Sample records for 111b 111b 111b

  1. XPS and AES Studies of Cu/CdTe(111)-B

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Teeter, G.; Gessert, T. A.; Asher, S. E.

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Copper is frequently used as a p-type dopant to improve the performance of back contacts in CdTe thin-film solar cells. In this study, surface-analysis techniques are used to probe fundamental interactions between Cu and the CdTe(111)-B surface. The results presented here were facilitated by the newly constructed surface-analysis cluster tool in the Measurements and Characterization Division at NREL; they reveal a host of fundamental phenomena that occur in the Cu/CdTe system.

  2. Data:Fc5038c1-11b7-4630-b7c0-7c82d981e744 | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Tri-County Electric Coop, Inc (Kansas) Effective date: 20131101 End date if known: Rate...

  3. THE TRANSIT LIGHT CURVE PROJECT. II. TWO TRANSITS OF THE EXOPLANET OGLE-TR-111b1 Joshua N. Winn,2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    in abundance in radial velocity surveys. For this reason, Pont et al. (2004) referred to OGLE-TR-111. 2002; Vidal-Madjar et al. 2003), and the Rossiter-McLaughlin effect (Queloz et al. 2000; Winn et al a rich star field in Carina. Spectroscopic follow-up by Pont et al. (2004) revealed a periodic Doppler

  4. Data:F111b665-5c77-40a0-a0af-241b4c7e1c9b | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    oct 15th. Available to schools and churches within the District's service area, which use electricity exclusively for all normal uses, including electric space and water heating....

  5. The generation fleet in MISO is being affected by time, fuel...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Power Plan 111(b) & (d) Nature of Regulation Mercury and Air Toxics Standards Cross State Air Pollution Rule and Cooling Water Regulations (316(b)) New air quality standards Coal...

  6. CX-008009: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Safety and Security Component Installation and Alteration CX(s) Applied: B1.11, B2.2 Date: 11/28/2011 Location(s): Washington Offices(s): Science, Pacific Northwest Site Office

  7. October 2014 Seventh Northwest Conservation and Electric Power Plan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of complying with regulations on air and water pollution control, disposal of waste products, fuel extraction costs o new regulations? e.g., Mercury and Air Toxics Standard Residual effects? residual effects after for regulating carbon emissions under Clean Air Act: - 111(b) -- applies to new power plants: use? how

  8. Perturbation of the Izmit earthquake aftershock decaying activity following the 1999 Mw 7.2 Duzce, Turkey, earthquake

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ¨zce, Turkey, earthquake Guillaume Daniel,1 David Marsan,2 and Michel Bouchon1 Received 4 August 2005; revised patterns of seismicity in western Turkey, following the occurrence of the 12 November 1999 Mw 7.2 Du activity following the 1999 Mw 7.2 Du¨zce, Turkey, earthquake, J. Geophys. Res., 111, B05310, doi:10

  9. Structural and Room-Temperature Transport Properties of Zinc Blende and Wurtzite InAs Nanowires

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Deli

    Structural and Room-Temperature Transport Properties of Zinc Blende and Wurtzite InAs Nanowires between pure zinc blende (ZB) NWs and wurtzite (WZ) NWs containing stacking faults and small ZB segments their growth-direction axis while wurtzite (WZ) InAs NWs grown on InAs (111)B substrates have numerous stacking

  10. CX-011219: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Office of Secure Transportation Multiple Actions CX(s) Applied: B1.2, B1.3, B1.11, B1.15 Date: 09/25/2013 Location(s): Tennessee Offices(s): Oak Ridge Office

  11. Effects of internal mineral structures on the magnetic remanence of silicate-hosted titanomagnetite inclusions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dunin-Borkowski, Rafal E.

    Effects of internal mineral structures on the magnetic remanence of silicate-hosted titanomagnetite epitaxially by exsolution from their host silicate. Close examination of clinopyroxene- hosted inclusions of silicate-hosted titanomagnetite inclusions: An electron holography study, J. Geophys. Res., 111, B12S15

  12. CX-000568: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Neutron imaging of metal hydride beds at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Spallation Neutron SourceCX(s) Applied: B1.11, B1.13, B3.6Date: 12/30/2009Location(s): TennesseeOffice(s): Sandia Site Office

  13. Transit timing with fast cameras on large telescopes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Adams, Elisabeth Rose

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Timing and system parameters were measured for seven transiting exoplanets: OGLETR- 56b (11 transits), OGLE-TR-132b (7), OGLE-TR-111b (6), OGLE-TR-113b (6), CoRoT-2b (3), OGLE-TR-10b (3), and XO-2b (2). Ground-based ...

  14. CX-007519: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Determination CX-007519: Categorical Exclusion Determination "Waste Management Construction Support CX(s) Applied: B1.3, B1.11, B1.23, B1.24, B1.27, B1.28, B1.29, B1.31, B2.1...

