Sample records for 110-75-8 2-chloroethyl vinyl

  1. Treatability studies of groundwater contaminated with bis(2-chloroethyl) ether

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Huang, F.Y.C. [New Mexico Inst. of Mining and Technology, Socorro, NM (United States). Dept. of Mineral and Environmental Engineering] [New Mexico Inst. of Mining and Technology, Socorro, NM (United States). Dept. of Mineral and Environmental Engineering; Li, K.Y.; Liu, C.C. [Lamar Univ., Beaumont, TX (United States). Dept. of Chemical Engineering] [Lamar Univ., Beaumont, TX (United States). Dept. of Chemical Engineering

    1999-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The groundwater aquifer underneath a chemical manufacturing plant in Southeast Texas has been contaminated with the leachate from its landfill. There are 17 major chlorinated hydrocarbon contaminants found in the groundwater with concentrations ranging from 1 ppm to 1,200 ppm. An air-stripping unit followed by a thermal catalytic oxidation unit is currently operating on-site to remove all of the chlorinated compounds from the contaminated groundwater. One of the contaminants, bis(2-chloroethyl)ether (DCEE), has a fairly low Henry`s Law constant; therefore, a high air flow rate is employed in the stripping unit to improve the overall stripping efficiency. Nevertheless, the treated groundwater still contains a fair amount of DCEE. An UV-peroxidation reactor is set up to study its feasibility for oxidizing DCEE. The treatability data indicate that DCEE at a concentration of 200 ppm can be oxidized effectively in the presence of H{sub 2}O{sub 2} and the effective UV wavelengths lie between 200 and 280 nm. No noticeable reduction of the oxidation rate is observed at low temperature ({approximately} 11 C). Apparent oxidation rate equations of DCEE are determined and several process design parameters are discussed.

  2. In vivo potentiation of 1-(2-chloroethyl)-3-cyclohexyl-1-nitrosourea by the radiation sensitizer benznidazole

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Siemann, D.W.; Morrissey, S.; Wolf, K.

    1983-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Recent studies in mouse tumor systems have indicated a potential therapeutic advantage in combining the radiosensitizer misonidazole (MISO) with cancer chemotherapy drugs. One agent the antitumor activity of which has been enhanced to a greater extent than its hematological or gastrointestinal toxicities is the nitrosourea, 1-(2-chloroethyl)-3-cyclohexyl-1-nitrosourea (CCNU). Recently, sensitizers more lipophylic than MISO have been reported to give greater tumor response enhancement when combined with CCNU. The present studies compared the potential therapeutic benefit of combining MISO (partition coefficient, 0.43) or benznidazole (BENZO) (partition coefficient, 8.5) in KHT sarcoma or RIF-1 tumor-bearing C3H mice. Both sensitizers were administered i.p. and given either 30 min before (BENZO) or simultaneously with (MISO) the chemotherapeutic agent. Survival of clonogenic tumor cells assessed 22 to 24 hr after treatment or in situ tumor growth delay were used as assays of tumor response. Normal tissue toxicity was determined using the drug dose yielding 50% animal lethality in 30 days end point. When combined with CCNU, doses of MISO (5.0 mmol/kg) or BENZO (0.3 mmol/kg) were found to yield approximately equivalent increases in both the tumor effect (enhancement ratio, approximately 1.8 to 2.0) and normal tissue toxicity (enhancement ratio approximately 1.3 to 1.4). Both sensitizers therefore led to a therapeutic benefit. However, although a approximately 10-fold lower dose of the more lipophylic sensitizer BENZO proved to be as effective as MISO at enhancing the tumoricidal effects of CCNU, this dose reduction did not result in a greater therapeutic gain for BENZO.

