January show that margins on all crudes are on the rise in this market, due to a turnaround in product prices. The lighter crudes are showing the greatest increase in Gross Product Worth. This is having a modest shrinking effect on the margin differential between light and heavy crudes in this market. The domestic crude West Texas Intermediate, at 40/sup 0/ API, provides the highest GPW in this crude slate sample, over US $31 per barrel, compared to GPW of under US $28 per barrel for Lagunillas. Still, as Lagunillas cost about US $8 less than does WTI, refiners with sufficient residue conversion capacity can be earning about US $3.50 more in margin per barrel than they can with WTI. Although few refiners would be using a 15/sup 0/ API crude exclusively for any length of time, heavier oil's inclusion in modern refiners' diets is enhancing their competitive position more than any other single factor. This issue of Energy Detente presents the fuel price/tax series and industrial fuel prices for January 1984 for countries of the Western Hemisphere.

  18. Refining industry trends: Europe and surroundings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Guariguata, U.G.

    1997-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The European refining industry, along with its counterparts, is struggling with low profitability due to excess primary and conversion capacity, high operating costs and impending decisions of stringent environmental regulations that will require significant investments with hard to justify returns. This region was also faced in the early 1980s with excess capacity on the order of 4 MMb/d and satisfying the {open_quotes}at that point{close_quotes} demand by operating at very low utilization rates (60%). As was the case in the US, the rebalancing of the capacity led to the closure of some 51 refineries. Since the early 1990s, the increase in demand growth has essentially balanced the capacity threshold and utilization rates are settled around the 90% range. During the last two decades, the major oil companies have reduced their presence in the European refining sector, giving some state oil companies and producing countries the opportunity to gain access to the consumer market through the purchase of refining capacity in various countries-specifically, Kuwait in Italy; Libya and Venezuela in Germany; and Norway in other areas of Scandinavia. Although the market share for this new cast of characters remains small (4%) relative to participation by the majors (35%), their involvement in the European refining business set the foundation whereby US independent refiners relinquished control over assets that could not be operated profitably as part of a previous vertically integrated structure, unless access to the crude was ensured. The passage of time still seems to render this model valid.

  19. Grain Refinement of Permanent Mold Cast Copper Base Alloys

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    M.Sadayappan; J.P.Thomson; M.Elboujdaini; G.Ping Gu; M. Sahoo

    2005-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Grain refinement is a well established process for many cast and wrought alloys. The mechanical properties of various alloys could be enhanced by reducing the grain size. Refinement is also known to improve casting characteristics such as fluidity and hot tearing. Grain refinement of copper-base alloys is not widely used, especially in sand casting process. However, in permanent mold casting of copper alloys it is now common to use grain refinement to counteract the problem of severe hot tearing which also improves the pressure tightness of plumbing components. The mechanism of grain refinement in copper-base alloys is not well understood. The issues to be studied include the effect of minor alloy additions on the microstructure, their interaction with the grain refiner, effect of cooling rate, and loss of grain refinement (fading). In this investigation, efforts were made to explore and understand grain refinement of copper alloys, especially in permanent mold casting conditions.

  20. 5.841 Crystal Structure Refinement, Fall 2006

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mueller, Peter

    This course in crystal structure refinement examines the practical aspects of crystal structure determination from data collection strategies to data reduction and basic and advanced refinement problems of organic and ...

  1. 5.067 Crystal Structure Refinement, Fall 2007

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mueller, Peter

    This course in crystal structure refinement examines the practical aspects of crystal structure determination from data collection strategies to data reduction and basic and advanced refinement problems of organic and ...

  2. Using supercritical fluids to refine hydrocarbons

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Yarbro, Stephen Lee

    2014-11-25T23:59:59.000Z

    This is a method to reactively refine hydrocarbons, such as heavy oils with API gravities of less than 20.degree. and bitumen-like hydrocarbons with viscosities greater than 1000 cp at standard temperature and pressure using a selected fluid at supercritical conditions. The reaction portion of the method delivers lighter weight, more volatile hydrocarbons to an attached contacting device that operates in mixed subcritical or supercritical modes. This separates the reaction products into portions that are viable for use or sale without further conventional refining and hydro-processing techniques. This method produces valuable products with fewer processing steps, lower costs, increased worker safety due to less processing and handling, allow greater opportunity for new oil field development and subsequent positive economic impact, reduce related carbon dioxide, and wastes typical with conventional refineries.

  3. Dinosaurs can fly -- High performance refining

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Treat, J.E. [Booz-Allen and Hamilton, Inc., San Francisco, CA (United States)

    1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    High performance refining requires that one develop a winning strategy based on a clear understanding of one`s position in one`s company`s value chain; one`s competitive position in the products markets one serves; and the most likely drivers and direction of future market forces. The author discussed all three points, then described measuring performance of the company. To become a true high performance refiner often involves redesigning the organization as well as the business processes. The author discusses such redesigning. The paper summarizes ten rules to follow to achieve high performance: listen to the market; optimize; organize around asset or area teams; trust the operators; stay flexible; source strategically; all maintenance is not equal; energy is not free; build project discipline; and measure and reward performance. The paper then discusses the constraints to the implementation of change.

  4. Validating Process Refinement with Ontologies , Gerd Groener2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Staab, Steffen

    Validating Process Refinement with Ontologies Yuan Ren1 , Gerd Groener2 , Jens Lemcke3 , Tirdad University of Koblenz-Landau, 3 SAP AG Abstract. A crucial task in process management is the validation of process refinements. A process refinement is a process description in a more fine-grained representation

  5. MECS 2006 - Petroleum Refining | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't YourTransport(FactDepartment ofLetterEconomy andTermsDepartment1|Petroleum Refining MECS 2006 -

  6. Iterative-build OMIT maps: map improvement by iterative model building and refinement without model bias

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Terwilliger, Thomas C., E-mail: terwilliger@lanl.gov [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Grosse-Kunstleve, Ralf W.; Afonine, Pavel V.; Moriarty, Nigel W.; Adams, Paul D. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, One Cyclotron Road, Building 64R0121, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Read, Randy J. [Department of Haematology, University of Cambridge, Cambridge CB2 0XY (United Kingdom); Zwart, Peter H. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, One Cyclotron Road, Building 64R0121, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Hung, Li-Wei [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States)

    2008-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An OMIT procedure is presented that has the benefits of iterative model building density modification and refinement yet is essentially unbiased by the atomic model that is built. A procedure for carrying out iterative model building, density modification and refinement is presented in which the density in an OMIT region is essentially unbiased by an atomic model. Density from a set of overlapping OMIT regions can be combined to create a composite ‘iterative-build’ OMIT map that is everywhere unbiased by an atomic model but also everywhere benefiting from the model-based information present elsewhere in the unit cell. The procedure may have applications in the validation of specific features in atomic models as well as in overall model validation. The procedure is demonstrated with a molecular-replacement structure and with an experimentally phased structure and a variation on the method is demonstrated by removing model bias from a structure from the Protein Data Bank.

  7. Electron beam skull melting and refining of secondary copper

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bychkov, Y.; Ladokhin, S. [Donetskvtortsvetmet, Donetsk (Ukraine)

    1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Electron Beam Melting is the most efficient technology for metals and alloys refining. For secondary metals processing the Electron Beam Skull Melting (EBSM) with the electromagnetic stirring (EMS) of melt in the crucible was shown to be the most appropriate. The copper produced by EBSM with EMS possesses higher density and electric conductivity in comparison with other refining methods. The details for high power electrical machines were cast of the copper waste refined by EBSM technology.

  8. Table 44. Refiner Motor Gasoline Volumes by Formulation, Sales...

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    250 Energy Information AdministrationPetroleum Marketing Annual 1999 Table 44. Refiner Motor Gasoline Volumes by Formulation, Sales Type, PAD District, and State (Thousand Gallons...

  9. Table 44. Refiner Motor Gasoline Volumes by Formulation, Sales...

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    - - - - W W - - - - - - See footnotes at end of table. 44. Refiner Motor Gasoline Volumes by Formulation, Sales Type, PAD District, and State 292 Energy...

  10. Table 43. Refiner Motor Gasoline Volumes by Grade, Sales Type...

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    220 Energy Information AdministrationPetroleum Marketing Annual 1998 Table 43. Refiner Motor Gasoline Volumes by Grade, Sales Type, PAD District, and State (Thousand Gallons per...

  11. Table 43. Refiner Motor Gasoline Volumes by Grade, Sales Type...

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    220 Energy Information AdministrationPetroleum Marketing Annual 1999 Table 43. Refiner Motor Gasoline Volumes by Grade, Sales Type, PAD District, and State (Thousand Gallons per...

  12. Table 35. Refiner Motor Gasoline Prices by Grade, Sales Type...

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    Energy Information Administration Petroleum Marketing Annual 1995 Table 35. Refiner Motor Gasoline Prices by Grade, Sales Type, PAD District, and State (Cents per Gallon...

  13. Table 35. Refiner Motor Gasoline Prices by Grade, Sales Type...

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    134 Energy Information AdministrationPetroleum Marketing Annual 1998 Table 35. Refiner Motor Gasoline Prices by Grade, Sales Type, PAD District, and State (Cents per Gallon...

  14. Petroleum Products Table 43. Refiner Motor Gasoline Volumes...

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    220 Energy Information AdministrationPetroleum Marketing Annual 2000 Table 43. Refiner Motor Gasoline Volumes by Grade, Sales Type, PAD District, and State (Thousand Gallons per...

  15. Table 43. Refiner Motor Gasoline Volumes by Grade, Sales Type...

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    Energy Information Administration Petroleum Marketing Annual 1995 Table 43. Refiner Motor Gasoline Volumes by Grade, Sales Type, PAD District, and State (Thousand Gallons per...

  16. Petroleum Products Table 43. Refiner Motor Gasoline Volumes...

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    Energy Information Administration Petroleum Marketing Annual 1995 Table 43. Refiner Motor Gasoline Volumes by Grade, Sales Type, PAD District, and State (Thousand Gallons per...

  17. Table 44. Refiner Motor Gasoline Volumes by Formulation, Sales...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    250 Energy Information AdministrationPetroleum Marketing Annual 1998 Table 44. Refiner Motor Gasoline Volumes by Formulation, Sales Type, PAD District, and State (Thousand Gallons...

  18. Table 44. Refiner Motor Gasoline Volumes by Formulation, Sales...

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Energy Information Administration Petroleum Marketing Annual 1995 Table 44. Refiner Motor Gasoline Volumes by Formulation, Sales Type, PAD District, and State (Thousand Gallons...

  19. Table 35. Refiner Motor Gasoline Prices by Grade, Sales Type...

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    134 Energy Information AdministrationPetroleum Marketing Annual 1999 Table 35. Refiner Motor Gasoline Prices by Grade, Sales Type, PAD District, and State (Cents per Gallon...

  20. ITP Petroleum Refining: Energy Efficiency Roadmap for Petroleum...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy Efficiency Roadmap for Petroleum Refineries in California ITP Petroleum Refining: Energy Efficiency Roadmap for Petroleum Refineries in California refiningroadmap.pdf More...

  1. Table 19. U.S. Refiner Residual Fuel Oil Prices

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Prices," source for backcast estimates prior to January 1983. 19. U.S. Refiner Residual Fuel Oil Prices 36 Energy Information Administration Petroleum Marketing Annual 1997...

  2. Table 19. U.S. Refiner Residual Fuel Oil Prices

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Prices," source for backcast estimates prior to January 1983. 19. U.S. Refiner Residual Fuel Oil Prices 36 Energy Information Administration Petroleum Marketing Annual 1996...

  3. Source: Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-782A, "Refiners...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Refiner Retail Volumes 1996 Annual Averages Motor Gasoline No. 2 Distillate Propane Kero-jet Residual Fuel Oil Other Energy Information Administration Petroleum Marketing Annual...

  4. Source: Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-782A, "Refiners...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Refiner Retail Volumes 1997 Annual Averages Motor Gasoline No. 2 Distillate Propane Kero-jet Residual Fuel Oil Other Energy Information Administration Petroleum Marketing Annual...

  5. Adaptively refined large eddy simulations of clusters

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maier, A; Schmidt, W; Niemeyer, J C

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a numerical scheme for modelling unresolved turbulence in cosmological adaptive mesh refinement codes. As a first application, we study the evolution of turbulence in the intra-cluster medium and in the core of a galaxy cluster. Simulations with and without subgrid scale model are compared in detail. Since the flow in the ICM is subsonic, the global turbulent energy contribution at the unresolved length scales is smaller than 1% of the internal energy. We find that the production of turbulence is closely correlated with merger events occurring in the cluster environment, and its dissipation locally affects the cluster energy budget. Because of this additional source of dissipation, the core temperature is larger and the density is smaller in the presence of subgrid scale turbulence than in the standard adiabatic run, resulting in a higher entropy core value.

  6. Specification and Refinement of a RealTime Control System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Smith, Graeme

    such approach via the specification and refinement of the well­known Steam Boiler Control Problem. The case. These features, although not central to the Steam Boiler Control Problem, are typical of features which must­level (i.e., abstract) specification of the Steam Boiler Control Problem. This specification is refined

  7. Feasibility of Organizations -A Refinement of Chemical Organization Theory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hinze, Thomas

    Feasibility of Organizations - A Refinement of Chemical Organization Theory with Application to P a theorem providing a criteria for an unfeasible organization. This is a refinement of organization theory organization. Key words: reaction networks, constructive dynamical systems, chem- ical organization theory

  8. On Adaptive Mesh Refinement for Atmospheric Pollution Models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sandu, Adrian

    On Adaptive Mesh Refinement for Atmospheric Pollution Models Emil M. Constantinescu and Adrian res- olution system for modeling regional air pollution based on the chemical transport model STEM. Keywords: Air Pollution Modeling, Adaptive Mesh Refinement. 1 Introduction Inadequate grid resolution can

  9. Changing System Interfaces Consistently: a New Refinement Strategy for CSP B

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Doran, Simon J.

    Changing System Interfaces Consistently: a New Refinement Strategy for CSP B Steve Schneider refinement in the context of CSP B. Our motivation to include this notion of refinement within the CSP B to change the events of a CSP process and the B machines when refining a system. Notions of refinement based

  10. Electron beam cold hearth refining in Vallejo

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lowe, J.H.C. [Axel Johnson Metals, Inc., Vallejo, CA (United States)

    1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Electron Beam Cold Hearth Refining Furnace (EBCHR) in Vallejo, California is alive, well, and girding itself for developing new markets. A brief review of the twelve years experience with EBCHR in Vallejo. Acquisition of the Vallejo facility by Axel Johnson Metals, Inc. paves the way for the development of new products and markets. A discussion of some of the new opportunities for the advancement of EBCHR technology. Discussed are advantages to the EBCHR process which include: extended surface area of molten metal exposed to higher vacuum; liberation of insoluble oxide particles to the surface of the melt; higher temperatures that allowed coarse solid particles like carbides and carbonitrides to be suspended in the fluid metal as fine micro-segregates, and enhanced removal of volatile trace impurities like lead, bismuth and cadmium. Future work for the company includes the continued recycling of alloys and also fabricating stainless steel for the piping of chip assembly plants. This is to prevent `killer defects` that ruin a memory chip.

  11. GRChombo : Numerical Relativity with Adaptive Mesh Refinement

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Katy Clough; Pau Figueras; Hal Finkel; Markus Kunesch; Eugene A. Lim; Saran Tunyasuvunakool

    2015-03-11T23:59:59.000Z

    Numerical relativity has undergone a revolution in the past decade. With a well-understood mathematical formalism, and full control over the gauge modes, it is now entering an era in which the science can be properly explored. In this work, we introduce GRChombo, a new numerical relativity code written to take full advantage of modern parallel computing techniques. GRChombo's features include full adaptive mesh refinement with block structured Berger-Rigoutsos grid generation which supports non-trivial "many-boxes-in-many-boxes" meshing hierarchies, and massive parallelism through the Message Passing Interface (MPI). GRChombo evolves the Einstein equation with the standard BSSN formalism, with an option to turn on CCZ4 constraint damping if required. We show that GRChombo passes all the standard "Apples-to-Apples" code comparison tests. We also show that it can stably and accurately evolve vacuum black hole spacetimes such as binary black hole mergers, and non-vacuum spacetimes such as scalar collapses into black holes. As an illustration of its AMR capability, we demonstrate the evolution of triple black hole merger, which can be set up trivially in GRChombo.

  12. GRChombo : Numerical Relativity with Adaptive Mesh Refinement

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Clough, Katy; Finkel, Hal; Kunesch, Markus; Lim, Eugene A; Tunyasuvunakool, Saran

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Numerical relativity has undergone a revolution in the past decade. With a well-understood mathematical formalism, and full control over the gauge modes, it is now entering an era in which the science can be properly explored. In this work, we introduce GRChombo, a new numerical relativity code written to take full advantage of modern parallel computing techniques. GRChombo's features include full adaptive mesh refinement with block structured Berger-Rigoutsos grid generation which supports non-trivial "many-boxes-in-many-boxes" meshing hierarchies, and massive parallelism through the Message Passing Interface (MPI). GRChombo evolves the Einstein equation with the standard BSSN formalism, with an option to turn on CCZ4 constraint damping if required. We show that GRChombo passes all the standard "Apples-to-Apples" code comparison tests. We also show that it can stably and accurately evolve vacuum black hole spacetimes such as binary black hole mergers, and non-vacuum spacetimes such as scalar collapses into b...

  13. Interfacial Properties of Electron Beam Cured Composites

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eberle, C.C.

    1999-12-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The objectives of the CRADA are to: Confirm that fiber-resin adhesion is responsible for the observed poor shear properties; Determine the mechanism(s) responsible for poor adhesion between carbon fibers and epoxy resins after e-beam curing; Develop and evaluate resin systems and fiber treatments to improve the properties of e-beam cured, carbon-fiber-reinforced composites; and Develop refined methods for processing e-beam cured, carbon-fiber-reinforced composites.

  14. Hydrogen and Fuel Cells - Refining the Message Initiating a National Dialogue and Educational Agenda

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eggert, Anthony; Kurani, Kenneth S; Turrentine, Tom; Ogden, Joan M; Sperling, Dan; Winston, Emily

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    April 1, 2005 Hydrogen and Fuel Cells – Refining the MessageHydrogen and Fuel Cells – Refining the Message Initiating athe communication problem. Hydrogen and fuel cells have now

  15. E-Print Network 3.0 - amerya petroleum refining Sample Search...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ) Petroleum Refining Efficiency: 150 ppm S RFG with MTBE: GBS (d) Petroleum Refining... Eficiency: ... Source: Argonne National Laboratory - GREET Model Project Collection:...

  16. Iterative model-building, structure refinement, and density modification with the PHENIX AutoBuild Wizard

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Terwilliger, T. C.; Los Alamos National Laboratory, Mailstop M888, Los Alamos, NM 87545, USA; Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, One Cyclotron Road, Building 64R0121, Berkeley, CA 94720, USA; Department of Haematology, University of Cambridge, Cambridge CB2 0XY, England

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Iterative model-building, structure refinement, and densitytool for iterative model- building, structure refinement andusing RESOLVE or TEXTAL model- building, RESOLVE statistical

  17. Source: Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-782A, "Refiners...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    S O N D 0 10 20 30 40 50 60 70 1995 Cents per Gallon Excluding Taxes Retail < or 1% Wholesale < or 1% Retail > 1% Wholesale > 1% 7. U.S. Refiner Residual Fuel Oil Prices and...

  18. Table 43. Refiner Motor Gasoline Volumes by Grade, Sales Type...

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    150.0 2,026.7 W W 234.5 161.7 - 396.3 See footnotes at end of table. 43. Refiner Motor Gasoline Volumes by Grade, Sales Type, PAD District, and State 262 Energy Information...

  19. Table 43. Refiner Motor Gasoline Volumes by Grade, Sales Type...

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    253.2 2,222.4 W W 206.4 134.3 - 340.7 See footnotes at end of table. 43. Refiner Motor Gasoline Volumes by Grade, Sales Type, PAD District, and State 262 Energy Information...

  20. Petroleum Products Table 43. Refiner Motor Gasoline Volumes...

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    150.0 2,026.7 W W 234.5 161.7 - 396.3 See footnotes at end of table. 43. Refiner Motor Gasoline Volumes by Grade, Sales Type, PAD District, and State 262 Energy Information...

  1. Petroleum Products Table 43. Refiner Motor Gasoline Volumes...

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    253.2 2,222.4 W W 206.4 134.3 - 340.7 See footnotes at end of table. 43. Refiner Motor Gasoline Volumes by Grade, Sales Type, PAD District, and State 262 Energy Information...

  2. Consensus Clustering Algorithms: Comparison and Refinement Andrey Goder

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Filkov, Vladimir

    -deterministic clustering algorithms, e.g. K-means, are sensitive to the choice of the initial seed clusters; running K-meansConsensus Clustering Algorithms: Comparison and Refinement Andrey Goder Vladimir Filkov Computer

  3. Source: Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-782A, "Refiners...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Refiner Retail Volumes 1995 Annual Averages Motor Gasoline No. 2 Distillate Propane Kero-jet Residual Fuel Oil Other 39.1% 17.4% 2.2% 32.0% 8.1% 1.1% Energy Information...

  4. Japan`s refiner/marketers headed for major shakeout

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-08-26T23:59:59.000Z

    Japan`s downstream oil industry is in a state of crisis and headed for a major shakeout. The major catalyst for this was a dramatic deregulation step during April 1996 that allowed refined petroleum product imports by non-refiners. The move, together with a sharp drop in refining margins, falling retail gasoline prices, and a service station sector on the brink of collapse, are all leading to massive changes in the way the country`s refiners and marketers do business. This paper reviews the collapse of corporate profits during this period of deregulation; the development of a new price system geared toward bringing the prices of gasoline, fuel oil, and kerosene into line with each other to offset the fall in gasoline prices; and industry restructuring including mergers, acquisitions, and marketing consolidation. The paper then makes predictions on the outcome of these changes on the Japanese oil industry.

  5. Polygons in Buildings and their Refined Side Lengths

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kapovich, Michael; Leeb, Bernhard; Millson, John J.

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    1999. [Bro] K. Brown, Buildings, Springer, 1989. [BuBI] D.AMS, 2001. [D] M. Davis, Buildings are CAT(0), in “Geometryat Springerlink.com POLYGONS IN BUILDINGS AND THEIR REFINED

  6. Steps taken at Malelane refinery to improve refined sugar quality

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M Moodley; Pm Schorn

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The refinery at Malelane has in the past produced refined sugar for the consumer market. A decision was taken by the management of Transvaal Sugar (TSB) to produce a quality of refined sugar that would also be acceptable to the industrial and the export markets. The processes that were evaluated and implemented at the Malelane refinery during the past three seasons to achieve this objective, are described.

  7. Adaptive mesh refinement for shocks and material interfaces

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dai, William Wenlong [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    There are three kinds of adaptive mesh refinement (AMR) in structured meshes. Block-based AMR sometimes over refines meshes. Cell-based AMR treats cells cell by cell and thus loses the advantage of the nature of structured meshes. Patch-based AMR is intended to combine advantages of block- and cell-based AMR, i.e., the nature of structured meshes and sharp regions of refinement. But, patch-based AMR has its own difficulties. For example, patch-based AMR typically cannot preserve symmetries of physics problems. In this paper, we will present an approach for a patch-based AMR for hydrodynamics simulations. The approach consists of clustering, symmetry preserving, mesh continuity, flux correction, communications, management of patches, and load balance. The special features of this patch-based AMR include symmetry preserving, efficiency of refinement across shock fronts and material interfaces, special implementation of flux correction, and patch management in parallel computing environments. To demonstrate the capability of the AMR framework, we will show both two- and three-dimensional hydrodynamics simulations with many levels of refinement.

  8. US refiners choose variety of routes to MTBE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rhodes, A.K.

    1992-09-07T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper reports that refiners and merchant manufacturers in the U.S. are gearing up to produce the large volumes of methyl tertiary butyl ether (MTBE) needed to comply with oxygenated gasoline requirements. The 1990 U.S. Clean Air Act Amendments specify that, as of the first of this coming November, gasoline containing a minimum of 2.7 wt % oxygen must be sold in 39 CO-nonattainment cities. Refiners and others are scurrying to bring MTBE capacity on line in time to meet this requirement. Many U.S. refiners already have some operating MTBE capacity, but this will not be nearly enough to meet the looming increase in demand. As a result, additional capacity is being constructed worldwide.

  9. Numerical solution of plasma fluid equations using locally refined grids

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Colella, P., LLNL

    1997-01-26T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper describes a numerical method for the solution of plasma fluid equations on block-structured, locally refined grids. The plasma under consideration is typical of those used for the processing of semiconductors. The governing equations consist of a drift-diffusion model of the electrons and an isothermal model of the ions coupled by Poisson's equation. A discretization of the equations is given for a uniform spatial grid, and a time-split integration scheme is developed. The algorithm is then extended to accommodate locally refined grids. This extension involves the advancement of the discrete system on a hierarchy of levels, each of which represents a degree of refinement, together with synchronization steps to ensure consistency across levels. A brief discussion of a software implementation is followed by a presentation of numerical results.

  10. The US petroleum refining industry in the 1980's

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1990-10-11T23:59:59.000Z

    As part of the EIA program on petroleum, The US Petroleum Refining Industry in the 1980's, presents a historical analysis of the changes that took place in the US petroleum refining industry during the 1980's. It is intended to be of interest to analysts in the petroleum industry, state and federal government officials, Congress, and the general public. The report consists of six chapters and four appendices. Included is a detailed description of the major events and factors that affected the domestic refining industry during this period. Some of the changes that took place in the 1980's are the result of events that started in the 1970's. The impact of these events on US refinery configuration, operations, economics, and company ownership are examined. 23 figs., 11 tabs.

  11. Trends in heavy oil production and refining in California

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Olsen, D.K.; Ramzel, E.B.; Pendergrass, R.A. II.

    1992-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report is one of a series of publications assessing the feasibility of increasing domestic heavy oil production and is part of a study being conducted for the US Department of Energy. This report summarizes trends in oil production and refining in Canada. Heavy oil (10{degrees} to 20{degrees} API gravity) production in California has increased from 20% of the state's total oil production in the early 1940s to 70% in the late 1980s. In each of the three principal petroleum producing districts (Los Angeles Basin, Coastal Basin, and San Joaquin Valley) oil production has peaked then declined at different times throughout the past 30 years. Thermal production of heavy oil has contributed to making California the largest producer of oil by enhanced oil recovery processes in spite of low oil prices for heavy oil and stringent environmental regulation. Opening of Naval Petroleum Reserve No. 1, Elk Hills (CA) field in 1976, brought about a major new source of light oil at a time when light oil production had greatly declined. Although California is a major petroleum-consuming state, in 1989 the state used 13.3 billion gallons of gasoline or 11.5% of US demand but it contributed substantially to the Nation's energy production and refining capability. California is the recipient and refines most of Alaska's 1.7 million barrel per day oil production. With California production, Alaskan oil, and imports brought into California for refining, California has an excess of oil and refined products and is a net exporter to other states. The local surplus of oil inhibits exploitation of California heavy oil resources even though the heavy oil resources exist. Transportation, refining, and competition in the market limit full development of California heavy oil resources.

  12. Trends in heavy oil production and refining in California

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Olsen, D.K.; Ramzel, E.B.; Pendergrass, R.A. II

    1992-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report is one of a series of publications assessing the feasibility of increasing domestic heavy oil production and is part of a study being conducted for the US Department of Energy. This report summarizes trends in oil production and refining in Canada. Heavy oil (10{degrees} to 20{degrees} API gravity) production in California has increased from 20% of the state`s total oil production in the early 1940s to 70% in the late 1980s. In each of the three principal petroleum producing districts (Los Angeles Basin, Coastal Basin, and San Joaquin Valley) oil production has peaked then declined at different times throughout the past 30 years. Thermal production of heavy oil has contributed to making California the largest producer of oil by enhanced oil recovery processes in spite of low oil prices for heavy oil and stringent environmental regulation. Opening of Naval Petroleum Reserve No. 1, Elk Hills (CA) field in 1976, brought about a major new source of light oil at a time when light oil production had greatly declined. Although California is a major petroleum-consuming state, in 1989 the state used 13.3 billion gallons of gasoline or 11.5% of US demand but it contributed substantially to the Nation`s energy production and refining capability. California is the recipient and refines most of Alaska`s 1.7 million barrel per day oil production. With California production, Alaskan oil, and imports brought into California for refining, California has an excess of oil and refined products and is a net exporter to other states. The local surplus of oil inhibits exploitation of California heavy oil resources even though the heavy oil resources exist. Transportation, refining, and competition in the market limit full development of California heavy oil resources.

  13. Iterative build OMIT maps: Map improvement by iterative model-building and refinement without model bias

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Los Alamos National Laboratory, Mailstop M888, Los Alamos, NM 87545, USA; Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, One Cyclotron Road, Building 64R0121, Berkeley, CA 94720, USA; Department of Haematology, University of Cambridge, Cambridge CB2 0XY, England; Terwilliger, Thomas; Terwilliger, T.C.; Grosse-Kunstleve, Ralf Wilhelm; Afonine, P.V.; Moriarty, N.W.; Zwart, P.H.; Hung, L.-W.; Read, R.J.; Adams, P.D.

    2008-02-12T23:59:59.000Z

    A procedure for carrying out iterative model-building, density modification and refinement is presented in which the density in an OMIT region is essentially unbiased by an atomic model. Density from a set of overlapping OMIT regions can be combined to create a composite 'Iterative-Build' OMIT map that is everywhere unbiased by an atomic model but also everywhere benefiting from the model-based information present elsewhere in the unit cell. The procedure may have applications in the validation of specific features in atomic models as well as in overall model validation. The procedure is demonstrated with a molecular replacement structure and with an experimentally-phased structure, and a variation on the method is demonstrated by removing model bias from a structure from the Protein Data Bank.

  14. Time Critical Isosurface Refinement And Smoothing V. Pascucci

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Texas at Austin, University of

    the global geometry of the embedding (no self- intersections) of any approximated level of detail: (i) a progressive al- gorithm that builds a multi-resolution surface by successive refine- ments so of the U.S. Depart- ment of Energy by University of California Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under

  15. Source: Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-782A, "Refiners...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    4. U.S. Refiner Wholesale Petroleum Product Prices Figure J F M A M J J A S O N D 0 20 40 60 80 100 120 1996 Cents per Gallon Excluding Taxes Kero-jet Propane No. 1 Distillate No....

  16. Source: Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-782A, "Refiners...

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    4. U.S. Refiner Wholesale Petroleum Product Prices Figure J F M A M J J A S O N D 0 20 40 60 80 100 120 1995 Cents per Gallon Excluding Taxes Kero-jet Propane No. 1 Distillate No....

  17. Source: Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-782A, "Refiners...

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    4. U.S. Refiner Wholesale Petroleum Product Prices Figure J F M A M J J A S O N D 0 20 40 60 80 100 120 1997 Cents per Gallon Excluding Taxes Kero-jet Propane No. 1 Distillate No....

  18. Table 35. Refiner Motor Gasoline Prices by Grade, Sales Type...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    71.8 W 70.5 78.9 W 76.0 83.6 W 69.2 75.2 See footnotes at end of table. 35. Refiner Motor Gasoline Prices by Grade, Sales Type, PAD District and State 176 Energy Information...

  19. Table 35. Refiner Motor Gasoline Prices by Grade, Sales Type...

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    W 68.4 70.8 W W 78.6 W 85.7 81.8 W 69.3 73.8 See footnotes at end of table. 35. Refiner Motor Gasoline Prices by Grade, Sales Type, PAD District and State 176 Energy Information...

  20. Refinement of the One-Copy Serializable Correctness Criterion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Muñoz, Francesc

    Refinement of the One-Copy Serializable Correctness Criterion M. I. Ruiz-Fuertes, F. D. Mu~noz-Esco. Mu~noz-Esco´i Instituto Tecnol´ogico de Inform´atica Universidad Polit´ecnica de Valencia Camino de

  1. Electron beam melting and refining state of the art 1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bakish, R. [ed.

    1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This is the proceedings of the Electron Beam Melting and Refining - State of the Art 1995 Conference. It contains 23 of the 30 scheduled papers. Papers cover an array of electron beam melting applications, from industrial plating of metal strip, through government work on manufacturing and processing fissile alloys. Separate abstracts have been prepared for articles from this proceedings.

  2. Refining Hygienic Macros for Modules and Separate Compilation Matthias Blume

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Blume, Matthias

    Refining Hygienic Macros for Modules and Separate Compilation Matthias Blume Department of Computer of the assumptions hygienic macro systems are based on. We will investigate how these assumptions have to be changed, and the consequences for the construction of hygienic macro expanders. Macro expansion algorithms rely on their ability

  3. Note on refined topological vertex, Jack polynomials and instanton counting

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jianfeng Wu

    2010-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

    In this article, we calculated the refined topological vertex for the one parameter case using the Jack symmetric functions. Also, we obtain the partition function for elliptic N=2 models, the results coincide with those of Nekrasov instanton counting partition functions for the $N=2^{\\ast}$ theories.

  4. #PRL --A Proof Refinement Calculus for Classical Reasoning

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kreitz, Christoph

    #µPRL -- A Proof Refinement Calculus for Classical Reasoning in Computational Type Theory Nuria, 14482 Potsdam, Germany {brede,kreitz}@cs.uni­potsdam.de Abstract. We present a hybrid proof calculus #µPRL to con­ structive proofs and show that the restriction of #µPRL to µ­safe proof terms is sound

  5. PRL A Proof Refinement Calculus for Classical Reasoning

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kreitz, Christoph

    µPRL ­ A Proof Refinement Calculus for Classical Reasoning in Computational Type Theory Nuria Brede, Germany {brede,kreitz}@cs.uni-potsdam.de Abstract. We present a hybrid proof calculus µPRL that combines and show that the restriction of µPRL to µ-safe proof terms is sound and complete for intuitionistic

  6. Refining 31 P nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy for marine

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paytan, Adina

    Refining 31 P nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy for marine particulate samples: Storage 31 P nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy has recently been used to characterize phosphorus.e., no storage, refrigeration, freezing, and oven-drying and grinding) prior to extraction for solution 31 P

  7. Department of Computing Stepwise Refinement in Event-B||CSP

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Doran, Simon J.

    in Event-B||CSP Part 1: Safety Steve Schneider, Helen Treharne and Heike Wehrheim March 12th 2011 #12;Stepwise Refinement in Event-B CSP Part 1: Safety Steve Schneider1 Helen Treharne1 Heike Wehrheim2 1, 2011 Contents 1 Introduction 3 2 CSP 3 2.1 Notation

  8. An accuracy study of mesh refinement on mapped grids

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Calhoun, Donna

    An accuracy study of mesh refinement on mapped grids D. Calhoun and R. J. LeVeque, October, 2003 on a highly skewed portion of a mapped grid. Smooth and shock-wave solutions to the Euler equations are used interface. Key words: gas dynamics, finite-volume, finite-difference, Cartesian grid, mapped grids

  9. The use of Fourier reverse transforms in crystallographic phase refinement

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ringrose, S.

    1997-10-08T23:59:59.000Z

    Often a crystallographer obtains an electron density map which shows only part of the structure. In such cases, the phasing of the trial model is poor enough that the electron density map may show peaks in some of the atomic positions, but other atomic positions are not visible. There may also be extraneous peaks present which are not due to atomic positions. A method for determination of crystal structures that have resisted solution through normal crystallographic methods has been developed. PHASER is a series of FORTRAN programs which aids in the structure solution of poorly phased electron density maps by refining the crystallographic phases. It facilitates the refinement of such poorly phased electron density maps for difficult structures which might otherwise not be solvable. The trial model, which serves as the starting point for the phase refinement, may be acquired by several routes such as direct methods or Patterson methods. Modifications are made to the reverse transform process based on several assumptions. First, the starting electron density map is modified based on the fact that physically the electron density map must be non-negative at all points. In practice a small positive cutoff is used. A reverse Fourier transform is computed based on the modified electron density map. Secondly, the authors assume that a better electron density map will result by using the observed magnitudes of the structure factors combined with the phases calculated in the reverse transform. After convergence has been reached, more atomic positions and less extraneous peaks are observed in the refined electron density map. The starting model need not be very large to achieve success with PHASER; successful phase refinement has been achieved with a starting model that consists of only 5% of the total scattering power of the full molecule. The second part of the thesis discusses three crystal structure determinations.

  10. The Compositionality of Abstraction for Coloured Petri Nets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lakos, Charles

    The Compositionality of Abstraction for Coloured Petri Nets Charles Lakos, Electrical Engineering.Lakos@utas.edu.au Abstract: An earlier paper considered the appropriate properties for abstract net components in the Coloured Petri Net formalism. This paper extends that earlier work in refining some definitions

  11. Development of miscella refining process for cottonseed oil-isopropyl alcohol system: laboratory-scale evaluations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chau, Chi-Fai

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A technologically feasible cottonseed oil-isopropyl alcohol (IPA) miscella refining process was developed to produce high quality cottonseed oil. Individual steps necessary to refine cottonseed oil-IPA miscella were determined and improved...

  12. WELDABILITY OF GRAIN-REFINED Fe-12Ni-0.25Ti STEEL FOR CRYOGENIC APPLICATIONS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Morris Jr., J.W.

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of the Cryogenic Nickel Steels, WRC Bull, 205, May, 1975.REFINED Fe-12Ni-0.25Ti STEEL FOR CRYOGENIC APPLICATIONS D.E.REFINED Fe-12Ni-0.25Ti STEEL FOR CRYOGENIC APPLICATIONS D.

  13. Protein extraction in the refinement of Coastal Bermudagrass

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    De La Rosa Perez, Luis Bernardo

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    , phosphoric acid, gaseous hydrochloric acid, anhydrous ammonia and ethylendiamine (Chang et aL, 1981; Wylie and Steen, 1988). Also the use of organic solvents such as hexane or cadoxen ([Cd(ethylendiamine)3](OH)2, cadmium ethylendiamine) (Ladisch et al... and lignin. Integrated conversion of the entire "barrel of biomass" (also referred to as biomass refining), is essential to obtain good system economics. This study evaluated the use of the Ammonia Fiber Explosion (AFEX) process in an integrated conversion...

  14. EWO Mee'ng September 2012 Petrobras Refining Decision-Making Design

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grossmann, Ignacio E.