  15. Direct imaging of InSb (110)-(1x1) surface grown by molecular beam epitaxy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mishima, T. D. [Homer L. Dodge Department of Physics and Astronomy, and Center for Semiconductor Physics in Nanostructures, University of Oklahoma, Norman, Oklahoma 73019 (United States)

    2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    High-resolution transmission electron microscopy under a profile imaging condition (HR-profile TEM) was employed to determine the structural model for the InSb(110)-(1x1) relaxation surface grown by molecular beam epitaxy (MBE). HR-profile TEM analyses indicate that the chevron model, which is widely accepted for zinc-blende-type III-V(110)-(1x1) surfaces prepared by cleavage, is also applicable to the InSb(110)-(1x1) surface prepared under an Sb-rich MBE condition. The assignment of atomic species (In or Sb) of InSb(110)-(1x1) surfaces was confirmed based on a HR-profile TEM image that captures the connected facets of InSb(110)-(1x1) and InSb(111)B-(2x2). On the basis of the well-known atomic species of InSb(111)B-(2x2), the atomic species of the InSb(110)-(1x1) surface were deduced straightforwardly: the atoms shifted upward and downward at the topmost layer of the InSb(110)-(1x1) surface are Sb and In, respectively. The atomic arrangements of the InSb(110)-(1x1)-InSb(111)B-(2x2) facet determined by HR-profile TEM may represent the atomic arrangements of zinc-blende-type III-V(331)B surfaces.

  16. Structure and electrical characterization of gallium arsenide nanowires with different V/III ratio growth parameters

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Muhammad, R.; Ahamad, R. [Sustainability Research Alliance, Universiti Teknologi Malaysia, 81310 Skudai, Johor (Malaysia); Ibrahim, Z.; Othaman, Z. [Physic Department, Faculty of Science, Universiti Teknologi Malaysia, 81310 Skudai, Johor (Malaysia)

    2014-03-05T23:59:59.000Z

    Gallium arsenide (GaAs) nanowires were grown vertically on GaAs(111)B substrate by gold-assisted using metal-organic chemical vapour deposition. Field-emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and conductivity atomic force microscopy (CAFM) analysis were carried out to investigate the effects of V/III ratio on structural properties and current-voltage changes in the wires. Results show that GaAs NWs grow preferably in the wurtzite crystal structure than zinc blende crystal structure with increasing V/III ratio. Additionally, CAFM studies have revealed that zincblende nanowires indicate ohmic characteristic compared to oscillation current occurred for wurtzite structures. The GaAs NWs with high quality structures are needed in solar cells technology for trapping energy that directly converts of sunlight into electricity with maximum capacity.

  17. Investigation of crystalline and electronic band alignment properties of GaP/Ge(111) heterostructure

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dixit, V. K.; Kumar, Shailendra; Singh, S. D.; Khamari, S. K.; Kumar, R.; Tiwari, Pragya; Sharma, T. K.; Oak, S. M. [Raja Ramanna Centre for Advanced Technology, Indore, Madhya Pradesh 452013 (India); Phase, D. M. [UGC-DAE Consortium for Scientific Research, Khandwa Road, Indore, Madhya Pradesh 452001 (India)

    2014-03-03T23:59:59.000Z

    Gallium phosphide (GaP) epitaxial layer and nanostructures are grown on n-Ge(111) substrates using metal organic vapour phase epitaxy. It is confirmed by high resolution x-ray diffraction measurements that the layer is highly crystalline and oriented with the coexistence of two domains, i.e., GaP(111)A and GaP(111)B, with an angle of 60 between them due to the formation of a wurtzite monolayer at the interface. The valence band offset between GaP and Ge is 0.7??0.1?eV as determined from the valence band onsets and from Kraut's method. A band alignment diagram for GaP/Ge/GeOx is also constructed which can be used to design monolithic optoelectronic integrated circuits.

  18. Morphological evolution of seeded self-limiting quantum dots on patterned substrates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dimastrodonato, Valeria; Pelucchi, Emanuele [Tyndall National Institute, University College Cork, Dyke Parade, Cork (Ireland); Vvedensky, Dimitri D. [The Blackett Laboratory, Imperial College London, London SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom)

    2013-12-04T23:59:59.000Z

    We present experimental data and a comprehensive theoretical model for the self-limiting growth during metalorganic vaporphase epitaxy of Al{sub x}Ga{sub 1?x}As within tetrahedral recesses etched in GaAs(111)B substrates. A self-limiting profile develops during growth, accompanied by Ga segregation, and leads to the formation of quantum dots and vertical quantum wires along the base and central axis of the recesses, respectively. A theoretical model based on reaction-diffusion equations for the precursor kinetics, adatom diffusion and incorporation, on each crystallographic facet composing the template, is formulated: our theory explains, and reproduces with good agreement, all the experimental trends of the self-limiting profile and alloy segregation dependence on material composition and growth temperature. These results represent a promising route toward a reproducible on-demand design of seeded lowdimensional nanostructures grown on any patterned surface.