  3. 2,6-Dithiopurine, a nucleophilic scavenger, protects against mutagenesis in mouse skin treated in vivo with 2-(chloroethyl) ethyl sulfide, a mustard gas analog

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boulware, Stephen [Division of Pharmacy and Toxicology, College of Pharmacy, The University of Texas at Austin, Dell Pediatric Research Institute, 1400 Barbara Jordan Blvd., Austin, TX 78723 (United States)] [Division of Pharmacy and Toxicology, College of Pharmacy, The University of Texas at Austin, Dell Pediatric Research Institute, 1400 Barbara Jordan Blvd., Austin, TX 78723 (United States); Fields, Tammy; McIvor, Elizabeth; Powell, K. Leslie; Abel, Erika L. [Department of Molecular Carcinogenesis, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Science Park, Smithville, TX 78957 (United States)] [Department of Molecular Carcinogenesis, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Science Park, Smithville, TX 78957 (United States); Vasquez, Karen M. [Division of Pharmacy and Toxicology, College of Pharmacy, The University of Texas at Austin, Dell Pediatric Research Institute, 1400 Barbara Jordan Blvd., Austin, TX 78723 (United States)] [Division of Pharmacy and Toxicology, College of Pharmacy, The University of Texas at Austin, Dell Pediatric Research Institute, 1400 Barbara Jordan Blvd., Austin, TX 78723 (United States); MacLeod, Michael C., E-mail: mcmacleod@mdanderson.org [Department of Molecular Carcinogenesis, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Science Park, Smithville, TX 78957 (United States)

    2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Sulfur mustard [bis(2-chloroethyl)sulfide, SM] is a well-known DNA-damaging agent that has been used in chemical warfare since World War I, and is a weapon that could potentially be used in a terrorist attack on a civilian population. Dermal exposure to high concentrations of SM produces severe, long-lasting burns. Topical exposure to high concentrations of 2-(chloroethyl) ethyl sulfide (CEES), a monofunctional analog of SM, also produces severe skin lesions in mice. Utilizing a genetically engineered mouse strain, Big Blue, that allows measurement of mutation frequencies in mouse tissues, we now show that topical treatment with much lower concentrations of CEES induces significant dose- and time-dependent increases in mutation frequency in mouse skin; the mutagenic exposures produce minimal toxicity as determined by standard histopathology and immunohistochemical analysis for cytokeratin 6 and the DNA-damage induced phosphorylation of histone H2AX (?-H2AX). We attempted to develop a therapeutic that would inhibit the CEES-induced increase in mutation frequency in the skin. We observe that multi-dose, topical treatment with 2,6-dithiopurine (DTP), a known chemical scavenger of CEES, beginning 1 h post-exposure to CEES, completely abolishes the CEES-induced increase in mutation frequency. These findings suggest the possibility that DTP, previously shown to be non-toxic in mice, may be useful as a therapeutic agent in accidental or malicious human exposures to SM. -- Highlights: ? 200 mM 2-(chloroethyl) ethyl sulfide (CEES) induces mutations in mouse skin. ? This dose of CEES is not overtly toxic, as assayed by histopathology. ? 2,6-Dithiopurine (DTP), applied after CEES-treatment, abolishes CEES-mutagenesis. ? This supports the idea that sulfur mustards exhibit long biological half-lives.

  4. Expression of proliferative and inflammatory markers in a full-thickness human skin equivalent following exposure to the model sulfur mustard vesicant, 2-chloroethyl ethyl sulfide

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Black, Adrienne T. [Pharmacology and Toxicology, Rutgers University, Piscataway, NJ (United States); Hayden, Patrick J. [MatTek Corporation, Ashland, MA (United States); Casillas, Robert P. [Battelle Memorial Institute, Columbus, OH (United States); Heck, Diane E. [Environmental Health Sciences, New York Medical College, Valhalla, NY (United States); Gerecke, Donald R. [Pharmacology and Toxicology, Rutgers University, Piscataway, NJ (United States); Sinko, Patrick J. [Pharmaceutics, Rutgers University, Piscataway, NJ (United States); Laskin, Debra L. [Pharmacology and Toxicology, Rutgers University, Piscataway, NJ (United States); Laskin, Jeffrey D., E-mail: jlaskin@eohsi.rutgers.ed [Environmental and Occupational Medicine, UMDNJ-Robert Wood Johnson Medical School, Piscataway, NJ (United States)