    & Algorithm Thesis Prospectus Mathematical Modeling for Strategic and Investment Planning in the Oil-Refining Industry Brenno C. Menezes, Lincoln F. Moro Refining Op7miza7on PETROBRAS Petróleo SEWO Mee'ng ­ September 2012 Petrobras Refining Decision-Making Design Thesis Formulation

  15. Refinement and verification of concurrent systems specified in ObjectZ and CSP

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Smith, Graeme

    Refinement and verification of concurrent systems specified in Object­Z and CSP Graeme Smith­Z and CSP. A common semantic basis for the two languages enables a unified method of refinement to be used, based upon CSP refinement. To enable state­based techniques to be used for the Object­Z components

  16. Refined similarity hypotheses in shell models of turbulence

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Emily S. C. Ching; H. Guo; T. S. Lo

    2008-04-16T23:59:59.000Z

    A major challenge in turbulence research is to understand from first principles the origin of anomalous scaling of the velocity fluctuations in high-Reynolds-number turbulent flows. One important idea was proposed by Kolmogorov [J. Fluid Mech. {\\bf 13}, 82 (1962)], which attributes the anomaly to the variations of the locally averaged energy dissipation rate. Kraichnan later pointed out [J. Fluid Mech. {\\bf 62}, 305 (1973)] that the locally averaged energy dissipation rate is not an inertial-range quantity and a proper inertial-range quantity would be the local energy transfer rate. As a result, Kraichnan's idea attributes the anomaly to the variations of the local energy transfer rate. These ideas, generally known as refined similarity hypotheses, can also be extended to study the anomalous scaling of fluctuations of an active scalar, like the temperature in turbulent convection. In this paper, we examine the validity of these refined similarity hypotheses and their extensions to an active scalar in shell models of turbulence. We find that Kraichnan's refined similarity hypothesis and its extension are valid.

  17. U. S. refiners move into another challenging technical era

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hall, J.R. (Ashland Oil Inc., Ashland, KY (US))

    1991-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

    With the transition to unleaded gasoline scarcely behind us, another new era is dawning for the U.S. refiner. No one yet knows the exact configuration of the refinery of the future and no two refineries are likely to adapt in exactly the same way. What is certain, however, is that by the year 2000, refineries will be more technologically advanced, their products will be more environmentally acceptable, and their operators will be more highly trained. The typical U.S. refinery in the year 2000 will be located at an existing refinery site because economic and environmental considerations will make it impossible to build new grassroots capacity. As a result of the Clean Air act, the refinery of tomorrow will produce cleaner fuels The entire U.S. gasoline pool will likely be reformulated. Most of the diesel fuel pool will consist of ultralow-sulfur product. And jet fuel-which is experiencing rapid demand growth-will be an increasingly important product. Many existing refining process will remain in use, but they will be more efficient and more technologically advanced. Energy efficiency will be a primary concern, as refiners seek to combat ever-increasing crude oil costs and refinery operating expenses. The refinery of the future also will be much more environmentally acceptable. The article is a closer look at the refinery of the future.

  18. CONSTRAINED-TRANSPORT MAGNETOHYDRODYNAMICS WITH ADAPTIVE MESH REFINEMENT IN CHARM

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miniati, Francesco [Physics Department, Wolfgang-Pauli-Strasse 27, ETH-Zuerich, CH-8093 Zuerich (Switzerland); Martin, Daniel F., E-mail: fm@phys.ethz.ch, E-mail: DFMartin@lbl.gov [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States)

    2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present the implementation of a three-dimensional, second-order accurate Godunov-type algorithm for magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) in the adaptive-mesh-refinement (AMR) cosmological code CHARM. The algorithm is based on the full 12-solve spatially unsplit corner-transport-upwind (CTU) scheme. The fluid quantities are cell-centered and are updated using the piecewise-parabolic method (PPM), while the magnetic field variables are face-centered and are evolved through application of the Stokes theorem on cell edges via a constrained-transport (CT) method. The so-called multidimensional MHD source terms required in the predictor step for high-order accuracy are applied in a simplified form which reduces their complexity in three dimensions without loss of accuracy or robustness. The algorithm is implemented on an AMR framework which requires specific synchronization steps across refinement levels. These include face-centered restriction and prolongation operations and a reflux-curl operation, which maintains a solenoidal magnetic field across refinement boundaries. The code is tested against a large suite of test problems, including convergence tests in smooth flows, shock-tube tests, classical two- and three-dimensional MHD tests, a three-dimensional shock-cloud interaction problem, and the formation of a cluster of galaxies in a fully cosmological context. The magnetic field divergence is shown to remain negligible throughout.

  19. Synthesis and single crystal structure refinement of the one-layer hydrate of sodium brittle mica

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kalo, Hussein; Milius, Wolfgang [Lehrstuhl fuer Anorganische Chemie I, University of Bayreuth, D-95440 Bayreuth (Germany)] [Lehrstuhl fuer Anorganische Chemie I, University of Bayreuth, D-95440 Bayreuth (Germany); Braeu, Michael [BASF Construction Chemicals GmbH, 83308 Trostberg (Germany)] [BASF Construction Chemicals GmbH, 83308 Trostberg (Germany); Breu, Josef, E-mail: Josef.Breu@uni-bayreuth.de [Lehrstuhl fuer Anorganische Chemie I, University of Bayreuth, D-95440 Bayreuth (Germany)] [Lehrstuhl fuer Anorganische Chemie I, University of Bayreuth, D-95440 Bayreuth (Germany)

    2013-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A sodium brittle mica with the ideal composition [Na{sub 4}]{sup inter}[Mg{sub 6}]{sup oct}[Si{sub 4}Al{sub 4}]{sup tet}O{sub 20}F{sub 4} was synthesized via melt synthesis in a gas tight crucible. This mica is unusual inasmuch as the known mica structure holds only room for two interlayer cations per unit cell and inasmuch as it readily hydrates despite the high layer charge while ordinary micas and brittle micas are non-swelling. The crystal structure of one-layer hydrate sodium brittle mica was determined and refined from single crystal X-ray data. Interlayer cations reside at the center of the distorted hexagonal cavities and are coordinated by the three inner basal oxygen atoms. The coordination of the interlayer cation is completed by three interlayer water molecules residing at the center of the interlayer region. The relative position of adjacent 2:1-layers thus is fixed by these octahedrally coordinated interlayer cations. Pseudo-symmetry leads to extensive twinning. In total five twin operations generate the same environment for the interlayer species and are energetically degenerate. - Graphical abstract: The sodium brittle mica has been successfully synthesized by melt synthesis and the crystal structure of the one-layer hydrate of sodium brittle mica was determined from single crystal X-ray diffraction data. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Melt synthesis yielded coarse grained sodium brittle mica which showed little disorder. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Sodium brittle mica hydrated completely to the state of one-layer hydrate. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Structure of one-layer hydrate of sodium brittle mica could therefore be determined and refined. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Arrangement of upper and lower tetrahedral sheet encompassing interlayer cation were clarified.

  20. Electrode compositions

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Block, J.; Fan, X.

    1998-10-27T23:59:59.000Z

    An electrode composition is described for use as an electrode in a non-aqueous battery system. The electrode composition contains an electrically active powder in a solid polymer and, as a dispersant, a C{sub 8}-C{sub 15} alkyl capped oligomer of a hexanoic acid that is electrochemically inert at 2.5--4.5 volts.

  1. Exact results on ABJ theory and the refined topological string

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Masazumi Honda; Kazumi Okuyama

    2014-07-22T23:59:59.000Z

    We study the partition function of the ABJ theory, which is the N=6 superconformal Chern-Simons matter theory with gauge group U(N)xU(N+M) and Chern-Simons levels (k,-k). We exactly compute the ABJ partition function on a three sphere for various k, M and N via the Fermi gas approach. By using these exact data, we show that the ABJ partition function is completely determined by the refined topological string on local P^1 x P^1, including membrane instanton effects in the M-theory dual.

  2. Changing Trends in the Refining Industry (released in AEO2006)

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    There have been some major changes in the U.S. refining industry recently, prompted in part by a significant decline in the quality of imported crude oil and by increasing restrictions on the quality of finished products. As a result, high-quality crudes, such as the West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude that serves as a benchmark for oil futures on the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), have been trading at record premiums to the OPEC (Organization of the Petroleum Exporting Countries) Basket price.

  3. REFINING PROGRAM HELPS REENERGIZE NEBRASKA UPGRADES | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYouTube YouTube Note: Since the.pdfBreakingMay 2015 < prevQuick Guide: Power PurchaseOwner's Role3REFINING PROGRAM

  4. Refining Bio-Oil alongside Petroleum | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYouTube YouTube Note: Since the.pdfBreakingMay 2015 < prevQuick Guide:U.N.JuneAs part of itsRefining Bio-Oil

  5. ITP Petroleum Refining: Petroleum Technology Vision 2020 | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't YourTransport(Fact Sheet),Energy Petroleum Technology Vision 2020 ITP Petroleum Refining:

  6. California refiners move smoothly into next phase of RFG

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schaffer, S. [ed.

    1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The California RFG program (CARB RFG) began at the refinery level in March, the terminal level in April and will begin being enforced at the retail level June 1. By all accounts, early implementation is proceeding smoothly, with prices for both gasoline and oxygenates remaining fairly steady. Analysts labeled the introduction of the world`s cleanest gasoline {open_quotes}a non-event{close_quotes}. By April 1, more than half of the retail gasoline stations in California had fully complying CARB RFG. With cumulative investments of more than $3 billion, California`s refiners will be looking to recapture as much of the cost in the marketplace as possible. The incremental cost of CARB RFG production over federal RFG is estimated by refiners to be about 10{cents}/gal, mainly due to the capital investments needed for hydrotreating to reduce sulfur levels. Early batches of fuel on the spot market sold for about 8{cents}/gal over conventional prices, about 4.5{cents}/gal above federal RFG, according to the Oil Price Information Service (OPIS).

  7. A refined model for characterizing x-ray multilayers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Oren, A.L.; Henke, B.L.

    1987-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The ability to quickly and accurately characterize arbitrary multilayers is very valuable for not only can we use the characterizations to predict the reflectivity of a multilayer for any soft x-ray wavelength, we also can generalize the results to apply to other multilayers of the same type. In addition, we can use the characterizations as a means of evaluating various sputtering environments and refining sputtering techniques to obtain better multilayers. In this report we have obtained improved characterizations for sample molybdenum-silicon and vanadium-silicon multilayers. However, we only examined five crystals overall, so the conclusions that we could draw about the structure of general multilayers is limited. Research involving many multilayers manufactured under the same sputtering conditions is clearly in order. In order to best understand multilayer structures it may be necessary to further refine our model, e.g., adopting a Gaussian form for the interface regions. With such improvements we can expect even better agreement with experimental values and continued concurrence with other characterization techniques. 18 refs., 30 figs., 7 tabs.

  8. Bitumen composition

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Halasz, A.; Spinell, G.; Doolittle, D.H.

    1989-11-07T23:59:59.000Z

    This patent describes a bitumen composition. It comprises: asphalt and from about 1 wt.% to about 10 wt.%, based on asphalt, of an {alpha} -olefin polymer having a molecular weight within the range from about 750 to 5000.

  9. Hydride compositions

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lee, Myung, W.

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Disclosed are a composition for use in storing hydrogen and a method for making the composition. The composition comprises a mixture of two or more hydrides, each hydride having a different series of hydrogen sorption isotherms that contribute to the overall isotherms of the mixture. The hydrides are chosen so that the isotherms of the mixture have regions wherein the H equilibrium pressure increases with increasing hydrogen, preferably linearly. The isotherms of the mixture can be adjusted by selecting hydrides with different isotherms and by varying the amounts of the individual hydrides, or both. Preferably, the mixture is made up of hydrides that have isotherms with substantially flat plateaus and in nearly equimolar amounts. The composition is activated by degassing, exposing to H, and then heating below the softening temperature of any of the constituents. When the composition is used to store hydrogen, its hydrogen content can be found simply by measuring P{sub H}{sub 2} and determining H/M from the isothermic function of the composition.

  10. REFINEMENT OF THE NEPHELINE DISCRIMINATOR: RESULTS OF A PHASE I STUDY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fox, K; James Newell, J; Tommy Edwards, T; David Best, D; Irene Reamer, I; Phyllis Workman, P

    2008-02-13T23:59:59.000Z

    The performance of a glass used for immobilization of high-level nuclear waste (HLW) is generally quantified by its resistance to chemical degradation, or durability. The durability of a HLW glass is dependent on its composition. If crystalline phases form within a glass during cooling, the composition of the residual glass network is altered, therefore affecting the durability of the glass. Crystallization of nepheline (NaAlSiO{sub 4}) has been shown to adversely impact the durability of HLW glasses since it removes glass forming species (in this case, Al and Si) from the glass network. The propensity for nepheline crystallization in a HLW glass increases with increasing concentrations of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} and Na{sub 2}O in the glass. Nepheline crystallization is therefore of concern for processing of HLW at the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) since the sludge waste streams at the Savannah River Site (SRS) can contain high concentrations of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} and Na{sub 2}O. Currently, a 'nepheline discriminator' is included as a process control constraint at the DWPF. The nepheline discriminator relates the concentrations of SiO{sub 2}, Na{sub 2}O and Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} (as weight percentages in glass) to a critical value of 0.62. The discriminator defines a boundary line on the SiO{sub 2}-Na{sub 2}O-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} ternary diagram above which (or toward the SiO{sub 2} corner of the ternary) nepheline is not predicted to crystallize in the glass upon quenching or slow cooling. The current equation uses only the concentrations of the SiO{sub 2}, Na{sub 2}O and Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} components in the glass in predicting whether or not nepheline is likely to crystallize. However, several other components have been shown to impact the propensity for nepheline crystallization, including B{sub 2}O{sub 3} and CaO among others. Therefore, the potential exists to further refine the nepheline discriminator to include these components. In addition, recently studied HLW glasses with relatively high Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} compositions of 25 wt % or greater and nepheline discriminator values well below 0.62 have been shown to be free of nepheline crystallization upon quenching and slow cooling. Thus, the current nepheline discriminator equation also appears to be conservative for some HLW glass compositions. Refining the nepheline discriminator to include other important components and to reduce conservatism may provide access to high Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} concentration glass compositions for the DWPF, which could in turn allow access to higher waste loadings, decreased washing and improved waste throughput. The objective of this study was to develop and characterize a series of HLW glass compositions based on a projected composition of Sludge Batch 5 (SB5), the next sludge batch to be processed in the DWPF. The selected glass compositions all had nepheline discriminator values below the current limit of 0.62. They cover a range of locations on the SiO{sub 2}-Na{sub 2}O-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} diagram. They also include varying amounts of B{sub 2}O{sub 3} and CaO to support an evaluation of the impact of these components on the propensity for nepheline crystallization. The results described in this report confirm that some conservatism exists in the current nepheline discriminator. Several glass compositions, particularly compositions that target higher Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} concentrations, were shown to be very durable (i.e., PCT responses that were more than an order of magnitude better than that of the Environmental Assessment benchmark glass) while their nepheline discriminator values were well below the current nepheline discriminator limit of 0.62. Increased concentrations of B{sub 2}O{sub 3} and increased concentrations of CaO were shown to improve durability responses and suppress the formation of nepheline. This provides incentive to revise the nepheline discriminator to reduce some of this conservatism and incorporate the influence of B{sub 2}O{sub 3}. The revised nepheline discriminator could potentially change from a constant line on

  11. Phosphorescent compositions, methods of making the compositions, and methods of using the compositions

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Jia, Weiyi; Wang, Xiaojun; Jia, George D.; Lewis, Linda; Yen, Laurel C.

    2014-06-24T23:59:59.000Z

    Compositions, methods of making compositions, materials including compositions, crayons including compositions, paint including compositions, ink including compositions, waxes including compositions, polymers including compositions, vesicles including the compositions, methods of making each, and the like are disclosed.

  12. Phosphorescent compositions, methods of making the compositions, and methods of using the compositions

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Jia, Weiyi; Wang, Xiaojun; Yen, William; Yen, Laurel C.; Jia, George D.

    2012-12-04T23:59:59.000Z

    Compositions, methods of making compositions, materials including compositions, crayons including compositions, paint including compositions, ink including compositions, waxes including compositions, polymers including compositions, vesicles including the compositions, methods of making each, and the like are disclosed.

  13. Decontamination and decarburization of stainless and carbon steel by melt refining

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mizia, R.E.; Worcester, S.A.; Twidwell, L.G.; Webber, D.; Paolini, D.J.; Weldon, T.A.

    1996-09-05T23:59:59.000Z

    With many nuclear reactors and facilities being decommissioned in the next ten to twenty years the concern for handling and storing Radioactive Scrap Metal (RSM) is growing. Upon direction of the DOE Office of Environmental Restoration and Waste Management, Lockheed Idaho Technology Company (LITCO) is developing technologies for the conditioning of spent fuels and high-level wastes for interim storage and repository acceptance, including the recycling of Radioactive Scrap Metals (RSM) for beneficial reuse with the DOE complex. In February 1993, Montana Tech of the University of Montana was contracted to develop and demonstrate technologies for the decontamination of stainless steel RSM. The general objectives of the Montana Tech research program included conducting a literature survey, performing laboratory scale melt refining experiments to optimize decontaminating slag compositions, performing an analysis of preferred melting techniques, coordinating pilot scale and commercial scale demonstrations, and producing sufficient quantities of surrogate-containing material for all of the laboratory, pilot and commercial scale test programs. Later on, the program was expanded to include decontamination of carbon steel RSM. Each research program has been completed, and results are presented in this report.

  14. Decontamination of metals by melt refinings/slagging: An annotated bibliography

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mizia, R.E. [ed.; Worcester, S.A.; Twidwell, L.G.; Paolini, D.J.; Weldon, T.A.

    1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    As the number of nuclear installations undergoing decontamination and decommissioning (D&D) increases, current radioactive waste storage space is consumed and establishment of new waste storage areas becomes increasingly difficult, the problem of handling and storing radioactive scrap metal (RSM) gains increasing importance in the DOE Environmental Restoration and Waste Management Program. To alleviate present and future waste storage problems, Westinghouse Idaho Nuclear Company (WINCO) is managing a program for the recycling of RSM for beneficial use within the DOE complex. As part of that effort, Montana Tech has been awarded a contract to help optimize melting and refining technology for the recycling of stainless steel RSM. The scope of the Montana Tech program includes a literature survey, a decontaminating slag design study, small scale melting studies to determine optimum slag compositions for removal of radioactive contaminant surrogates, analysis of preferred melting techniques, and coordination of large scale melting demonstrations (100--500 lbs) to be conducted at selected facilities. The program will support recycling and decontaminating stainless steel RSM for use in waste canisters for Idaho Waste Immobilization Facility densified high level waste. This report is the result of the literature search conducted to establish a basis for experimental melt/slag program development.

  15. Exploratory research on solvent refined coal liquefaction. Annual technical progress report, January 1-December 31, 1979

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    1980-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes the progress of the Exploratory Research on Solvent Refined Coal Liquefaction project by The Pittsburg and Midway Coal Mining Co.'s Merriam Laboratory during 1979. In a series of experiments with varying feed gas composition, low levels (5 to 10 mole %) of carbon monoxide had little effect on the SRC II processing of Pittsburgh Seam coal (Powhatan No. 5 Mine) while higher levels (20 to 40 mole %) resulted in a general degradation of operability and reduced oil yields. Addition of finely divided (approx. 1 ..mu..m) pyrite to the reactive Powhatan coal had little effect on oil yields although the molecular weight of the distillation residue was apparently decreased. When finely divided pyrite and magnetite were added to the less reactive coals from the Loveridge and Blacksville No. 1 Mines (also Pittsburgh Seam), however, substantial increases in oil yields and product quality were obtained. In a comparison of upflow and downflow dissolver configurations with Powhatan coal in the SRC II mode, there was no difference in yields or product quality. A study characterizing specific reactors revealed a significantly higher conversion in the SRC I mode with a reactor approximating plug flow conditions compared to a completely backmixed reactor. In the SRC II mode there was only a slightly higher oil yield with the plug flow reactor.

  16. Impact of Environmental Compliance Costs on U.S. Refining Profitability 1995-2001

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report assesses the effects of pollution abatement requirements on the financial performance of U.S. petroleum refining and marketing operations during the 1995 to 2001 period. This study is a follow-up to the October 1997 publication entitled The Impact of Environmental Compliance Costs on U.S. Refining Profitability, that focused on the financial impacts of U.S. refining pollution abatement investment requirements in the 1988 to1995 period.

  17. Table 7. U.S. Refiner Motor Gasoline Volumes by Grade and Sales...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Information Administration Petroleum Marketing Annual 1995 Table 7. U.S. Refiner Motor Gasoline Volumes by Grade and Sales Type (Million Gallons per Day) - Continued Year...

  18. Table A1. Refiner/Reseller Motor Gasoline Prices by Grade, PAD...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AdministrationPetroleum Marketing Annual 1999 401 Table A1. RefinerReseller Motor Gasoline Prices by Grade, PAD District and State, 1984-Present (Cents per Gallon...

  19. Table A1. Refiner/Reseller Motor Gasoline Prices by Grade, PAD...

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    Information Administration Petroleum Marketing Annual 1995 Table A1. RefinerReseller Motor Gasoline Prices by Grade, PAD District and State, 1984-Present (Cents per Gallon...

  20. Table 6. U.S. Refiner Motor Gasoline Prices by Grade and Sales...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Energy Information AdministrationPetroleum Marketing Annual 1999 Table 6. U.S. Refiner Motor Gasoline Prices by Grade and Sales Type (Cents per Gallon Excluding Taxes) - Continued...

  1. Table 10. U.S. Refiner Oxygenated Motor Gasoline Prices by...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AdministrationPetroleum Marketing Annual 1999 Table 10. U.S. Refiner Oxygenated Motor Gasoline Prices by Grade and Sales Type (Cents per Gallon Excluding Taxes) Year Month...

  2. Table 6. U.S. Refiner Motor Gasoline Prices by Grade and Sales...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Energy Information AdministrationPetroleum Marketing Annual 1998 Table 6. U.S. Refiner Motor Gasoline Prices by Grade and Sales Type (Cents per Gallon Excluding Taxes) - Continued...

  3. Table 7. U.S. Refiner Motor Gasoline Volumes by Grade and Sales...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Energy Information AdministrationPetroleum Marketing Annual 1998 Table 7. U.S. Refiner Motor Gasoline Volumes by Grade and Sales Type (Million Gallons per Day) - Continued Year...

  4. Table 6. U.S. Refiner Motor Gasoline Prices by Grade and Sales...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Information Administration Petroleum Marketing Annual 1995 Table 6. U.S. Refiner Motor Gasoline Prices by Grade and Sales Type (Cents per Gallon Excluding Taxes) - Continued...

  5. Table 2. U.S. Refiner Prices of Petroleum Products to End Users

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    fuel. Note: Motor gasoline averages and totals prior to October 1993 include leaded gasoline. Sources: Energy Information Administration Form EIA-782A, "Refiners'Gas Plant...

  6. RFA-14-0001 - In the Matter of Commonwealth Oil Refining Company...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    both programs would reduce the dependence of Puerto Rican consumers on high cost imported oil and refined petroleum products and that, consequently, both programs were consistent...

  7. Refining and Extending the Business Model with Information Technology: Dell Computer Corporation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kraemer, Kenneth L; Dedrick, Jason; Yamashiro, Sandra

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of Dell’s Direct Business Model Fuels Fifteenth ConsecutiveAND EXTENDING THE REFINING AND EXTENDING THE BUSINESS MODELBUSINESS MODEL CENTER FOR RESEARCH ON INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY

  8. OPERATOR INTERACTION WITH MODEL-BASED PREDICTIVE CONTROLLERS IN PETROCHEMICAL REFINING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Virginia, University of

    OPERATOR INTERACTION WITH MODEL-BASED PREDICTIVE CONTROLLERS IN PETROCHEMICAL REFINING Greg A success in the petrochemical industry, they have introduced new challenges for the operators and engineers

  9. Table A2. Refiner/Reseller Prices of Aviation Fuels, Propane...

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Marketing Annual 1999 421 Table A2. RefinerReseller Prices of Aviation Fuels, Propane, and Kerosene, by PAD District, 1983-Present (Cents per Gallon Excluding Taxes) -...

  10. Table A2. Refiner/Reseller Prices of Aviation Fuels, Propane...

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    Marketing Annual 1995 467 Table A2. RefinerReseller Prices of Aviation Fuels, Propane, and Kerosene, by PAD District, 1983-Present (Cents per Gallon Excluding Taxes) -...

  11. Quantitative Methods for Strategic and Investment Planning in the Oil-Refining

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grossmann, Ignacio E.

    by one refinery Refinery Opera*onal Planning - Simulate the Refining Scenarios Supply Chain Investments Planning - Test the refinery best scenarios

  12. Table 46. Refiner No. 2 Distillate, Diesel Fuel, and Fuel Oil...

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Petroleum Marketing Annual 1998 295 Table 46. Refiner No. 2 Distillate, Diesel Fuel, and Fuel Oil Volumes by PAD District and State (Thousand Gallons per Day) - Continued...

  13. Table 46. Refiner No. 2 Distillate, Diesel Fuel, and Fuel Oil...

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Petroleum Marketing Annual 1995 337 Table 46. Refiner No. 2 Distillate, Diesel Fuel, and Fuel Oil Volumes by PAD District and State (Thousand Gallons per Day) - Continued...

  14. Table 46. Refiner No. 2 Distillate, Diesel Fuel, and Fuel Oil...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Petroleum Marketing Annual 1999 295 Table 46. Refiner No. 2 Distillate, Diesel Fuel, and Fuel Oil Volumes by PAD District and State (Thousand Gallons per Day) - Continued...

  15. Table A3. Refiner/Reseller Prices of Distillate and Residual...

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    Marketing Annual 1999 441 Table A3. RefinerReseller Prices of Distillate and Residual Fuel Oils, by PAD District, 1983-Present (Cents per Gallon Excluding Taxes) - Continued...

  16. Table 12. U.S. Refiner Reformulated Motor Gasoline Prices by...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Administration Petroleum Marketing Annual 1995 Table 12. U.S. Refiner Reformulated Motor Gasoline Prices by Grade and Sales Type (Cents per Gallon Excluding Taxes) - Continued...

  17. Table 10. U.S. Refiner Oxygenated Motor Gasoline Prices by...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Administration Petroleum Marketing Annual 1995 Table 10. U.S. Refiner Oxygenated Motor Gasoline Prices by Grade and Sales Type (Cents per Gallon Excluding Taxes) - Continued...

  18. Table 11. U.S. Refiner Oxygenated Motor Gasoline Volumes by...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Administration Petroleum Marketing Annual 1995 Table 11. U.S. Refiner Oxygenated Motor Gasoline Volumes by Grade and Sales Type (Million Gallons per Day) - Continued Year...

  19. ENZO: AN ADAPTIVE MESH REFINEMENT CODE FOR ASTROPHYSICS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bryan, Greg L.; Turk, Matthew J. [Columbia University, Department of Astronomy, New York, NY 10025 (United States); Norman, Michael L.; Bordner, James; Xu, Hao; Kritsuk, Alexei G. [CASS, University of California, San Diego, 9500 Gilman Drive La Jolla, CA 92093-0424 (United States); O'Shea, Brian W.; Smith, Britton [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824 (United States); Abel, Tom; Wang, Peng; Skillman, Samuel W. [Kavli Institute for Particle Astrophysics and Cosmology, Stanford University, Menlo Park, CA 94025 (United States); Wise, John H. [Center for Relativistic Astrophysics, School of Physics, Georgia Institute of Technology, 837 State Street, Atlanta, GA (United States); Reynolds, Daniel R. [Department of Mathematics, Southern Methodist University, Box 750156, Dallas, TX 75205-0156 (United States); Collins, David C. [Department of Physics, Florida State University, Tallahassee, FL 32306 (United States); Harkness, Robert P. [NICS, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, 1 Bethel Valley Rd, Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States); Kim, Ji-hoon [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of California, 1156 High Street, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States); Kuhlen, Michael [Theoretical Astrophysics Center, University of California Berkeley, Hearst Field Annex, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Goldbaum, Nathan [Institute for Astronomy, University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh EH9 3HJ (United Kingdom); Hummels, Cameron [Department of Astronomy/Steward Observatory, University of Arizona, 933 N. Cherry Ave., Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States); Tasker, Elizabeth [Physics Department, Faculty of Science, Hokkaido University, Kita-10 Nishi 8, Kita-ku, Sapporo 060-0810 (Japan); Collaboration: Enzo Collaboration; and others

    2014-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper describes the open-source code Enzo, which uses block-structured adaptive mesh refinement to provide high spatial and temporal resolution for modeling astrophysical fluid flows. The code is Cartesian, can be run in one, two, and three dimensions, and supports a wide variety of physics including hydrodynamics, ideal and non-ideal magnetohydrodynamics, N-body dynamics (and, more broadly, self-gravity of fluids and particles), primordial gas chemistry, optically thin radiative cooling of primordial and metal-enriched plasmas (as well as some optically-thick cooling models), radiation transport, cosmological expansion, and models for star formation and feedback in a cosmological context. In addition to explaining the algorithms implemented, we present solutions for a wide range of test problems, demonstrate the code's parallel performance, and discuss the Enzo collaboration's code development methodology.

  20. Refining and classifying finite-time Lyapunov exponent ridges

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Allshouse, Michael R

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    While more rigorous and sophisticated methods for identifying Lagrangian based coherent structures exist, the finite-time Lyapunov exponent (FTLE) field remains a straightforward and popular method for gaining some insight into transport by complex, time-dependent two-dimensional flows. In light of its enduring appeal, and in support of good practice, we begin by investigating the effects of discretization and noise on two numerical approaches for calculating the FTLE field. A practical method to extract and refine FTLE ridges in two-dimensional flows, which builds on previous methods, is then presented. Seeking to better ascertain the role of an FTLE ridge in flow transport, we adapt an existing classification scheme and provide a thorough treatment of the challenges of classifying the types of deformation represented by an FTLE ridge. As a practical demonstration, the methods are applied to an ocean surface velocity field data set generated by a numerical model.

  1. Fuel and oxygen addition for metal smelting or refining process

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Schlichting, M.R.

    1994-11-22T23:59:59.000Z

    A furnace for smelting iron ore and/or refining molten iron is equipped with an overhead pneumatic lance, through which a center stream of particulate coal is ejected at high velocity into a slag layer. An annular stream of nitrogen or argon enshrouds the coal stream. Oxygen is simultaneously ejected in an annular stream encircling the inert gas stream. The interposition of the inert gas stream between the coal and oxygen streams prevents the volatile matter in the coal from combusting before it reaches the slag layer. Heat of combustion is thus more efficiently delivered to the slag, where it is needed to sustain the desired reactions occurring there. A second stream of lower velocity oxygen can be delivered through an outermost annulus to react with carbon monoxide gas rising from slag layer, thereby adding still more heat to the furnace. 7 figs.

  2. Photoimageable composition

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dentinger, Paul; Krafick, Karen L.; Simison, Kelby Liv

    2005-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

    The use of photoacid generators including an alkoxyphenylphenyliodonium salt and/or bis(t-butylphenyl)iodonium salt in a photoimageable composition helps improve resolution. Suitable photoimageable compositions includes: (a) a multifuctional polymeric epoxy resin that is dissolved in an organic solvent wherein the epoxy resin comprises oligomers of bisphenol A that is quantitatively protected by glycidyl ether and wherein the oligomers have an average functionality that ranges from about 3 to 12; and a photoacid generator comprising an alkoxyphenylphenyliodonium salt and/or bis(t-butylphenyl)iodonium salt. Preferred alkoxyphenylphenyliodonium salts include 4-octyloxyphenyl phenyliodonium hexafluoroantimonate and 4-methoxyphenyl phenyliodonium hexafluoroantimonate. The photoimageable composition is particularly suited for producing high aspect ratio microstructures.

  3. Photoimageable composition

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Simison, Kelby Liv; Dentinger, Paul

    2003-11-11T23:59:59.000Z

    The use of selected buffering amines in a photoimageable composition prevents process bias which with conventional photoresists causes designed features to be distorted, especially in corners and high resolution features. It is believed that the amines react with the catalysts, e.g., photoacids, generated to create an inert salt. The presence of the amines also increases resolution. Suitable photoimageable compositions includes: (a) a multifunctional polymeric epoxy resin that is dissolved in an organic solvent wherein the epoxy resin comprises oligomers of bisphenol A that is quantitatively protected by glycidyl ether and wherein the oligomers have an average functionality that ranges from about 3 to 12; (b) a photoactive compound; and (c) an amine that is selected from the group consisting of triisobutylamine, 1,8-bis(dimethylamino)naphthalene (also known as PROTON SPONGET.TM.), 2,2'-diazabicyclo[2.2.2] octane and mixtures thereof. The photoimageable composition is particularly suited for producing high aspect ratio metal microstructures.

  4. Composite material

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hutchens, Stacy A. (Knoxville, TN); Woodward, Jonathan (Solihull, GB); Evans, Barbara R. (Oak Ridge, TN); O'Neill, Hugh M. (Knoxville, TN)

    2012-02-07T23:59:59.000Z

    A composite biocompatible hydrogel material includes a porous polymer matrix, the polymer matrix including a plurality of pores and providing a Young's modulus of at least 10 GPa. A calcium comprising salt is disposed in at least some of the pores. The porous polymer matrix can comprise cellulose, including bacterial cellulose. The composite can be used as a bone graft material. A method of tissue repair within the body of animals includes the steps of providing a composite biocompatible hydrogel material including a porous polymer matrix, the polymer matrix including a plurality of pores and providing a Young's modulus of at least 10 GPa, and inserting the hydrogel material into cartilage or bone tissue of an animal, wherein the hydrogel material supports cell colonization in vitro for autologous cell seeding.

  5. Transformation Composition

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Drewes, Frank

    Proc. AGTIVE'99, to appear in LNCS Graph Transformation Modules and their Composition ? Frank,knirsch,kreo,kuskeg@informatik.uni-bremen.de Abstract. In this paper, we investigate the notion of transformation modules as a structuring principle. Based on the notion of transformation units, a concept that allows to specify binary relations on graphs

  6. Wavelet Bi-frames with few Generators from Multivariate Refinable Functions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ehler, Martin

    Wavelet Bi-frames with few Generators from Multivariate Refinable Functions Martin Ehler Bin Han compactly supported wavelet bi-frames with few generators from almost any pair of compactly sup- ported multivariate refinable functions. In our examples, we focus on wavelet bi-frames whose primal and dual wavelets

  7. Refining k-means by Bootstrap and Data Depth Aurora Torrente and Juan Romo

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Romo, Juan

    Refining k-means by Bootstrap and Data Depth Aurora Torrente and Juan Romo Departamento de Estad two simple, computationally fast methods that allow the refinement of the initial points of k-means to cluster a given data set. They are based on alternating k-means and the search of the deepest (most

  8. Rapidly-Exploring Roadmaps: Weighing Exploration vs. Refinement in Optimal Motion Planning

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    North Carolina at Chapel Hill, University of

    Rapidly-Exploring Roadmaps: Weighing Exploration vs. Refinement in Optimal Motion Planning Ron of already explored regions to find better paths. We present the rapidly- exploring roadmap (RRM), a new to explore further or to refine the explored space by adding edges to the current roadmap to find higher

  9. To appear in EPTCS. A CSP account of Event-B refinement

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Doran, Simon J.

    To appear in EPTCS. A CSP account of Event-B refinement Steve Schneider Department of Computing a CSP account of Event-B refinement, with a treatment for the first time of splitting events and of anticipated events. To this end, we define a CSP seman- tics for Event-B and show how the different forms

  10. FDR3 --A Modern Refinement Checker for CSP Thomas Gibson-Robinson, Philip Armstrong,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oxford, University of

    FDR3 -- A Modern Refinement Checker for CSP Thomas Gibson-Robinson, Philip Armstrong, Alexandre.roscoe}@cs.ox.ac.uk Abstract. FDR3 is a complete rewrite of the CSP refinement checker FDR2, incorporating a significant number describe the new algorithm that FDR3 uses to construct its internal representation of CSP processes

  11. FDR3 --A Modern Refinement Checker for CSP Thomas Gibson-Robinson, Philip Armstrong,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oxford, University of

    FDR3 -- A Modern Refinement Checker for CSP Thomas Gibson-Robinson, Philip Armstrong, Alexandre.roscoe}@cs.ox.ac.uk Abstract. FDR3 is a complete rewrite of the CSP refinement checker FDR2, incorporating a significant number describe the new algorithm that FDR3 uses to construct its in- ternal representation of CSP processes

  12. Don't care in SMT--Building flexible yet efficient abstraction/refinement solvers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Leucker, Martin

    Don't care in SMT--Building flexible yet efficient abstraction/refinement solvers Andreas Bauer Satisfiability Modulo Theories (SMT) solver for a wide range of theories. Our method follows the abstrac- tion/refinement approach to simplify the implementation of custom SMT solvers. The expected performance penalty

  13. Don't care in SMT---Building flexible yet efficient abstraction/refinement solvers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Leucker, Martin

    Don't care in SMT---Building flexible yet efficient abstraction/refinement solvers Andreas Bauer an efficient Satisfiability Modulo Theories (SMT) solver for a wide range of theories. Our method follows the abstrac­ tion/refinement approach to simplify the implementation of custom SMT solvers. The expected

  14. Aspects of Western Refining, Inc.'s Proposed Acquisition of Giant Industries, Inc.

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Presentation of company-level, non-proprietary data and relevant aggregate data for U.S. refinery capacity and gasoline marketing of Western Refining and Giant Industries to inform discussions of Western Refining Inc.'s proposed acquisition of Giant Industries Inc. for a total of $1.5 billion, which was announced August 28, 2006.

  15. Cosmos++: Relativistic Magnetohydrodynamics on Unstructured Grids with Local Adaptive Refinement

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peter Anninos; P. Chris Fragile; Jay D. Salmonson

    2005-09-09T23:59:59.000Z

    A new code and methodology are introduced for solving the general relativistic magnetohydrodynamic (GRMHD) equations in fixed background spacetimes using time-explicit, finite-volume discretization. The code has options for solving the GRMHD equations using traditional artificial-viscosity (AV) or non-oscillatory central difference (NOCD) methods, or a new extended AV (eAV) scheme using artificial-viscosity together with a dual energy-flux-conserving formulation. The dual energy approach allows for accurate modeling of highly relativistic flows at boost factors well beyond what has been achieved to date by standard artificial viscosity methods. It provides the benefit of Godunov methods in capturing high Lorentz boosted flows but without complicated Riemann solvers, and the advantages of traditional artificial viscosity methods in their speed and flexibility. Additionally, the GRMHD equations are solved on an unstructured grid that supports local adaptive mesh refinement using a fully threaded oct-tree (in three dimensions) network to traverse the grid hierarchy across levels and immediate neighbors. A number of tests are presented to demonstrate robustness of the numerical algorithms and adaptive mesh framework over a wide spectrum of problems, boosts, and astrophysical applications, including relativistic shock tubes, shock collisions, magnetosonic shocks, Alfven wave propagation, blast waves, magnetized Bondi flow, and the magneto-rotational instability in Kerr black hole spacetimes.