  19. PRECLOSURE CONSEQUENCE ANALYSES FOR LICENSE APPLICATION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    S. Tsai

    2005-01-12T23:59:59.000Z

    Radiological consequence analyses are performed for potential releases from normal operations in surface and subsurface facilities and from Category 1 and Category 2 event sequences during the preclosure period. Surface releases from normal repository operations are primarily from radionuclides released from opening a transportation cask during dry transfer operations of spent nuclear fuel (SNF) in Dry Transfer Facility 1 (DTF 1), Dry Transfer Facility 2 (DTF 2), the Canister Handling facility (CHF), or the Fuel Handling Facility (FHF). Subsurface releases from normal repository operations are from resuspension of waste package surface contamination and neutron activation of ventilated air and silica dust from host rock in the emplacement drifts. The purpose of this calculation is to demonstrate that the preclosure performance objectives, specified in 10 CFR 63.111(a) and 10 CFR 63.111(b), have been met for the proposed design and operations in the geologic repository operations area. Preclosure performance objectives are discussed in Section 6.2.3 and are summarized in Tables 1 and 2.

  20. Varietal response and some factors influencing host reaction to Helminthosporium (H. sesami) blight of sesame

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stone, William Jack Hanson

    1957-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    70. 0 5. 0 63. 6 27. 3 3. 0 5. 0 22 ' 2 33 3 4. o 5. 0 50. 0 37. 5 4. o 87. 5 55 5 33 ' 3 12 5 9. 1 100. 0 95. 0 4o. o 100. 0 100. 0 30. 0 100. 0 95. 0 9. 1 97 o 95 o 44. 5 96. o 95 o 12. 5 96. o 100. 0 87 5 V 51-8-4-1-1 9.... 1 63. 6 6. o 27. 3 100. 0 94. o B 17-1-1-1-B-B-1-1-1 25. 0 5 0 75. 0 100. 0 95. 0 Appendix Table 1 continued. ~Pd1 N 57-2-B-B-1-B-1-1 0 Stem izd'ection 8. 3 16. 7 75 o 100. 0 100. 0 H 1119-3-B-1-B-1-1-1 B 2346-1-B-B-1-1-1 SC 896...

  1. Effect of catalyst diameter on vapour-liquid-solid growth of GaAs nanowires

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    O'Dowd, B. J., E-mail: odowdbj@tcd.ie; Shvets, I. V. [CRANN, School of Physics, Trinity College, the University of Dublin, Dublin D2 (Ireland); Wojtowicz, T.; Kolkovsky, V.; Wojciechowski, T.; Zgirski, M. [Institute of Physics, Polish Academy of Sciences, Warsaw 02-668 (Poland); Rouvimov, S. [Notre Dame Integrated Imaging Facility (NDIIF), University of Notre Dame, Notre Dame, Indiana 46556 (United States); Liu, X.; Pimpinella, R.; Dobrowolska, M.; Furdyna, J. [Department of Physics, University of Notre Dame, Notre Dame, Indiana 46556 (United States)

    2014-08-14T23:59:59.000Z

    GaAs nanowires were grown on (111)B GaAs substrates using the vapour-liquid-solid mechanism. The Au/Pt nanodots used to catalyse wire growth were defined lithographically and had varying diameter and separation. An in-depth statistical analysis of the resulting nanowires, which had a cone-like shape, was carried out. This revealed that there were two categories of nanowire present, with differing height and tapering angle. The bimodal nature of wire shape was found to depend critically on the diameter of the Au-Ga droplet atop the nanowire. Transmission electron microscopy analysis also revealed that the density of stacking faults in the wires varied considerably between the two categories of wire. It is believed that the cause of the distinction in terms of shape and crystal structure is related to the contact angle between the droplet and the solid-liquid interface. The dependency of droplet diameter on contact angle is likely related to line-tension, which is a correction to Young's equation for the contact angle of a droplet upon a surface. The fact that contact angle may influence resulting wire structure and shape has important implications for the planning of growth conditions and the preparation of wires for use in proposed devices.