    2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Sulfur mustard is a potent vesicant that induces inflammation, edema and blistering following dermal exposure. To assess molecular mechanisms mediating these responses, we analyzed the effects of the model sulfur mustard vesicant, 2-chloroethyl ethyl sulfide, on EpiDerm-FT{sup TM}, a commercially available full-thickness human skin equivalent. CEES (100-1000 {mu}M) caused a concentration-dependent increase in pyknotic nuclei and vacuolization in basal keratinocytes; at high concentrations (300-1000 {mu}M), CEES also disrupted keratin filament architecture in the stratum corneum. This was associated with time-dependent increases in expression of proliferating cell nuclear antigen, a marker of cell proliferation, and poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) and phosphorylated histone H2AX, markers of DNA damage. Concentration- and time-dependent increases in mRNA and protein expression of eicosanoid biosynthetic enzymes including COX-2, 5-lipoxygenase, microsomal PGE{sub 2} synthases, leukotriene (LT) A{sub 4} hydrolase and LTC{sub 4} synthase were observed in CEES-treated skin equivalents, as well as in antioxidant enzymes, glutathione S-transferases A1-2 (GSTA1-2), GSTA3 and GSTA4. These data demonstrate that CEES induces rapid cellular damage, cytotoxicity and inflammation in full-thickness skin equivalents. These effects are similar to human responses to vesicants in vivo and suggest that the full thickness skin equivalent is a useful in vitro model to characterize the biological effects of mustards and to develop potential therapeutics.

  5. Inhibition of NADPH cytochrome P450 reductase by the model sulfur mustard vesicant 2-chloroethyl ethyl sulfide is associated with increased production of reactive oxygen species

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gray, Joshua P. [Department of Science, United States Coast Guard Academy, New London, CT (United States); Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, Rutgers University, Piscataway, NJ (United States); Mishin, Vladimir [Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, Rutgers University, Piscataway, NJ (United States); Heck, Diane E. [Department of Environmental Health Science, New York Medical College, Valhalla, NY (United States); Laskin, Debra L. [Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, Rutgers University, Piscataway, NJ (United States); Laskin, Jeffrey D., E-mail: jlaskin@eohsi.rutgers.ed [Environmental and Occupational Medicine, UMDNJ-Robert Wood Johnson Medical School, Piscataway, NJ (United States)

    2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Inhalation of vesicants including sulfur mustard can cause significant damage to the upper airways. This is the result of vesicant-induced modifications of proteins important in maintaining the integrity of the lung. Cytochrome P450s are the major enzymes in the lung mediating detoxification of sulfur mustard and its metabolites. NADPH cytochrome P450 reductase is a flavin-containing electron donor for cytochrome P450. The present studies demonstrate that the sulfur mustard analog, 2-chloroethyl ethyl sulfide (CEES), is a potent inhibitor of human recombinant cytochrome P450 reductase, as well as native cytochrome P450 reductase from liver microsomes of saline and {beta}-naphthoflavone-treated rats, and cytochrome P450 reductase from type II lung epithelial cells. Using rat liver microsomes from {beta}-naphthoflavone-treated rats, CEES was found to inhibit CYP 1A1 activity. This inhibition was overcome by microsomal cytochrome P450 reductase from saline-treated rats, which lack CYP 1A1 activity, demonstrating that the CEES inhibitory activity was selective for cytochrome P450 reductase. Cytochrome P450 reductase also generates reactive oxygen species (ROS) via oxidation of NADPH. In contrast to its inhibitory effects on the reduction of cytochrome c and CYP1A1 activity, CEES was found to stimulate ROS formation. Taken together, these data demonstrate that sulfur mustard vesicants target cytochrome P450 reductase and that this effect may be an important mechanism mediating oxidative stress and lung injury.

  6. Preparation of vinyl acetate

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Tustin, Gerald Charles (Kingsport, TN); Zoeller, Joseph Robert (Kingsport, TN); Depew, Leslie Sharon (Kingsport, TN)

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This invention pertains to the preparation of vinyl acetate by contacting a mixture of hydrogen and ketene with a heterogeneous catalyst containing a transition metal to produce acetaldehyde, which is then reacted with ketene in the presence of an acid catalyst to produce vinyl acetate.

  7. Preparation of vinyl acetate

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Tustin, G.C.; Zoeller, J.R.; Depew, L.S.

    1998-03-24T23:59:59.000Z

    This invention pertains to the preparation of vinyl acetate by contacting a mixture of hydrogen and ketene with a heterogeneous catalyst containing a transition metal to produce acetaldehyde, which is then reacted with ketene in the presence of an acid catalyst to produce vinyl acetate.