  16. J4.3 LARGE-EDDY SIMULATION ACROSS A GRID REFINEMENT INTERFACE USING EXPLICIT FILTERING AND RECONSTRUCTION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chow, Fotini Katopodes

    reflect off grid refinement interfaces, specifically on the outflow boundary from a fine to a coarse grid reflection off grid refinement interfaces by forcing the filter-resolved scale on a fine grid to equal

  17. Simulation of multicomponent evaporation in electron beam melting and refining

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Powell, A.; Szekely, J. [Massachusetts Inst. of Tech., Cambridge, MA (United States); Van Den Avyle, J.; Damkroger, B. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1996-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Experimental results and a mathematical model are presented to describe differential evaporation rates in electron beam melting of titanium alloys containing aluminum and vanadium. Experiments characterized the evaporation rate of commercially pure titanium, and vapor composition over titanium with up to 6% Al and 4.5% V content as a function of beam power, scan frequency and background pressure. The model is made up of a steady-state heat and mass transport model of a melting hearth and a model of transient thermal and flow behavior near the surface. Activity coefficients for aluminum and vanadium in titanium are roughly estimated by fitting model parameters to experimental results. Based on the ability to vary evaporation rate by 10-15% using scan frequency alone, we discuss the possibility of on-line composition control by means of intelligent manipulation of the electron beam.

  18. EVALUATION OF THE SACCHAROFLEX 2000 REFLECTANCE MEASURING INSTRUMENT FOR REFINED SUGAR COLOUR ESTIMATION AT HULETTS REFINERY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M Moodley; N K Padayachee; V Govender

    Due to the successful use of the Saccharoflex 2000 reflectance measurement instrument on the estimation of refined sugar colour elsewhere in the world, it was decided by Tongaat-Hulett Sugar to evaluate the instrument at the refinery in Durban. Tests were carried out on first, second, third and fourth refined sugars, the results of which showed a good correlation between the ICUMSA colour measurement and the reflectance reading obtained from the Saccharoflex 2000. The instrument offers a number of advantages, the main one being that a refined sugar colour value can be obtained in less than a minute. The refinery has therefore purchased one for process control.

  19. Influence of Aluminum Content on Grain Refinement and Strength of AZ31 Magnesium GTA Weld Metal

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Babu, N. Kishore [Singapore Institute of Manufacturing Technology; Cross, Carl E. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2012-06-28T23:59:59.000Z

    The goal is to characterize the effect of Al content on AZ31 weld metal, the grain size and strength, and examine role of Al on grain refinement. The approach is to systematically vary the aluminum content of AZ31 weld metal, Measure average grain size in weld metal, and Measure cross-weld tensile properties and hardness. Conclusions are that: (1) increased Al content in AZ31 weld metal results in grain refinement Reason: higher undercooling during solidification; (2) weld metal grain refinement resulted in increased strength & hardness Reason: grain boundary strengthening; and (3) weld metal strength can be raised to wrought base metal levels.

  20. RAM: a Relativistic Adaptive Mesh Refinement Hydrodynamics Code

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, Wei-Qun; /KIPAC, Menlo Park; MacFadyen, Andrew I.; /Princeton, Inst. Advanced Study

    2005-06-06T23:59:59.000Z

    The authors have developed a new computer code, RAM, to solve the conservative equations of special relativistic hydrodynamics (SRHD) using adaptive mesh refinement (AMR) on parallel computers. They have implemented a characteristic-wise, finite difference, weighted essentially non-oscillatory (WENO) scheme using the full characteristic decomposition of the SRHD equations to achieve fifth-order accuracy in space. For time integration they use the method of lines with a third-order total variation diminishing (TVD) Runge-Kutta scheme. They have also implemented fourth and fifth order Runge-Kutta time integration schemes for comparison. The implementation of AMR and parallelization is based on the FLASH code. RAM is modular and includes the capability to easily swap hydrodynamics solvers, reconstruction methods and physics modules. In addition to WENO they have implemented a finite volume module with the piecewise parabolic method (PPM) for reconstruction and the modified Marquina approximate Riemann solver to work with TVD Runge-Kutta time integration. They examine the difficulty of accurately simulating shear flows in numerical relativistic hydrodynamics codes. They show that under-resolved simulations of simple test problems with transverse velocity components produce incorrect results and demonstrate the ability of RAM to correctly solve these problems. RAM has been tested in one, two and three dimensions and in Cartesian, cylindrical and spherical coordinates. they have demonstrated fifth-order accuracy for WENO in one and two dimensions and performed detailed comparison with other schemes for which they show significantly lower convergence rates. Extensive testing is presented demonstrating the ability of RAM to address challenging open questions in relativistic astrophysics.

  1. State of heavy oil production and refining in California

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Olsen, D.K.; Ramzel, E.B. [BDM-Oklahoma, Inc., Bartlesville, OK (United States)

    1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    California is unique in the United States because it has the largest heavy oil (10{degrees} to 20{degrees}API gravity) resource, estimated to be in excess of 40 billion barrels. Of the current 941,543 barrels/day of oil produced in California (14% of the U.S. total), 70% or 625,312 barrels/day is heavy oil. Heavy oil constituted only 20% of California`s oil production in the early 1940s, but development of thermal oil production technology in the 1960s allowed the heavy industry to grow and prosper to the point where by the mid-1980s, heavy oil constituted 70% of the state`s oil production. Similar to the rest of the United States, light oil production in the Los Angeles Basin, Coastal Region, and San Joaquin Valley peaked and then declined at different times throughout the past 30 years. Unlike other states, California developed a heavy oil industry that replaced declining light oil production and increased the states total oil production, despite low heavy oil prices, stringent environmental regulations and long and costly delays in developing known oil resources. California`s deep conversion refineries process the nation`s highest sulfur, lowest API gravity crude to make the cleanest transportation fuels available. More efficient vehicles burning cleaner reformulated fuels have significantly reduced the level of ozone precursors (the main contributor to California`s air pollution) and have improved air quality over the last 20 years. In a state where major oil companies dominate, the infrastructure is highly dependent on the 60% of ANS production being refined in California, and California`s own oil production. When this oil is combined with the small volume of imported crude, a local surplus of marketed oil exists that inhibits exploitation of California`s heavy oil resources. As ANS production declines, or if the export restrictions on ANS sales are lifted, a window of opportunity develops for increased heavy oil production.

  2. Lubricant compositions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, A.L.; Lawson, R.D.; Root, J.C.

    1981-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Lubricant compositions adapted for use under extreme pressure conditions are disclosed. They comprise a major proportion of a lubricating grease, and a minor proportion of an additive consisting essentially of a solid, oil insoluble arylene sulfide polymer, and a metal salt, particularly an alkali metal or alkaline earth metal salt, particularly an alkali metal or alkaline earth metal salt of a phosphorus acid, for example, mono- or dicalcium phosphate, or an alkali metal or alkaline earth metal carbonate exemplified by calcium carbonate, or a mixture of such a phosphate salt and carbonate.

  3. Table 9. U.S. Refiner Conventional Motor Gasoline Volumes by...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    5.7 5.9 4.4 12.9 NA 17.3 See footnotes at end of table. 9. U.S. Refiner Conventional Motor Gasoline Volumes by Grade and Sales Type 18 Energy Information Administration ...

  4. Table 10. U.S. Refiner Oxygenated Motor Gasoline Prices by...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    98.0 98.0 86.6 75.0 - 80.1 See footnotes at end of table. 10. U.S. Refiner Oxygenated Motor Gasoline Prices by Grade and Sales Type 20 Energy Information Administration ...

  5. Table 13. U.S. Refiner Reformulated Motor Gasoline Volumes by...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    3.3 3.4 7.9 3.3 W 11.3 See footnotes at end of table. 13. U.S. Refiner Reformulated Motor Gasoline Volumes by Grade and Sales Type 26 Energy Information Administration ...

  6. Table 12. U.S. Refiner Reformulated Motor Gasoline Prices by...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    92.4 92.1 83.7 74.1 W 80.9 See footnotes at end of table. 12. U.S. Refiner Reformulated Motor Gasoline Prices by Grade and Sales Type 24 Energy Information Administration ...

  7. Table 8. U.S. Refiner Conventional Motor Gasoline Prices by...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    87.4 86.9 78.3 68.5 W 70.8 See footnotes at end of table. 8. U.S. Refiner Conventional Motor Gasoline Prices by Grade and Sales Type 16 Energy Information Administration ...

  8. Table 12. U.S. Refiner Reformulated Motor Gasoline Prices by...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    92.8 92.5 84.0 72.5 W 80.7 See footnotes at end of table. 12. U.S. Refiner Reformulated Motor Gasoline Prices by Grade and Sales Type 24 Energy Information Administration ...

  9. Table 8. U.S. Refiner Conventional Motor Gasoline Prices by...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    88.4 87.8 80.1 70.0 NA 72.6 See footnotes at end of table. 8. U.S. Refiner Conventional Motor Gasoline Prices by Grade and Sales Type 16 Energy Information Administration ...

  10. Table 10. U.S. Refiner Oxygenated Motor Gasoline Prices by...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    94.0 93.9 83.2 73.8 - 79.3 See footnotes at end of table. 10. U.S. Refiner Oxygenated Motor Gasoline Prices by Grade and Sales Type 20 Energy Information Administration ...

  11. Table 13. U.S. Refiner Reformulated Motor Gasoline Volumes by...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    3.6 3.7 7.9 3.1 W 11.0 See footnotes at end of table. 13. U.S. Refiner Reformulated Motor Gasoline Volumes by Grade and Sales Type 26 Energy Information Administration ...

  12. Table 9. U.S. Refiner Conventional Motor Gasoline Volumes by...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    5.7 5.9 3.9 12.7 W 16.6 See footnotes at end of table. 9. U.S. Refiner Conventional Motor Gasoline Volumes by Grade and Sales Type 18 Energy Information Administration ...

  13. Process for solvent refining of coal using a denitrogenated and dephenolated solvent

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Garg, Diwakar (Macungie, PA); Givens, Edwin N. (Bethlehem, PA); Schweighardt, Frank K. (Allentown, PA)

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A process is disclosed for the solvent refining of non-anthracitic coal at elevated temperatures and pressure in a hydrogen atmosphere using a hydrocarbon solvent which before being recycled in the solvent refining process is subjected to chemical treatment to extract substantially all nitrogenous and phenolic constituents from the solvent so as to improve the conversion of coal and the production of oil in the solvent refining process. The solvent refining process can be either thermal or catalytic. The extraction of nitrogenous compounds can be performed by acid contact such as hydrogen chloride or fluoride treatment, while phenolic extraction can be performed by caustic contact or contact with a mixture of silica and alumina.

  14. Table A2. Refiner/Reseller Prices of Aviation Fuels, Propane...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    - W 73.5 See footnotes at end of table. A2. RefinerReseller Prices of Aviation Fuels, Propane, and Kerosene, by PAD District, 1983-Present Energy Information Administration ...

  15. Economic impact of the European Union Emission Trading Scheme : evidence from the refining sector

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lacombe, Romain H

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    I study the economic impact of the European Union Emission Trading Scheme (EU ETS) on the refining industry in Europe. I contrast previous ex-ante studies with the lessons from a series of interviews I conducted with ...

  16. Using a conformation-dependent stereochemical library improves crystallographic refinement of proteins

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tronrud, Dale E.; Berkholz, Donald S.; Karplus, P. Andrew (Oregon State U.)

    2010-07-02T23:59:59.000Z

    The major macromolecular crystallographic refinement packages restrain models to ideal geometry targets defined as single values that are independent of molecular conformation. However, ultrahigh-resolution X-ray models of proteins are not consistent with this concept of ideality and have been used to develop a library of ideal main-chain bond lengths and angles that are parameterized by the {phi}/{psi} angle of the residue [Berkholz et al. (2009), Structure, 17, 1316-1325]. Here, it is first shown that the new conformation-dependent library does not suffer from poor agreement with ultrahigh-resolution structures, whereas current libraries have this problem. Using the TNT refinement package, it is then shown that protein structure refinement using this conformation-dependent library results in models that have much better agreement with library values of bond angles with little change in the R values. These tests support the value of revising refinement software to account for this new paradigm.

  17. A Concept-Driven Construction of the Mondex Protocol using Three Refinements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Banach, Richard

    as closely as possible to the original, or by adapting the problem to fit the style of the tool, thereby, the proof is monolithic, consisting of a single refinement. Other authors, particularly [19] and [20], have

  18. A ConceptDriven Construction of the Mondex Protocol using Three Refinements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Banach, Richard

    as closely as possible to the original, or by adapting the problem to fit the style of the tool, thereby, the proof is monolithic, consisting of a single refinement. Other authors, particularly [19] and [20], have

  19. Table 46. Refiner No. 2 Distillate, Diesel Fuel, and Fuel Oil...

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    132.9 1,418.3 See footnotes at end of table. 46. Refiner No. 2 Distillate, Diesel Fuel, and Fuel Oil Volumes by PAD District and State Energy Information Administration ...

  20. Table 46. Refiner No. 2 Distillate, Diesel Fuel, and Fuel Oil...

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    839.2 135.0 1,251.9 See footnotes at end of table. 46. Refiner No. 2 Distillate, Diesel Fuel, and Fuel Oil Volumes by PAD District and State Energy Information Administration ...

  1. Table A3. Refiner/Reseller Prices of Distillate and Residual...

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    A3. RefinerReseller Prices of Distillate and Residual Fuel Oils, by PAD District, 1983-Present (Cents per Gallon Excluding Taxes) Geographic Area Year No. 1 Distillate No. 2...

  2. Optimized Execution of Action Chains through Subgoal Refinement Freek Stulp and Michael Beetz

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cremers, Daniel

    Optimized Execution of Action Chains through Subgoal Refinement Freek Stulp and Michael Beetz, Germany {stulp,beetz}@in.tum.de Abstract In this paper we propose a novel computation model

  3. Refinement trajectory and determination of eigenstates by a wavelet based adaptive method

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pipek, Janos; Nagy, Szilvia [Department of Theoretical Physics, Institute of Physics, Budapest University of Technology and Economics, H-1521 Budapest (Hungary); Department of Telecommunication, Jedlik Anyos Institute of Informatics, Electrical and Mechanical Engineering, Szechenyi Istvan University, H-9026 Gyor, Egyetem ter 1 (Hungary)

    2006-11-07T23:59:59.000Z

    The detail structure of the wave function is analyzed at various refinement levels using the methods of wavelet analysis. The eigenvalue problem of a model system is solved in granular Hilbert spaces, and the trajectory of the eigenstates is traced in terms of the resolution. An adaptive method is developed for identifying the fine structure localization regions, where further refinement of the wave function is necessary.

  4. Refine your search Select options from the menu on the left hand

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yener, Aylin

    ://psu.summon.serialssolutions.comhttp://psu.summon.serialssolutions.com F I N A L LY : RESEARCH AS EASYAS 1-2-3 #12;1 Enter search term into search box. 2 Refine results relevant articles were published in that year. Include or Exclude subject terms from your searchRefine your search Select options from the menu on the left hand side of the results screen

  5. Thickness-based adaptive mesh refinement methods for multi-phase flow simulations with thin regions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, Xiaodong [The State Key Laboratory of Nonlinear Mechanics, Institute of Mechanics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190 (China); Yang, Vigor, E-mail: vigor.yang@aerospace.gatech.edu [School of Aerospace Engineering, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA 30332-0150 (United States)

    2014-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    In numerical simulations of multi-scale, multi-phase flows, grid refinement is required to resolve regions with small scales. A notable example is liquid-jet atomization and subsequent droplet dynamics. It is essential to characterize the detailed flow physics with variable length scales with high fidelity, in order to elucidate the underlying mechanisms. In this paper, two thickness-based mesh refinement schemes are developed based on distance- and topology-oriented criteria for thin regions with confining wall/plane of symmetry and in any situation, respectively. Both techniques are implemented in a general framework with a volume-of-fluid formulation and an adaptive-mesh-refinement capability. The distance-oriented technique compares against a critical value, the ratio of an interfacial cell size to the distance between the mass center of the cell and a reference plane. The topology-oriented technique is developed from digital topology theories to handle more general conditions. The requirement for interfacial mesh refinement can be detected swiftly, without the need of thickness information, equation solving, variable averaging or mesh repairing. The mesh refinement level increases smoothly on demand in thin regions. The schemes have been verified and validated against several benchmark cases to demonstrate their effectiveness and robustness. These include the dynamics of colliding droplets, droplet motions in a microchannel, and atomization of liquid impinging jets. Overall, the thickness-based refinement technique provides highly adaptive meshes for problems with thin regions in an efficient and fully automatic manner.

  6. Composite of refractory material

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Holcombe, Cressie E. (Knoxville, TN); Morrow, Marvin S. (Kingston, TN)

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A composite refractory material composition comprises a boron carbide matrix and minor constituents of yttrium-boron-oxygen-carbon phases uniformly distributed throughout the boron carbide matrix.

  7. Composite of refractory material

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Holcombe, C.E.; Morrow, M.S.

    1994-07-19T23:59:59.000Z

    A composite refractory material composition comprises a boron carbide matrix and minor constituents of yttrium-boron-oxygen-carbon phases uniformly distributed throughout the boron carbide matrix.

  8. The third, use of quantum mechanics to evaluate the molecular energy and forces, holds promise for future refinements when applied wholesale,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sali, Andrej

    for future refinements when applied wholesale, but is already capable of producing valuable insight when

  9. Need for refining capacity creates opportunities for producers in Middle East

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ali, M.S.S. (Bahrain National Oil Co., Awali (Bahrain))

    1994-07-11T23:59:59.000Z

    Oil industry interest in refining has revived in the past few years in response to rising oil consumption. The trend creates opportunities, for countries in the Middle East, which do not own refining assets nearly in proportion to their crude oil reserved. By closing this gap between reserves and refining capacity, the countries can ease some of the instability now characteristic of the oil market. Some major oil producing countries have begun to move downstream. During the 1980s, Venezuela, Kuwait, Saudi Arabia, Libya, and other members of the Organization of Petroleum Exporting Countries acquired refining assets through direct total purchase or joint ventures. Nevertheless, the oil industry remains largely unintegrated, with the Middle East holding two thirds of worldwide oil reserves but only a small share downstream. As worldwide refining capacity swings from a period of surplus toward one in which the need for new capacity will be built. The paper discusses background of the situation, shrinking surplus, investment requirements, sources of capital, and shipping concerns.

  10. Empirical examination of allegations of ''below-cost'' retail selling of gasoline by refiners: Research study No. 038

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hogarty, T.F.; Lindstrom, P.M.

    1986-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    It is alleged by some dealers that (major) refiners consistently sell their gasoline through directly operated stations at retail prices below the prices charged to resellers. The results of this examination, involving more than 2000 price comparisons, failed to reveal a single instance where the average monthly retail price at refiner operated stations was below the price charged resellers by refiners. This result obtained not only for all gasoline sales by major refiners, but also for specific grades of gasoline sold by all refiners. Moreover, a large majority of the average monthly price differentials were greater than 6 cents per gallon, and exceeded 10 cents per gallon in a significant number of instances. Thus, the data do not support the allegation of widespread ''below-cost'' selling by refiners through outlets which they own and operate. Therefore, the rationale offered for legislation mandating retail divorcement, or prohibiting ''below-cost'' is not supported by the evidence. 3 figs., 5 tabs.

  11. Automating crystallographic structure solution and refinement of protein–ligand complexes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Echols, Nathaniel, E-mail: nechols@lbl.gov; Moriarty, Nigel W., E-mail: nechols@lbl.gov; Klei, Herbert E.; Afonine, Pavel V. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA 94720-8235 (United States); Bunkóczi, Gábor [University of Cambridge, Cambridge Institute for Medical Research, Wellcome Trust/MRC Building, Cambridge CB2 0XY (United Kingdom); Headd, Jeffrey J. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA 94720-8235 (United States); McCoy, Airlie J.; Oeffner, Robert D.; Read, Randy J. [University of Cambridge, Cambridge Institute for Medical Research, Wellcome Trust/MRC Building, Cambridge CB2 0XY (United Kingdom); Terwilliger, Thomas C. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545-0001 (United States); Adams, Paul D., E-mail: nechols@lbl.gov [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA 94720-8235 (United States); University of California at Berkeley, Berkeley, CA 94720-1762 (United States)

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A software system for automated protein–ligand crystallography has been implemented in the Phenix suite. This significantly reduces the manual effort required in high-throughput crystallographic studies. High-throughput drug-discovery and mechanistic studies often require the determination of multiple related crystal structures that only differ in the bound ligands, point mutations in the protein sequence and minor conformational changes. If performed manually, solution and refinement requires extensive repetition of the same tasks for each structure. To accelerate this process and minimize manual effort, a pipeline encompassing all stages of ligand building and refinement, starting from integrated and scaled diffraction intensities, has been implemented in Phenix. The resulting system is able to successfully solve and refine large collections of structures in parallel without extensive user intervention prior to the final stages of model completion and validation.

  12. Free kick instead of cross-validation in maximum-likelihood refinement of macromolecular crystal structures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pražnikar, Jure [Institute Jožef Stefan, Jamova 39, 1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia); University of Primorska, (Slovenia); Turk, Dušan, E-mail: dusan.turk@ijs.si [Institute Jožef Stefan, Jamova 39, 1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia); Center of Excellence for Integrated Approaches in Chemistry and Biology of Proteins, (Slovenia)

    2014-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The maximum-likelihood free-kick target, which calculates model error estimates from the work set and a randomly displaced model, proved superior in the accuracy and consistency of refinement of crystal structures compared with the maximum-likelihood cross-validation target, which calculates error estimates from the test set and the unperturbed model. The refinement of a molecular model is a computational procedure by which the atomic model is fitted to the diffraction data. The commonly used target in the refinement of macromolecular structures is the maximum-likelihood (ML) function, which relies on the assessment of model errors. The current ML functions rely on cross-validation. They utilize phase-error estimates that are calculated from a small fraction of diffraction data, called the test set, that are not used to fit the model. An approach has been developed that uses the work set to calculate the phase-error estimates in the ML refinement from simulating the model errors via the random displacement of atomic coordinates. It is called ML free-kick refinement as it uses the ML formulation of the target function and is based on the idea of freeing the model from the model bias imposed by the chemical energy restraints used in refinement. This approach for the calculation of error estimates is superior to the cross-validation approach: it reduces the phase error and increases the accuracy of molecular models, is more robust, provides clearer maps and may use a smaller portion of data for the test set for the calculation of R{sub free} or may leave it out completely.

  13. Studies on design of a process for organo-refining of coal to obtain super clean coal

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sharma, C.S.; Sharma, D.K. [Indian Inst. of Tech., New Delhi (India). Centre for Energy Studies

    1999-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Organo-refining of coal results in refining the coal to obtain super clean coal and residual coal. Super clean coal may be used to obtain value added chemicals, products, and cleaner fuels from coal. In the present work, studies on the design of a semicontinuous process for organo-refining of one ton of coal have been made. The results are reported. This is only a cursory attempt for the design, and further studies may be required for designing this process for use in the development of a scaled-up process of organo-refining of coal.

  14. ,"Motor Gasoline Sales to End Users, Total Refiner Sales Volumes"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghurajiConventional Gasoline Sales to End Users, Total Refiner Sales Volumes"forUsers, Total Refiner

  15. ,"U.S. Conventional Gasoline Refiner Sales Volumes"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghurajiConventional Gasoline Sales to End Users, Total Refiner SalesConventional Gasoline Refiner Sales

  16. ,"U.S. Conventional, Average Refiner Gasoline Prices"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghurajiConventional Gasoline Sales to End Users, Total Refiner SalesConventional Gasoline Refiner

  17. Microcracking in fibrous composites 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Conrad, Nicholas

    1973-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    are conducted on a unidirectional graphite fiber-reinforced epoxy in order to determine some aspects of nonlinear behavior, and the results of microcracking. The nature. of the microstructure of composites and the microcracking that occurs in composites... of microscopy samples. 53 21. Graphite composite surfaces, as received (top, 60X) and as prepared (bottom, 100X) ~ 56 22, Graphite composite surfaces after peeling (1000X). 58 23. Scotchply surfaces after peeling (1000X). 60 24. Graphite composite damaged...

  18. Federal/Industry Development of Energy-Conserving Technologies for the Chemical and Petroleum Refining Industries 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alston, T. G.; Humphrey, J. L.

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Argonne National Laboratory has started a program to identify future RD&D projects that (i) promise cost-effective savings of scarce fuels in the chemical and petroleum refining industries, (ii) are not likely to be pursued by industry alone...

  19. EIS-0069: Solvent Refined Coal-II Demonstration Project, Fort Martin, Monongalia County, West Virginia

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The U.S. Department of Energy developed this statement to assess the potential environmental, economic and social impacts associated with the construction and short-term operation of a 6,000-tons-per-stream-day-capacity facility that will demonstrate the technical operability, economic viability, and environmental acceptability of the solvent refined coal process at Fort Martin, West Virginia.

  20. Table 7. U.S. Refiner Motor Gasoline Volumes by Grade and Sales...

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    35.2 213.6 9.5 9.8 12.9 16.6 NA 29.5 See footnotes at end of table. 7. U.S. Refiner Motor Gasoline Volumes by Grade and Sales Type 14 Energy Information Administration ...

  1. Table A1. Refiner/Reseller Motor Gasoline Prices by Grade, PAD...

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    71.6 92.3 78.2 101.8 83.6 87.5 74.7 See footnotes at end of table. A1. RefinerReseller Motor Gasoline Prices by Grade, PAD District, and State, 1984-Present 452 Energy Information...

  2. Table 6. U.S. Refiner Motor Gasoline Prices by Grade and Sales...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    62.2 68.5 90.1 89.6 82.4 70.9 NA 75.9 See footnotes at end of table. 6. U.S. Refiner Motor Gasoline Prices by Grade and Sales Type 12 Energy Information Administration ...

  3. Table 11. U.S. Refiner Oxygenated Motor Gasoline Volumes by...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    - 4.9 0.4 0.4 0.3 0.4 - 0.7 See footnotes at end of table. 11. U.S. Refiner Oxygenated Motor Gasoline Volumes by Grade and Sales Type 22 Energy Information Administration ...

  4. Table 6. U.S. Refiner Motor Gasoline Prices by Grade and Sales...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    61.5 67.3 89.8 89.5 82.2 69.4 71.1 74.9 See footnotes at end of table. 6. U.S. Refiner Motor Gasoline Prices by Grade and Sales Type 12 Energy Information Administration ...

  5. Table 7. U.S. Refiner Motor Gasoline Volumes by Grade and Sales...

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    33.9 215.8 9.7 10.0 12.1 16.3 0.0 28.4 See footnotes at end of table. 7. U.S. Refiner Motor Gasoline Volumes by Grade and Sales Type 14 Energy Information Administration ...

  6. Table 11. U.S. Refiner Oxygenated Motor Gasoline Volumes by...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    W 5.6 0.5 0.5 0.5 0.4 - 0.9 See footnotes at end of table. 11. U.S. Refiner Oxygenated Motor Gasoline Volumes by Grade and Sales Type 22 Energy Information Administration ...

  7. The Nekrasov-Okounkov hook length formula: refinement, elementary proof, extension and applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    2008/05/09 The Nekrasov-Okounkov hook length formula: refinement, elementary proof, extension and applications Guo-Niu HAN ABSTRACT. -- The paper is devoted to the derivation of the expan- sion formula function for t-cores. Several applications are derived, including the "marked hook formula". 1

  8. Three Dimensional Adaptive Mesh Refinement on a Spherical Shell for Atmospheric Models with Lagrangian Coordinates

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jablonowski, Christiane

    Three Dimensional Adaptive Mesh Refinement on a Spherical Shell for Atmospheric Models for Atmospheric Research 1. Introduction One of the most important advances needed in global climate models of this project is a parallel adaptive grid library, which is currently under development at the University

  9. Tools for macromolecular model building and refinement into electron cryo-microscopy reconstructions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brown, Alan; Long, Fei; Nicholls, Robert A.; Toots, Jaan; Emsley, Paul; Murshudov, Garib, E-mail: garib@mrc-lmb.cam.ac.uk [MRC Laboratory of Molecular Biology, Francis Crick Avenue, Cambridge CB2 0QH (United Kingdom)

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A description is given of new tools to facilitate model building and refinement into electron cryo-microscopy reconstructions. The recent rapid development of single-particle electron cryo-microscopy (cryo-EM) now allows structures to be solved by this method at resolutions close to 3 Å. Here, a number of tools to facilitate the interpretation of EM reconstructions with stereochemically reasonable all-atom models are described. The BALBES database has been repurposed as a tool for identifying protein folds from density maps. Modifications to Coot, including new Jiggle Fit and morphing tools and improved handling of nucleic acids, enhance its functionality for interpreting EM maps. REFMAC has been modified for optimal fitting of atomic models into EM maps. As external structural information can enhance the reliability of the derived atomic models, stabilize refinement and reduce overfitting, ProSMART has been extended to generate interatomic distance restraints from nucleic acid reference structures, and a new tool, LIBG, has been developed to generate nucleic acid base-pair and parallel-plane restraints. Furthermore, restraint generation has been integrated with visualization and editing in Coot, and these restraints have been applied to both real-space refinement in Coot and reciprocal-space refinement in REFMAC.

  10. Grain refinement and texture development of cast bi90sb10 alloy via severe plastic deformation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Im, Jae-taek

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this work was to study learn about grain refinement mechanisms and texture development in cast n-type Bi90Sb10 alloy caused by severe plastic deformation. The practical objective is to produce a fine grained and textured...

  11. Proceedings of the conference on electron beam melting and refining - state of the art 1996

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bakish, R. [ed.

    1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This conference proceedings summarizes state-of-the-art work in the field of electron-beam melting and refining, as presented at the 1996 conference. Papers are grouped as follows: invited papers; tutorial papers; electron beam melting related fundamentals; electron beam evaporation papers; and miscellaneous papers. Separate abstracts have been submitted to the energy database for some contributions to this proceedings.

  12. REFINING AND MAINTAINING THE OPTIMAL PERFORMANCE OF THE CEBAF SRF SYSTEMS *

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    REFINING AND MAINTAINING THE OPTIMAL PERFORMANCE OF THE CEBAF SRF SYSTEMS * C. Reece, J. Benesch CEBAF at Jefferson Lab is striving to achieve its maximum reliability at the maximum deliverable energy beam time when CEBAF is run near its maximum energy. Operation at increased rf power levels has

  13. Rocky Mountain area petroleum product availability with reduced PADD IV refining capacity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hadder, G.R.; Chin, S.M.

    1994-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Studies of Rocky Mountain area petroleum product availability with reduced refining capacity in Petroleum Administration for Defense IV (PADD IV, part of the Rocky Mountain area) have been performed with the Oak Ridge National Laboratory Refinery Yield Model, a linear program which has been updated to blend gasolines to satisfy constraints on emissions of nitrogen oxides and winter toxic air pollutants. The studies do not predict refinery closures in PADD IV. Rather, the reduced refining capacities provide an analytical framework for probing the flexibility of petroleum refining and distribution for winter demand conditions in the year 2000. Industry analysts have estimated that, for worst case scenarios, 20 to 35 percent of PADD IV refining capacity could be shut-down as a result of clean air and energy tax legislation. Given these industry projections, the study scenarios provide the following conclusions: The Rocky Mountain area petroleum system would have the capability to satisfy winter product demand with PADD IV refinery capacity shut-downs in the middle of the range of industry projections, but not in the high end of the range of projections. PADD IV crude oil production can be maintained by re-routing crude released from PADD IV refinery demands to satisfy increased crude oil demands in PADDs II (Midwest), III (Gulf Coast), and Washington. Clean Air Act product quality regulations generally do not increase the difficulty of satisfying emissions reduction constraints in the scenarios.

  14. Protein NMR Structures Refined with Rosetta Have Higher Accuracy Relative to Corresponding Xray Crystal Structures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baker, David

    refinement of protein NMR structures was also compared with restrained CS-Rosetta calculations. For proteins spectroscopy (NMR). While X-ray crystal structures are derived from electron density data and are often dynamics and has the advantage of not requiring crystallization. Solution NMR structure determination

  15. Iterative model-building, structure refinement, and density modification with the PHENIX AutoBuild Wizard

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Los Alamos National Laboratory, Mailstop M888, Los Alamos, NM 87545, USA; Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, One Cyclotron Road, Building 64R0121, Berkeley, CA 94720, USA; Department of Haematology, University of Cambridge, Cambridge CB2 0XY, England; Terwilliger, Thomas; Terwilliger, T.C.; Grosse-Kunstleve, Ralf Wilhelm; Afonine, P.V.; Moriarty, N.W.; Zwart, P.H.; Hung, L.-W.; Read, R.J.; Adams, P.D.

    2007-04-29T23:59:59.000Z

    The PHENIX AutoBuild Wizard is a highly automated tool for iterative model-building, structure refinement and density modification using RESOLVE or TEXTAL model-building, RESOLVE statistical density modification, and phenix.refine structure refinement. Recent advances in the AutoBuild Wizard and phenix.refine include automated detection and application of NCS from models as they are built, extensive model completion algorithms, and automated solvent molecule picking. Model completion algorithms in the AutoBuild Wizard include loop-building, crossovers between chains in different models of a structure, and side-chain optimization. The AutoBuild Wizard has been applied to a set of 48 structures at resolutions ranging from 1.1 {angstrom} to 3.2 {angstrom}, resulting in a mean R-factor of 0.24 and a mean free R factor of 0.29. The R-factor of the final model is dependent on the quality of the starting electron density, and relatively independent of resolution.

  16. Iterative model building, structure refinement and density modification with the PHENIX AutoBuild wizard

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Terwilliger, Thomas C., E-mail: terwilliger@lanl.gov [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Mailstop M888, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Grosse-Kunstleve, Ralf W.; Afonine, Pavel V.; Moriarty, Nigel W.; Zwart, Peter H. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, One Cyclotron Road, Building 64R0121, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Hung, Li-Wei [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Mailstop M888, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Read, Randy J. [Department of Haematology, University of Cambridge, Cambridge CB2 0XY (United Kingdom); Adams, Paul D., E-mail: terwilliger@lanl.gov [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, One Cyclotron Road, Building 64R0121, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Los Alamos National Laboratory, Mailstop M888, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States)

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The highly automated PHENIX AutoBuild wizard is described. The procedure can be applied equally well to phases derived from isomorphous/anomalous and molecular-replacement methods. The PHENIX AutoBuild wizard is a highly automated tool for iterative model building, structure refinement and density modification using RESOLVE model building, RESOLVE statistical density modification and phenix.refine structure refinement. Recent advances in the AutoBuild wizard and phenix.refine include automated detection and application of NCS from models as they are built, extensive model-completion algorithms and automated solvent-molecule picking. Model-completion algorithms in the AutoBuild wizard include loop building, crossovers between chains in different models of a structure and side-chain optimization. The AutoBuild wizard has been applied to a set of 48 structures at resolutions ranging from 1.1 to 3.2 Å, resulting in a mean R factor of 0.24 and a mean free R factor of 0.29. The R factor of the final model is dependent on the quality of the starting electron density and is relatively independent of resolution.

  17. NWS Product Definition Document (PDD) for: Refinement of SPC Experimental Enhanced Resolution Thunderstorm Outlook

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    NWS Product Definition Document (PDD) for: Refinement of SPC Experimental Enhanced Resolution replaces an existing PDD, whose evaluation period expired on 15 February 2008, and revises the current SPC will also evaluate changes in the distribution of SPC forecaster workload and the ability to maintain

  18. Most of the world's titanium output is refined into titanium dioxide (TiO2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Torgersen, Christian

    Most of the world's titanium output is refined into titanium dioxide (TiO2 ), which is used to give.S. Geological Survey (USGS) supports science to understand · How and where titanium resources form and concentrate in the Earth's crust · How titanium resources interact with the environment to affect human

  19. Use of Lung Transplantation Survival Models to Refine Patient Selection in Cystic Fibrosis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Adler, Fred

    Use of Lung Transplantation Survival Models to Refine Patient Selection in Cystic Fibrosis Theodore Angeles, California Lung transplantation in cystic fibrosis may improve survival for patients with low 5 and United Network for Organ Sharing data, we identified 845 lung transplant recipients from 1991

  20. Soundness and Separability of Workflow Nets in the Stepwise Refinement Approach

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sidorova, Natalia

    Soundness and Separability of Workflow Nets in the Stepwise Refinement Approach Kees van Hee.sidorova@tue.nl, wsinmarc@win.tue.nl Abstract. Workflow nets are recognized as a modelling paradigm for the business process modelling. We introduce and investigate several cor- rectness notions for workflow nets, ranging from proper

  1. Soundness and Separability of Workflow Nets in the Stepwise Refinement Approach

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sidorova, Natalia

    Soundness and Separability of Workflow Nets in the Stepwise Refinement Approach Kees van Hee.sidorova@tue.nl, wsinmarc@win.tue.nl Abstract. Workflow nets are recognized as a modelling paradigm for the business process modelling. We introduce and investigate several cor­ rectness notions for workflow nets, ranging from proper

  2. A Pareto-Optimal Refinement Method for Protein Design Lucas Gregorio Nivo n1.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baker, David

    Moretti1. , David Baker1,2 * 1 Department of Biochemistry, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington, United States of America, 2 Howard Hughes Medical Institute (HHMI), University of Washington, Seattle for functional site design. Citation: Nivo´n LG, Moretti R, Baker D (2013) A Pareto-Optimal Refinement Method

  3. Refinement of weed risk assessments for biofuels using Camelina sativa as a model species

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peterson, Robert K. D.