  2. Recent progress in GaInAsSb thermophotovoltaics grown by organometallic vapor phase epitaxy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, C.A.; Choi, H.K.; Oakley, D.C. [Massachusetts Inst. of Tech., Lexington, MA (United States). Lincoln Lab.; Charache, G.W. [Lockheed Martin, Inc., Schenectady, NY (United States)

    1998-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Studies on the materials development of Ga{sub 1{minus}x}In{sub x}As{sub y}Sb{sub 1{minus}y} alloys for thermophotovoltaic (TPV) devices are reviewed. Ga{sub 1{minus}x}In{sub x}As{sub y}Sb{sub 1{minus}y} epilayers were grown lattice matched to GaSb substrates by organometallic vapor phase epitaxy (OMVPE) using all organometallic precursors including triethylgallium, trimethylindium, tertiarybutylarsine, and trimethylantimony with diethyltellurium and dimethylzinc as the n- and p-type dopants, respectively. The overall material quality of these alloys depends on growth temperature, In content, V/III ratio, substrate misorientation, and to a lesser extent, growth rate. A mirror-like surface morphology and room temperature photoluminescence (PL) are obtained for GaInAsSb layers with peak emission in the wavelength range between 2 and 2.5 {micro}m. The crystal quality improves for growth temperature decreasing from 575 to 525 C, and with decreasing In content, as based on epilayer surface morphology and low temperature PL spectra. A trend of smaller full width at half-maximum for low temperature PL spectra is observed as the growth rate is increased from 1.5 to 2.5 and 5 {micro}m/h. In general, GaInAsSb layers grown on (100) GaSb substrates with a 6{degree} toward (111)B misorientation exhibited overall better material quality than layers grown on the more standard substrate (100)2{degree} toward (110). Consistent growth of high performance lattice-matched GaInAsSb TPV devices is also demonstrated.

  3. OMVPE growth and characterization of GaInAsSb for thermophotovoltaics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, C.A.; Charache, G.W.

    1998-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Studies on the materials development of Ga{sub 1{minus}x}In{sub x}As{sub y}Sb{sub 1{minus}y} alloys for thermophotovoltaic (TPV) devices are reviewed. Ga{sub 1{minus}x}In{sub x}As{sub y}Sb{sub 1{minus}y} epilayers were grown lattice matched to GaSb substrates by organometallic vapor phase epitaxy (OMVPE) using all organometallic precursors including triethylgallium, trimethylindium, tertiarybutylarsine, and trimethylantimony with diethyltellurium and dimethylzinc as the n- and p-type dopants, respectively. The overall material quality of these alloys depends on growth temperature, In content, V/III ratio, substrate misorientation, and to a lesser extent, growth rate. A mirror-like surface morphology and room temperature photoluminescence (PL) are obtained for GaInAsSb layers with peak emission in the wavelength range between 2 and 2.5 {micro}m. The crystal quality improves for growth temperature decreasing from 575 to 525 C, and with decreasing In content, as based on epilayer surface morphology and low temperature PL spectra. A trend of smaller full width at half-maximum for low temperature PL spectra is observed as the growth rate is increased from 1.5 to 2.5 and 5 {micro}m/h. In general, GaInAsSb layers grown on (100) GaSb substrates with a 6{degree} toward (111)B misorientation exhibited overall better material quality than layers grown on the more standard substrate (100) 2{degree} toward (110). Consistent growth of high performance lattice-matched GaInAsSb TPV devices is also demonstrated.

  4. SEISMIC ANALYSIS FOR PRECLOSURE SAFETY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    E.N. Lindner

    2004-12-03T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this seismic preclosure safety analysis is to identify the potential seismically-initiated event sequences associated with preclosure operations of the repository at Yucca Mountain and assign appropriate design bases to provide assurance of achieving the performance objectives specified in the Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) 10 CFR Part 63 for radiological consequences. This seismic preclosure safety analysis is performed in support of the License Application for the Yucca Mountain Project. In more detail, this analysis identifies the systems, structures, and components (SSCs) that are subject to seismic design bases. This analysis assigns one of two design basis ground motion (DBGM) levels, DBGM-1 or DBGM-2, to SSCs important to safety (ITS) that are credited in the prevention or mitigation of seismically-initiated event sequences. An application of seismic margins approach is also demonstrated for SSCs assigned to DBGM-2 by showing a high confidence of a low probability of failure at a higher ground acceleration value, termed a beyond-design basis ground motion (BDBGM) level. The objective of this analysis is to meet the performance requirements of 10 CFR 63.111(a) and 10 CFR 63.111(b) for offsite and worker doses. The results of this calculation are used as inputs to the following: (1) A classification analysis of SSCs ITS by identifying potential seismically-initiated failures (loss of safety function) that could lead to undesired consequences; (2) An assignment of either DBGM-1 or DBGM-2 to each SSC ITS credited in the prevention or mitigation of a seismically-initiated event sequence; and (3) A nuclear safety design basis report that will state the seismic design requirements that are credited in this analysis. The present analysis reflects the design information available as of October 2004 and is considered preliminary. The evolving design of the repository will be re-evaluated periodically to ensure that seismic hazards are properly evaluated and identified. This document supersedes the seismic classifications, assignments, and computations in ''Seismic Analysis for Preclosure Safety'' (BSC 2004a).