  8. Regulation of Hsp27 and Hsp70 expression in human and mouse skin construct models by caveolae following exposure to the model sulfur mustard vesicant, 2-chloroethyl ethyl sulfide

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Black, Adrienne T. [Pharmacology and Toxicology, Rutgers University, Piscataway, NJ (United States); Hayden, Patrick J. [MatTek Corporation, Ashland, MA (United States); Casillas, Robert P. [Battelle Memorial Institute, Columbus, OH (United States); Heck, Diane E. [Environmental Health, New York Medical College, Valhalla, NY (United States); Gerecke, Donald R. [Pharmacology and Toxicology, Rutgers University, Piscataway, NJ (United States); Sinko, Patrick J. [Pharmaceutics, Rutgers University, Piscataway, NJ (United States); Laskin, Debra L. [Pharmacology and Toxicology, Rutgers University, Piscataway, NJ (United States); Laskin, Jeffrey D., E-mail: jlaskin@eohsi.rutgers.edu [Environmental and Occupational Medicine, UMDNJ-Robert Wood Johnson Medical School, Piscataway, NJ (United States)

    2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Dermal exposure to the vesicant sulfur mustard causes marked inflammation and tissue damage. Basal keratinocytes appear to be a major target of sulfur mustard. In the present studies, mechanisms mediating skin toxicity were examined using a mouse skin construct model and a full-thickness human skin equivalent (EpiDerm-FT{sup TM}). In both systems, administration of the model sulfur mustard vesicant, 2-chloroethyl ethyl sulfide (CEES, 100-1000 {mu}M) at the air surface induced mRNA and protein expression of heat shock proteins 27 and 70 (Hsp27 and Hsp70). CEES treatment also resulted in increased expression of caveolin-1, the major structural component of caveolae. Immunohistochemistry revealed that Hsp27, Hsp70 and caveolin-1 were localized in basal and suprabasal layers of the epidermis. Caveolin-1 was also detected in fibroblasts in the dermal component of the full thickness human skin equivalent. Western blot analysis of caveolar membrane fractions isolated by sucrose density centrifugation demonstrated that Hsp27 and Hsp70 were localized in caveolae. Treatment of mouse keratinocytes with filipin III or methyl-{beta}-cyclodextrin, which disrupt caveolar structure, markedly suppressed CEES-induced Hsp27 and Hsp70 mRNA and protein expression. CEES treatment is known to activate JNK and p38 MAP kinases; in mouse keratinocytes, inhibition of these enzymes suppressed CEES-induced expression of Hsp27 and Hsp70. These data suggest that MAP kinases regulate Hsp 27 and Hsp70; moreover, caveolae-mediated regulation of heat shock protein expression may be important in the pathophysiology of vesicant-induced skin toxicity.

  9. Copolymerization Studies of Vinyl Chloride and Vinyl Acetate with Ethylene Using a Transition-Metal Catalyst

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goddard III, William A.

    monomers with polar functionality (such as vinyl acetate (VA), vinyl chloride (VC), and acrylates).1 OverCopolymerization Studies of Vinyl Chloride and Vinyl Acetate with Ethylene Using a Transition-Flory constants were identical (0.81) for the ethylene homopolymerizations and the ethylene/vinyl chloride

  10. Microbial reductive dehalogenation of vinyl chloride

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Spormann, Alfred M. (Stanford, CA); Muller, Jochen A. (Baltimore, MD); Rosner, Bettina M. (Berlin, DE); Von Abendroth, Gregory (Nannhein, DE); Meshulam-Simon, Galit (Los Altos, CA); McCarty, Perry L (Stanford, CA)

    2011-11-22T23:59:59.000Z

    Compositions and methods are provided that relate to the bioremediation of chlorinated ethenes, particularly the bioremediation of vinyl chloride by Dehalococcoides-like organisms. An isolated strain of bacteria, Dehalococcoides sp. strain VS, that metabolizes vinyl chloride is provided; the genetic sequence of the enzyme responsible for vinyl chloride dehalogenation; methods of assessing the capability of endogenous organisms at an environmental site to metabolize vinyl chloride; and a method of using the strains of the invention for bioremediation.