    Refinement of weed risk assessments for biofuels using Camelina sativa as a model species Philip B and Environmental Sciences, Montana State University, PO Box 173120, Bozeman, MT 59717-3120, USA Summary 1. Biofuel. However, concerns have been raised on the invasiveness of biofuel feedstocks. Estimating invasion

  4. Nonrigid Motion Analysis Based on Dynamic Refinement of Finite Element Models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sarkar, Sudeep

    Nonrigid Motion Analysis Based on Dynamic Refinement of Finite Element Models Leonid V. Tsap finite element models. The method is based on the iterative analysis of the differences betweenÐPhysically-based vision, deformable models, nonrigid motion analysis, biomedical applications, finite element analysis. æ

  5. Environmental Regulations and Changes in Petroleum Refining Operations (Released in the STEO June 1998)

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Changes in domestic refining operations are identified and related to the summer Reid vapor pressure (RVP) restrictions and oxygenate blending requirements. This analysis uses published Energy Information Administration survey data and linear regression equations from the Short-Term Integrated Forecasting System (STIFS). The STIFS model is used for producing forecasts appearing in the Short-Term Energy Outlook.

  6. A Characteristic Domain Decomposition and SpaceTime Local Refinement Method for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sharpley, Robert

    partial differential equations model the reactive transport of solutes in groundwater and surface water with other domain decomposition and local refinement schemes. 1 Introduction First­order linear hyperbolic interfaces that introduce extra difficulties. Physical interfaces arise, for example, in the modeling

  7. A Characteristic Domain Decomposition and SpaceTime Local Refinement Method for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    South Carolina, University of

    model the reactive transport of solutes in groundwater and surface water, the movement of aerosols and local refinement schemes. 1 Introduction First­order linear hyperbolic partial differential equations that introduce extra difficulties. Physical interfaces arise, for example, in the modeling of transport processes

  8. A Characteristic Domain Decomposition and Space Time Local Refinement Method for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sharpley, Robert

    cause severe numerical difficulties [1­5]. Conventional finite difference or finite element methods­Lagrangian methods; linear hyperbolic problems; local refinement techniques I. INTRODUCTION First-order linear hyperbolic partial differential equations model the reactive transport of solutes in groundwater and surface

  9. A Refined Ethical Impact Assessment Tool and a Case Study of its Application

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at San Diego, University of

    A Refined Ethical Impact Assessment Tool and a Case Study of its Application Michael Bailey1 , Erin? What impact does the immediacy of an event (e.g., DDoS) have on our response to the event? [4 understanding, and (iii) retrospectively apply this EIA to an ethically challenging, original study in ICTR. 1

  10. The Use of Re-Refined Oil in Vehicle Fleets Copyright 1996 Society of Automotive Engineers, Inc.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Timothy T. Maxwell; Glen Hagler; Jesse C. Jones; Raghu Narayan; Atila Ertas

    A literature search to identify deleterious effects of using re-refined oil did not disclose any validated occurrences. Significant engine testing using re-refined lubricating oil is reported and no cases were discovered in which engine operation was affected negatively by the use of re-refined oil. The American Petroleum Institute (AFT) allows the use of re-refined base stock oils in the blending of end use lubricants. Based on oil sample testing performed in this research as well as other authoritative sources, it was determined that no significant chemical or physical differences exist between rerefined and virgin oils. Differences noted in this research were related to higher levels of polynuclear aromatics (PNA’s) in the re-refined oil. PNA’s

  11. Heteroporphyrin nanotubes and composites

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Shelnutt, John A.; Medforth, Craig J.; Wang, Zhongchun

    2006-11-07T23:59:59.000Z

    Heteroporphyrin nanotubes, metal nanostructures, and metal/porphyrin-nanotube composite nanostructures formed using the nanotubes as photocatalysts and structural templates, and the methods for forming the nanotubes and composites.

  12. Heteroporphyrin nanotubes and composites

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Shelnutt, John A. (Tijeras, NM); Medforth, Craig J. (Winters, CA); Wang, Zhongchun (Albuquerque, NM)

    2007-05-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Heteroporphyrin nanotubes, metal nanostructures, and metal/porphyrin-nanotube composite nanostructures formed using the nanotubes as photocatalysts and structural templates, and the methods for forming the nanotubes and composites.

  13. Two-boson composites

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Malte C. Tichy; Peter Alexander Bouvrie; Klaus Mølmer

    2013-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

    Composite bosons made of two bosonic constituents exhibit deviations from ideal bosonic behavior due to their substructure. This deviation is reflected by the normalization ratio of the quantum state of N composites. We find a set of saturable, efficiently evaluable bounds for this indicator, which quantifies the bosonic behavior of composites via the entanglement of their constituents. We predict an abrupt transition between ordinary and exaggerated bosonic behavior in a condensate of two-boson composites.

  14. Nano-composite materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lee, Se-Hee; Tracy, C. Edwin; Pitts, J. Roland

    2010-05-25T23:59:59.000Z

    Nano-composite materials are disclosed. An exemplary method of producing a nano-composite material may comprise co-sputtering a transition metal and a refractory metal in a reactive atmosphere. The method may also comprise co-depositing a transition metal and a refractory metal composite structure on a substrate. The method may further comprise thermally annealing the deposited transition metal and refractory metal composite structure in a reactive atmosphere.

  15. Composite fuel cell membranes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Plowman, Keith R. (Lake Jackson, TX); Rehg, Timothy J. (Lake Jackson, TX); Davis, Larry W. (West Columbia, TX); Carl, William P. (Marble Falls, TX); Cisar, Alan J. (Cypress, TX); Eastland, Charles S. (West Columbia, TX)

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A bilayer or trilayer composite ion exchange membrane suitable for use in a fuel cell. The composite membrane has a high equivalent weight thick layer in order to provide sufficient strength and low equivalent weight surface layers for improved electrical performance in a fuel cell. In use, the composite membrane is provided with electrode surface layers. The composite membrane can be composed of a sulfonic fluoropolymer in both core and surface layers.

  16. Composite fuel cell membranes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Plowman, K.R.; Rehg, T.J.; Davis, L.W.; Carl, W.P.; Cisar, A.J.; Eastland, C.S.

    1997-08-05T23:59:59.000Z

    A bilayer or trilayer composite ion exchange membrane is described suitable for use in a fuel cell. The composite membrane has a high equivalent weight thick layer in order to provide sufficient strength and low equivalent weight surface layers for improved electrical performance in a fuel cell. In use, the composite membrane is provided with electrode surface layers. The composite membrane can be composed of a sulfonic fluoropolymer in both core and surface layers.

  17. Arylene fluorinated sulfonimide compositions

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Teasley, Mark F. (Landenberg, PA)

    2010-11-23T23:59:59.000Z

    Described herein are aromatic sulfonimide compositions that can be used to prepare polymers useful as membranes in electrochemical cells.

  18. Phase change compositions

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Salyer, Ival O. (Dayton, OH)

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Compositions containing crystalline, straight chain, alkyl hydrocarbons as phase change materials including cementitious compositions containing the alkyl hydrocarbons neat or in pellets or granules formed by incorporating the alkyl hydrocarbons in polymers or rubbers; and polymeric or elastomeric compositions containing alkyl hydrocarbons.

  19. Phase change compositions

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Salyer, Ival O. (Dayton, OH); Griffen, Charles W. (Mason, OH)

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Compositions containing crystalline, long chain, alkyl hydrocarbons as phase change materials including cementitious compositions containing the alkyl hydrocarbons neat or in pellets or granules formed by incorporating the alkyl hydrocarbons in polymers or rubbers; and polymeric or elastomeric compositions containing alkyl hydrocarbons.

  20. Solid polymer electrolyte compositions

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Garbe, James E. (Stillwater, MN); Atanasoski, Radoslav (Edina, MN); Hamrock, Steven J. (St. Paul, MN); Le, Dinh Ba (St. Paul, MN)

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An electrolyte composition is featured that includes a solid, ionically conductive polymer, organically modified oxide particles that include organic groups covalently bonded to the oxide particles, and an alkali metal salt. The electrolyte composition is free of lithiated zeolite. The invention also features cells that incorporate the electrolyte composition.

  1. Decontamination of metals by melt refining/slagging. An annotated bibliography: Update on stainless steel and steel

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Worchester, S.A.; Twidwell, L.G.; Paolini, D.J.; Weldon, T.A. [Montana Tech of the Univ., of Montana (United States); Mizia, R.E. [Lockheed Idaho Technologies Co., Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The following presentation is an update to a previous annotation, i.e., WINCO-1138. The literature search and annotated review covers all metals used in the nuclear industries but the emphasis of this update is directed toward work performed on mild steels. As the number of nuclear installations undergoing decontamination and decommissioning (D&D) increases, current radioactive waste storage space is consumed and establishment of new waste storage areas becomes increasingly difficult, the problem of handling and storing radioactive scrap metal (RSM) gains increasing importance in the DOE Environmental Restoration and Waste Management Program. To alleviate present and future waste problems, Lockheed Idaho Technologies Co (LITCO) is managing a program for the recycling of RSM for beneficial use within the DOE complex. As part of that effort, Montana Tech has been awarded a contract to help optimize melting and refining technology for the recycling of stainless steel RSM. The scope of the Montana Tech program includes a literature survey, a decontaminating slag design study, small wide melting studies to determine optimum slag compositions for removal of radioactive contaminant surrogates, analysis of preferred melting techniques, and coordination of large scale melting demonstrations (100--2,000 lbs) to be conducted at selected facilities. The program will support recycling and decontaminating stainless steel RSM for use in waste canisters for Idaho Waste Immobilization Facility densified high level waste and Pit 9/RWMC boxes. This report is the result of the literature search conducted to establish a basis for experimental melt/slag program development. The program plan will be jointly developed by Montana Tech and LITCO.

  2. Preliminary assessment of future refining impacts of the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hadder, G.R.

    1991-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A preliminary assessment of the future refining impacts of the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990 has been performed with the Navy Mobility Fuels Forecasting Systems. The assessment suggests that gasoline reformulation costs in domestic coastal and near-coastal refining regions in the year 2000 could be 3.5 to 5.6 cents per gallon (in terms of 1989 currency). For heating value equivalent to one gallon of conventional gasoline, the regional total added costs (including reformulation costs) for reformulated gasoline could be 5.9 to 8.0 cents. In blending reformulated gasolines, the reduction of butane for lower Reid vapor pressure and the reduction of reformate for lower aromatics are generally compensated by increased percentages of alkylate and/or straight run naphthas. Relatively larger refinery process capacity additions are required for butane isomerization, alkylation, aromatics recovery, and distillate hydrotreating. 21 refs., 3 figs., 18 tabs.

  3. Hydrodynamical adaptive mesh refinement simulations of turbulent flows - I. Substructure in a wind

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Iapichino, L; Schmidt, W; Niemeyer, J C

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The problem of the resolution of turbulent flows in adaptive mesh refinement (AMR) simulations is investigated by means of 3D hydrodynamical simulations in an idealised setup, representing a moving subcluster during a merger event. AMR simulations performed with the usual refinement criteria based on local gradients of selected variables do not properly resolve the production of turbulence downstream of the cluster. Therefore we apply novel AMR criteria which are optimised to follow the evolution of a turbulent flow. We demonstrate that these criteria provide a better resolution of the flow past the subcluster, allowing us to follow the onset of the shear instability, the evolution of the turbulent wake and the subsequent back-reaction on the subcluster core morphology. We discuss some implications for the modelling of cluster cold fronts.

  4. Hydrodynamical adaptive mesh refinement simulations of turbulent flows - I. Substructure in a wind

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    L. Iapichino; J. Adamek; W. Schmidt; J. C. Niemeyer

    2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The problem of the resolution of turbulent flows in adaptive mesh refinement (AMR) simulations is investigated by means of 3D hydrodynamical simulations in an idealised setup, representing a moving subcluster during a merger event. AMR simulations performed with the usual refinement criteria based on local gradients of selected variables do not properly resolve the production of turbulence downstream of the cluster. Therefore we apply novel AMR criteria which are optimised to follow the evolution of a turbulent flow. We demonstrate that these criteria provide a better resolution of the flow past the subcluster, allowing us to follow the onset of the shear instability, the evolution of the turbulent wake and the subsequent back-reaction on the subcluster core morphology. We discuss some implications for the modelling of cluster cold fronts.

  5. Re-refining of Waste Oil Solvent Is Used in Treatment/Distillation Process

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    unknown authors

    INDUSTRIAL APPLICATION. A combination solvent treatment/distillation process has been designed for re-refining industrial waste oil (such as equipment lubricants, metal-working oil, and process oil) and used automotive lubricants (engine oil, hydraulic oil, and gear oil) for reuse. WASTE ENERGY RECOVERY. Recycling of waste oil in the United States has the potential to save the energy equivalent of 7-12 million bbl of crude oil annually.1 WASTE OIL RECOVERY. Prior to 1960, a significant portion of the demand for automotive lubricating oil was met by re-relined used oil. At the time, 150 re-refineries produced 300 million gal of motor oil annually. Since 1960, however, the production of re-refined oil has steadily declined. In 1981, for example, out of about 1.2 billion gal of automobile lubricating oil and 1.6 billion gal of industrial lubricating oils purchased, 25 U.S. rerefineries

  6. Characterization of U-6Nb ingots produced via the electron beam cold hearth refining process

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McKoon, R.H.

    1997-11-14T23:59:59.000Z

    A study was undertaken at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory to characterize uranium, 6% niobium ingots produced via electron beam melting, hearth refining and continuous casting and to compare this material with conventional VIM/skull melt/VAR material. Samples of both the ingot and feed material were analyzed for niobium and trace metallic elements, carbon, oxygen and nitrogen. This material was also inspected metallographically and via microprobe analysis.

  7. Liquid-liquid extraction as the means of refining cottonseed oil

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Patel, Manubhai Chunibhai

    1956-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Cottonseed oil, as well as other vegetable oils, contain a number of non-triglyceride impurities, Jamieson and Baughman (1) report tne following in crude cottonseed oil: raffinose, pentosans& resins, protoses& peptcnes, phosphatides& eterols, phytosterols... in the crude oil& combines with or destroys phospho-lipids and other minor constituents and removes suspended foreign matter. These materials which have been rendered insoluble can be separated from the refined oil by settling or centrifugation...

  8. ,"U.S. Residual Fuel Oil Refiner Sales Volumes"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy SourcesRefinery, Bulk Terminal, and Natural Gas Plant Stocks of SelectedRefiner

  9. Improved crystallographic models through iterated local density-guided model deformation and reciprocal-space refinement

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Terwilliger, Thomas C., E-mail: terwilliger@lanl.gov [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Read, Randy J. [University of Cambridge, Cambridge CB2 0XY (United Kingdom); Adams, Paul D. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, One Cyclotron Road, Building 64R0121, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Brunger, Axel T. [Stanford University, 318 Campus Drive West, Stanford, CA 94305-5432 (United States); Afonine, Pavel V.; Grosse-Kunstleve, Ralf W. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, One Cyclotron Road, Building 64R0121, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Hung, Li-Wei [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States)

    2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A density-based procedure is described for improving a homology model that is locally accurate but differs globally. The model is deformed to match the map and refined, yielding an improved starting point for density modification and further model-building. An approach is presented for addressing the challenge of model rebuilding after molecular replacement in cases where the placed template is very different from the structure to be determined. The approach takes advantage of the observation that a template and target structure may have local structures that can be superimposed much more closely than can their complete structures. A density-guided procedure for deformation of a properly placed template is introduced. A shift in the coordinates of each residue in the structure is calculated based on optimizing the match of model density within a 6 Å radius of the center of that residue with a prime-and-switch electron-density map. The shifts are smoothed and applied to the atoms in each residue, leading to local deformation of the template that improves the match of map and model. The model is then refined to improve the geometry and the fit of model to the structure-factor data. A new map is then calculated and the process is repeated until convergence. The procedure can extend the routine applicability of automated molecular replacement, model building and refinement to search models with over 2 Å r.m.s.d. representing 65–100% of the structure.

  10. Constrained-Transport Magnetohydrodynamics with Adaptive-Mesh-Refinement in CHARM

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miniatii, Francesco; Martin, Daniel

    2011-05-24T23:59:59.000Z

    We present the implementation of a three-dimensional, second order accurate Godunov-type algorithm for magneto-hydrodynamic (MHD), in the adaptivemesh-refinement (AMR) cosmological code CHARM. The algorithm is based on the full 12-solve spatially unsplit Corner-Transport-Upwind (CTU) scheme. Thefluid quantities are cell-centered and are updated using the Piecewise-Parabolic- Method (PPM), while the magnetic field variables are face-centered and areevolved through application of the Stokes theorem on cell edges via a Constrained- Transport (CT) method. The so-called ?multidimensional MHD source terms?required in the predictor step for high-order accuracy are applied in a simplified form which reduces their complexity in three dimensions without loss of accuracyor robustness. The algorithm is implemented on an AMR framework which requires specific synchronization steps across refinement levels. These includeface-centered restriction and prolongation operations and a reflux-curl operation, which maintains a solenoidal magnetic field across refinement boundaries. Thecode is tested against a large suite of test problems, including convergence tests in smooth flows, shock-tube tests, classical two- and three-dimensional MHD tests,a three-dimensional shock-cloud interaction problem and the formation of a cluster of galaxies in a fully cosmological context. The magnetic field divergence isshown to remain negligible throughout. Subject headings: cosmology: theory - methods: numerical

  11. Rietveld Refinement

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's PossibleRadiation Protection TechnicalResonantNovember 15 to March 15A Megawatt is

  12. Hydrogen storage compositions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, Wen; Vajo, John J.; Cumberland, Robert W.; Liu, Ping

    2011-04-19T23:59:59.000Z

    Compositions for hydrogen storage and methods of making such compositions employ an alloy that exhibits reversible formation/deformation of BH4- anions. The composition includes a ternary alloy including magnesium, boron and a metal and a metal hydride. The ternary alloy and the metal hydride are present in an amount sufficient to render the composition capable of hydrogen storage. The molar ratio of the metal to magnesium and boron in the alloy is such that the alloy exhibits reversible formation/deformation of BH4- anions. The hydrogen storage composition is prepared by combining magnesium, boron and a metal to prepare a ternary alloy and combining the ternary alloy with a metal hydride to form the hydrogen storage composition.

  13. Hydrogen storage compositions

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Li, Wen; Vajo, John J.; Cumberland, Robert W.; Liu, Ping

    2011-04-19T23:59:59.000Z

    Compositions for hydrogen storage and methods of making such compositions employ an alloy that exhibits reversible formation/deformation of BH.sub.4.sup.- anions. The composition includes a ternary alloy including magnesium, boron and a metal and a metal hydride. The ternary alloy and the metal hydride are present in an amount sufficient to render the composition capable of hydrogen storage. The molar ratio of the metal to magnesium and boron in the alloy is such that the alloy exhibits reversible formation/deformation of BH.sub.4.sup.- anions. The hydrogen storage composition is prepared by combining magnesium, boron and a metal to prepare a ternary alloy and combining the ternary alloy with a metal hydride to form the hydrogen storage composition.

  14. Continuous Fiber Ceramic Composites

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2002-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Fiber-reinforced ceramic composites demonstrate the high-temperature stability of ceramics--with an increased fracture toughness resulting from the fiber reinforcement of the composite. The material optimization performed under the continuous fiber ceramic composites (CFCC) included a series of systematic optimizations. The overall goals were to define the processing window, to increase the robustinous of the process, to increase process yield while reducing costs, and to define the complexity of parts that could be fabricated.

  15. TAO, Vol. 16, No. 2, 331-343, June 2005 A Refined Historical Record of Volcanic Eruptions around Taiwan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lin, Andrew Tien-Shun

    . 2. RESULTS Five historical submarine eruptions around offshore Taiwan have been reported (Simkin in the Volcanoes of the World (Simkin and Siebert 1994). The refined results of five historical records around

  16. Leptons in Composite MFV

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Michele Redi

    2014-07-21T23:59:59.000Z

    We study the lepton sector of composite Higgs models with partial compositeness. The standard anarchic scenario is in conflict with the absence of observable charged lepton flavor violation. This tension can be completely solved in MFV scenarios that require either left-handed or right-handed SM leptons to be equally composite. Constraints on this scenario are weak and the composite lepton partners could be as light as few hundreds GeVs with interesting LHC signatures. The contribution to the muon (g-2) in theories where the Higgs is a pseudo Nambu-Goldstone boson is also discussed.

  17. Electrically conductive cellulose composite

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Evans, Barbara R.; O'Neill, Hugh M.; Woodward, Jonathan

    2010-05-04T23:59:59.000Z

    An electrically conductive cellulose composite includes a cellulose matrix and an electrically conductive carbonaceous material incorporated into the cellulose matrix. The electrical conductivity of the cellulose composite is at least 10 .mu.S/cm at 25.degree. C. The composite can be made by incorporating the electrically conductive carbonaceous material into a culture medium with a cellulose-producing organism, such as Gluconoacetobacter hansenii. The composites can be used to form electrodes, such as for use in membrane electrode assemblies for fuel cells.

  18. Reactive composite compositions and mat barriers

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Langton, Christine A. (Aiken, SC); Narasimhan, Rajendran (Evans, GA); Karraker, David G. (Aiken, SC)

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A hazardous material storage area has a reactive multi-layer composite mat which lines an opening into which a reactive backfill and hazardous material are placed. A water-inhibiting cap may cover the hazardous material storage area. The reactive multi-layer composite mat has a backing onto which is placed an active layer which will neutralize or stabilize hazardous waste and a fronting layer so that the active layer is between the fronting and backing layers. The reactive backfill has a reactive agent which can stabilize or neutralize hazardous material and inhibit the movement of the hazardous material through the hazardous material storage area.

  19. CARBON-CARBON COMPOSITE ALLCOMP Carbon-Carbon Composite

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rollins, Andrew M.

    materials. MATERIALS AND DESIRED DATA Carbon-Carbon Composites(T300 & SWB): Crush Resistance, Bend StrengthCARBON-CARBON COMPOSITE ALLCOMP Carbon-Carbon Composite · C-C supplied in two forms · T300: C strength 4340 steel, carbon-carbon composite, and Carbon-Silicon Carbide composite were tested to examine

  20. Biodegradable synthetic bone composites

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Liu, Gao; Zhao, Dacheng; Saiz, Eduardo; Tomsia, Antoni P.

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The invention provides for a biodegradable synthetic bone composition comprising a biodegradable hydrogel polymer scaffold comprising a plurality of hydrolytically unstable linkages, and an inorganic component; such as a biodegradable poly(hydroxyethylmethacrylate)/hydroxyapatite (pHEMA/HA) hydrogel composite possessing mineral content approximately that of human bone.

  1. Atmospheric Thermodynamics Composition

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Russell, Lynn

    1 Atmospheric Thermodynamics Ch1 Composition Ch2 Laws Ch3 Transfers Ch12 EnergyBalance Ch4 Water Ch Sciences: Atmospheric Thermodynamics Instructor: Lynn Russell, NH343 http #12;2 Review from Ch. 1 · Thermodynamic quantities · Composition · Pressure · Density · Temperature

  2. Liquid crystalline composites containing phyllosilicates

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Chaiko, David J.

    2004-07-13T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention provides phyllosilicate-polymer compositions which are useful as liquid crystalline composites. Phyllosilicate-polymer liquid crystalline compositions of the present invention can contain a high percentage of phyllosilicate while at the same time be transparent. Because of the ordering of the particles liquid crystalline composite, liquid crystalline composites are particularly useful as barriers to gas transport.

  3. Numerical relativity simulations of neutron star merger remnants using conservative mesh refinement

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tim Dietrich; Sebastiano Bernuzzi; Maximiliano Ujevic; Bernd Bruegmann

    2015-04-06T23:59:59.000Z

    We study equal and unequal-mass neutron star mergers by means of new numerical relativity simulations in which the general relativistic hydrodynamics solver employs an algorithm that guarantees mass conservation across the refinement levels of the computational mesh. We consider eight binary configurations with total mass $M=2.7\\,M_\\odot$, mass-ratios $q=1$ and $q=1.16$, and four different equation of states (EOSs), and one configuration with a stiff EOS, $M=2.5M_\\odot$ and $q=1.5$. We focus on the post-merger dynamics and study the merger remnant, dynamical ejecta and the postmerger gravitational wave spectrum. Although most of the merger remnants form a hypermassive neutron star collapsing to a black hole+disk system on dynamical timescales, stiff EOSs can eventually produce a stable massive neutron star. Ejecta are mostly emitted around the orbital plane; favored by large mass ratios and softer EOS. The postmerger wave spectrum is mainly characterized by non-axisymmetric oscillations of the remnant. The stiff EOS configuration consisting of a $1.5M_\\odot$ and a $1.0M_\\odot$ neutron star shows a rather peculiar dynamics. During merger the companion star is very deformed; about~$\\sim0.03M_\\odot$ of rest-mass becomes unbound from the tidal tail due torque; and the merger remnant forms stable neutron star surrounded by a massive accretion disk $\\sim0.3M_\\odot$. Similar configurations might be particularly interesting for electromagnetic counterparts. Comparing results obtained with and without the conservative mesh refinement algorithm, we find that post-merger simulations can be affected by systematic errors if mass conservation is not enforced in the mesh refinement strategy. However, mass conservation also depends on grid details and on the artificial atmosphere setup. [abridged

  4. Ensemble refinement shows conformational flexibility in crystal structures of human complement factor D

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Forneris, Federico; Burnley, B. Tom; Gros, Piet, E-mail: p.gros@uu.nl [Utrecht University, Padualaan 8, 3584 CH Utrecht (Netherlands)

    2014-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Ensemble-refinement analysis of native and mutant factor D (FD) crystal structures indicates a dynamical transition in FD from a self-inhibited inactive conformation to a substrate-bound active conformation that is reminiscent of the allostery in thrombin. Comparison with previously observed dynamics in thrombin using NMR data supports the crystallographic ensembles. Human factor D (FD) is a self-inhibited thrombin-like serine proteinase that is critical for amplification of the complement immune response. FD is activated by its substrate through interactions outside the active site. The substrate-binding, or ‘exosite’, region displays a well defined and rigid conformation in FD. In contrast, remarkable flexibility is observed in thrombin and related proteinases, in which Na{sup +} and ligand binding is implied in allosteric regulation of enzymatic activity through protein dynamics. Here, ensemble refinement (ER) of FD and thrombin crystal structures is used to evaluate structure and dynamics simultaneously. A comparison with previously published NMR data for thrombin supports the ER analysis. The R202A FD variant has enhanced activity towards artificial peptides and simultaneously displays active and inactive conformations of the active site. ER revealed pronounced disorder in the exosite loops for this FD variant, reminiscent of thrombin in the absence of the stabilizing Na{sup +} ion. These data indicate that FD exhibits conformational dynamics like thrombin, but unlike in thrombin a mechanism has evolved in FD that locks the unbound native state into an ordered inactive conformation via the self-inhibitory loop. Thus, ensemble refinement of X-ray crystal structures may represent an approach alternative to spectroscopy to explore protein dynamics in atomic detail.

  5. Direct Reduction of Waste through Refining of DOE Metal Assets - 13632

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hargett, Michael C.; Terekhov, Dimitri; Khozan, Kamran M. [Chemical Vapour Metal Refining - CVMR (United States)] [Chemical Vapour Metal Refining - CVMR (United States)

    2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    CVMR{sup R} presents a technology for refining nickel from the enrichment barrier materials of the DOE that is proven through 100 years of use by the metals industry. CVMR{sup R} applies modern controls, instrumentation for process and monitoring of the system, and innovative production methods to produce a wide spectrum of products that generate new technology applications and improvements to our society and economy. CVMR{sup R} will receive barrier materials as a secure operation and size reduce the metal to a shred that is fed to a carbonylation reactor where nickel is reacted with carbon monoxide and generate nickel carbonyl. The carbonyl will be filtered and decomposed with heat to form a variety of products that include high value nano powders, coated substrates, net shapes and pure nickel. The residue from the reactor will retain radionuclides from enrichment activities. The carbon monoxide will only react and extract nickel under the operating conditions to leave volumetric contamination in the unreacted residue. A demonstration plant was designed and built by CVMR{sup R} and operated by BWXT, to demonstrate the systems capabilities to DOE in 2006. A pilot plant operation precedes the detailed design of the nickel refinery and provides essential data for design, safe work practices, waste characterizations and system kinetics and confirms the project feasibility. CVMR{sup R} produces nickel products that are cleaner than the nickel in U.S. commerce and used by industry today. The CVMR{sup R} process and systems for nickel refining is well suited for DOE materials and will provide value through environmental stewardship, recovery of high value assets, and support of the DOE environmental remediation programs as the refined nickel generates additional long term benefits to local communities. (authors)

  6. Automotive Composites Consortium Focal Project 4: Automotive...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Composites Consortium Focal Project 4: Automotive Components from Structural Composites Automotive Composites Consortium Focal Project 4: Automotive Components from Structural...

  7. Progress toward uranium scrap recycling via electron beam cold hearth refining

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McKoon, R.H.

    1994-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A 250 kW electron beam cold hearth refining (EBCHR) melt furnace at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) has been in operation for over a year producing 5.5 in.-diameter ingots of various uranium alloys. Production of in-specification uranium-6%-niobium (U-6Nb) alloy ingots has been demonstrated using Virgin feedstock. A vibratory scrap feeder has been installed on the system and the ability to recycle chopped U-6Nb scrap has been established. A preliminary comparison of vacuum arc remelted (VAR) and electron beam (EB) melted product is presented.

  8. Progress toward uranium scrap recycling via Electron Cold Hearth Refining (EBCHR)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McKoon, R.H.

    1994-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

    A 250 kW electron beam cold hearth refining (EBCHR) melt furnace at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) has been in operation for over a year producing 5.5 in.-diameter ingots of various uranium alloys. Production of in-specification uranium-6% - niobium (U-6Nb) alloy ingots has been demonstrated using virgin feedstock. A vibratory scrap feeder has been installed on the system and the ability to recycle chopped U-6Nb scrap has been established. A preliminary comparison of vacuum arc remelted (VAR) and electron beam (EB) melted product is presented.

  9. Progress toward uranium scrap recycling via electron beam cold hearth refining

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McKoon, R.H. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States)

    1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    A 250 kW electron beam cold hearth refining (EBCHR) melt furnace at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) has been in operation for over a year producing 5.5 in.-diameter ingots of various uranium alloys. Production of in-specification uranium 6% niobium (U-6Nb) alloy ingots has been demonstrated using virgin feedstock. A vibratory scrap feeder has been installed on the system and the ability to recycle chopped U-6Nb scrap has been established. A preliminary comparison of vacuum arc remelted (VAR) and electron beam (EB) melted product is presented.

  10. A study of acid sludge obtained in the refining of petroleum

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnson, Albert Sidney

    1923-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    fo. petroleum Refin- eries {S l yellow colo of petroleum after ref in&ng m:y be due to impurities in the sulphurio &icid used ~ Since it is known that nitro. ?en trioxide, nitro en pentoxide, and selenium dioxide will cayuse discolor ~tion... of the sludge with ocustio soda o soda ash, &nd the "mixing" of the neutrul- ised sludge eith fuel oil. Much i&ttentlon h s been:i eu t:& the recover" of tho sludge acid, i. nd but little cr no uttention to thc study of the orgunic c&ntent of the caid sludge...

  11. HASSP and HEAVY: Tools for automated heavy atom searches and refinement

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Terwilliger, T.T.

    1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this tutorial, a simple example using model data for one derivative with anomalous information will be used to demonstrate the use of HASSP and HEAVY in heavy atom determination and refinement. The data used here will actually be based on model MAD data that has been converted to MIR format using MADMRG, but the treatment is identical to that for any other SIR+anomalous data. The data nd most of the programs discussed here can be obtained by e-mail from ``terwil @prov2.lanl.gov`` along with VAX-specific command files to run the data through.

  12. Studies of the refining of crude cottonseed oil and its solutions in commercial hexane

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zeitoun, Mohamed Ali

    1958-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    oil. In a more recent patent (17) Clayton used 1.5 per cent by weight of 29 per cent ammonium hydroxide to refine soybean oil. The well-mixed oil and ammonia solution is heated to 200?F., then rapidly cooled to 150?F., and then centrifuged... neutralized by soda ash. The soap- stock is removed in a multi-tray thickener. The neutralized miscella is then washed countercurrently with dilute caustic soda solution then with water. It is claimed that this method substantially reduces oil loss...

  13. ,"U.S. Motor Gasoline Refiner Sales Volumes"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources andPlant Liquids,+ LeasePriceExpectedOther CountriesTrinidadRefiner Sales

  14. Table 3b. Imported Refiner Acquisition Cost of Crude Oil, Projected vs. Actual

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro IndustriesTownDells,1Stocks Nov-14Total Delivered Residentialtightb. Imported Refiner

  15. Petroleum Refining Sector (NAICS 324110) Energy and GHG Combustion Emissions Profile, November 2012

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn'tOrigin of Contamination in235-1 TermoelectricaPavingPerry Luksin About69 2.4 PETROLEUM REFINING

  16. NREL Refines Method to Convert Lignin to Nylon Precursor - News Releases |

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Saleshttp://www.fnal.gov/directorate/nalcal/nalcal02_07_05_files/nalcal.gifNREL NREL Refines Method to Convert Lignin to Nylon

  17. ,"Conventional Gasoline Sales to End Users, Total Refiner Sales Volumes"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghurajiConventional Gasoline Sales to End Users, Total Refiner Sales Volumes" ,"Click worksheet

  18. ,"Kerosene-Type Jet Fuel Sales to End Users Refiner Sales Volumes"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghurajiConventional Gasoline Sales to End Users, Total Refiner Sales Volumes"for

  19. ,"No. 2 Diesel Fuel Sales to End Users Refiner Sales Volumes"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghurajiConventional Gasoline Sales to End Users, Total Refiner Sales Volumes"forUsers,

  20. ,"No. 2 Distillate Sales to End Users Refiner Sales Volumes"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghurajiConventional Gasoline Sales to End Users, Total Refiner Sales Volumes"forUsers,Sales to End

  1. ,"Residual Fuel Oil Sales to End Users Refiner Sales Volumes"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghurajiConventional Gasoline Sales to End Users, Total Refiner Sales Volumes"forUsers,Sales to Endto

  2. ,"U.S. Reformulated, Average Refiner Gasoline Prices"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghurajiConventional Gasoline Sales toReformulated, Average Refiner Gasoline Prices" ,"Click

  3. ,"U.S. Sales for Resale, Total Refiner Motor Gasoline Sales Volumes"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghurajiConventional Gasoline Sales toReformulated, Average Refiner Gasoline Prices"Sales Volumes

  4. ,"U.S. Sales to End Users, Total Refiner Motor Gasoline Sales Volumes"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghurajiConventional Gasoline Sales toReformulated, Average Refiner Gasoline Prices"SalesSales

  5. Hybrid matrix fiber composites

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Deteresa, Steven J.; Lyon, Richard E.; Groves, Scott E.

    2003-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Hybrid matrix fiber composites having enhanced compressive performance as well as enhanced stiffness, toughness and durability suitable for compression-critical applications. The methods for producing the fiber composites using matrix hybridization. The hybrid matrix fiber composites include two chemically or physically bonded matrix materials, whereas the first matrix materials are used to impregnate multi-filament fibers formed into ribbons and the second matrix material is placed around and between the fiber ribbons that are impregnated with the first matrix material and both matrix materials are cured and solidified.

  6. Electrically conductive composite material

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Clough, R.L.; Sylwester, A.P.

    1988-06-20T23:59:59.000Z

    An electrically conductive composite material is disclosed which comprises a conductive open-celled, low density, microcellular carbon foam filled with a non-conductive polymer or resin. The composite material is prepared in a two-step process consisting of first preparing the microcellular carbon foam from a carbonizable polymer or copolymer using a phase separation process, then filling the carbon foam with the desired non-conductive polymer or resin. The electrically conductive composites of the present invention has a uniform and consistent pattern of filler distribution, and as a result is superior over prior art materials when used in battery components, electrodes, and the like. 2 figs.

  7. Hard metal composition

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sheinberg, Haskell (Los Alamos, NM)

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A composition of matter having a Rockwell A hardness of at least 85 is formed from a precursor mixture comprising between 3 and 10 weight percent boron carbide and the remainder a metal mixture comprising from 70 to 90 percent tungsten or molybdenum, with the remainder of the metal mixture comprising nickel and iron or a mixture thereof. The composition has a relatively low density of between 7 to 14 g/cc. The precursor is preferably hot pressed to yield a composition having greater than 100% of theoretical density.

  8. Hard metal composition

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sheinberg, H.

    1983-07-26T23:59:59.000Z

    A composition of matter having a Rockwell A hardness of at least 85 is formed from a precursor mixture comprising between 3 and 10 wt % boron carbide and the remainder a metal mixture comprising from 70 to 90% tungsten or molybdenum, with the remainder of the metal mixture comprising nickel and iron or a mixture thereof. The composition has a relatively low density of between 7 and 14 g/cc. The precursor is preferably hot pressed to yield a composition having greater than 100% of theoretical density.

  9. Electrically conductive composite material

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Clough, R.L.; Sylwester, A.P.

    1989-05-23T23:59:59.000Z

    An electrically conductive composite material is disclosed which comprises a conductive open-celled, low density, microcellular carbon foam filled with a non-conductive polymer or resin. The composite material is prepared in a two-step process consisting of first preparing the microcellular carbon foam from a carbonizable polymer or copolymer using a phase separation process, then filling the carbon foam with the desired non-conductive polymer or resin. The electrically conductive composites of the present invention has a uniform and consistent pattern of filler distribution, and as a result is superior over prior art materials when used in battery components, electrodes, and the like. 2 figs.

  10. Electrically conductive composite material

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Clough, Roger L. (Albuquerque, NM); Sylwester, Alan P. (Albuquerque, NM)

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An electrically conductive composite material is disclosed which comprises a conductive open-celled, low density, microcellular carbon foam filled with a non-conductive polymer or resin. The composite material is prepared in a two-step process consisting of first preparing the microcellular carbon foam from a carbonizable polymer or copolymer using a phase separation process, then filling the carbon foam with the desired non-conductive polymer or resin. The electrically conductive composites of the present invention has a uniform and consistant pattern of filler distribution, and as a result is superior over prior art materials when used in battery components, electrodes, and the like.

  11. Composite Dirac Neutrinos

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yuval Grossman; Dean J Robinson

    2011-01-25T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a mechanism that naturally produces light Dirac neutrinos. The basic idea is that the right-handed neutrinos are composite. Any realistic composite model must involve `hidden flavor' chiral symmetries. In general some of these symmetries may survive confinement, and in particular, one of them manifests itself at low energy as an exact $B-L$ symmetry. Dirac neutrinos are therefore produced. The neutrinos are naturally light due to compositeness. In general, sterile states are present in the model, some of them can naturally be warm dark matter candidates.

  12. Flexible composite radiation detector

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Cooke, D. Wayne (Santa Fe, NM); Bennett, Bryan L. (Los Alamos, NM); Muenchausen, Ross E. (Los Alamos, NM); Wrobleski, Debra A. (Los Alamos, NM); Orler, Edward B. (Los Alamos, NM)

    2006-12-05T23:59:59.000Z

    A flexible composite scintillator was prepared by mixing fast, bright, dense rare-earth doped powdered oxyorthosilicate (such as LSO:Ce, LSO:Sm, and GSO:Ce) scintillator with a polymer binder. The binder is transparent to the scintillator emission. The composite is seamless and can be made large and in a wide variety of shapes. Importantly, the composite can be tailored to emit light in a spectral region that matches the optimum response of photomultipliers (about 400 nanometers) or photodiodes (about 600 nanometers), which maximizes the overall detector efficiency.

  13. Conformation-dependent backbone geometry restraints set a new standard for protein crystallographic refinement

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Moriarty, Nigel W.; Tronrud, Dale E.; Adams, Paul D.; Karplus, P. Andrew

    2014-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Ideal values of bond angles and lengths used as external restraints are crucial for the successful refinement of protein crystal structures at all but the highest of resolutions. The restraints in common usage today have been designed based on the assumption that each type of bond or angle has a single ideal value independent of context. However, recent work has shown that the ideal values are, in fact, sensitive to local conformation, and as a first step toward using such information to build more accurate models, ultra-high resolution protein crystal structures have been used to derive a conformation-dependent library (CDL)more »of restraints for the protein backbone (Berkholz et al. 2009. Structure. 17, 1316). Here, we report the introduction of this CDL into the Phenix package and the results of test refinements of thousands of structures across a wide range of resolutions. These tests show that use of the conformation dependent library yields models that have substantially better agreement with ideal main-chain bond angles and lengths and, on average, a slightly enhanced fit to the X-ray data. No disadvantages of using the backbone CDL are apparent. In Phenix usage of the CDL can be selected by simply specifying the cdl=True option. This successful implementation paves the way for further aspects of the context-dependence of ideal geometry to be characterized and applied to improve experimental and predictive modelling accuracy.« less

  14. Hydrodynamical adaptive mesh refinement simulations of turbulent flows - II. Cosmological simulations of galaxy clusters

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    L. Iapichino; J. C. Niemeyer

    2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The development of turbulent gas flows in the intra-cluster medium and in the core of a galaxy cluster is studied by means of adaptive mesh refinement (AMR) cosmological simulations. A series of six runs was performed, employing identical simulation parameters but different criteria for triggering the mesh refinement. In particular, two different AMR strategies were followed, based on the regional variability of control variables of the flow and on the overdensity of subclumps, respectively. We show that both approaches, albeit with different results, are useful to get an improved resolution of the turbulent flow in the ICM. The vorticity is used as a diagnostic for turbulence, showing that the turbulent flow is not highly volume-filling but has a large area-covering factor, in agreement with previous theoretical expectations. The measured turbulent velocity in the cluster core is larger than 200 km/s, and the level of turbulent pressure contribution to the cluster hydrostatic equilibrium is increased by using the improved AMR criteria.

  15. Projected refined product balances in key Latin American countries: A preliminary examination

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Over the years, the East-West Center (EWC) has developed considerable expertise in refinery modeling, especially in the area of forecasting product balances for countries, given planned capacity changes, changes in product demand, changes in crude slates, and changes in product specifications. This expertise has been applied on an ongoing basis to the major refiners in the Middle East and the Asia-Pacific region, along with the US West Coast as region in its own right. Refinery modeling in these three areas has been ongoing for nearly 15 years at the Center, and the tools and information sources are now well developed. To date, the EWC has not applied these tools to Latin America. Although research on Latin America has been an ongoing area of concern at the Center in recent years, the information gathered to date is still not of the level of detail nor quality available for other areas. The modeling efforts undertaken in this report are of a ``baseline`` nature, designed to outline the major issues, attempt a first cut at emerging product balances, and, above all, to elicit commentary from those directly involved in the oil industry in the key countries modeled. Our experience in other regions has shown that it takes a few years dialogue with refiners and government planner in individual countries to develop a reliable database, as well as the insights into operational constraints and practices that make accurate modeling possible. This report is no more than a first step down the road.

  16. Conformation-dependent backbone geometry restraints set a new standard for protein crystallographic refinement

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Moriarty, Nigel W.; Tronrud, Dale E.; Adams, Paul D.; Karplus, P. Andrew

    2014-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Ideal values of bond angles and lengths used as external restraints are crucial for the successful refinement of protein crystal structures at all but the highest of resolutions. The restraints in common usage today have been designed based on the assumption that each type of bond or angle has a single ideal value independent of context. However, recent work has shown that the ideal values are, in fact, sensitive to local conformation, and as a first step toward using such information to build more accurate models, ultra-high resolution protein crystal structures have been used to derive a conformation-dependent library (CDL) of restraints for the protein backbone (Berkholz et al. 2009. Structure. 17, 1316). Here, we report the introduction of this CDL into the Phenix package and the results of test refinements of thousands of structures across a wide range of resolutions. These tests show that use of the conformation dependent library yields models that have substantially better agreement with ideal main-chain bond angles and lengths and, on average, a slightly enhanced fit to the X-ray data. No disadvantages of using the backbone CDL are apparent. In Phenix usage of the CDL can be selected by simply specifying the cdl=True option. This successful implementation paves the way for further aspects of the context-dependence of ideal geometry to be characterized and applied to improve experimental and predictive modelling accuracy.

  17. Solvent Refined Coal (SRC) process. Quarterly technical progress report, January 1979-March 1979

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1980-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes the progress of the Solvent Refined Coal (SRC) Project by the Pittsburg and Midway Coal Mining Co. for the Department of Energy for the period January 1, 1979 to March 31, 1979. Activities included the operation and modification of the Solvent Refined Coal Pilot Plant at Fort Lewis, Washington; the Process Development Unit P-99 at Harmarville, Pennsylvania; and research at Merriam Laboratory in Merriam, Kansas. The Pilot Plant processed Powhatan No. 5 Coal in the SRC-II mode of operation studying the effect of coal particle size and system temperature on coal slurry blending and the effect of carbon monoxide concentration in the reaction feed gas on process yields. January and February were spent completing installation of a fourth High Pressure Separator on Process Development Unit P-99 to better simulate operating conditions for the proposed Demonstration Plant. During March, one run was completed at P-99 feeding Pittsburgh Seam Coal from the Powhatan No. 5 Mine. Merriam investigations included a study of the effect of iron containing additives on SRC-I operation, the addition of carbon monoxide to the feed gas, utilization of a hydrogenated solvent (Cresap process solvent) in the SRC-I mode under both normal and short residence time operating conditions, and development of a simulated distillation technique to determine the entire boiling range distribution of product oils.

  18. Environmental-control considerations in the production and use of solvent-refined coal

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Huang, H.S.

    1980-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report presents the results of an environmental-control study of the solvent-refined-coal (SRC) process. The report complements a previous Argonne report: Assessment of Status of Technology for Solvent Refining of Coal (ANL/ECT-3, Appendix B). The current review separates discussion of environmental control into two broad sections: production of SRC fuels, both solid and liquid, and their utilization. Control technologies are briefly reviewed for the gas, liquid, and solid wastes generated by the production of SRC. For an SRC-I plant, producing solid product, potential waste streams are then identified and discussed in terms of applicable control technologies and promulgated EPA standards. The SRC-production section concludes with a discussion of the biological activity of certain products of an SRC-II plant, producing liquid fuel. The author summarizes recent experimental findings and recommends accelerated research at SRC plants to quantify the effects of biological activity and develop measures needed to reduce those effects. No unusual environmental-control problems have been detected in the combustion of SRC fuels. It is recommended, however, that more SRC combustion studies be made and that the solid and liquid fuels used in them be derived from a variety of parent coals. Such studies will establish the broad data base needed to demonstrate that SRC fuels burn efficiently within environmentally safe limits.

  19. Composite production riser assessment 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kim, Won Ki

    2007-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

    The performance of a deep water composite production riser from a system perspective is presented, and its advantages are articulated through comparisons with a typical steel riser under identical service conditions. The ...

  20. Sintered composite filter

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bergman, W.

    1986-05-02T23:59:59.000Z

    A particulate filter medium formed of a sintered composite of 0.5 micron diameter quartz fibers and 2 micron diameter stainless steel fibers is described. Preferred composition is about 40 vol.% quartz and about 60 vol.% stainless steel fibers. The media is sintered at about 1100/sup 0/C to bond the stainless steel fibers into a cage network which holds the quartz fibers. High filter efficiency and low flow resistance are provided by the smaller quartz fibers. High strength is provided by the stainless steel fibers. The resulting media has a high efficiency and low pressure drop similar to the standard HEPA media, with tensile strength at least four times greater, and a maximum operating temperature of about 550/sup 0/C. The invention also includes methods to form the composite media and a HEPA filter utilizing the composite media. The filter media can be used to filter particles in both liquids and gases.

  1. Composition for detecting uranyl

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Baylor, L.C.; Stephens, S.M.

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention relates to an indicator composition for use in spectrophotometric detection of a substance in a solution, and a method for making the composition. Useful indicators are sensitive to the particular substance being measured, but are unaffected by the fluid and other chemical species that may be present in the fluid. Optical indicators are used to measure the uranium concentration of process solutions in facilities for extracting uranium from ores, production of nuclear fuels, and reprocessing of irradiated fuels. The composition comprises an organohalide covalently bonded to an indicator for the substance, in such a manner that the product is itself an indicator that provides increased spectral resolution for detecting the substance. The indicator is preferably arsenazo III and the organohalide is preferably cyanuric chloride. These form a composition that is ideally suited for detecting uranyl.

  2. Microcracking in fibrous composites

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Conrad, Nicholas

    1973-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    MICROCRACKING IN FIBROUS COMPOSITES A Thesis by Nicholas Conrad Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirement for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE August 1973 Major Subject...: Interdisciplinary Engineering MICROCRACKING IN FIBROUS COMPOSITES A Thesis by Nicholas Conrad Approved as to style and content by: (Chairman of Co~'tee) c. (Head o Department) Ix~ (Member) (Member) August 1973 ABSTRACT Microcracking in Fibrous...

  3. Composite desiccant structure

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Fraioli, Anthony V. (Hawthorn Woods, IL); Schertz, William W. (Batavia, IL)

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A composite formed of small desiccant particles retained in a dark matrix composed of a porous binder containing a transition metal oxide with pores to provide moisture transport with respect to the particles, and metallic fibers to remove the heat of condensation during dehumidification and provide heat for the removal of moisture during regeneration. The moisture absorbing properties of the composite may be regenerated by exposure of the dark matrix to solar radiation with dehumidification occurring at night.

  4. Composite desiccant structure

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Fraioli, A.V.; Schertz, W.W.

    1984-06-06T23:59:59.000Z

    This patent discloses a composite formed of small desiccant particles retained in a dark matrix composed of a porous binder containing a transition metal oxide with pores to provide moisture transport with respect to the particles, and metallic fibers to remove the heat of condensation during dehumidification and provide heat for the removal of moisture during regeneration. The moisture absorbing properties of the composite may be regenerated by exposure of the dark matrix to solar radiation with dehumidification occurring at night.

  5. Nanostructured metal-polyaniline composites

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Hsing-Lin (Los Alamos, NM); Li, Wenguang (Elgin, IL); Bailey, James A. (Los Alamos, NM); Gao, Yuan (Brewer, ME)

    2010-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Metal-polyaniline (PANI) composites are provided together with a process of preparing such composites by an electrodeless process. The metal of the composite can have nanoscale structural features and the composites can be used in applications such as catalysis for hydrogenation reactions and for analytical detection methods employing SERS.

  6. Improving macromolecular atomic models at moderate resolution by automated iterative model building, statistical density modification and refinement

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Terwilliger, Thomas C., E-mail: terwilliger@lanl.gov [Mail Stop M888, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States)

    2003-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A procedure for iterative model-building, statistical density modification and refinement at moderate resolution (up to about 2.8 Å) is described. An iterative process for improving the completeness and quality of atomic models automatically built at moderate resolution (up to about 2.8 Å) is described. The process consists of cycles of model building interspersed with cycles of refinement and combining phase information from the model with experimental phase information (if any) using statistical density modification. The process can lead to substantial improvements in both the accuracy and completeness of the model compared with a single cycle of model building. For eight test cases solved by MAD or SAD at resolutions ranging from 2.0 to 2.8 Å, the fraction of models built and assigned to sequence was 46–91% (mean of 65%) after the first cycle of building and refinement, and 78-95% (mean of 87%) after 20 cycles. In an additional test case, an incorrect model of gene 5 protein (PDB code 2gn5; r.m.s.d. of main-chain atoms from the more recent refined structure 1vqb at 1.56 Å) was rebuilt using only structure-factor amplitude information at varying resolutions from 2.0 to 3.0 Å. Rebuilding was effective at resolutions up to about 2.5 Å. The resulting models had 60-80% of the residues built and an r.m.s.d. of main-chain atoms from the refined structure of 0.20 to 0.62 Å. The algorithm is useful for building preliminary models of macromolecules suitable for an experienced crystallographer to extend, correct and fully refine.

  7. Refined model of the {Fe9} magnetic molecule from low-temperature inelastic neutron scattering studies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Engelhardt, Larry [Francis Marion University; Demmel, Franz [Rutherford Appleton Laboratory; Luban, Marshall [Ames Laboratory; Timco, Grigore A [The University of Manchester; Tuna, Floriana [The University of Manchester; Winpenny, Richard E [The University of Manchester

    2014-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a refined model of the {Fe9} tridiminished icosahedron magnetic molecule system. This molecule was originally modeled as being composed of two ({Fe3} and {Fe6}) clusters, with the Fe3+ ions within each cluster being coupled via exchange interactions, but with no coupling between the clusters. The present inelastic neutron scattering (INS) measurements were used to probe the low-lying energy spectrum of {Fe9}, and these results demonstrate that the previously published model of two uncoupled clusters is incomplete. To achieve agreement between the experiment and theory, we have augmented the model with relatively small exchange coupling between the clusters. A combination of Lanczos matrix diagonalization and quantum Monte Carlo simulations have been used to achieve good agreement between the experimental data and the improved model of the full {Fe9} system despite the complexity of this model (with Hilbert space dimension >107).

  8. Dynamic Implicit 3D Adaptive Mesh Refinement for Non-Equilibrium Radiation Diffusion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Philip, Bobby [ORNL] [ORNL; Wang, Zhen [ORNL] [ORNL; Berrill, Mark A [ORNL] [ORNL; Rodriguez Rodriguez, Manuel [ORNL] [ORNL; Pernice, Michael [Idaho National Laboratory (INL)] [Idaho National Laboratory (INL)

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The time dependent non-equilibrium radiation diffusion equations are important for solving the transport of energy through radiation in optically thick regimes and find applications in several fields including astrophysics and inertial confinement fusion. The associated initial boundary value problems that are encountered exhibit a wide range of scales in space and time and are extremely challenging to solve. To efficiently and accurately simulate these systems we describe our research on combining techniques that will also find use more broadly for long term time integration of nonlinear multiphysics systems: implicit time integration for efficient long term time integration of stiff multiphysics systems, local control theory based step size control to minimize the required global number of time steps while controlling accuracy, dynamic 3D adaptive mesh refinement (AMR) to minimize memory and computational costs, Jacobian Free Newton Krylov methods on AMR grids for efficient nonlinear solution, and optimal multilevel preconditioner components that provide level independent linear solver convergence.

  9. Refinement of the twinned structure of cymrite from the Ruby Creek deposit (Alaska)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bolotina, N. B.; Rastsvetaeva, R. K., E-mail: rast@ns.crys.ras.ru; Kashaev, A. A. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Shubnikov Institute of Crystallography (Russian Federation)

    2010-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The mineral cymrite from the Ruby Creek deposit (Alaska) was reinvestigated by X-ray diffraction in a pseudo-orthorhombic unit cell with a = 5.3350(1) A, b = 36.9258(8) A, c = 7.6934(1) A, {beta} = 90.00(1){sup o}. A twin law corresponding to a sixfold axis was revealed for the first time. The structure was refined in the monoclinic space group P12{sub 1}1 to the R factor of 5.4%. The Al and Si atoms are assumed to be ordered within a double layer. The rotation of the cation sublattice by 60{sup o} around the c axis leads to the disorder of the T sites in the crystal structure (T = Al, Si).

  10. Development of the electron beam melting and refining in the Eastern Europe

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mladenov, G.M. [Institute of Electronics, Sofia (Bulgaria)

    1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    A open research potential for the many R & D projects, as well as developed industrial structures exist in the Central and Eastern Europe countries. Now the economy crisis in this part of the world, due to the positive exiting democratic changes and to the transition from central planned to the market economy are a challenge. Bridging the research and industrial potential of the Eastern Europe to the developed economies is a way to keep the knowledge and people with activity in this field and to extend the future market of EB products. A brief revue of the institutions and a very short general information for the EB melting and refinement development in the Eastern Europe countries is given.

  11. Proceedings of the conference on electron beam melting and refining - state of the art 1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bakish, R. [ed.

    1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The volume: Proceedings of the Conference on Electron Beam Melting and Refining-State of the Art 1994 covers many aspects of electron beam production, process control, components, and applications. Included were several papers from the defunct Soviet Bloc nations concerning the specifications and uses for their electron beam furnaces. Main topics of the conference were: Electron Beam (EB) Equipment; Safety and Analytical Aspects related to EB Melting; Material Processing with EB; Other Applications for EB; and A Look at EB in the East. EB has many uses, several papers mentioned the recycling of uranium scrap, the casting of heat resistant or corrosion resistant alloys, or the improved microstructure of alloys with the technique.

  12. Astrophysical hydrodynamics with a high-order discontinuous Galerkin scheme and adaptive mesh refinement

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schaal, Kevin; Chandrashekar, Praveen; Pakmor, Rüdiger; Klingenberg, Christian; Springel, Volker

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Solving the Euler equations of ideal hydrodynamics as accurately and efficiently as possible is a key requirement in many astrophysical simulations. It is therefore important to continuously advance the numerical methods implemented in current astrophysical codes, especially also in light of evolving computer technology, which favours certain computational approaches over others. Here we introduce the new adaptive mesh refinement (AMR) code TENET, which employs a high-order Discontinuous Galerkin (DG) scheme for hydrodynamics. The Euler equations in this method are solved in a weak formulation with a polynomial basis by means of explicit Runge-Kutta time integration and Gauss-Legendre quadrature. This approach offers significant advantages over commonly employed finite volume (FV) solvers. In particular, the higher order capability renders it computationally more efficient, in the sense that the same precision can be obtained at significantly less computational cost. Also, the DG scheme inherently conserves a...

  13. Lance for fuel and oxygen injection into smelting or refining furnace

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Schlichting, M.R.

    1994-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

    A furnace for smelting iron ore and/or refining molten iron is equipped with an overhead pneumatic lance, through which a center stream of particulate coal is ejected at high velocity into a slag layer. An annular stream of nitrogen or argon enshrouds the coal stream. Oxygen is simultaneously ejected in an annular stream encircling the inert gas stream. The interposition of the inert gas stream between the coal and oxygen streams prevents the volatile matter in the coal from combusting before it reaches the slag layer. Heat of combustion is thus more efficiently delivered to the slag, where it is needed to sustain the desired reactions occurring there. A second stream of lower velocity oxygen can be delivered through an outermost annulus to react with carbon monoxide gas rising from slag layer, thereby adding still more heat to the furnace. 7 figures.

  14. 3D Adaptive Mesh Refinement Simulations of Pellet Injection in Tokamaks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    R. Samtaney; S.C. Jardin; P. Colella; D.F. Martin

    2003-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

    We present results of Adaptive Mesh Refinement (AMR) simulations of the pellet injection process, a proven method of refueling tokamaks. AMR is a computationally efficient way to provide the resolution required to simulate realistic pellet sizes relative to device dimensions. The mathematical model comprises of single-fluid MHD equations with source terms in the continuity equation along with a pellet ablation rate model. The numerical method developed is an explicit unsplit upwinding treatment of the 8-wave formulation, coupled with a MAC projection method to enforce the solenoidal property of the magnetic field. The Chombo framework is used for AMR. The role of the E x B drift in mass redistribution during inside and outside pellet injections is emphasized.

  15. Liquid crystalline composites containing phyllosilicates

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Chaiko; David J. (Naperville, IL)

    2007-05-08T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention provides barrier films having reduced gas permeability for use in packaging and coating applications. The barrier films comprise an anisotropic liquid crystalline composite layer formed from phyllosilicate-polymer compositions. Phyllosilicate-polymer liquid crystalline compositions of the present invention can contain a high percentage of phyllosilicate while remaining transparent. Because of the ordering of the particles in the liquid crystalline composite, barrier films comprising liquid crystalline composites are particularly useful as barriers to gas transport.

  16. Development of a performance-based industrial energy efficiency indicator for corn refining plants.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boyd, G. A.; Decision and Information Sciences; USEPA

    2006-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Organizations that implement strategic energy management programs have the potential to achieve sustained energy savings if the programs are carried out properly. A key opportunity for achieving energy savings that plant managers can take is to determine an appropriate level of energy performance by comparing their plant's performance with that of similar plants in the same industry. Manufacturing facilities can set energy efficiency targets by using performance-based indicators. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), through its ENERGY STAR{reg_sign} program, has been developing plant energy performance indicators (EPIs) to encourage a variety of U.S. industries to use energy more efficiently. This report describes work with the corn refining industry to provide a plant-level indicator of energy efficiency for facilities that produce a variety of products--including corn starch, corn oil, animal feed, corn sweeteners, and ethanol--for the paper, food, beverage, and other industries in the United States. Consideration is given to the role that performance-based indicators play in motivating change; the steps needed to develop indicators, including interacting with an industry to secure adequate data for an indicator; and the actual application and use of an indicator when complete. How indicators are employed in the EPA's efforts to encourage industries to voluntarily improve their use of energy is discussed as well. The report describes the data and statistical methods used to construct the EPI for corn refining plants. Individual equations are presented, as are the instructions for using them in an associated Excel spreadsheet.

  17. An enriched finite element model with q-refinement for radiative boundary layers in glass cooling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mohamed, M. Shadi [Institute for Infrastructure and Environment, Heriot-Watt University, Edinburgh EH14 4AS (United Kingdom)] [Institute for Infrastructure and Environment, Heriot-Watt University, Edinburgh EH14 4AS (United Kingdom); Seaid, Mohammed; Trevelyan, Jon [School of Engineering and Computing Sciences, University of Durham, South Road, Durham DH1 3LE (United Kingdom)] [School of Engineering and Computing Sciences, University of Durham, South Road, Durham DH1 3LE (United Kingdom); Laghrouche, Omar [Institute for Infrastructure and Environment, Heriot-Watt University, Edinburgh EH14 4AS (United Kingdom)] [Institute for Infrastructure and Environment, Heriot-Watt University, Edinburgh EH14 4AS (United Kingdom)

    2014-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Radiative cooling in glass manufacturing is simulated using the partition of unity finite element method. The governing equations consist of a semi-linear transient heat equation for the temperature field and a stationary simplified P{sub 1} approximation for the radiation in non-grey semitransparent media. To integrate the coupled equations in time we consider a linearly implicit scheme in the finite element framework. A class of hyperbolic enrichment functions is proposed to resolve boundary layers near the enclosure walls. Using an industrial electromagnetic spectrum, the proposed method shows an immense reduction in the number of degrees of freedom required to achieve a certain accuracy compared to the conventional h-version finite element method. Furthermore the method shows a stable behaviour in treating the boundary layers which is shown by studying the solution close to the domain boundaries. The time integration choice is essential to implement a q-refinement procedure introduced in the current study. The enrichment is refined with respect to the steepness of the solution gradient near the domain boundary in the first few time steps and is shown to lead to a further significant reduction on top of what is already achieved with the enrichment. The performance of the proposed method is analysed for glass annealing in two enclosures where the simplified P{sub 1} approximation solution with the partition of unity method, the conventional finite element method and the finite difference method are compared to each other and to the full radiative heat transfer as well as the canonical Rosseland model.

  18. Saccharide antifreeze compositions

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Walters, Kent; Duman, John G; Serianni, Anthony S

    2013-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

    The invention provides an antifreeze glycolipid compounds and composition comprising a polysaccharide moiety of Formula I; ##STR00001## wherein D-Manp represents a D-mannopyranose moiety, D-Xylp represents a D-xylopyranose moiety, and n is about 5 to about 70; and one or more lipid moieties covalently linked to the polysaccharide moiety of Formula I or electrostatically associated with the polysaccaride moiety for Formula I. The antifreeze glycolipid compounds and compositions can be used for a variety of industrial, agricultural, medical, and cosmetic applications where recrystallization-inhibition, cyroprotection, or cryopreservation is desired. The antifreeze glycolipid compounds or compositions can be used as, for example, as cryoprotectants for tissue preservation and transplantation, improving the texture of processed frozen food and frozen meats, frostbit protection, crop protection, and green alternatives for land vehicle antifreeze and aircraft de-icing.

  19. Ceramic composite coating

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wicks, George G. (Aiken, SC)

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A thin, room-temperature-curing, ceramic composite for coating and patching etal substrates comprises a sol gel silica glass matrix filled with finely ground particles or fibers, preferably alumina. The sol gel glass is made by adding ethanol to water to form a first mixture, then separately adding ethanol to tetraethyl orthosilicate to form a second mixture, then slowly adding the first to the second mixture to make a third mixture, and making a slurry by adding the finely ground particles or fibers to the third mixture. The composite can be applied by spraying, brushing or trowelling. If applied to patch fine cracks, densification of the ceramic composite may be obtained to enhance sealing by applying heat during curing.

  20. Ceramic composite coating

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wicks, G.G.

    1997-01-21T23:59:59.000Z

    A thin, room-temperature-curing, ceramic composite for coating and patching metal substrates comprises a sol gel silica glass matrix filled with finely ground particles or fibers, preferably alumina. The sol gel glass is made by adding ethanol to water to form a first mixture, then separately adding ethanol to tetraethyl orthosilicate to form a second mixture, then slowly adding the first to the second mixture to make a third mixture, and making a slurry by adding the finely ground particles or fibers to the third mixture. The composite can be applied by spraying, brushing or trowelling. If applied to patch fine cracks, densification of the ceramic composite may be obtained to enhance sealing by applying heat during curing.

  1. Abrasion resistant composition

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Fischer, Keith D; Barnes, Christopher A; Henderson, Stephen L

    2014-05-13T23:59:59.000Z

    A surface covering composition of abrasion resistant character adapted for disposition in overlying bonded relation to a metal substrate. The surface covering composition includes metal carbide particles within a metal matrix at a packing factor of not less than about 0.6. Not less than about 40 percent by weight of the metal carbide particles are characterized by an effective diameter in the range of +14-32 mesh prior to introduction to the metal matrix. Not less than about 3 percent by weight of the metal carbide particles are characterized by an effective diameter of +60 mesh prior to introduction to the metal matrix.

  2. Composition for radiation shielding

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kronberg, James W. (Aiken, SC)

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A composition for use as a radiation shield. The shield has a depleted urum core for absorbing gamma rays and a bismuth coating for preventing chemical corrosion and absorbing gamma rays. Alternatively, a sheet of gadolinium may be positioned between the uranium core and the bismuth coating for absorbing neutrons. The composition is preferably in the form of a container for storing materials that emit radiation such as gamma rays and neutrons. The container is preferably formed by casting bismuth around a pre-formed uranium container having a gadolinium sheeting, and allowing the bismuth to cool. The resulting container is a structurally sound, corrosion-resistant, radiation-absorbing container.

  3. Model Refinement Needs A model developed by Peters and Marmorek (2003) will be used to generate predictions for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    449 Model Refinement Needs A model developed by Peters and Marmorek (2003) will be used to generate primarily an energy sink or primarily a source of food? More information is needed as to interactions predictions for comparison with observed variations in kokanee production. As with most models

  4. How smooth is the smoothest function in a given refinable space? Albert Cohen, Ingrid Daubechies, Amos Ron

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ron, Amos

    of wavelets from multiresolution analysis, as well as in the study of subdivision algorithms is well are the univariate splines and the multivariate box splines (cf. [2]), and for these spline spaces the rigidHow smooth is the smoothest function in a given refinable space? Albert Cohen, Ingrid Daubechies

  5. How smooth is the smoothest function in a given refinable space? Albert Cohen, Ingrid Daubechies, Amos Ron

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liblit, Ben

    analysis, as well as in the study of subdivision algorithms is well-known, well-understood and well of such spaces are the univariate splines and the multivariate box splines (cf. [2]), and for these spline spacesHow smooth is the smoothest function in a given refinable space? Albert Cohen, Ingrid Daubechies

  6. Using Knowledge-Based Neural Networks to Improve Algorithms: Refining the Chou-Fasman Algorithm for Protein Folding

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maclin, Rich

    for Protein Folding Richard Maclin Jude W. Shavlik Computer Sciences Dept. University of Wisconsin 1210 W learning Theory refinement Neural networks Finite-state automata Protein folding Chou-Fasman algorithm-Fasman algorithm, a method for predicting how globular proteins fold. Empirical evidence shows

  7. Analysis of multicomponent evaporation in electron beam melting and refining of titanium alloys

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Powell, A.; Szekely, J.; Pal, U. [Massachusetts Inst. of Tech., Cambridge, MA (United States). Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering; Avyle, J. van den; Damkroger, B. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States). Materials Processing Dept.

    1997-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Experimental evidence and a mathematical model are presented to evaluate the effect of beam-scan frequency on composition change in electron-beam melting of titanium alloys. Experiments characterized the evaporation rate of commercially pure (CP) titanium and vapor composition over titanium alloy with up to 6 wt pct aluminum and 4.5 wt pct vanadium, as a function of beam power, scan frequency, and background pressure. These data and thermal mapping of the hearth melt surface are used to estimate activity coefficients of aluminum and vanadium in the hearth. The model describes transient heat transfer in the surface of the melt and provides a means of estimating enhancement of pure titanium evaporation and change in final aluminum composition due to local heating at moderate beam-scan frequencies.

  8. Workshop on Composition Languages

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schneider, Jean-Guy

    Lumpe Co-located with the 8th European Software Engineering Conference and the 9th ACM SIGSOFT Symposium by Jean-Guy Schneider and Markus Lumpe Co-located with the 8th European Software Engineering Conference and the 9th ACM SIGSOFT Symposium on the Foundations of Software Engineering #12;#12;Workshop on Composition

  9. Workshop on Composition Languages

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schneider, Jean-Guy

    European Conference on Object-Oriented Programming #12;#12;Workshop on Composition Languages (WCL 2002 and Thomas Genssler Co-located with the 16th European Conference on Object-Oriented Programming #12;Copyright in Malaga, Spain on June 11, 2002. The workshop was affiliated with the 16th European Conference on Object

  10. Composite Load Model Evaluation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lu, Ning; Qiao, Hong (Amy)

    2007-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The WECC load modeling task force has dedicated its effort in the past few years to develop a composite load model that can represent behaviors of different end-user components. The modeling structure of the composite load model is recommended by the WECC load modeling task force. GE Energy has implemented this composite load model with a new function CMPLDW in its power system simulation software package, PSLF. For the last several years, Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) has taken the lead and collaborated with GE Energy to develop the new composite load model. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) and BPA joint force and conducted the evaluation of the CMPLDW and test its parameter settings to make sure that: • the model initializes properly, • all the parameter settings are functioning, and • the simulation results are as expected. The PNNL effort focused on testing the CMPLDW in a 4-bus system. An exhaustive testing on each parameter setting has been performed to guarantee each setting works. This report is a summary of the PNNL testing results and conclusions.

  11. Goal: develop high-level decision-making optimization to predict structural modifications in refining and logistics assets using more rigorous formulations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grossmann, Ignacio E.

    Processing Blending Quantitative Methods for Strategic and Investment Planning in the Oil-Refining Industry in refining and logistics assets using more rigorous formulations PETROBRAS Current Tool for Strategic, When to Invest? Only optimize streams transfers (oil and fuels import/export, market supply) + NLP

  12. The potential impact of proposed hazardous air pollutant legislation on the US refining industry. Final report, Task 9

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1989-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Administration has recently submitted a Clean Air Act Bill to Congress which would significantly modify the regulatory treatment of industrial hazardous air pollutants (air toxics). The adverse economic impacts of this legislation on the petroleum refining industry could be substantial. Depending on how EPA interprets the legislative language, the capital costs of compliance for the proposed bill could range from $1.3 to $15.0 billion. At the upper end of the range, costs of this order of magnitude would be over 2.5 times larger than the combined estimated cost of EPAs gasoline volatility (RVP) regulations and the proposed diesel sulfur content regulations. Potential compliance costs could be as much as $0.40 per barrel processed for large, complex refineries and as much as $0.50 per barrel for some small, simple refineries. For perspective, total refining costs, including a normal return on investment, are $4--5 per barrel. Because foreign refineries supplying the US will not be affected by the US air toxics regulations, US refineries may not be able to raise prices sufficiently to recover their compliance costs. For this reason, the air toxic legislation may put US refineries at an economic disadvantage relative to foreign competitors. Even under the best petroleum product market conditions, costs of $0.40 to $0.50 per barrel processed could reduce US Gulf refiner cash operating margins by as much as 29 percent. Under less favorable market conditions, such as the mid-80`s when refiners were losing money, the hazardous air pollutant regulations could greatly increase US refiner operating losses and potentially lead to closure of some marginal refineries.

  13. Chronological refinement of an ice core record at Upper Fremont Glacier in south central North America

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schuster, Paul F. [U.S. Geological Survey, Water Resources Division, Boulder, Colorado (United States)] [U.S. Geological Survey, Water Resources Division, Boulder, Colorado (United States); White, David E. [Golden Software, Golden, Colorado (United States)] [Golden Software, Golden, Colorado (United States); Naftz, David L. [U.S. Geological Survey, Water Resources Division, Salt Lake City, Utah (United States)] [U.S. Geological Survey, Water Resources Division, Salt Lake City, Utah (United States); Cecil, L. DeWayne [U.S. Geological Survey, Water Resources Division, Idaho Falls, Idaho (United States)] [U.S. Geological Survey, Water Resources Division, Idaho Falls, Idaho (United States)

    2000-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

    The potential to use ice cores from alpine glaciers in the midlatitudes to reconstruct paleoclimatic records has not been widely recognized. Although excellent paleoclimatic records exist for the polar regions, paleoclimatic ice core records are not common from midlatitude locations. An ice core removed from the Upper Fremont Glacier in Wyoming provides evidence for abrupt climate change during the mid-1800s. Volcanic events (Krakatau and Tambora) identified from electrical conductivity measurements (ECM) and isotopic and chemical data from the Upper Fremont Glacier were reexamined to confirm and refine previous chronological estimates of the ice core. At a depth of 152 m the refined age-depth profile shows good agreement (1736{+-}10 A.D.) with the {sup 14}C age date (1729{+-}95 A.D.). The {delta}{sup 18}O profile of the Upper Fremont Glacier (UFG) ice core indicates a change in climate known as the Little Ice Age (LIA). However, the sampling interval for {delta}{sup 18}O is sufficiently large (20 cm) such that it is difficult to pinpoint the LIA termination on the basis of {delta}{sup 18}O data alone. Other research has shown that changes in the {delta}{sup 18}O variance are generally coincident with changes in ECM variance. The ECM data set contains over 125,000 data points at a resolution of 1 data point per millimeter of ice core. A 999-point running average of the ECM data set and results from f tests indicates that the variance of the ECM data decreases significantly at about 108 m. At this depth, the age-depth profile predicts an age of 1845 A.D. Results indicate the termination of the LIA was abrupt with a major climatic shift to warmer temperatures around 1845 A.D. and continuing to present day. Prediction limits (error bars) calculated for the profile ages are {+-}10 years (90% confidence level). Thus a conservative estimate for the time taken to complete the LIA climatic shift to present-day climate is about 10 years, suggesting the LIA termination in alpine regions of central North America may have occurred on a relatively short (decadal) timescale. (c) 2000 American Geophysical Union.

  14. Desensitization of metastable intermolecular composites

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Busse, James R. (South Fork, CO); Dye, Robert C. (Los Alamos, NM); Foley, Timothy J. (Los Alamos, NM); Higa, Kelvin T. (Ridgecrest, CA); Jorgensen, Betty S. (Jemez Springs, NM); Sanders, Victor E. (White Rock, NM); Son, Steven F. (Los Alamos, NM)

    2011-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

    A method to substantially desensitize a metastable intermolecular composite material to electrostatic discharge and friction comprising mixing the composite material with an organic diluent and removing enough organic diluent from the mixture to form a mixture with a substantially putty-like consistency, as well as a concomitant method of recovering the metastable intermolecular composite material.

  15. Ly{alpha} RADIATIVE TRANSFER IN COSMOLOGICAL SIMULATIONS USING ADAPTIVE MESH REFINEMENT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Laursen, Peter [Dark Cosmology Centre, Niels Bohr Institute, University of Copenhagen, Juliane Maries Vej 30, DK-2100, Copenhagen Oe (Denmark); Razoumov, Alexei O. [Institute for Computational Astrophysics, Department of Astronomy and Physics, Saint Mary's University, Halifax, NS, B3H3C3 (Canada); Sommer-Larsen, Jesper [Excellence Cluster Universe, Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Boltzmannstrasse 2, D-85748 Garching (Germany)], E-mail: pela@dark-cosmology.dk, E-mail: razoumov@ap.smu.ca, E-mail: jslarsen@astro.ku.dk

    2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A numerical code for solving various Ly{alpha} radiative transfer (RT) problems is presented. The code is suitable for an arbitrary, three-dimensional distribution of Ly{alpha} emissivity, gas temperature, density, and velocity field. Capable of handling Ly{alpha} RT in an adaptively refined grid-based structure, it enables detailed investigation of the effects of clumpiness of the interstellar (or intergalactic) medium. The code is tested against various geometrically and physically idealized configurations for which analytical solutions exist, and subsequently applied to three different simulated high-resolution 'Lyman-break galaxies', extracted from high-resolution cosmological simulations at redshift z = 3.6. Proper treatment of the Ly{alpha} scattering reveals a diversity of surface brightness (SB) and line profiles. Specifically, for a given galaxy the maximum observed SB can vary by an order of magnitude, and the total flux by a factor of 3-6, depending on the viewing angle. This may provide an explanation for differences in observed properties of high-redshift galaxies, and in particular a possible physical link between Lyman-break galaxies and regular Ly{alpha} emitters.