  11. Microbial reductive dehalogenation of vinyl chloride

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Spormann, Alfred M [Stanford, CA; Muller, Jochen A [Baltimore, MD; Rosner, Bettina M [Berlin, DE; Von Abendroth, Gregory [Mannheim, DE; Meshulam-Simon, Galit [Los Angeles, CA; McCarty, Perry L [Stanford, CA

    2014-02-11T23:59:59.000Z

    Compositions and methods are provided that relate to the bioremediation of chlorinated ethenes, particularly the bioremediation of vinyl chloride by Dehalococcoides-like organisms. An isolated strain of bacteria, Dehalococcoides sp. strain VS, that metabolizes vinyl chloride is provided; the genetic sequence of the enzyme responsible for vinyl chloride dehalogenation; methods of assessing the capability of endogenous organisms at an environmental site to metabolize vinyl chloride; and a method of using the strains of the invention for bioremediation.

  12. Guidance Document Carcinogenic Substances

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mustard gas (bis(2-chloroethyl)sulfide) Formaldehyde (gas) Vinyl chloride Acetaldehyde Carbon tetrachloride 1,4-Dioxane Chloroform Ethyl carbamate (uret 3-Chloro-2-methylpropene Hexamethylphosphor 1

  13. Rheology of silicon carbide/vinyl ester nanocomposites

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yong, Virginia; Hahn, H. Thomas

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    New York, 1999. SILICON CARBIDE/VINYL ESTER NANOCOMPOSITESRheology of Silicon Carbide/Vinyl Ester NanocompositesABSTRACT: Silicon carbide (SiC) nanoparticles with no

  14. Beam damage of poly(2-chloroethyl methylacrylate) [PCEMA] films...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    evaluating x-ray damage. PCEMA has been shown to be more sensitive to degradation than PVC which has also been used as a damage sensitive material useful for comparison of damage...

  15. analog 2-chloroethyl ethyl: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    de 170 High Purity Ethyl Acetate Production with a Batch Reactive Distillation Column using Dynamic Optimization Strategy CiteSeer Summary: AbstractEthyl acetate with the...

  16. 4-Vinyl-, 4-vinyl-, and 4'-vinyl-2,2':6',2''-terpyridinyl ligands: their synthesis and the electrochemistry of their transition-metal coordination complexes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Potts, K.T.; Usifer, D.A.; Guadalupe, A.; Abruna, H.D.

    1987-06-24T23:59:59.000Z

    4'-Vinyl-2,2':6',2''-terpyridinyl was conveniently prepared from 2-acetylpyridine via -oxoketene dithioacetal methodology, the intermediate 4'-(methylthio)-2,2':6',2''-terpyridinyl being converted into the corresponding 4'-methyl derivative with methylmagnesium bromide and bis(triphenylphosphino)nickel(II) dichloride followed by generation of the methyl anion with lithium tetramethylpiperidide, reaction of the anion with chloromethyl methyl ether, and introduction of the vinyl group by treatment of the ether with potassium tert-butoxide/THF. Analogous reactions led to the 4-vinyl- and 6-vinyl isomers by using the appropriate methyl-substituted 2-acetylpyridine except that in these instances desulfurization of the 4'-methylthio group with nickel boride was an addition step. These vinyl-substituted ligands formed a variety of readily electropolymerizable simple and mixed-ligand complex monomers with cobalt, ruthenium, and iron with polymerization rates whose magnitude varied with position and number of vinyl substituents.

  17. Process for the preparation of vinyl acetate

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Tustin, Gerald Charles (Kingsport, TN); Zoeller, Joseph Robert (Kingsport, TN); Depew, Leslie Sharon (Kingsport, TN)

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This invention pertains to the preparation of vinyl acetate by contacting within a contact zone a mixture of ketene and acetaldehyde with an acid catalyst at about one bar pressure and between about 85.degree. and 200.degree. C. and removing the reaction products from the contact zone.

  18. Process for the preparation of vinyl acetate

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Tustin, G.C.; Zoeller, J.R.; Depew, L.S.

    1998-02-17T23:59:59.000Z

    This invention pertains to the preparation of vinyl acetate by contacting within a contact zone a mixture of ketene and acetaldehyde with an acid catalyst at about one bar pressure and between about 85 and 200 C and removing the reaction products from the contact zone.

  19. Research Needs: Glass Solar Reflectance and Vinyl Siding

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hart, Robert

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    vinyl- sunlight.html. Certainteed. 2005. “PVC Capstockon PVC Substrate. ” Material Safety Data Sheet MSDS Number:2010. “Overview of materials for PVC, Rigid Grade. ” http://

  20. Reduction of Vinyl Chloride in Metallic Iron-Water Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Deng, Baolin

    Reduction of Vinyl Chloride in Metallic Iron-Water Systems B A O L I N D E N G * Department to groundwater and soil contamination. In particular, VC can be produced as an intermediate in the reductive). Remediation of groundwater contaminated with chlori- nated ethylenes, including vinyl chloride, has been chal

  1. VINYL CHLORIDE ACUTE TOXICITY THRESHOLDS IN THE CONTEXT OF CONTROLLING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    . The "irreversible effects threshold" is the maximum concentration of pollutant in the air for a given exposure timeVINYL CHLORIDE ACUTE TOXICITY THRESHOLDS IN THE CONTEXT OF CONTROLLING URBAN DEVELOPMENT OR LAND of vinyl Chloride , the french procedure to set acute toxicity thresholds in the context of controlling

  2. Beam damage of poly(vinyl chloride) [PVC] as observed by x-ray...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    damage of poly(vinyl chloride) PVC as observed by x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy at 143 K, 303 K and 373 K. Beam damage of poly(vinyl chloride) PVC as observed by x-ray...

  3. Beam Damage of Poly(Vinyl Chloride) [PVC] Film as Observed by...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Damage of Poly(Vinyl Chloride) PVC Film as Observed by X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy. Beam Damage of Poly(Vinyl Chloride) PVC Film as Observed by X-ray Photoelectron...

  4. Research Needs: Glass Solar Reflectance and Vinyl Siding

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hart, Robert; Curcija, Charlie; Arasteh, Dariush; Goudey, Howdy; Kohler, Christian; Selkowitz, Stephen

    2011-07-07T23:59:59.000Z

    The subject of glass solar reflectance and its contribution to permanent vinyl siding distortion has not been extensively studied, and some phenomena are not yet well understood. This white paper presents what is known regarding the issue and identifies where more research is needed. Three primary topics are discussed: environmental factors that control the transfer of heat to and from the siding surface; vinyl siding properties that may affect heat build-up and permanent distortion; and factors that determine the properties of reflected solar radiation from glass surfaces, including insulating window glass. Further research is needed to fully characterize the conditions associated with siding distortion, the scope of the problem, physical properties of vinyl siding, insulating window glass reflection characteristics, and possible mitigation or prevention strategies.

  5. Reactor-chromatographic determination of vinyl chloride in polyvinyl chloride

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Berezkin, V.G.

    1986-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The authors carry out a chromatographic study of the volatile products that evolve when various grades of domestic polyvinyl chloride are heated, to determine the concentration of residual monomer. To find vinyl chloride in complex mixtures of air pollutants the authors used sorptive reaction concentration of impurities. This new combination of methods is based on preliminary separation at the sampling stage of impurities that interfere in the analysis, followed by concentration of the desired components in a trap with an adsorbent, and chromatographic determination of the concentrated trace materials. The method obtains low vinyl chloride concentrations (down to 10/sup -4/-10/sup -5/ wt. %) with +/-5 relative error.

  6. Research Needs: Glass Solar Reflectance and Vinyl Siding

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    .S. for residential buildings. To meet IECC's U-factor and solar heat gain coefficient (SHGC) requirements insulatingLBNL-5022E Research Needs: Glass Solar Reflectance and Vinyl Siding Authors: R. Hart*, C. Curcija of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would

  7. Beam damage of poly(2-chloroethyl methylacrylate) [PCEMA] films as observed

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsruc DocumentationP-Series to someone6 M. Babzien, I. Ben-Zvi, P. StudyBeam Historyby x-ray

  8. ORIGINAL PAPER Natural Fiber Reinforced Poly(vinyl chloride) Composites: Effect

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ORIGINAL PAPER Natural Fiber Reinforced Poly(vinyl chloride) Composites: Effect of Fiber Type Science+Business Media, LLC 2008 Abstract Poly(vinyl chloride) (PVC) and natural fiber composites were copolymer on composite properties was investigated. Mechanical analysis showed that storage modulus

  9. Vinyl chloride monomer and other contaminants in PVC welding fumes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Williamson, J.; Kavanagh, B.