  16. Technical support to the Solvent Refined Coal (SRC) demonstration projects: assessment of current research and development

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Edwards, M.S.; Rodgers, B.R.; Brown, C.H.; Carlson, P.K.; Gambill, W.R.; Gilliam, T.M.; Holmes, J.M.; Krishnan, R.P.; Parsly, L.F.

    1980-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A program to demonstrate Solvent Refined Coal (SRC) technology has been initiated by the US Department of Energy (DOE) in partnership with two industrial groups. Project management responsibility has been assigned to the Oak Ridge Operations Office (ORO) of DOE. ORO requested that the Oak Ridge National Laboratory assess current research and development (R and D) activities and develop recommendations for those activities that might contribute to successful completion of the SRC demonstration plant projects. The objectives of this final report are to discuss in detail the problem areas in SRC; to discuss the current and planned R and D investigations relevant to the problems identified; and to suggest appropriate R and D activities in support of designs for the SRC demonstration plants. Four types of R and D activities are suggested: continuation of present and planned activities; coordination of activities and results, present and proposed; extension/redirection of activities not involving major equipment purchase or modifications; and new activities. Important examples of the first type of activity include continuation of fired heater, slurry rheology, and slurry mixing studies at Ft. Lewis. Among the second type of activity, coordination of data acquisition and interpretation is recommended in the areas of heat transfer, vapor/liquid equilibria, and physical properties. Principal examples of recommendations for extension/redirection include screening studies at laboratory scale on the use of carbonaceous precoat (e.g., anthracite) infiltration, and 15- to 30-day continuous tests of the Texaco gasifier at the Texaco Montebello facility (using SRC residues).

  17. Refining the associations of the Fermi Large Area Telescope Source Catalogs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massaro, F; Landoni, M; Paggi, A; Masetti, N; Giroletti, M; Otí-Floranes, H; Chavushyan, V; Jiménez-Bailón, E; Patiño-Álvarez, V; Digel, S W; Smith, Howard A; Tosti, G

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Fermi-Large Area Telescope (LAT) First Source Catalog (1FGL) was released in February 2010 and the Fermi-LAT 2-Year Source Catalog (2FGL) appeared in April 2012, based on data from 24 months of operation. Since their releases, many follow up observations of unidentified gamma-ray sources (UGSs) were performed and new procedures to associate gamma-ray sources with potential counterparts at other wavelengths were developed. Here we review and characterize all the associations as published in the 1FGL and 2FGL catalog on the basis of multifrequency archival observations. In particular we located 177 spectra for the low-energy counterparts that were not listed in the previous Fermi catalogs, and in addition we present new spectroscopic observations of 8 gamma-ray blazar candidates. Based on our investigations, we introduce a new counterpart category of "candidate associations" and propose a refined classification for the candidate low-energy counterparts of the Fermi sources. We compare the 1FGL-assigned coun...

  18. Development of refined MCNPX-PARET multi-channel model for transient analysis in research reactors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kalcheva, S.; Koonen, E. [SCK-CEN, BR2 Reactor Dept., Boeretang 200, 2400 Mol (Belgium); Olson, A. P. [RERTR Program, Nuclear Engineering Div., Argonne National Laboratory, Cass Avenue, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States)

    2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Reactivity insertion transients are often analyzed (RELAP, PARET) using a two-channel model, representing the hot assembly with specified power distribution and an average assembly representing the remainder of the core. For the analysis of protected by the reactor safety system transients and zero reactivity feedback coefficients this approximation proves to give adequate results. However, a more refined multi-channel model representing the various assemblies, coupled through the reactivity feedback effects to the whole reactor core is needed for the analysis of unprotected transients with excluded over power and period trips. In the present paper a detailed multi-channel PARET model has been developed which describes the reactor core in different clusters representing typical BR2 fuel assemblies. The distribution of power and reactivity feedback in each cluster of the reactor core is obtained from a best-estimate MCNPX calculation using the whole core geometry model of the BR2 reactor. The sensitivity of the reactor response to power, temperature and energy distributions is studied for protected and unprotected reactivity insertion transients, with zero and non-zero reactivity feedback coefficients. The detailed multi-channel model is compared vs. simplified fewer-channel models. The sensitivities of transient characteristics derived from the different models are tested on a few reactivity insertion transients with reactivity feedback from coolant temperature and density change. (authors)

  19. Refinement of a formula for decay after weak coherent excitation of a sphere

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Friedberg, R., E-mail: rfriedberg1@nyc.rr.co [Barnard College, Columbia University, 452 Riverside Drive, New York, NY 10027 (United States)

    2010-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A new formula has been given recently by A.A. Svidzinsky and M.O. Scully to describe the temporal evolution of the excitation function beta(t,r{sup -}>) in a large sphere satisfying the Markov condition after excitation by a single photon. This formula is based on a physically reasonable Ansatz from which differential equations are inferred for the undetermined radial functions in the Ansatz. The solution to these differential equations leads to the formula for beta. Numerical calculations from this formula yield a value approx10% for the maximum probability of occupancy of secondary excited states. In this paper, we refine the formula of Svidzinsky and Scully by allowing the radial functions in the Ansatz to depend on the angular index l of the spherical Bessel functions. By using the Debye formula for the asymptotic behavior of j{sub l}(u) for large l as well as u, we obtain differential equations in each angular sector, similar to theirs but with a dependence on l. The solution to these equations yields our improved formula, from which we calculate 17.1% for the maximum probability of secondary excited states.

  20. Dynamic implicit 3D adaptive mesh refinement for non-equilibrium radiation diffusion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    B. Philip; Z. Wang; M.A. Berrill; M. Birke; M. Pernice

    2014-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The time dependent non-equilibrium radiation diffusion equations are important for solving the transport of energy through radiation in optically thick regimes and find applications in several fields including astrophysics and inertial confinement fusion. The associated initial boundary value problems that are encountered often exhibit a wide range of scales in space and time and are extremely challenging to solve. To efficiently and accurately simulate these systems we describe our research on combining techniques that will also find use more broadly for long term time integration of nonlinear multi-physics systems: implicit time integration for efficient long term time integration of stiff multi-physics systems, local control theory based step size control to minimize the required global number of time steps while controlling accuracy, dynamic 3D adaptive mesh refinement (AMR) to minimize memory and computational costs, Jacobian Free Newton–Krylov methods on AMR grids for efficient nonlinear solution, and optimal multilevel preconditioner components that provide level independent solver convergence.

  1. Solvent Refined Coal (SRC) process. [Runs 49 to 57 and 59 to 62

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    1980-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes the progress of the Solvent Refined Coal (SRC) project for the period January 1, 1979 through December 31, 1979. The fourth quarter of 1979 is reported here in detail. Turnaround activities at the Fort Lewis SRC-II Pilot Plant were completed. During the shutdown, installation of Slurry Preheater B was completed. In addition, extensive modifications were completed to improve operability and slurry handling capabilities. The experimental program for testing Slurry Preheater B was revised to improve the data base for design scale-up considerations. Coal feed was established using Powhatan No. 6 coal. Twenty slurry survey tests were designed to establish the effects of varous slurry and heater inlet hydrogen flow rates on heat transfer, heater coil pressure drop, and heater operability. Additional tests were also added to the preheater evaluation program to study the effects of coal concentration, recycle pyridine insoluble concentration and preheater outlet temperatures. During 1979, PDU P-99 completed 13 runs (Runs 49 to 57 and 59 to 62). All these runs were made feeding coal from the Powhatan No. 5 Mine.

  2. Multigroup radiation hydrodynamics with flux-limited diffusion and adaptive mesh refinement

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    González, Matthias; Commerçon, Benoît; Masson, Jacques

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Radiative transfer plays a key role in the star formation process. Due to a high computational cost, radiation-hydrodynamics simulations performed up to now have mainly been carried out in the grey approximation. In recent years, multi-frequency radiation-hydrodynamics models have started to emerge, in an attempt to better account for the large variations of opacities as a function of frequency. We wish to develop an efficient multigroup algorithm for the adaptive mesh refinement code RAMSES which is suited to heavy proto-stellar collapse calculations. Due to prohibitive timestep constraints of an explicit radiative transfer method, we constructed a time-implicit solver based on a stabilised bi-conjugate gradient algorithm, and implemented it in RAMSES under the flux-limited diffusion approximation. We present a series of tests which demonstrate the high performance of our scheme in dealing with frequency-dependent radiation-hydrodynamic flows. We also present a preliminary simulation of a three-dimensional p...

  3. Technology status in support of refined technical baseline for the Spent Nuclear Fuel project. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Puigh, R.J.; Toffer, H.; Heard, F.J.; Irvin, J.J.; Cooper, T.D.

    1995-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

    The Spent Nuclear Fuel Project (SNFP) has undertaken technology acquisition activities focused on supporting the technical basis for the removal of the N Reactor fuel from the K Basins to an interim storage facility. The purpose of these technology acquisition activities has been to identify technology issues impacting design or safety approval, to establish the strategy for obtaining the necessary information through either existing project activities, or the assignment of new work. A set of specific path options has been identified for each major action proposed for placing the N Reactor fuel into a ``stabilized`` form for interim storage as part of this refined technical basis. This report summarizes the status of technology information acquisition as it relates to key decisions impacting the selection of specific path options. The following specific categories were chosen to characterize and partition the technology information status: hydride issues and ignition, corrosion, hydrogen generation, drying and conditioning, thermal performance, criticality and materials accountability, canister/fuel particulate behavior, and MCO integrity. This report represents a preliminary assessment of the technology information supporting the SNFP. As our understanding of the N Reactor fuel performance develops the technology information supporting the SNFP will be updated and documented in later revisions to this report. Revision 1 represents the incorporation of peer review comments into the original document. The substantive evolution in our understanding of the technical status for the SNFP (except section 3) since July 1995 have not been incorporated into this revision.

  4. Microstructural refinement and enhanced transport properties in binary doped NdFeAsO superconductor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aswathy, P. M.; Anooja, J. B.; Varghese, Neson; Syamaprasad, U., E-mail: syamcsir@gmail.com [National Institute for Interdisciplinary Science and Technology (CSIR), Trivandrum 695019 (India)

    2014-02-07T23:59:59.000Z

    We report the synthesis of Nd{sub 1?x}Ca{sub x}FeAsO{sub 1?2x}F{sub 2x} superconductors using CaF{sub 2} as a binary dopant that provides both holes and electrons by simultaneous substitution of Ca{sup 2+} ions and F{sup ?} ions at Nd{sup 3+} and O{sup 2?} sites, respectively. The sample with x?=?0.2 exhibits a maximum critical temperature (T{sub C}) of 52.3?K and transport critical current density (J{sub C}) of 1240?A/cm{sup 2} at 12?K. An interesting feature observed for binary doped samples is the preferential alignment of (00l) planes and the refinement of microstructure both in terms of grain size and grain connectivity. NdFeAsO based superconductors are already known for their very high critical fields and field independent J{sub C}(H) performance. However, the development of the bulk superconductors with oriented large grains and good grain connectivity has not been reported so far and hence the present work will be definitely a step towards the progress in NdFeAsO based conductor development.

  5. Relativistic Hydrodynamic Flows Using Spatial and Temporal Adaptive Structured Mesh Refinement

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peng Wang; Tom Abel; Weiqun Zhang

    2007-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Astrophysical relativistic flow problems require high resolution three-dimensional numerical simulations. In this paper, we describe a new parallel three-dimensional code for simulations of special relativistic hydrodynamics (SRHD) using both spatially and temporally structured adaptive mesh refinement (AMR). We used the method of lines to discretize the SRHD equations spatially and a total variation diminishing (TVD) Runge-Kutta scheme for time integration. For spatial reconstruction, we have implemented piecewise linear method (PLM), piecewise parabolic method (PPM), third order convex essentially non-oscillatory (CENO) and third and fifth order weighted essentially non-oscillatory (WENO) schemes. Flux is computed using either direct flux reconstruction or approximate Riemann solvers including HLL, modified Marquina flux, local Lax-Friedrichs flux formulas and HLLC. The AMR part of the code is built on top of the cosmological Eulerian AMR code {\\sl enzo}. We discuss the coupling of the AMR framework with the relativistic solvers. Via various test problems, we emphasize the importance of resolution studies in relativistic flow simulations because extremely high resolution is required especially when shear flows are present in the problem. We also present the results of two 3d simulations of astrophysical jets: AGN jets and GRB jets. Resolution study of those two cases further highlights the need of high resolutions to calculate accurately relativistic flow problems.

  6. Startup due for multi-national Gulf DRB demonstration. [Donor Refined Bitumen

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1986-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    October is the scheduled start-up date for a 450 barrels per day demonstration of the Gulf Donor Refined Bitumen (DRB) process in France. The project will be carried out by a joint venture consisting of Gulf Canada, Alberta Oil Sands Technology and Research Authority, and ASVAHL, a joint venture of three French companies. The Gulf DRB process is a liquid phase hydrocracking process in which hydrogen is made available from a donor rather than as high pressure gaseous hydrogen. Donor liquid is circulated between the feed cracking step and a re-hydrogenation step. The donor is a distillate stream containing substituted tetralins. It is derived from the feedstock in sufficient quantity for the process to be self-sufficient in donor. The DRB process is expected to perform with high reliability because of the simplicity of the process, operation at moderate pressure (800 psi), and the use of uncomplicated off-the-shelf equipment. The process and demonstration plant are described.

  7. Dimensional reduction as a tool for mesh refinement and trackingsingularities of PDEs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stinis, Panagiotis

    2007-06-10T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a collection of algorithms which utilizedimensional reduction to perform mesh refinement and study possiblysingular solutions of time-dependent partial differential equations. Thealgorithms are inspired by constructions used in statistical mechanics toevaluate the properties of a system near a critical point. The firstalgorithm allows the accurate determination of the time of occurrence ofa possible singularity. The second algorithm is an adaptive meshrefinement scheme which can be used to approach efficiently the possiblesingularity. Finally, the third algorithm uses the second algorithm untilthe available resolution is exhausted (as we approach the possiblesingularity) and then switches to a dimensionally reduced model which,when accurate, can follow faithfully the solution beyond the time ofoccurrence of the purported singularity. An accurate dimensionallyreduced model should dissipate energy at the right rate. We construct twovariants of each algorithm. The first variant assumes that we have actualknowledge of the reduced model. The second variant assumes that we knowthe form of the reduced model, i.e., the terms appearing in the reducedmodel, but not necessarily their coefficients. In this case, we alsoprovide a way of determining the coefficients. We present numericalresults for the Burgers equation with zero and nonzero viscosity toillustrate the use of the algorithms.

  8. A Predictive Model of Fragmentation using Adaptive Mesh Refinement and a Hierarchical Material Model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Koniges, A E; Masters, N D; Fisher, A C; Anderson, R W; Eder, D C; Benson, D; Kaiser, T B; Gunney, B T; Wang, P; Maddox, B R; Hansen, J F; Kalantar, D H; Dixit, P; Jarmakani, H; Meyers, M A

    2009-03-03T23:59:59.000Z

    Fragmentation is a fundamental material process that naturally spans spatial scales from microscopic to macroscopic. We developed a mathematical framework using an innovative combination of hierarchical material modeling (HMM) and adaptive mesh refinement (AMR) to connect the continuum to microstructural regimes. This framework has been implemented in a new multi-physics, multi-scale, 3D simulation code, NIF ALE-AMR. New multi-material volume fraction and interface reconstruction algorithms were developed for this new code, which is leading the world effort in hydrodynamic simulations that combine AMR with ALE (Arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian) techniques. The interface reconstruction algorithm is also used to produce fragments following material failure. In general, the material strength and failure models have history vector components that must be advected along with other properties of the mesh during remap stage of the ALE hydrodynamics. The fragmentation models are validated against an electromagnetically driven expanding ring experiment and dedicated laser-based fragmentation experiments conducted at the Jupiter Laser Facility. As part of the exit plan, the NIF ALE-AMR code was applied to a number of fragmentation problems of interest to the National Ignition Facility (NIF). One example shows the added benefit of multi-material ALE-AMR that relaxes the requirement that material boundaries must be along mesh boundaries.

  9. Refinement, Validation and Application of Cloud-Radiation Parameterization in a GCM

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dr. Graeme L. Stephens

    2009-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The research performed under this award was conducted along 3 related fronts: (1) Refinement and assessment of parameterizations of sub-grid scale radiative transport in GCMs. (2) Diagnostic studies that use ARM observations of clouds and convection in an effort to understand the effects of moist convection on its environment, including how convection influences clouds and radiation. This aspect focuses on developing and testing methodologies designed to use ARM data more effectively for use in atmospheric models, both at the cloud resolving model scale and the global climate model scale. (3) Use (1) and (2) in combination with both models and observations of varying complexity to study key radiation feedback Our work toward these objectives thus involved three corresponding efforts. First, novel diagnostic techniques were developed and applied to ARM observations to understand and characterize the effects of moist convection on the dynamical and thermodynamical environment in which it occurs. Second, an in house GCM radiative transfer algorithm (BUGSrad) was employed along with an optimal estimation cloud retrieval algorithm to evaluate the ability to reproduce cloudy-sky radiative flux observations. Assessments using a range of GCMs with various moist convective parameterizations to evaluate the fidelity with which the parameterizations reproduce key observable features of the environment were also started in the final year of this award. The third study area involved the study of cloud radiation feedbacks and we examined these in both cloud resolving and global climate models.

  10. Radiation shielding composition

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Quapp, William J. (Idaho Falls, ID); Lessing, Paul A. (Idaho Falls, ID)

    2000-12-26T23:59:59.000Z

    A composition for use as a radiation shield. The shield is a concrete product containing a stable uranium aggregate for attenuating gamma rays and a neutron absorbing component, the uranium aggregate and neutron absorbing component being present in the concrete product in sufficient amounts to provide a concrete having a density between about 4 and about 15 grams/cm.sup.3 and which will at a predetermined thickness, attenuate gamma rays and absorb neutrons from a radioactive material of projected gamma ray and neutron emissions over a determined time period. The composition is preferably in the form of a container for storing radioactive materials that emit gamma rays and neutrons. The concrete container preferably comprises a metal liner and/or a metal outer shell. The resulting radiation shielding container has the potential of being structurally sound, stable over a long period of time, and, if desired, readily mobile.

  11. Negative electrode composition

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kaun, Thomas D. (New Lenox, IL); Chilenskas, Albert A. (Western Springs, IL)

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A secondary electrochemical cell and a negative electrode composition for use therewith comprising a positive electrode containing an active material of a chalcogen or a transiton metal chalcogenide, a negative electrode containing a lithium-aluminum alloy and an amount of a ternary alloy sufficient to provide at least about 5 percent overcharge capacity relative to a negative electrode solely of the lithium-aluminum alloy, the ternary alloy comprising lithium, aluminum, and iron or cobalt, and an electrolyte containing lithium ions in contact with both of the positive and the negative electrodes. The ternary alloy is present in the electrode in the range of from about 5 percent to about 50 percent by weight of the electrode composition and may include lithium-aluminum-nickel alloy in combination with either the ternary iron or cobalt alloys. A plurality of series connected cells having overcharge capacity can be equalized on the discharge side without expensive electrical equipment.

  12. Radiation shielding composition

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Quapp, William J. (Idaho Falls, ID); Lessing, Paul A. (Idaho Falls, ID)

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A composition for use as a radiation shield. The shield is a concrete product containing a stable uranium aggregate for attenuating gamma rays and a neutron absorbing component, the uranium aggregate and neutron absorbing component being present in the concrete product in sufficient amounts to provide a concrete having a density between about 4 and about 15 grams/cm.sup.3 and which will at a predetermined thickness, attenuate gamma rays and absorb neutrons from a radioactive material of projected gamma ray and neutron emissions over a determined time period. The composition is preferably in the form of a container for storing radioactive materials that emit gamma rays and neutrons. The concrete container preferably comprises a metal liner and/or a metal outer shell. The resulting radiation shielding container has the potential of being structurally sound, stable over a long period of time, and, if desired, readily mobile.

  13. Radiation shielding composition

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Quapp, W.J.; Lessing, P.A.

    1998-07-28T23:59:59.000Z

    A composition is disclosed for use as a radiation shield. The shield is a concrete product containing a stable uranium aggregate for attenuating gamma rays and a neutron absorbing component, the uranium aggregate and neutron absorbing component being present in the concrete product in sufficient amounts to provide a concrete having a density between about 4 and about 15 grams/cm{sup 3} and which will at a predetermined thickness, attenuate gamma rays and absorb neutrons from a radioactive material of projected gamma ray and neutron emissions over a determined time period. The composition is preferably in the form of a container for storing radioactive materials that emit gamma rays and neutrons. The concrete container preferably comprises a metal liner and/or a metal outer shell. The resulting radiation shielding container has the potential of being structurally sound, stable over a long period of time, and, if desired, readily mobile. 5 figs.

  14. Composite carbon foam electrode

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mayer, S.T.; Pekala, R.W.; Kaschmitter, J.L.

    1997-05-06T23:59:59.000Z

    Carbon aerogels used as a binder for granulated materials, including other forms of carbon and metal additives, are cast onto carbon or metal fiber substrates to form composite carbon thin film sheets. The thin film sheets are utilized in electrochemical energy storage applications, such as electrochemical double layer capacitors (aerocapacitors), lithium based battery insertion electrodes, fuel cell electrodes, and electrocapacitive deionization electrodes. The composite carbon foam may be formed by prior known processes, but with the solid particles being added during the liquid phase of the process, i.e. prior to gelation. The other forms of carbon may include carbon microspheres, carbon powder, carbon aerogel powder or particles, graphite carbons. Metal and/or carbon fibers may be added for increased conductivity. The choice of materials and fibers will depend on the electrolyte used and the relative trade off of system resistivity and power to system energy. 1 fig.

  15. Composite carbon foam electrode

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mayer, Steven T. (San Leandro, CA); Pekala, Richard W. (Pleasant Hill, CA); Kaschmitter, James L. (Pleasanton, CA)

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Carbon aerogels used as a binder for granularized materials, including other forms of carbon and metal additives, are cast onto carbon or metal fiber substrates to form composite carbon thin film sheets. The thin film sheets are utilized in electrochemical energy storage applications, such as electrochemical double layer capacitors (aerocapacitors), lithium based battery insertion electrodes, fuel cell electrodes, and electrocapacitive deionization electrodes. The composite carbon foam may be formed by prior known processes, but with the solid particles being added during the liquid phase of the process, i.e. prior to gelation. The other forms of carbon may include carbon microspheres, carbon powder, carbon aerogel powder or particles, graphite carbons. Metal and/or carbon fibers may be added for increased conductivity. The choice of materials and fibers will depend on the electrolyte used and the relative trade off of system resistivty and power to system energy.

  16. Composition for radiation shielding

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kronberg, J.W.

    1994-08-02T23:59:59.000Z

    A composition for use as a radiation shield is disclosed. The shield has a depleted uranium core for absorbing gamma rays and a bismuth coating for preventing chemical corrosion and absorbing gamma rays. Alternatively, a sheet of gadolinium may be positioned between the uranium core and the bismuth coating for absorbing neutrons. The composition is preferably in the form of a container for storing materials that emit radiation such as gamma rays and neutrons. The container is preferably formed by casting bismuth around a pre-formed uranium container having a gadolinium sheeting, and allowing the bismuth to cool. The resulting container is a structurally sound, corrosion-resistant, radiation-absorbing container. 2 figs.

  17. Solid state electrochemical composite

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Visco, Steven J. (Berkeley, CA); Jacobson, Craig P. (Moraga, CA); DeJonghe, Lutgard C. (Lafayette, CA)

    2009-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Provided is a composite electrochemical device fabricated from highly electronically conductive materials such as metals, metal alloys, or electronically conductive ceramics. The electronic conductivity of the electrode substrate is maximized. The invention allows for an electrode with high electronic conductivity and sufficient catalytic activity to achieve high power density in ionic (electrochemical) devices such as fuel cells and electrolytic gas separation systems including oxygen generation system.

  18. Thin film composite electrolyte

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Schucker, Robert C. (The Woodlands, TX)

    2007-08-14T23:59:59.000Z

    The invention is a thin film composite solid (and a means for making such) suitable for use as an electrolyte, having a first layer of a dense, non-porous conductive material; a second layer of a porous ionic conductive material; and a third layer of a dense non-porous conductive material, wherein the second layer has a Coefficient of thermal expansion within 5% of the coefficient of thermal expansion of the first and third layers.

  19. Micromechanical Damage Models for Continuous Fiber Reinforced Composite Materials

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wu, Yi

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    strength of metal and ceramic-matrix composites, Actacomposites (MMCs) and ceramic matrix composites (CMCs). InPolymer Matrix Composite Ceramic Matrix Composite Composite

  20. Creep damage mechanisms in composites

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nutt, S.R.

    1994-10-17T23:59:59.000Z

    During the past year, research has focused on processing and characterization of intermetallic composites synthesized by plasma spray deposition. This versatile process allows rapid synthesis of a variety of different composite systems with potential applications for coatings, functionally gradient materials, rapid proto-typing and 3d printing, as well as near-net-shape processing of complex shapes. We have been pursuing an experimental program of research aimed at a fundamental understanding of the microstructural processes involved in the synthesis of intermetallic composites, including diffusion, heat transfer, grain boundary migration, and the dependence of these phenomena on deposition parameters. The work has been motivated by issues arising from composite materials manufacturing technologies. Recent progress is described in section B on the following topics: (1) Reactive atomization and deposition of intermetallic composites (Ni3Al); (2) Reactive synthesis of MoSi2-SiC composites; (3) Mechanical alloying of nanocrystalline alloys; (4) Tensile creep deformation of BMAS glass-ceramic composites.

  1. Projections of the impact of expansion of domestic heavy oil production on the U.S. refining industry from 1990 to 2010. Topical report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Olsen, D.K.; Ramzel, E.B.; Strycker, A.R. [National Institute for Petroleum and Energy Research, Bartlesville, OK (United States). ITT Research Institute] [National Institute for Petroleum and Energy Research, Bartlesville, OK (United States). ITT Research Institute; Guariguata, G.; Salmen, F.G. [Bonner and Moore Management Science, Houston, TX (United States)] [Bonner and Moore Management Science, Houston, TX (United States)

    1994-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report is one of a series of publications assessing the feasibility of increasing domestic heavy oil (10{degrees} to 20{degrees} API gravity) production. This report provides a compendium of the United States refining industry and analyzes the industry by Petroleum Administration for Defense District (PADD) and by ten smaller refining areas. The refining capacity, oil source and oil quality are analyzed, and projections are made for the U.S. refining industry for the years 1990 to 2010. The study used publicly available data as background. A linear program model of the U.S. refining industry was constructed and validated using 1990 U.S. refinery performance. Projections of domestic oil production (decline) and import of crude oil (increases) were balanced to meet anticipated demand to establish a base case for years 1990 through 2010. The impact of additional domestic heavy oil production, (300 MB/D to 900 MB/D, originating in select areas of the U.S.) on the U.S. refining complex was evaluated. This heavy oil could reduce the import rate and the balance of payments by displacing some imported, principally Mid-east, medium crude. The construction cost for refining units to accommodate this additional domestic heavy oil production in both the low and high volume scenarios is about 7 billion dollars for bottoms conversion capacity (delayed coking) with about 50% of the cost attributed to compliance with the Clean Air Act Amendment of 1990.

  2. DARPA Efforts and Interests in Composites

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    * Improved properties Open Manufacturing * Technology Insertion Program * Bonded Composite Confidence * InformaticsProbabilistic Process Modeling * Composites Manufacturing...

  3. Biomass Compositional Analysis Laboratory (Fact Sheet), National...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Providing detailed and accurate characterization of the chemical composition of biomass feedstocks, intermediates, and products Compositional Analysis Service Capabilities...

  4. Design of a Safeguards Instrument for Plutonium Quantification in an Electrochemical Refining System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Le Coq, Annabelle G

    2013-06-25T23:59:59.000Z

    ]. The electrorefiner is the key operational unit in pyroprocessing. The goal of this unit is to electrolytically separate the actinides, the cladding hulls, bond sodium, and fission products (FP) using temperatures around 450?C. The metallic fuel rods are chopped... ..................................................... 80 APPENDIX C. MCNP MODEL OF THE EBR-II FOR BURNUP CALCULATION ... 86 APPENDIX D. EBR-II SPENT FUEL ACTINIDE ISOTOPIC COMPOSITION ......... 88 vii LIST OF FIGURES Page Figure 1.1. Pyroprocessing materials: (a) dentritic uranium...

  5. Carbide/nitride grain refined rare earth-iron-boron permanent magnet and method of making

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McCallum, R. William (Ames, IA); Branagan, Daniel J. (Ames, IA)

    1996-01-23T23:59:59.000Z

    A method of making a permanent magnet wherein 1) a melt is formed having a base alloy composition comprising RE, Fe and/or Co, and B (where RE is one or more rare earth elements) and 2) TR (where TR is a transition metal selected from at least one of Ti, Zr, Hf, V, Nb, Ta, Cr, Mo, W, and Al) and at least one of C and N are provided in the base alloy composition melt in substantially stoichiometric amounts to form a thermodynamically stable compound (e.g. TR carbide, nitride or carbonitride). The melt is rapidly solidified in a manner to form particulates having a substantially amorphous (metallic glass) structure and a dispersion of primary TRC, TRN and/or TRC/N precipitates. The amorphous particulates are heated above the crystallization temperature of the base alloy composition to nucleate and grow a hard magnetic phase to an optimum grain size and to form secondary TRC, TRN and/or TRC/N precipitates dispersed at grain boundaries. The crystallized particulates are consolidated at an elevated temperature to form a shape. During elevated temperature consolidation, the primary and secondary precipitates act to pin the grain boundaries and minimize deleterious grain growth that is harmful to magnetic properties.

  6. Carbide/nitride grain refined rare earth-iron-boron permanent magnet and method of making

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McCallum, R.W.; Branagan, D.J.

    1996-01-23T23:59:59.000Z

    A method of making a permanent magnet is disclosed wherein (1) a melt is formed having a base alloy composition comprising RE, Fe and/or Co, and B (where RE is one or more rare earth elements) and (2) TR (where TR is a transition metal selected from at least one of Ti, Zr, Hf, V, Nb, Ta, Cr, Mo, W, and Al) and at least one of C and N are provided in the base alloy composition melt in substantially stoichiometric amounts to form a thermodynamically stable compound (e.g. TR carbide, nitride or carbonitride). The melt is rapidly solidified in a manner to form particulates having a substantially amorphous (metallic glass) structure and a dispersion of primary TRC, TRN and/or TRC/N precipitates. The amorphous particulates are heated above the crystallization temperature of the base alloy composition to nucleate and grow a hard magnetic phase to an optimum grain size and to form secondary TRC, TRN and/or TRC/N precipitates dispersed at grain boundaries. The crystallized particulates are consolidated at an elevated temperature to form a shape. During elevated temperature consolidation, the primary and secondary precipitates act to pin the grain boundaries and minimize deleterious grain growth that is harmful to magnetic properties. 33 figs.

  7. Reactive Blast Waves from Composite Charges

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kuhl, A L; Bell, J B; Beckner, V E

    2009-10-16T23:59:59.000Z

    Investigated here is the performance of composite explosives - measured in terms of the blast wave they drive into the surrounding environment. The composite charge configuration studied here was a spherical booster (1/3 charge mass), surrounded by aluminum (Al) powder (2/3 charge mass) at an initial density of {rho}{sub 0} = 0.604 g/cc. The Al powder acts as a fuel but does not detonate - thereby providing an extreme example of a 'non-ideal' explosive (where 2/3 of the charge does not detonate). Detonation of the booster charge creates a blast wave that disperses the Al powder and ignites the ensuing Al-air mixture - thereby forming a two-phase combustion cloud embedded in the explosion. Afterburning of the booster detonation products with air also enhances and promotes the Al-air combustion process. Pressure waves from such reactive blast waves have been measured in bomb calorimeter experiments. Here we describe numerical simulations of those experiments. A Heterogeneous Continuum Model was used to model the dispersion and combustion of the Al particle cloud. It combines the gasdynamic conservation laws for the gas phase with a dilute continuum model for the dispersed phase, as formulated by Nigmatulin. Inter-phase mass, momentum and energy exchange are prescribed by phenomenological models of Khasainov. It incorporates a combustion model based on mass conservation laws for fuel, air and products; source/sink terms are treated in the fast-chemistry limit appropriate for such gasdynamic fields, along with a model for mass transfer from the particle phase to the gas. The model takes into account both the afterburning of the detonation products of the booster with air, and the combustion of the Al particles with air. The model equations were integrated by high-order Godunov schemes for both the gas and particle phases. Adaptive Mesh Refinement (AMR) was used to capture the energy-bearing scales of the turbulent flow on the computational grid, and to track/resolve reaction zones. Numerical simulations of the explosion fields from 1.5-g and 10-kg composite charges were performed. Computed pressure histories (red curve) are compared with measured waveforms (black curves) in Fig. 1. Comparison of these results with a waveform for a non-combustion case in nitrogen (blue curve) demonstrates that a reactive blast wave was formed. Cross-sectional views of the temperature field at various times are presented in Fig. 2, which shows that the flow is turbulent. Initially, combustion occurs at the fuel-air interface, and the energy release rate is controlled by the rate of turbulent mixing. Eventually, oxidizer becomes distributed throughout the cloud via ballistic mixing of the particles with air; energy release then occurs in a distributed combustion mode, and Al particle kinetics controls the energy release rate. Details of the Heterogeneous Continuum Model and results of the numerical simulations of composite charge explosions will be described in the paper.

  8. Solvent refined coal (SRC) process. Quarterly technical progress report, January 1980-March 1980. [In process streams

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes the progress of the Solvent Refined Coal (SRC) project at the SRC Pilot Plant in Fort Lewis, Wahsington, and the Process Development Unit (P-99) in Harmarville, Pennsylvania. After the remaining runs of the slurry preheater survey test program were completed January 14, the Fort Lewis Pilot Plant was shut down to inspect Slurry Preheater B and to insulate the coil for future testing at higher rates of heat flux. Radiographic inspection of the coil showed that the welds at the pressure taps and the immersion thermowells did not meet design specifications. Slurry Preheater A was used during the first 12 days of February while weld repairs and modifications to Slurry Preheater B were completed. Two attempts to complete a material balance run on Powhatan No. 6 Mine coal were attempted but neither was successful. Slurry Preheater B was in service the remainder of the quarter. The start of a series of runs at higher heat flux was delayed because of plugging in both the slurry and the hydrogen flow metering systems. Three baseline runs and three slurry runs of the high heat flux program were completed before the plant was shut down March 12 for repair of the Inert Gas Unit. Attempts to complete a fourth slurry run at high heat flux were unsuccessful because of problems with the coal feed handling and the vortex mix systems. Process Development Unit (P-99) completed three of the four runs designed to study the effect of dissolver L/D ratio. The fourth was under way at the end of the period. SRC yield correlations have been developed that include coal properties as independent variables. A preliminary ranking of coals according to their reactivity in PDU P-99 has been made. Techniques for studying coking phenomenona are now in place.

  9. Molybdenum disilicide composites

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Rodriguez, Robert P. (Nambe, NM); Petrovic, John J. (Los Alamos, NM)

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Molybdenum disilicide/.beta.'-Si.sub.6-z Al.sub.z O.sub.z N.sub.8-z, wherein z=a number from greater than 0 to about 5, composites are made by use of in situ reactions among .alpha.-silicon nitride, molybdenum disilicide, and aluminum. Molybdenum disilicide within a molybdenum disilicide/.beta.'-Si.sub.6-z Al.sub.z O.sub.z N.sub.8-z eutectoid matrix is the resulting microstructure when the invention method is employed.

  10. Composite turbine bucket assembly

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Liotta, Gary Charles; Garcia-Crespo, Andres

    2014-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

    A composite turbine blade assembly includes a ceramic blade including an airfoil portion, a shank portion and an attachment portion; and a transition assembly adapted to attach the ceramic blade to a turbine disk or rotor, the transition assembly including first and second transition components clamped together, trapping said ceramic airfoil therebetween. Interior surfaces of the first and second transition portions are formed to mate with the shank portion and the attachment portion of the ceramic blade, and exterior surfaces of said first and second transition components are formed to include an attachment feature enabling the transition assembly to be attached to the turbine rotor or disk.

  11. Composite oxygen transport membrane

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Christie, Gervase Maxwell; Lane, Jonathan A.

    2014-08-05T23:59:59.000Z

    A method of producing a composite oxygen ion membrane and a composite oxygen ion membrane in which a porous fuel oxidation layer and a dense separation layer and optionally, a porous surface exchange layer are formed on a porous support from mixtures of (Ln.sub.1-xA.sub.x).sub.wCr.sub.1-yB.sub.yO.sub.3-.delta. and a doped zirconia. In the porous fuel oxidation layer and the optional porous surface exchange layer, A is Calcium and in the dense separation layer A is not Calcium and, preferably is Strontium. Preferred materials are (La.sub.0.8Ca.sub.0.2).sub.0.95Cr.sub.0.5Mn.sub.0.5O.sub.3-.delta. for the porous fuel oxidation and optional porous surface exchange layers and (La.sub.0.8Sr.sub.0.2).sub.0.95Cr.sub.0.5Fe.sub.0.5O.sub.3-.delta. for the dense separation layer. The use of such materials allows the membrane to sintered in air and without the use of pore formers to reduce membrane manufacturing costs. The use of materials, as described herein, for forming the porous layers have application for forming any type of porous structure, such as a catalyst support.

  12. Cast dielectric composite linear accelerator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sanders, David M. (Livermore, CA); Sampayan, Stephen (Manteca, CA); Slenes, Kirk (Albuquerque, NM); Stoller, H. M. (Albuquerque, NM)

    2009-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

    A linear accelerator having cast dielectric composite layers integrally formed with conductor electrodes in a solventless fabrication process, with the cast dielectric composite preferably having a nanoparticle filler in an organic polymer such as a thermosetting resin. By incorporating this cast dielectric composite the dielectric constant of critical insulating layers of the transmission lines of the accelerator are increased while simultaneously maintaining high dielectric strengths for the accelerator.

  13. Alumina-based ceramic composite

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Alexander, Kathleen B. (Oak Ridge, TN); Tiegs, Terry N. (Lenoir City, TN); Becher, Paul F. (Oak Ridge, TN); Waters, Shirley B. (Knoxville, TN)

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An improved ceramic composite comprising oxide ceramic particulates, nonoxide ceramic particulates selected from the group consisting of carbides, borides, nitrides of silicon and transition metals and mixtures thereof, and a ductile binder selected from the group consisting of metallic, intermetallic alloys and mixtures thereof is described. The ceramic composite is made by blending powders of the ceramic particulates and the ductile to form a mixture and consolidating the mixture of under conditions of temperature and pressure sufficient to produce a densified ceramic composite.

  14. Method for fabricating ceramic composites

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Goretta, Kenneth C. (Downers Grove, IL); Singh, Dileep (Naperville, IL); Polzin, Bryant J. (Downers Grove, IL); Cruse, Terry (Lisle, IL); Picciolo, John J. (Lockport, IL)

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A method for producing composite ceramic material is provided wherein a core ceramic structure is produced and simultaneously enveloped with a sleeve of similar material.

  15. Vibrational Damping of Composite Materials

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Biggerstaff, Janet M.

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    bonded, and cocured with polyimide film separating thebonded, and cocured with polyimide film separating thedamping) composite with polyimide lamimate barrier layer ?(

  16. TESTING GROUND BASED GEOPHYSICAL TECHNIQUES TO REFINE ELECTROMAGNETIC SURVEYS NORTH OF THE 300 AREA HANFORD WASHINGTON

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    PETERSEN SW

    2010-12-02T23:59:59.000Z

    Airborne electromagnetic (AEM) surveys were flown during fiscal year (FY) 2008 within the 600 Area in an attempt to characterize the underlying subsurface and to aid in the closure and remediation design study goals for the 200-PO-1 Groundwater Operable Unit (OU). The rationale for using the AEM surveys was that airborne surveys can cover large areas rapidly at relatively low costs with minimal cultural impact, and observed geo-electrical anomalies could be correlated with important subsurface geologic and hydrogeologic features. Initial interpretation of the AEM surveys indicated a tenuous correlation with the underlying geology, from which several anomalous zones likely associated with channels/erosional features incised into the Ringold units were identified near the River Corridor. Preliminary modeling resulted in a slightly improved correlation but revealed that more information was required to constrain the modeling (SGW-39674, Airborne Electromagnetic Survey Report, 200-PO-1 Groundwater Operable Unit, 600 Area, Hanford Site). Both time-and frequency domain AEM surveys were collected with the densest coverage occurring adjacent to the Columbia River Corridor. Time domain surveys targeted deeper subsurface features (e.g., top-of-basalt) and were acquired using the HeliGEOTEM{reg_sign} system along north-south flight lines with a nominal 400 m (1,312 ft) spacing. The frequency domain RESOLVE system acquired electromagnetic (EM) data along tighter spaced (100 m [328 ft] and 200 m [656 ft]) north-south profiles in the eastern fifth of the 200-PO-1 Groundwater OU (immediately adjacent to the River Corridor). The overall goal of this study is to provide further quantification of the AEM survey results, using ground based geophysical methods, and to link results to the underlying geology and/or hydrogeology. Specific goals of this project are as follows: (1) Test ground based geophysical techniques for the efficacy in delineating underlying geology; (2) Use ground measurements to refine interpretations of AEM data; and (3) Improve the calibration and correlation of AEM information. The potential benefits of this project are as follows: (1) Develop a tool to map subsurface units at the Hanford Site in a rapid and cost effective manner; (2) Map groundwater pathways within the River Corridor; and (3) Aid development of the conceptual site model. If anomalies observed in the AEM data can be correlated with subsurface geology, then the rapid scanning and non-intrusive capabilities provided by the airborne surveys can be used at the Hanford Site to screen for areas that warrant further investigation.

  17. State of competition in gasoline marketing. The effects of refiner operation at retail (a study required by Title III of the Petroleum Marketing Practices Act)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Delaney, J.B.; Fenili, R.N.

    1980-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Title III of the Petroleum Marketing Practices Act requires the Secretary of Energy to report to the Congress on the extent to which producers, refiners, and other suppliers of motor fuel subsidize the sale of such fuel at retail or wholesale with profits obtained from other operations. This is Part I of the report required under that Title. It addresses a number of questions relating to the central issue - the state of competition in the gasoline marketing industry. Part II of the report, to be issued this fall, will discuss the subpoenaed documents of nine integrated companies, and will contain recommendations for action, if deemed necessary. The basic thrust of Part I is an examination of three issues: (1) Are integrated refiners subsidizing their company operated gasoline retail outlets; (2) Are integrated refiners moving gasoline away from their branded dealer network into their own retail outlets; and (3) Are integrated refiners manipulating the allocation system in favor of their own retail outlets to the detriment of other gasoline marketers. At a series of regional hearings, independent marketers charged that integrated refiners were engaging in each of these practices. In essence, integrated refiners were portrayed as using unfair or illegal competitive practices which would ultimately lead to their domination of retail gasoline markets. This report addresses each allegation, after providing a historical and theoretical framework for today's debate.

  18. Composite heat damage assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Janke, C.J.; Wachter, E.A. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Philpot, H.E. [Oak Ridge K-25 Site, TN (United States); Powell, G.L. [Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant, TN (United States)

    1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The effects of heat damage were determined on the residual mechanical, physical, and chemical properties of IM6/3501-6 laminates, and potential nondestructive techniques to detect and assess material heat damage were evaluated. About one thousand preconditioned specimens were exposed to elevated temperatures, then cooled to room temperature and tested in compression, flexure, interlaminar shear, shore-D hardness, weight loss, and change in thickness. Specimens experienced significant and irreversible reduction in their residual properties when exposed to temperatures exceeding the material upper service temperature of this material (350{degrees}F). The Diffuse Reflectance Infrared Fourier Transform and Laser-Pumped Fluorescence techniques were found to be capable of rapid, in-service, nondestructive detection and quantitation of heat damage in IM6/3501- 6. These techniques also have the potential applicability to detect and assess heat damage effects in other polymer matrix composites.

  19. Nanostructured composite reinforced material

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Seals, Roland D. (Oak Ridge, TN); Ripley, Edward B. (Knoxville, TN); Ludtka, Gerard M. (Oak Ridge, TN)

    2012-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

    A family of materials wherein nanostructures and/or nanotubes are incorporated into a multi-component material arrangement, such as a metallic or ceramic alloy or composite/aggregate, producing a new material or metallic/ceramic alloy. The new material has significantly increased strength, up to several thousands of times normal and perhaps substantially more, as well as significantly decreased weight. The new materials may be manufactured into a component where the nanostructure or nanostructure reinforcement is incorporated into the bulk and/or matrix material, or as a coating where the nanostructure or nanostructure reinforcement is incorporated into the coating or surface of a "normal" substrate material. The nanostructures are incorporated into the material structure either randomly or aligned, within grains, or along or across grain boundaries.

  20. Mixed semiconductor nanocrystal compositions

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Maskaly, Garry R. (Los Alamos, NM); Schaller, Richard D. (Santa Fe, NM); Klimov, Victor I. (Los Alamos, NM)

    2011-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Composition comprising one or more energy donors and one or more energy acceptors, wherein energy is transferred from the energy donor to the energy acceptor and wherein: the energy acceptor is a colloidal nanocrystal having a lower band gap energy than the energy donor; the energy donor and the energy acceptor are separated by a distance of 40 nm or less; wherein the average peak absorption energy of the acceptor is at least 20 meV greater than the average peak emission energy of the energy donor; and wherein the ratio of the number of energy donors to the number of energy acceptors is from about 2:1 to about 1000:1.

  1. Acoustic-wave sensor apparatus for analyzing a petroleum-based composition and sensing solidification of constituents therein

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Spates, J.J.; Martin, S.J.; Mansure, A.J.

    1997-08-26T23:59:59.000Z

    An acoustic-wave sensor apparatus and method are disclosed. The apparatus for analyzing a normally liquid petroleum-based composition includes at least one acoustic-wave device in contact with the petroleum-based composition for sensing or detecting the presence of constituents (e.g. paraffins or petroleum waxes) therein which solidify upon cooling of the petroleum-based composition below a cloud-point temperature. The acoustic-wave device can be a thickness-shear-mode device (also termed a quartz crystal microbalance), a surface-acoustic-wave device, an acoustic-plate-mode device or a flexural plate-wave device. Embodiments of the present invention can be used for measuring a cloud point, a pour point and/or a freeze point of the petroleum-based composition, and for determining a temperature characteristic of each point. Furthermore, measurements with the acoustic-wave sensor apparatus can be made off-line by using a sample having a particular petroleum-based composition; or in-situ with the petroleum-based composition contained within a pipeline or storage tank. The acoustic-wave sensor apparatus has uses in many different petroleum technology areas, including the recovery, transport, storage, refining and use of petroleum and petroleum-based products. 7 figs.

  2. Acoustic-wave sensor apparatus for analyzing a petroleum-based composition and sensing solidification of constituents therein

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Spates, James J. (Albuquerque, NM); Martin, Stephen J. (Albuquerque, NM); Mansure, Arthur J. (Albuquerque, NM)

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An acoustic-wave sensor apparatus and method. The apparatus for analyzing a normally liquid petroleum-based composition includes at least one acoustic-wave device in contact with the petroleum-based composition for sensing or detecting the presence of constituents (e.g. paraffins or petroleum waxes) therein which solidify upon cooling of the petroleum-based composition below a cloud-point temperature. The acoustic-wave device can be a thickness-shear-mode device (also termed a quartz crystal mircrobalance), a surface-acoustic-wave device, an acoustic-plate-mode device or a flexural plate-wave device. Embodiments of the present invention can be used for measuring a cloud point, a pour point and/or a freeze point of the petroleum-based composition, and for determining a temperature characteristic of each point. Furthermore, measurements with the acoustic-wave sensor apparatus can be made off-line by using a sample having a particular petroleum-based composition; or in-situ with the petroleum-based composition contained within a pipeline or storage tank. The acoustic-wave sensor apparatus has uses in many different petroleum technology areas, including the recover transport, storage, refining and use of petroleum and petroleum-based products.

  3. Primordial Compositions of Refractory Inclusions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Grossman, L; Simon, S B; Rai, V K; Thiemens, M H; Hutcheon, I D; Williams, R W; Galy, A; Ding, T; Fedkin, A V; Clayton, R N; Mayeda, T K

    2008-02-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Bulk chemical and oxygen, magnesium and silicon isotopic compositions were measured for each of 17 Types A and B refractory inclusions from CV3 chondrites. After bulk chemical compositions were corrected for non-representative sampling in the laboratory, the Mg and Si isotopic compositions of each inclusion were used to calculate its original chemical composition assuming that the heavy-isotope enrichments of these elements are due to Rayleigh fractionation that accompanied their evaporation from CMAS liquids. The resulting pre-evaporation chemical compositions are consistent with those predicted by equilibrium thermodynamic calculations for high-temperature nebular condensates but only if different inclusions condensed from nebular regions that ranged in total pressure from 10{sup -6} to 10{sup -1} bar, regardless of whether they formed in a system of solar composition or in one enriched in OC dust relative to gas by a factor of ten relative to solar composition. This is similar to the range of total pressures predicted by dynamic models of the solar nebula for regions whose temperatures are in the range of silicate condensation temperatures. Alternatively, if departure from equilibrium condensation and/or non-representative sampling of condensates in the nebula occurred, the inferred range of total pressure could be smaller. Simple kinetic modeling of evaporation successfully reproduces observed chemical compositions of most inclusions from their inferred pre-evaporation compositions, suggesting that closed-system isotopic exchange processes did not have a significant effect on their isotopic compositions. Comparison of pre-evaporation compositions with observed ones indicates that 80% of the enrichment in refractory CaO + Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} relative to more volatile MgO + SiO{sub 2} is due to initial condensation and 20% due to subsequent evaporation for both Type A and Type B inclusions.

  4. Studies on the optimization of deformation processed metal metal matrix composites

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ellis, T.W.

    1994-01-04T23:59:59.000Z

    A methodology for the production of deformation processed metal metal matrix composites from hyper-eutectic copper-chromium alloys was developed. This methodology was derived from a basic study of the precipitation phenomena in these alloys encompassing evaluation of microstructural, electrical, and mechanical properties. The methodology developed produces material with a superior combination of electrical and mechanical properties compared to those presently available in commercial alloys. New and novel alloying procedures were investigated to extend the range of production methods available for these material. These studies focused on the use of High Pressure Gas Atomization and the development of new containment technologies for the liquid alloy. This allowed the production of alloys with a much more refined starting microstructure and lower contamination than available by other methods. The knowledge gained in the previous studies was used to develop two completely new families of deformation processed metal metal matrix composites. These composites are based on immissible alloys with yttrium and magnesium matrices and refractory metal reinforcement. This work extends the physical property range available in deformation processed metal metal matrix composites. Additionally, it also represents new ways to apply these metals in engineering applications.

  5. Glassy composition for hermetic seals

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wilder, Jr., James A. (Albuquerque, NM)

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The invention relates to a glassy composition adaptable for sealing to aluminum-based alloys to form a hermetically-sealed insulator body. The composition may either be employed as a glass or, after devitrifying heat treatment, as a glass-ceramic.

  6. Composites Technology for Hydrogen Pipelines

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Composites Technology for Hydrogen Pipelines Barton Smith, Barbara Frame, Larry Anovitz and Cliff;Composites Technology for Hydrogen Pipelines Fiber-reinforced polymer pipe Project Overview: Investigate of pipeline per day. · $190k/mile capital cost for distribution pipelines · Hydrogen delivery cost below $1

  7. Compositions of constructed microbial mats

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bender, Judith A. (Atlanta, GA); Phillips, Peter C. (Decatur, GA)

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Compositions and methods of use of constructed microbial mats, comprising cyanobacteria and purple autotrophic bacteria and an organic nutrient source, in a laminated structure, are described. The constructed microbial mat is used for bioremediation of different individual contaminants and for mixed or multiple contaminants, and for production of beneficial compositions and molecules.

  8. Vacuum flash evaporated polymer composites

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Affinito, John D. (Kennewick, WA); Gross, Mark E. (Pasco, WA)

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A method for fabrication of polymer composite layers in a vacuum is disclosed. More specifically, the method of dissolving salts in a monomer solution, vacuum flash evaporating the solution, condensing the flash evaporated solution as a liquid film, and forming the condensed liquid film into a polymer composite layer on a substrate is disclosed.

  9. Vacuum flash evaporated polymer composites

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Affinito, J.D.; Gross, M.E.

    1997-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

    A method for fabrication of polymer composite layers in a vacuum is disclosed. More specifically, the method of dissolving salts in a monomer solution, vacuum flash evaporating the solution, condensing the flash evaporated solution as a liquid film, and forming the condensed liquid film into a polymer composite layer on a substrate is disclosed.

  10. Surface decontamination compositions and methods

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wright; Karen E. (Idaho Falls, ID); Cooper, David C. (Idaho Falls, ID); Peterman, Dean R. (Idaho Falls, ID); Demmer, Ricky L. (Idaho Falls, ID); Tripp, Julia L. (Pocatello, ID); Hull, Laurence C. (Idaho Falls, ID)

    2011-03-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Clay-based compositions capable of absorbing contaminants from surfaces or objects having surface faces may be applied to a surface and later removed, the removed clay-based compositions absorbing at least a portion of the contaminant from the surface or object to which it was applied.

  11. Application of fractal theory in refined reservoir description for EOR pilot area

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yue Li; Yonggang Duan; Yun Li; Yuan Lu

    1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A reliable reservoir description is essential to investigate scenarios for successful EOR pilot test. Reservoir characterization includes formation composition, permeability, porosity, reservoir fluids and other petrophysical parameters. In this study, various new tools have been applied to characterize Kilamayi conglomerate formation. This paper examines the merits of various statistical methods for recognizing rock property correlation in vertical columns and gives out methods to determine fractal dimension including R/S analysis and power spectral analysis. The paper also demonstrates that there is obvious fractal characteristics in conglomerate reservoirs of Kilamayi oil fields. Well log data in EOR pilot area are used to get distribution profile of parameters including permeability, porosity, water saturation and shale content.

  12. Liver segmentation in contrast enhanced CT data using graph cuts and interactive 3D segmentation refinement methods

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Beichel, Reinhard; Bornik, Alexander; Bauer, Christian; Sorantin, Erich [Departments of Electrical and Computer Engineering and Internal Medicine, Iowa Institute for Biomedical Imaging, University of Iowa, Iowa City, Iowa 52242 (United States); Institute for Computer Graphics and Vision, Graz University of Technology, Inffeldgasse 16, A-8010 Graz (Austria); Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Iowa Institute for Biomedical Imaging, University of Iowa, Iowa City, Iowa 52242 (United States); Department of Radiology, Medical University Graz, Auenbruggerplatz 34, A-8010 Graz (Austria)

    2012-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: Liver segmentation is an important prerequisite for the assessment of liver cancer treatment options like tumor resection, image-guided radiation therapy (IGRT), radiofrequency ablation, etc. The purpose of this work was to evaluate a new approach for liver segmentation. Methods: A graph cuts segmentation method was combined with a three-dimensional virtual reality based segmentation refinement approach. The developed interactive segmentation system allowed the user to manipulate volume chunks and/or surfaces instead of 2D contours in cross-sectional images (i.e, slice-by-slice). The method was evaluated on twenty routinely acquired portal-phase contrast enhanced multislice computed tomography (CT) data sets. An independent reference was generated by utilizing a currently clinically utilized slice-by-slice segmentation method. After 1 h of introduction to the developed segmentation system, three experts were asked to segment all twenty data sets with the proposed method. Results: Compared to the independent standard, the relative volumetric segmentation overlap error averaged over all three experts and all twenty data sets was 3.74%. Liver segmentation required on average 16 min of user interaction per case. The calculated relative volumetric overlap errors were not found to be significantly different [analysis of variance (ANOVA) test, p = 0.82] between experts who utilized the proposed 3D system. In contrast, the time required by each expert for segmentation was found to be significantly different (ANOVA test, p = 0.0009). Major differences between generated segmentations and independent references were observed in areas were vessels enter or leave the liver and no accepted criteria for defining liver boundaries exist. In comparison, slice-by-slice based generation of the independent standard utilizing a live wire tool took 70.1 min on average. A standard 2D segmentation refinement approach applied to all twenty data sets required on average 38.2 min of user interaction and resulted in statistically not significantly different segmentation error indices (ANOVA test, significance level of 0.05). Conclusions: All three experts were able to produce liver segmentations with low error rates. User interaction time savings of up to 71% compared to a 2D refinement approach demonstrate the utility and potential of our approach. The system offers a range of different tools to manipulate segmentation results, and some users might benefit from a longer learning phase to develop efficient segmentation refinement strategies. The presented approach represents a generally applicable segmentation approach that can be applied to many medical image segmentation problems.

  13. A study of solvent refining of cottonseed oil by use of a rotating core countercurrent extraction column

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Holbrook, Charles Ray

    1953-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    -oleic acid and solvent solutions were added. The mixture was shaken several times and placed 1n a 30 C . atmosphere to reach thermal equilibrium and for the layers to break. The following data were observed for each phase: l Relative volume 2...A STUDY OF SOLVENT REFINING OF COTTONSEED OIL BY USE OF A ROTATING CORE COUNTERCURRENT EXTRACTION COLUMN A Thes1s by C. Ray Holbrook January- 1953 Approved as to style and content: aS a rman o u en s omm ee ea o epar men em ca -ng neer ng...

  14. ,"U.S. Sales for Resale Refiner Residual Fuel Oil and No. 4 Fuel Sales Volumes"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghurajiConventional Gasoline Sales toReformulated, Average Refiner Gasoline Prices"

  15. ,"U.S. Sales to End Users Refiner Residual Fuel Oil and No. 4 Fuel Sales Volumes"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghurajiConventional Gasoline Sales toReformulated, Average Refiner Gasoline Prices"Sales

  16. Study on Evaluation of Project Management Data for Decommissioning of Uranium Refining and Conversion Plant - 12234

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Usui, Hideo; Izumo, Sari; Tachibana, Mitsuo [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Tokai-mura, Naka-gun, Ibaraki, 319-1195 (Japan); Shibahara, Yuji [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Tokai-mura, Naka-gun, Ibaraki, 319-1195 (Japan); University of Fukui, Fukui-shi, Fukui, 910-8507 (Japan); Morimoto, Yasuyuki; Tokuyasu, Takashi; Takahashi, Nobuo; Tanaka, Yoshio; Sugitsue, Noritake [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Kagamino-cho, Tomata-gun, Okayama, 708-0698 (Japan)

    2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Some of nuclear facilities that would no longer be required have been decommissioned in JAEA (Japan Atomic Energy Agency). A lot of nuclear facilities have to be decommissioned in JAEA in near future. To implement decommissioning of nuclear facilities, it was important to make a rational decommissioning plan. Therefore, project management data evaluation system for dismantling activities (PRODIA code) has been developed, and will be useful for making a detailed decommissioning plan for an object facility. Dismantling of dry conversion facility in the uranium refining and conversion plant (URCP) at Ningyo-toge began in 2008. During dismantling activities, project management data such as manpower and amount of waste generation have been collected. Such collected project management data has been evaluated and used to establish a calculation formula to calculate manpower for dismantling equipment of chemical process and calculate manpower for using a green house (GH) which was a temporary structure for preventing the spread of contaminants during dismantling. In the calculation formula to calculate project management data related to dismantling of equipment, the relation of dismantling manpower to each piece of equipment was evaluated. Furthermore, the relation of dismantling manpower to each chemical process was evaluated. The results showed promise for evaluating dismantling manpower with respect to each chemical process. In the calculation formula to calculate project management data related to use of the GH, relations of GH installation manpower and removal manpower to GH footprint were evaluated. Furthermore, the calculation formula for secondary waste generation was established. In this study, project management data related to dismantling of equipment and use of the GH were evaluated and analyzed. The project management data, manpower for dismantling of equipment, manpower for installation and removal of GH, and secondary waste generation from GH were considered. Establishment of the calculation formula for dismantling of each kind of equipment makes it possible to evaluate manpower for dismantling the whole facility. However, it is not easy to prepare calculation formula for all kinds of equipment that exist in the facility. Therefore, a simpler evaluation method was considered to calculate manpower based on facility characteristics. The results showed promise for evaluating dismantling manpower with respect to each chemical process. For dismantling of contaminated equipment, a GH has been used for protection of the spread of contamination. The use of a GH increases manpower for installation and removal of GH etc. Moreover, structural materials of the GH such as plastic sheets, adhesive tape become a burnable secondary waste. To create an effective dismantling plan, it is necessary to carefully consider use of a GH preliminarily. Thus, an evaluation method of project management data such as manpower and secondary waste generation was considered. The results showed promise for evaluating project management data of GH by using established calculation formula. (authors)

  17. COLLABORATIVE RESEARCH: CONTINUOUS DYNAMIC GRID ADAPTATION IN A GLOBAL ATMOSPHERIC MODEL: APPLICATION AND REFINEMENT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gutowski, William J.; Prusa, Joseph M.; Smolarkiewicz, Piotr K.

    2012-05-08T23:59:59.000Z

    This project had goals of advancing the performance capabilities of the numerical general circulation model EULAG and using it to produce a fully operational atmospheric global climate model (AGCM) that can employ either static or dynamic grid stretching for targeted phenomena. The resulting AGCM combined EULAG's advanced dynamics core with the "physics" of the NCAR Community Atmospheric Model (CAM). Effort discussed below shows how we improved model performance and tested both EULAG and the coupled CAM-EULAG in several ways to demonstrate the grid stretching and ability to simulate very well a wide range of scales, that is, multi-scale capability. We leveraged our effort through interaction with an international EULAG community that has collectively developed new features and applications of EULAG, which we exploited for our own work summarized here. Overall, the work contributed to over 40 peer-reviewed publications and over 70 conference/workshop/seminar presentations, many of them invited. 3a. EULAG Advances EULAG is a non-hydrostatic, parallel computational model for all-scale geophysical flows. EULAG's name derives from its two computational options: EULerian (flux form) or semi-LAGrangian (advective form). The model combines nonoscillatory forward-in-time (NFT) numerical algorithms with a robust elliptic Krylov solver. A signature feature of EULAG is that it is formulated in generalized time-dependent curvilinear coordinates. In particular, this enables grid adaptivity. In total, these features give EULAG novel advantages over many existing dynamical cores. For EULAG itself, numerical advances included refining boundary conditions and filters for optimizing model performance in polar regions. We also added flexibility to the model's underlying formulation, allowing it to work with the pseudo-compressible equation set of Durran in addition to EULAG's standard anelastic formulation. Work in collaboration with others also extended the demonstrated range of validity of soundproof models, showing that they are more broadly applicable than some had previously thought. Substantial testing of EULAG included application and extension of the Jablonowski-Williamson baroclinic wave test - an archetype of planetary weather - and further analysis of multi-scale interactions arising from collapse of temperature fronts in both the baroclinic wave test and simulations of the Held-Suarez idealized climate. These analyses revealed properties of atmospheric gravity waves not seen in previous work and further demonstrated the ability of EULAG to simulate realistic behavior over several orders of magnitude of length scales. Additional collaborative work enhanced capability for modeling atmospheric flows with adaptive moving meshes and demonstrated the ability of EULAG to move into petascale computing. 3b. CAM-EULAG Advances We have developed CAM-EULAG in collaboration with former project postdoc, now University of Cape Town Assistant Professor, Babatunde Abiodun. Initial study documented good model performance in aqua-planet simulations. In particular, we showed that the grid adaptivity (stretching) implemented in CAM-EULAG allows higher resolution in selected regions without causing anomalous behavior such as spurious wave reflection. We then used the stretched-grid version to analyze simulated extreme precipitation events in West Africa, comparing the precipitation and event environment with observed behavior. The model simulates fairly well the spatial scale and the interannual and intraseasonal variability of the extreme events, although its extreme precipitation intensity is weaker than observed. In addition, both observations and the simulations show possible forcing of extreme events by African easterly waves. 3c. Other Contributions Through our collaborations, we have made contributions to a wide range of outcomes. For research focused on terrestrial behavior, these have included (1) upwind schemes for gas dynamics, (2) a nonlinear perspective on the dynamics of the Madden-Julian Oscillation, (3) numerical realism of thermal co

  18. Semantic Web Enabled Composition of Web Services

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Medjahed, Brahim

    Semantic Web Enabled Composition of Web Services Brahim Medjahed Dissertation submitted Falls Church, Virginia, USA Keywords: Semantic Web - Web Service - Ontology - Service Composition. Copyright 2004, Brahim Medjahed #12;Semantic Web Enabled Composition of Web Services Brahim Medjahed

  19. Methods and compositions using calcium carbonate

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Constantz, Brent R. (Portola Valley, CA); Farsad, Kasra (San Jose, CA); Camire, Chris (San Jose, CA); Patterson, Joshua (Freedom, CA); Ginder-Vogel, Matthew (Los Gatos, CA); Yaccato, Karin (San Jose, CA); Stagnaro, John (Santa Clara, CA); Devenney, Martin (Mountain View, CA); Ries, Justin (Chapel Hill, NC)

    2012-03-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Provided herein are compositions and methods including hydraulic cement, supplementary cementitious material, and/or self-cementing material. Methods for making the compositions and using the compositions are provided.

  20. Methods and compositions using calcium carbonate

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Constantz, Brent R. (Portola Valley, CA); Farsad, Kasra (San Jose, CA); Camire, Chris (San Jose, CA); Patterson, Joshua (Freedom, CA); Ginder-Vogel, Matthew (Los Gatos, CA); Yaccato, Karin (San Jose, CA); Stagnaro, John (Santa Clara, CA); Devenney, Martin (Mountain View, CA); Ries, Justin (Chapel Hill, NC)

    2011-11-22T23:59:59.000Z

    Provided herein are compositions and methods including hydraulic cement, supplementary cementitious material, and/or self-cementing material. Methods for making the compositions and using the compositions are provided.

  1. Methods and compositions using calcium carbonate

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Constantz, Brent R. (Portola Valley, CA); Farsad, Kasra (San Jose, CA); Camire, Chris (San Jose, CA); Chen, Irvin (San Jose, CA)

    2011-04-12T23:59:59.000Z

    Provided herein are compositions and methods including hydraulic cement, supplementary cementitious material, and/or self-cementing material. Methods for making the compositions and using the compositions are provided.

  2. Methods and compositions using calcium carbonate

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Constantz, Brent R. (Portola Valley, CA); Farsad, Kasra (San Jose, CA); Camire, Chris (San Jose, CA); Patterson, Joshua (Freedom, CA); Fernandez, Miguel (San Jose, CA); Yaccato, Karin (San Jose, CA); Thatcher, Ryan (Sunnyvale, CA); Stagnaro, John (Santa Clara, CA); Chen, Irvin (Santa Clara, CA); Omelon, Sidney (Willowdale, CA); Hodson, Keith (Palo Alto, CA); Clodic, Laurence (Sunnyvale, CA); Geramita, Katharine (Seattle, CA); Holland, Terence C. (Auburn Township, OH); Ries, Justin (Chapel Hill, NC)

    2012-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Provided herein are compositions and methods including hydraulic cement, supplementary cementitious material, and/or self-cementing material. Methods for making the compositions and using the compositions are provided.

  3. Methods and compositions using calcium carbonate

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Constantz, Brent R. (Portola Valley, CA); Farsad, Kasra (San Jose, CA); Camire, Chris (San Jose, CA); Chen, Irvin (Santa Clara, CA); Ginder-Vogel, Matthew (Los Gatos, CA); Fernandez, Miguel (San Jose, CA)

    2012-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Provided herein are compositions and methods including hydraulic cement, supplementary cementitious material, and/or self-cementing material. Methods for making the compositions and using the compositions are provided.

  4. Combustible structural composites and methods of forming combustible structural composites

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Daniels, Michael A. (Idaho Falls, ID); Heaps, Ronald J. (Idaho Falls, ID); Steffler, Eric D (Idaho Falls, ID); Swank, William D. (Idaho Falls, ID)

    2011-08-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Combustible structural composites and methods of forming same are disclosed. In an embodiment, a combustible structural composite includes combustible material comprising a fuel metal and a metal oxide. The fuel metal is present in the combustible material at a weight ratio from 1:9 to 1:1 of the fuel metal to the metal oxide. The fuel metal and the metal oxide are capable of exothermically reacting upon application of energy at or above a threshold value to support self-sustaining combustion of the combustible material within the combustible structural composite. Structural-reinforcing fibers are present in the composite at a weight ratio from 1:20 to 10:1 of the structural-reinforcing fibers to the combustible material. Other embodiments and aspects are disclosed.

  5. Combustible structural composites and methods of forming combustible structural composites

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Daniels, Michael A.; Heaps, Ronald J.; Steffler, Eric D.; Swank, W. David

    2013-04-02T23:59:59.000Z

    Combustible structural composites and methods of forming same are disclosed. In an embodiment, a combustible structural composite includes combustible material comprising a fuel metal and a metal oxide. The fuel metal is present in the combustible material at a weight ratio from 1:9 to 1:1 of the fuel metal to the metal oxide. The fuel metal and the metal oxide are capable of exothermically reacting upon application of energy at or above a threshold value to support self-sustaining combustion of the combustible material within the combustible structural composite. Structural-reinforcing fibers are present in the composite at a weight ratio from 1:20 to 10:1 of the structural-reinforcing fibers to the combustible material. Other embodiments and aspects are disclosed.

  6. COMPOSITES AUSTRALIA AND CRC-ACS 2013 COMPOSITES CONFERENCE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Qin, Qinghua

    (MAT_COMPOSITE_DAMAGE), while both Aluminium alloy sheets and copper bullets were modelled fibre prepeg layers are meshed using thin shell element named as THIN SHELL163 while aluminium sheets

  7. High temperature polymer concrete compositions

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Fontana, Jack J. (Shirley, NY); Reams, Walter (Shirley, NY)

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This invention is concerned with a polymer concrete composition, which is a two-component composition useful with many bases including metal. Component A, the aggregate composition, is broadly composed of silica, silica flour, portland cement, and acrylamide, whereas Component B, which is primarily vinyl and acrylyl reactive monomers, is a liquid system. A preferred formulation emphasizing the major necessary components is as follows: ______________________________________ Component A: Silica sand 60-77 wt. % Silica flour 5-10 wt. % Portland cement 15-25 wt. % Acrylamide 1-5 wt. % Component B: Styrene 50-60 wt. % Trimethylolpropane 35-40 wt. % trimethacrylate ______________________________________ and necessary initiators, accelerators, and surfactants.

  8. Alumina-based ceramic composite

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Alexander, K.B.; Tiegs, T.N.; Becher, P.F.; Waters, S.B.

    1996-07-23T23:59:59.000Z

    An improved ceramic composite comprising oxide ceramic particulates, nonoxide ceramic particulates selected from the group consisting of carbides, borides, nitrides of silicon and transition metals and mixtures thereof, and a ductile binder selected from the group consisting of metallic, intermetallic alloys and mixtures thereof is described. The ceramic composite is made by blending powders of the ceramic particulates and the ductile to form a mixture and consolidating the mixture of under conditions of temperature and pressure sufficient to produce a densified ceramic composite. 5 figs.

  9. A high-order finite-volume method for hyperbolic conservation laws on locally-refined grids

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McCorquodale, Peter; Colella, Phillip

    2011-01-28T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a fourth-order accurate finite-volume method for solving time-dependent hyperbolic systems of conservation laws on Cartesian grids with multiple levels of refinement. The underlying method is a generalization of that in [5] to nonlinear systems, and is based on using fourth-order accurate quadratures for computing fluxes on faces, combined with fourth-order accurate Runge?Kutta discretization in time. To interpolate boundary conditions at refinement boundaries, we interpolate in time in a manner consistent with the individual stages of the Runge-Kutta method, and interpolate in space by solving a least-squares problem over a neighborhood of each target cell for the coefficients of a cubic polynomial. The method also uses a variation on the extremum-preserving limiter in [8], as well as slope flattening and a fourth-order accurate artificial viscosity for strong shocks. We show that the resulting method is fourth-order accurate for smooth solutions, and is robust in the presence of complex combinations of shocks and smooth flows.

  10. Crystal-structure refinement of zirconium-rich eudialyte and its place among calcium-poor eudialyte-group minerals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aksenov, S. M., E-mail: aks.crys@gmail.com; Rastsvetaeva, R. K. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Shubnikov Institute of Crystallography (Russian Federation)] [Russian Academy of Sciences, Shubnikov Institute of Crystallography (Russian Federation)

    2013-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The repeated refinement of the crystal structure of zirconium-rich eudialyte based on the X-ray diffraction data set collected earlier revealed new structural features. The trigonal unit-cell parameters are a = 14.222(3) A, c = 30.165(5) A, V = 5283.9 A{sup 3}. The refinement resulted in the reduction of the R factor from 0.045 (2347F > 4{sigma}(F)) to 0.035 (3124F > 3{sigma}(F)). It was found that the ordering of Ca and Fe in six-membered rings leads to the lowering of the symmetry to R3. An excess amount of zirconium (more than three atoms per symmetrically independent unit) is located in the M2 microregion in square and five-vertex polyhedral positions. However, this amount is insufficient to be dominant, and the deficiency of zirconium is compensated for by sodium atoms. Based on the new data, zirconium-rich eudialyte can be assigned to the oneillite subtype, being a zirconium-rich and aluminum variety of raslakite.

  11. Diffusion Synthetic Acceleration for High-Order Discontinuous Finite Element SN Transport Schemes and Application to Locally Refined Unstructured Meshes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yaqi Wang; Jean C. Ragusa

    2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Diffusion synthetic acceleration (DSA) schemes compatible with adaptive mesh refinement (AMR) grids are derived for the SN transport equations discretized using high-order discontinuous finite elements. These schemes are directly obtained from the discretized transport equations by assuming a linear dependence in angle of the angular flux along with an exact Fick's law and, therefore, are categorized as partially consistent. These schemes are akin to the symmetric interior penalty technique applied to elliptic problems and are all based on a second-order discontinuous finite element discretization of a diffusion equation (as opposed to a mixed or P1 formulation). Therefore, they only have the scalar flux as unknowns. A Fourier analysis has been carried out to determine the convergence properties of the three proposed DSA schemes for various cell optical thicknesses and aspect ratios. Out of the three DSA schemes derived, the modified interior penalty (MIP) scheme is stable and effective for realistic problems, even with distorted elements, but loses effectiveness for some highly heterogeneous configurations. The MIP scheme is also symmetric positive definite and can be solved efficiently with a preconditioned conjugate gradient method. Its implementation in an AMR SN transport code has been performed for both source iteration and GMRes-based transport solves, with polynomial orders up to 4. Numerical results are provided and show good agreement with the Fourier analysis results. Results on AMR grids demonstrate that the cost of DSA can be kept low on locally refined meshes.

  12. Effect of acicular ferrite formation on grain refinement in the coarse-grained region of heat-affected zone

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wan, X.L.; Wei, R. [Institute of Advanced Steels and Welding Technology, Hubei Provincial Key Laboratory for Systems Science on Metallurgical Processing, Key Laboratory for Ferrous Metallurgy and Resources Utilization of Ministry of Education, Wuhan University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430081 (China); Wu, K.M., E-mail: wukaiming@wust.edu.cn [Institute of Advanced Steels and Welding Technology, Hubei Provincial Key Laboratory for Systems Science on Metallurgical Processing, Key Laboratory for Ferrous Metallurgy and Resources Utilization of Ministry of Education, Wuhan University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430081 (China)

    2010-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The microstructure of acicular ferrite and its formation for the grain refinement of coarse-grained region of heat-affected zone of high strength low-alloy bainite steels were studied using three-dimensional reconstruction technique. Crystallographic grain size was analyzed by means of electron backscatter diffraction. It was revealed that the microstructure in the coarse-grained region of the heat-affected zone consisted of predominantly bainite packets and a small proportion of acicular ferrite. Acicular ferrite was of lath or plate-like rather than needle or rod-like morphology. Tempering of the coarse-grained region of heat-affected zone showed that the acicular ferrite was more stable than the bainite, indicating that the acicular ferrite was formed prior to bainite. The acicular ferrite laths or plates divided the prior austenite grains into smaller and separate regions, and confining the bainite transformed at lower temperatures in the smaller regions and hence leading to the grain refinement in the coarse-grained region of the heat-affected zone.

  13. Sandia National Laboratories: understanding of composite material...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of composite material behavior in realistic wind applications Composite-Materials Fatigue Database Updated On January 22, 2014, in Energy, Materials Science, News, News & Events,...

  14. SEP Success Story: Energetx Composites: Retooling Manufacturing...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Program (SEP), Energetx Composites was able to shift its operations to producing wind turbine blades. | Photo courtesy of Energetx Composites. Using its fiberglass technology...

  15. Solvent refined coal (SRC) process. Annual technical progress report, January 1979-December 1979

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1980-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A set of statistically designed experiments was used to study the effects of several important operating variables on coal liquefaction product yield structures. These studies used a Continuous Stirred-Tank Reactor to provide a hydrodynamically well-defined system from which kinetic data could be extracted. An analysis of the data shows that product yield structures can be adequately represented by a correlative model. It was shown that second-order effects (interaction and squared terms) are necessary to provide a good model fit of the data throughout the range studied. Three reports were issued covering the SRC-II database and yields as functions of operating variables. The results agree well with the generally-held concepts of the SRC reaction process, i.e., liquid phase hydrogenolysis of liquid coal which is time-dependent, thermally activated, catalyzed by recycle ash, and reaction rate-controlled. Four reports were issued summarizing the comprehensive SRC reactor thermal response models and reporting the results of several studies made with the models. Analytical equipment for measuring SRC off-gas composition and simulated distillation of coal liquids and appropriate procedures have been established.

  16. Simulation of multicomponent losses in electron beam melting and refining at varying scan frequencies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Powell, A.; Szekely, J. [Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA (United States); Avyle, J.V.D.; Damkroger, B. [Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    A two-stage model is presented to describe alloy element evaporation rates from molten metal due to transient local heating by an electron beam. The first stage is a simulation of transient phenomena near the melt surface due to periodic heating by a scanning beam, the output of which is the relationship between operating parameters, surface temperature, and evaporation rate. At high scan rates, this can be done using a simple one-dimensional heat transfer model of the surface layer; at lower scan rates, a more complex three-dimensional model with fluid flow and periodic boundary conditions is necessary. The second stage couples this evaporation-surface temperature relationship with a larger steady state heat transfer and fluid flow model of an entire melting hearth or mold, in order to calculate local and total evaporation rates. Predictions are compared with experimental results from Sandia`s 310-kW electron beam melting furnace, in which evaporation rates and vapor compositions were studied in pure titanium and Ti-6%Al-4%V alloy. Evaporation rates were estimated from rate of condensation on a substrate held over the hearth, and were characterized as a function of beam power (10{sup {minus}3}, 10{sup {minus}4} and 10{sup {minus}5} torr).

  17. Simulation of multicomponent losses in electron beam melting and refining at varying scan frequencies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Powell, A.; Szekely, J. [Massachusetts Inst. of Tech., Cambridge, MA (United States); Van Den Avyle, J.; Damkroger, B. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1995-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

    A two-stage model is presented to describe alloy element evaporation rates from molten metal due to transient local heating by an electron beam. The first stage is a simulation of transient phenomena near the melt surface due to periodic heating by a scanning beam, the output of which is the relationship between operating parameters, surface temperature, and evaporation rate. At high scan rates, this can be done using a simple one-dimensional heat transfer model of the surface layer; at lower scan rates, a more complex three-dimensional model with fluid flow and periodic boundary conditions is necessary. The second stage couples this evaporation-surface temperature relationship with a larger steady state heat transfer and fluid flow model of an entire melting hearth or mold, in order to calculate local and total evaporation rates. Predictions are compared with experimental results from Sandia`s 310-kW electron beam melting furnace, in which evaporation rates and vapor compositions were studied in pure titanium and Ti-6%Al-4%V alloy. Evaporation rates were estimated from rate of condensation on a substrate held over the hearth, and were characterized as a function of beam power (150 and 225 kW), scan frequency (30, 115 and 450 Hz) and background pressure (10{sup {minus}3}, 10{sup {minus}4} and 10{sup {minus}5} torr).

  18. Diamond-silicon carbide composite

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Qian, Jiang; Zhao, Yusheng

    2006-06-13T23:59:59.000Z

    Fully dense, diamond-silicon carbide composites are prepared from ball-milled microcrystalline diamond/amorphous silicon powder mixture. The ball-milled powder is sintered (P=5–8 GPa, T=1400K–2300K) to form composites having high fracture toughness. A composite made at 5 GPa/1673K had a measured fracture toughness of 12 MPa.dot.m1/2. By contrast, liquid infiltration of silicon into diamond powder at 5 GPa/1673K produces a composite with higher hardness but lower fracture toughness. X-ray diffraction patterns and Raman spectra indicate that amorphous silicon is partially transformed into nanocrystalline silicon at 5 GPa/873K, and nanocrystalline silicon carbide forms at higher temperatures.

  19. Therapeutic tin-117m compositions

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Srivastava, Suresh C. (Setauket, NY); Meinken, George E. (Middle Island, NY); Mausner, Leonard F. (Stony Brook, NY); Atkins, Harold L. (Setauket, NY)

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The invention provides a method for the palliation of bone pain due to cancer by the administration of a unique dosage of a tin-117m (Sn-117m) stannic chelate complex in a pharmaceutically acceptable composition. In addition, the invention provides a method for simultaneous palliation of bone pain and radiotherapy in cancer patients using compositions containing Sn-117m chelates. The invention also provides a method for palliating bone pain in cancer patients using Sn-117m-containing compositions and monitoring patient status by imaging the distribution of the Sn-117m in the patients. Also provided are pharmaceutically acceptable compositions containing Sn-117m chelate complexes for the palliation of bone pain in cancer patients.

  20. Sandia National Laboratories: composite materials

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of fiber-reinforced polymers (composites) and other materials used to construct wind-turbine blades. The average wind turbine installed in 1989 had a power rating of 0.225 MW and...

  1. Rapid prototyping of green composites

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peek, Nadya (Nadya Meile)

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Rapid prototyping employs digital fabrication techniques to quickly manufacture parts. However, the available materials are not yet suitable for making strong, large or durable objects. Composites are materials which are ...

  2. Corrosion of Titanium Matrix Composites

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Covino, B.S., Jr.; Alman, D.E.

    2002-09-22T23:59:59.000Z

    The corrosion behavior of unalloyed Ti and titanium matrix composites containing up to 20 vol% of TiC or TiB{sub 2} was determined in deaerated 2 wt% HCl at 50, 70, and 90 degrees C. Corrosion rates were calculated from corrosion currents determined by extrapolation of the tafel slopes. All curves exhibited active-passive behavior but no transpassive region. Corrosion rates for Ti + TiC composites were similar to those for unalloyed Ti except at 90 degrees C where the composites were slightly higher. Corrosion rates for Ti + TiB{sub 2} composites were generally higher than those for unalloyed Ti and increased with higher concentrations of TiB{sub 2}. XRD and SEM-EDS analyses showed that the TiC reinforcement did not react with the Ti matrix during fabrication while the TiB{sub 2} reacted to form a TiB phase.

  3. Digital compositing with traditional artwork 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stanley, Michael Leighton

    2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis presents a general method and guidelines for compositing digital characters into traditional artwork by matching a character to the perspective, lighting, style, and complexity of the particular work of art. ...

  4. Digital compositing with traditional artwork

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stanley, Michael Leighton

    2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis presents a general method and guidelines for compositing digital characters into traditional artwork by matching a character to the perspective, lighting, style, and complexity of the particular work of art. The primary goal...

  5. Layered plasma polymer composite membranes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Babcock, W.C.

    1994-10-11T23:59:59.000Z

    Layered plasma polymer composite fluid separation membranes are disclosed, which comprise alternating selective and permeable layers for a total of at least 2n layers, where n is [>=]2 and is the number of selective layers. 2 figs.

  6. Method for preparing ceramic composite

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Alexander, K.B.; Tiegs, T.N.; Becher, P.F.; Waters, S.B.

    1996-01-09T23:59:59.000Z

    A process is disclosed for preparing ceramic composite comprising blending TiC particulates, Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} particulates and nickel aluminide and consolidating the mixture at a temperature and pressure sufficient to produce a densified ceramic composite having fracture toughness equal to or greater than 7 MPa m{sup 1/2}, a hardness equal to or greater than 18 GPa. 5 figs.

  7. Method for preparing ceramic composite

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Alexander, Kathleen B. (Oak Ridge, TN); Tiegs, Terry N. (Lenoir City, TN); Becher, Paul F. (Oak Ridge, TN); Waters, Shirley B. (Knoxville, TN)

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A process for preparing ceramic composite comprising blending TiC particulates, Al.sub.2 O.sub.3 particulates and nickle aluminide and consolidating the mixture at a temperature and pressure sufficient to produce a densified ceramic composite having fracture toughness equal to or greater than 7 MPa m.sup.1/2, a hardness equal to or greater than 18 GPa.

  8. Molybdenum disilicide alloy matrix composite

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Petrovic, J.J.; Honnell, R.E.; Gibbs, W.S.

    1991-12-03T23:59:59.000Z

    Compositions of matter consisting of matrix materials having silicon carbide dispersed throughout them and methods of making the compositions are disclosed. A matrix material is an alloy of an intermetallic compound, molybdenum disilicide, and at least one secondary component which is a refractory silicide. The silicon carbide dispersant may be in the form of VLS whiskers, VS whiskers, or submicron powder or a mixture of these forms. 3 figures.

  9. Dense, finely, grained composite materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dunmead, Stephen D. (Davis, CA); Holt, Joseph B. (San Jose, CA); Kingman, Donald D. (Danville, CA); Munir, Zuhair A. (Davis, CA)

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Dense, finely grained composite materials comprising one or more ceramic phase or phase and one or more metallic and/or intermetallic phase or phases are produced by combustion synthesis. Spherical ceramic grains are homogeneously dispersed within the matrix. Methods are provided, which include the step of applying mechanical pressure during or immediately after ignition, by which the microstructures in the resulting composites can be controllably selected.

  10. Seawater degradation of polymeric composites

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grant, Timothy Sean

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    SEAWATER DEGRADATION OF POLYMERIC COMPOSITES A Thesis by TIMOTHY SEAN GRANT Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE May 1991 Major... Subject: Mechanical Engineering SEAWATER DEGRADATION OF POLYMERIC COMPOSITES A Thesis by TIMOTHY SEAN GRANT Approved as to style and content by: Walter L. Bradley (Chair of mmittee) lan Letton (Member) arry ogan (Member) r John Whitcomb...

  11. Continuous Fiber Ceramic Composites (CFCC)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    R. A. Wagner

    2002-12-18T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes work to develop CFCC's for various applications in the Industries of the Future (IOF) and power generation areas. Performance requirements range from relatively modest for hot gas filters to severe for turbine combustor liners and infrared burners. The McDermott Technology Inc. (MTI) CFCC program focused on oxide/oxide composite systems because they are known to be stable in the application environments of interest. The work is broadly focused on dense and porous composite systems depending on the specific application. Dense composites were targeted at corrosion resistant components, molten aluminum handling components and gas turbine combustor liners. The development work on dense composites led to significant advances in fiber coatings for oxide fibers and matrix densification. Additionally, a one-step fabrication process was developed to produce low cost composite components. The program also supported key developments in advanced oxide fibers that resulted in an improved version of Nextel 610 fiber (commercially available as Nextel 650) and significant progress in the development of a YAG/alumina fiber. Porous composite development focused on the vacuum winding process used to produce hot gas filters and infrared burner components.

  12. aluminum composites final: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    in Biological Systems: Implications for Neurological years, mining, smelting, and refining of aluminum (Al) in various forms have increasingly exposed living of the Al...

  13. Polyolefin composites containing a phase change material

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Salyer, Ival O. (Dayton, OH)

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A composite useful in thermal energy storage, said composite being formed of a polyolefin matrix having a phase change material such as a crystalline alkyl hydrocarbon incorporated therein, said polyolefin being thermally form stable; the composite is useful in forming pellets, sheets or fibers having thermal energy storage characteristics; methods for forming the composite are also disclosed.

  14. Compositions and methods for increasing cellulose production

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Yang, Zhenbiao (Riverside, CA); Karr, Stephen (Camarillo, CA)

    2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This disclosure relates to methods and compositions for genetically altering cellulose biosynthesis.

  15. Genetic optimization of two-material composite laminates Laurent Grosset

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Coello, Carlos A. Coello

    the power of GAs for this application. COMPOSITE LAMINATE DESIGN Composite laminate optimization typically

  16. Third-Party Evaluation of Petro Tex Hydrocarbons, LLC, ReGen Lubricating Oil Re-refining Process

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Compere, A L [ORNL; Griffith, William {Bill} L [ORNL

    2009-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report presents an assessment of market, energy impact, and utility of the PetroTex Hydrocarbons, LLC., ReGen process for re-refining used lubricating oil to produce Group I, II, and III base oils, diesel fuel, and asphalt. PetroTex Hydrocarbons, LLC., has performed extensive pilot scale evaluations, computer simulations, and market studies of this process and is presently evaluating construction of a 23 million gallon per year industrial-scale plant. PetroTex has obtained a 30 acre site in the Texas Industries RailPark in Midlothian Texas. The environmental and civil engineering assessments of the site are completed, and the company has been granted a special use permit from the City of Midlothian and air emissions permits for the Texas Commission on Environmental Quality.

  17. SPCDC: A user-friendly computational tool for the design and refinement of practical pulse combustion systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barr, P.K.; Keller, J.O. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Kezerle, J.A. [Gas Research Institute (United States)

    1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper reports on the development and use of a user-friendly, PC-executable computer code that can assist engineers in designing pulse combustors for specific applications and in refining existing units. This code represents the culmination of over 10 years of research and development in the field of pulse combustion. The Sandia Pulse Combustor Design Code, or SPCDC, couples both the fuel-air injection and the energy release to the time-varying pressure wave. Because the injection and combustion processes both drive and are driven by the wave dynamics, this model couples the major processes that occur in a pulse combustor. SPCDC can supplement the time-proven method of actually building and testing a prototype unit, and significantly reduce the number of units that must be tested. It will help produce a superior pulse combustion system tailored to a specific application and should help widen the range of successful applications.

  18. Method of forming a chemical composition

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bingham, Dennis N. (Idaho Falls, ID); Wilding, Bruce M. (Idaho Falls, ID); Klingler, Kerry M. (Idaho Falls, ID); Zollinger, William T. (Idaho Falls, ID); Wendt, Kraig M. (Idaho Falls, ID)

    2007-10-09T23:59:59.000Z

    A method of forming a chemical composition such as a chemical hydride is described and which includes the steps of selecting a composition having chemical bonds and which is capable of forming a chemical hydride; providing a source of hydrogen; and exposing the selected composition to an amount of ionizing radiation to encourage the changing of the chemical bonds of the selected composition, and chemically reacting the selected composition with the source of hydrogen to facilitate the formation of a chemical hydride.

  19. Refinement of the Kansas City Plant site conceptual model with respect to dense non-aqueous phase liquids (DNAPL)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Korte, N.E.; Hall, S.C. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Baker, J.L. [AlliedSignal Corp., Kansas City, MO (United States). Dept. of Environmental Protection

    1995-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document presents a refinement of the site conceptual model with respect to dense non-aqueous phase liquid (DNAPL) at the US Department of Energy Kansas City Plant (KCP). This refinement was prompted by a review of the literature and the results of a limited study that was conducted to evaluate whether pools of DNAPL were present in contaminated locations at the KCP. The field study relied on the micropurge method of sample collection. This method has been demonstrated as a successful approach for obtaining discrete samples within a limited aquifer zone. Samples were collected at five locations across 5-ft well screens located at the base of the alluvial aquifer at the KCP. The hypothesis was that if pools of DNAPL were present, the dissolved concentration would increase with depth. Four wells with highly contaminated groundwater were selected for the test. Three of the wells were located in areas where DNAPL was suspected, and one where no DNAPL was believed to be present. The results demonstrated no discernible pattern with depth for the four wells tested. A review of the data in light of the available technical literature suggests that the fine-grained nature of the aquifer materials precludes the formation of pools. Instead, DNAPL is trapped as discontinuous ganglia that are probably widespread throughout the aquifer. The discontinuous nature of the DNAPL distribution prevents the collection of groundwater samples with concentrations approaching saturation. Furthermore, the results indicate that attempts to remediate the aquifer with conventional approaches will not result in restoration to pristine conditions because the tortuous groundwater flow paths will inhibit the efficiency of fluid-flow-based treatments.

  20. A revised partiality model and post-refinement algorithm for X-ray free-electron laser data

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Ginn, Helen Mary; Brewster, Aaron S.; Hattne, Johan; Evans, Gwyndaf; Wagner, Armin; Grimes, Jonathan M.; Sauter, Nicholas K.; Sutton, Geoff; Stuart, David Ian

    2015-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Research towards using X-ray free-electron laser (XFEL) data to solve structures using experimental phasing methods such as sulfur single-wavelength anomalous dispersion (SAD) has been hampered by shortcomings in the diffraction models for X-ray diffraction from FELs. Owing to errors in the orientation matrix and overly simple partiality models, researchers have required large numbers of images to converge to reliable estimates for the structure-factor amplitudes, which may not be feasible for all biological systems. Here, data for cytoplasmic polyhedrosis virus type 17 (CPV17) collected at 1.3 Å wavelength at the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) are revisited. A previously published definitionmore »of a partiality model for reflections illuminated by self-amplified spontaneous emission (SASE) pulses is built upon, which defines a fraction between 0 and 1 based on the intersection of a reflection with a spread of Ewald spheres modelled by a super-Gaussian wavelength distribution in the X-ray beam. A method of post-refinement to refine the parameters of this model is suggested. This has generated a merged data set with an overall discrepancy (by calculating theRsplitvalue) of 3.15% to 1.46 Å resolution from a 7225-image data set. The atomic numbers of C, N and O atoms in the structure are distinguishable in the electron-density map. There are 13 S atoms within the 237 residues of CPV17, excluding the initial disordered methionine. These only possess 0.42 anomalous scattering electrons each at 1.3 Å wavelength, but the 12 that have single predominant positions are easily detectable in the anomalous difference Fourier map. It is hoped that these improvements will lead towards XFEL experimental phase determination and structure determination by sulfur SAD and will generally increase the utility of the method for difficult cases.« less

  1. High-resolution structure of the M14-type cytosolic carboxypeptidase from Burkholderia cenocepacia refined exploiting PDB-REDO strategies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rimsa, Vadim; Eadsforth, Thomas C. [University of Dundee, Dundee DD1 5EH, Scotland (United Kingdom); Joosten, Robbie P. [Netherlands Cancer Institute, Plesmanlaan 121, 1066 CX Amsterdam (Netherlands); Hunter, William N., E-mail: w.n.hunter@dundee.ac.uk [University of Dundee, Dundee DD1 5EH, Scotland (United Kingdom)

    2014-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The structure of a bacterial M14-family carboxypeptidase determined exploiting microfocus synchrotron radiation and highly automated refinement protocols reveals its potential to act as a polyglutamylase. A potential cytosolic metallocarboxypeptidase from Burkholderia cenocepacia has been crystallized and a synchrotron-radiation microfocus beamline allowed the acquisition of diffraction data to 1.9 Å resolution. The asymmetric unit comprises a tetramer containing over 1500 amino acids, and the high-throughput automated protocols embedded in PDB-REDO were coupled with model–map inspections in refinement. This approach has highlighted the value of such protocols for efficient analyses. The subunit is constructed from two domains. The N-terminal domain has previously only been observed in cytosolic carboxypeptidase (CCP) proteins. The C-terminal domain, which carries the Zn{sup 2+}-containing active site, serves to classify this protein as a member of the M14D subfamily of carboxypeptidases. Although eukaryotic CCPs possess deglutamylase activity and are implicated in processing modified tubulin, the function and substrates of the bacterial family members remain unknown. The B. cenocepacia protein did not display deglutamylase activity towards a furylacryloyl glutamate derivative, a potential substrate. Residues previously shown to coordinate the divalent cation and that contribute to peptide-bond cleavage in related enzymes such as bovine carboxypeptidase are conserved. The location of a conserved basic patch in the active site adjacent to the catalytic Zn{sup 2+}, where an acetate ion is identified, suggests recognition of the carboxy-terminus in a similar fashion to other carboxypeptidases. However, there are significant differences that indicate the recognition of substrates with different properties. Of note is the presence of a lysine in the S1? recognition subsite that suggests specificity towards an acidic substrate.

  2. Composite media for ion processing

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mann, Nick R. (Blackfoot, ID); Wood, Donald J. (Peshastin, WA); Todd, Terry A. (Aberdeen, ID); Sebesta, Ferdinand (Prague, CZ)

    2009-12-08T23:59:59.000Z

    Composite media, systems, and devices for substantially removing, or otherwise processing, one or more constituents of a fluid stream. The composite media comprise a plurality of beads, each having a matrix substantially comprising polyacrylonitrile (PAN) and supporting one or more active components which are effective in removing, by various mechanisms, one or more constituents from a fluid stream. Due to the porosity and large surface area of the beads, a high level of contact is achieved between composite media of the present invention and the fluid stream being processed. Further, the homogeneity of the beads facilitates use of the beads in high volume applications where it is desired to effectively process a large volume of flow per unit of time.

  3. Advanced thermal imaging of composites

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, H.; Dinwiddie, R.B.

    1996-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Composite materials were studied by Scanning Thermal Conductivity Microscope (STCM) and high speed thermography. The STCM is a qualitative technique which is used to study thermal conductivity variations on a sub-micrometer scale. High speed thermography is a quantitative technique for measuring thermal diffusivity with a variable spatial resolution from centimeters down to less than 25 gm. A relative thermal conductivity contrast map was obtained from a SiC/Si3N4 continuous fiber ceramic composite using the STCM. Temperature changes of a carbon/carbon composite after a heat pulse were captured by an IR camera to generate a thermal diffusivity map of the specimen. Line profiles of the temperature distribution showed significant variations as a result of fiber orientation.

  4. Magnetoelectric effect in sputtered composites

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stein, Simon; Wuttig, Manfred; Viehland, Dwight; Quandt, Eckhard [Smart Materials, Caesar Research Center, 53175 Bonn (Germany); Smart Materials, Caesar Research Center, 53175 Bonn, Germany and Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Maryland, College Park, Maryland 20742 (United States); Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Virginia Tech, Blacksburg, Virginia 24061 (United States); Smart Materials, Caesar Research Center, 53175 Bonn (Germany)

    2005-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The magnetoelectric effect in millimeter size PMN-PT/Terfenol-D composites is known. In an effort towards miniaturization, we report on the magnetoelectric effect in micrometer-size sputtered composites. Multilayers of TbFe/FeCo with a thickness of 4 {mu}m were sputter deposited on both sides of PMN-PT piezoelectric single crystals. The magnetoelectric voltage of samples was measured and reached values of 13 mV/(Oe cm) at dc bias fields of 2 mT, a linear dependence of magnetoelectric voltage on ac amplitude was detected in the range from 1 mT to 1 nT.

  5. Compositional Variation Within Hybrid Nanostructures

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville Power Administration would like submit theInnovation Portal 50,904CompositionalCompositional

  6. TECHNICAL PUBLICATIONS & BOOKS PRESENTED/PUBLISHED GOMES J.S. & ALVES, F.B. (2013): "The Universe of the Oil & Gas Industry From Exploration to Refining", 780

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Williams, John M.

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Universe of the Oil & Gas Industry ­ From Exploration to Refining", 780 pages University textbook published by PARTEX Oil & Gas, Lisbon, Portugal. ISBN 9789892037783. GOMES J.S. (2012): "New Technologies in the Oil and Gas Industry", edited by J.S. Gomes, published by INTECH open science (www

  7. 3698 A. Hernandez-Solis et al. / Nuclear Engineering and Design 241 (2011) 36973706 The need to validate and refine BE codes that are used in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Demazière, Christophe

    to validate and refine BE codes that are used in the predictions of relevant reactor safety parameters, led), and offers a good opportunity to assess the accuracy of thermal­hydraulic codes in predicting, among other of thermal hydraulic codes in predicting radial and axial assembly void dis- tributions, under both steady

  8. Document: P1332 Category: Physical Sciences, Chemical/Materials License Status: Available for licensing Texas Industry Cluster: Petroleum Refining & Chemical Products

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lightsey, Glenn

    for licensing Texas Industry Cluster: Petroleum Refining & Chemical Products Lower-cost fuel cells Problem, and they offer an alternative to petroleum-burning internal combustion engines. The U.S. Environ- mental and as a replacement for off-grid small power and grid production power plants. Development Stage/IP Status Lab

  9. An introduction to the special section on application of leading pretreatments to switchgrass by the Biomass Refining Consortium for Applied Fundamentals

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Riverside, University of

    data was prepared. It was also desired to dig dee- per into pretreatment attributes to try to revealAn introduction to the special section on application of leading pretreatments to switchgrass by the Biomass Refining Consortium for Applied Fundamentals and Innovation (CAFI) Pretreatment is among the most

  10. Production of solar grade (SoG) silicon by refining liquid metallurgical grade (MG) silicon: Annual Report: June 10 1998--October 19, 1999

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Khattak, C.P.; Joyce, D.B.; Schmid, F.

    1999-12-13T23:59:59.000Z

    Pyro-metallurgical refining techniques are being developed for use with molten metallurgical-grade (MG) silicon so that directionally solidified refined MG silicon can be used as solar-grade (SoG) silicon feedstock for photovoltaic applications. The most problematic impurity elements are B and P because of their high segregation coefficients. Refining processes such as evacuation, formation of impurity complexes, oxidation of impurities, and slagging have been effective in removal of impurities from MG silicon. Charge sizes have been scaled up to 60 kg. Impurity analysis of 60-kg charges after refining and directional solidification has shown reduction of most impurities to <1 ppma and B and P to the 10-ppma level. It has been demonstrated that B and P, as well as other impurities, can be reduced from MG silicon. Further reduction of impurities will be necessary for use as SoG silicon. The procedures developed are simple and scaleable to larger charge sizes and carried out in a foundry or MG silicon production plant. Therefore, SoG silicon production using these procedures should be at low cost.

  11. PbSrYCaCuO : a new class of superconducting materials. Chemical analyses refined by Energy Dispersive X-rays

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    39 PbSrYCaCuO : a new class of superconducting materials. Chemical analyses refined by Energy of superconducting material - PbSrYCaCuO - has been recently synthesized. Energy Dispersive X-ray analyses synthesized a new class of superconducting materials, which can be represented by the general formula Pb2Sr2R1

  12. RESTful Web service composition with

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bae, Doo-Hwan

    RESTful Web service composition with BPEL for REST Cesare Pautasso Data & Knowledge Engineering (2009) 2010-05-04 Seul-Ki Lee #12;Contents Introduction Background Design principles of RESTful Web SE LAB 2010 #12;Introduction (1/5) Web Service Describes web-based applications over the web

  13. Method of manufacturing aerogel composites

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Cao, Wanqing (Alameda, CA); Hunt, Arlon Jason (Oakland, CA)

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Disclosed herewith is a process of forming an aerogel composite which comprises introducing a gaseous material into a formed aerogel monolith or powder, and causing decomposition of said gaseous material in said aerogel in amounts sufficient to cause deposition of the decomposition products of the gas on the surfaces of the pores of the said aerogel.

  14. Method of manufacturing aerogel composites

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Cao, W.; Hunt, A.J.

    1999-03-09T23:59:59.000Z

    Disclosed herewith is a process of forming an aerogel composite which comprises introducing a gaseous material into a formed aerogel monolith or powder, and causing decomposition of said gaseous material in said aerogel in amounts sufficient to cause deposition of the decomposition products of the gas on the surfaces of the pores of the said aerogel.

  15. CompositionsCHEMICAL Mallet Library

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    CompositionsCHEMICAL Mallet Library Chairman's Corner Computer facility opens West wing renovation fall 1996 chemistry & biochemistry departmental newsletter The Chemistry Library has existed almost- istry Department and of the General Libraries, from modest beginnings in the late 19th century

  16. Characterisation of a Composite LEPS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moumita Roy Basu; Sudatta Ray; Abhijit Bisoi; M. Saha Sarkar

    2015-06-05T23:59:59.000Z

    A low energy photon spectrometer (LEPS), which is a composite planar HPGe, has been characterised experimentally. It has been shown that beyond 200 keV, effect of image charges deteriorates the efficiency of the detector in its addback mode. Data has been corrected on eventby- event basis resulting in improvement of the performance.

  17. Solid-state radioluminescent compositions

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Clough, Roger L. (Albuquerque, NM); Gill, John T. (Miamisburg, OH); Hawkins, Daniel B. (Fairbanks, AK); Renschler, Clifford L. (Tijeras, NM); Shepodd, Timothy J. (Livermore, CA); Smith, Henry M. (Overland Park, KS)

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A solid state radioluminescent composition for light source comprises an optically clear polymer organic matrix containing tritiated organic materials and dyes capable of "red" shifting primary scintillation emissions from the polymer matrix. The tritiated organic materials are made by reducing, with tritium, an unsaturated organic compound that prior to reduction contains olefinic or alkynylic bonds.

  18. Characterisation of a Composite LEPS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moumita Roy Basu; Sudatta Ray; Abhijit Bisoi; M. Saha Sarkar

    2015-01-23T23:59:59.000Z

    A low energy photon spectrometer (LEPS), which is a composite planar HPGe, has been characterised experimentally. It has been shown that beyond 200 keV, effect of image charges deteriorates the efficiency of the detector in its addback mode. Data has been corrected on eventby- event basis resulting in improvement of the performance.

  19. Preparation of Carbon Nanotube-Composite 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sharma, Sundeep

    2011-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

    A composite is made up of two distinct materials and the resulted properties are different from the individual precursors. Composite combines a huge or bulkier element called matrix and reinforcement called filler or fiber. Fiber is added...

  20. Preparation of Carbon Nanotube-Composite

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sharma, Sundeep

    2011-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

    A composite is made up of two distinct materials and the resulted properties are different from the individual precursors. Composite combines a huge or bulkier element called matrix and reinforcement called filler or fiber. Fiber is added...

  1. Carbon Fiber Composite Cellular A Dissertation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wadley, Haydn

    Carbon Fiber Composite Cellular Structures ____________________________________ A Dissertation and honeycombs. However, for weight sensitive, ambient temperature applications, carbon fiber composites have emerged as a promising material due to its high specific strength and low density. Carbon fiber reinforced

  2. Passive machine augmented composite for multifunctional properties

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kim, Jong Hyun

    2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This dissertation studies by experiment and numerical analysis an advanced composite material (Machine Augmented Composite or MAC) for enhancement of the passive damping while maintaining its stiffness. This MAC is composed of a pre-buckled wall...

  3. Micro Joining of Aluminum Graphite Composites 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Velamati, Manasa

    2012-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

    Advanced aluminum graphite composites have unique thermal properties due to opposing coefficients of thermal expansion of aluminum and graphite. The thermal and mechanical properties of such composites are anisotropic due to directional properties...

  4. Inventors in Action: Composites and Automation | GE Global Research

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Composite Materials and Automation Inventors in Action: Composite Materials and Automation As our composite materials evolve, our manufacturing processes do too. A new class of...

  5. Nonlinear seismic response analysis of steel-concrete composite frames

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barbato, Michele

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    formulation of nonlinear steel- concrete composite beam ele-Behaviour of Composite Steel and Concrete Struc- turalE. (2001). “Analysis of steel-concrete composite frames with

  6. NOTE: OPTIMAL NON-HOMOGENEOUS COMPOSITES FOR ...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    R. Tavakoli

    2012-10-02T23:59:59.000Z

    NOTE: OPTIMAL NON-HOMOGENEOUS COMPOSITES FOR. DYNAMIC LOADING REVISITED. R. TAVAKOLI. 1. Problem formulation. Consider ? ? Rd (

  7. Compositions for saccharification of cellulosic material

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McBrayer, Brett; Shaghasi, Tarana; Vlasenko, Elena

    2013-11-12T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention relates to enzyme compositions for high temperature saccharification of cellulosic material and to uses thereof.

  8. Fall 2013 Composite Data Products - Backup Power

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kurtz, J.; Sprik, S.; Ainscough, C.; Saur, G.; Post, M.; Peters, M.

    2013-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report includes 28 composite data products (CDPs) produced in Fall 2013 for fuel cell backup power systems.

  9. Spring 2014 Composite Data Products: Backup Power

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kurtz, J.; Sprik, S.; Saur, G.

    2014-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report includes 30 composite data products (CDPs) produced in Spring 2014 for fuel cell backup power systems.

  10. Clean Energy Manufacturing Innovation Institute for Composite...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    and Fuel Cell Technologies Research, Development, and Demonstrations Funding Opportunity Announcement Webinar Slides Fiber Reinforced Polymer Composite Manufacturing Workshop...

  11. Biomass Compositional Analysis Laboratory (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This fact sheet provides information about Biomass Compositional Analysis Laboratory (BCAL) capabilities and applications at NREL's National Bioenergy Center.

  12. Desensitization and recovery of metastable intermolecular composites

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Busse, James R. (South Fork, CO); Dye, Robert C. (Los Alamos, NM); Foley, Timothy J. (Los Alamos, NM); Higa, Kelvin T. (Ridgecrest, CA); Jorgensen, Betty S. (Jemez Springs, NM); Sanders, Victor E. (White Rock, NM); Son, Steven F. (Los Alamos, NM)

    2010-09-07T23:59:59.000Z

    A method to substantially desensitize a metastable intermolecular composite material to electrostatic discharge and friction comprising mixing the composite material with an organic diluent and removing enough organic diluent from the mixture to form a mixture with a substantially putty-like consistency, as well as a concomitant method of recovering the metastable intermolecular composite material.

  13. Structural composites with integrated electromagnetic functionality

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nemat-Nasser, Sia

    Structural composites with integrated electromagnetic functionality Syrus C. Nemat-Nasser, Alireza, such as wires, into polymer-based or ceramic-based composites. In addition to desired structural properties, these materials may be leveraged for active tasks such as filtering. The advantages of such hybrid composites

  14. Extremal structures of multiphase heat conducting composites

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cherkaev, Andrej

    Extremal structures of multiphase heat conducting composites A.V. Cherkaev \\Lambda L.V. Gibiansky y April 19, 1995 Abstract In this paper we construct microstructures of multiphase composites with un be easily gen­ eralized for the three­dimensional composites with arbitrary number of phases. 1 Introduction

  15. Carbon nanotube-polymer composite actuators

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gennett, Thomas (Denver, CO); Raffaelle, Ryne P. (Honeoye Falls, NY); Landi, Brian J. (Rochester, NY); Heben, Michael J. (Denver, CO)

    2008-04-22T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention discloses a carbon nanotube (SWNT)-polymer composite actuator and method to make such actuator. A series of uniform composites was prepared by dispersing purified single wall nanotubes with varying weight percents into a polymer matrix, followed by solution casting. The resulting nanotube-polymer composite was then successfully used to form a nanotube polymer actuator.

  16. Composite scintillators for detection of ionizing radiation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dai, Sheng (Knoxville, TN) [Knoxville, TN; Stephan, Andrew Curtis (Knoxville, TN) [Knoxville, TN; Brown, Suree S. (Knoxville, TN) [Knoxville, TN; Wallace, Steven A. (Knoxville, TN) [Knoxville, TN; Rondinone, Adam J [Knoxville, TN

    2010-12-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Applicant's present invention is a composite scintillator having enhanced transparency for detecting ionizing radiation comprising a material having optical transparency wherein said material comprises nano-sized objects having a size in at least one dimension that is less than the wavelength of light emitted by the composite scintillator wherein the composite scintillator is designed to have selected properties suitable for a particular application.

  17. Energy Storage Structural Composites: TONY PEREIRA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Guo, John Zhanhu

    Energy Storage Structural Composites: a Review TONY PEREIRA 1, *, ZHANHU GUO 1 , S. NiEH 2 , J: This study demonstrates the construction of a multifunctional composite structure capable of energy storage) composites were laminated with energy storage all-solid-state thin- film lithium cells. The processes

  18. Electrically disbondable compositions and related methods

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gilbert, Michael D. (Brookline, NH)

    2008-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

    Compositions capable of rapidly curing to a strong substrate bond are removable from a surface to which the composition is bonded without damage to the underlying substrates. The compositions of the present invention may be used in both temporary and permanent bonding and coating applications.

  19. Solid composite electrolytes for lithium batteries

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kumar, Binod (Dayton, OH); Scanlon, Jr., Lawrence G. (Fairborn, OH)

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Solid composite electrolytes are provided for use in lithium batteries which exhibit moderate to high ionic conductivity at ambient temperatures and low activation energies. In one embodiment, a ceramic-ceramic composite electrolyte is provided containing lithium nitride and lithium phosphate. The ceramic-ceramic composite is also preferably annealed and exhibits an activation energy of about 0.1 eV.

  20. Structure of 2 molar NaOH in aqueous solution from neutron diffraction and empirical potential structure refinement

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McLain, Sylvia E.; Imberti, Silvia; Soper, Alan K.; Botti, Alberto; Bruni, Fabio; Ricci, Maria Antonietta [ISIS Facility, Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Chilton, Didcot, OXON OX11 0QX (United Kingdom); ISIS Facility, Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Chilton, Didcot, OXON OX11 0QX, United Kingdom and CNR-ISC, Sezione di Firenze, via Madonna del Piano 10, 50019 Sesto Fiorentino (Finland) (Italy); ISIS Facility, Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Chilton, Didcot, OXON OX11 0QX (United Kingdom); Dipartimento di Fisica E. Amaldi, Universita degli Studi Roma Tre, Via della Vasca Navale 84, 00146 Rome (Italy)

    2006-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Neutron diffraction with isotopic substitution has been used to investigate aqueous solutions of 2M NaOH in the liquid state. The data were modeled using empirical potential structure refinement which allows for the extraction of the ion-water and water-water correlations. The data show that the ion-water radial distribution functions are in accordance with those found by previous studies on NaOH solutions and follow a trend which is dependent on the concentration of the solute. In particular, the shape of the hydroxide hydration shell is found to be concentration independent, but the number of water molecules occupying this shell increases with dilution. Additionally, the water-water correlations show that there is still a measurable effect on water structure with the addition of ions at this concentration, as the second shell in the water oxygen radial distribution function is compressed relative to the first shell. The data are also used to discuss the recent claims that the published radial distribution functions of water are unreliable, showing that data taken at different neutron sources, with different diffraction geometry and systematic errors lead to the same structural information when analyzed via a realistic modeling regime.