    1987-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An investigation into the nature of fumes produced during thermal welding of plasticized PVC sheeting has been carried out with the objective of determining if the known carcinogen vinyl chloride monomer (VCM) is formed and to assess the level of exposure to the operator. The results show that the atmospheric concentrations of VCM are well below accepted occupational exposure limits. This finding is consistent with reports in the technical literature which suggest that VCM is produced during thermal degradation of PVC only at temperatures considerably higher than those encountered during plastic welding.

  10. Degradation of Vinyl Chloride and 1,2-Dichloroethane by Advanced Reduction Processes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liu, Xu

    2013-07-27T23:59:59.000Z

    A new treatment technology, called Advanced Reduction Process (ARP), was developed by combining UV irradiation with reducing reagents to produce highly reactive species that degrade contaminants rapidly. Vinyl chloride (VC) and 1,2-dichloroethane (1...

  11. Electron Beam Damage in Poly(Vinyl Chloride) and Poly(Acrylonitrile...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Electron Spectroscopy. Abstract: AES spectra of spun-cast films of poly(vinyl chloride) (PVC) and poly(acrylonitrile) (PAN) were collected over a period of time to determine...

  12. Pour-depressant activity of copolymers of ethylene with vinyl acetate in diesel fuel

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dushechkin, A.P.; Ivanov, V.I.; Elagin, A.L.; Levin, A.A.

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The authors investigate the influence of the degree of branching of the ethylene-vinyl acetate copolymers (EVAC) on the limiting filterability temperature and the solid point of diesel fuels. EVAC samples with identical contents of vinyl acetate and having a molecular weight of 4500-7200 were used. The pour-depressant activity of the copolymers was determined in diesel fuel. It is shown that the degree of branching of EVAC has a substantial influence on the depressant activity in diesel fuel.

  13. Cohort and case-control analyses of workers exposed to vinyl chloride: An update

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wu, W.A.; Steenland, K.; Brown, D.; Wells, V.; Jones, J.; Schulte, P.; Halperin, W.

    1989-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The mortality in a cohort of workers at a vinyl chloride polymerization plant has been updated, extending the period of observation in the original study from 1974 to 1986. Workers at this plant may have been exposed to vinyl chloride monomer and/or polyvinyl chloride dust, or may have had no exposure to either substance. Seventy-six percent of the work force worked in jobs with potential exposure to vinyl chloride monomer. Among the total cohort, statistically significant excess risks were observed for liver, lung, and brain cancer. For the subcohort of workers exposed to vinyl chloride monomer, the standardized mortality ratio (SMR) for liver cancer was 333 (90% confidence interval (CI) 202 to 521). However, there were no significant excesses of either brain (SMR = 145, 90% CI 78 to 249) or lung cancer (SMR = 115, 90% CI 96 to 141). To investigate dose response, nested case-control studies for liver, brain, and lung cancer were conducted among the total cohort (including the nonexposed). For these studies there were two exposure variables, cumulative dose of vinyl chloride monomer and cumulative dose of polyvinyl chloride dust. Cumulative dose was defined as the product of level and duration of exposure. The only significant association between disease risk and cumulative dose was for liver cancer and cumulative dose of vinyl chloride monomer. Further division of the liver cancers into angiosarcoma (n = 12) and other liver cancers (n = 7), based on review of death certificates and medical records, showed that the dose response existed only for angiosarcomas.

  14. Ethylene-Vinyl Acetate Potential Problems for Photovoltaic Packaging

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kempe, M. D.; Jorgensen, G. J.; Terwilliger, K. M.; McMahon, T. J.; Kennedy, C. E.; Borek, T. T.

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Photovoltaic (PV) devices are typically encapsulated using ethylene-vinyl acetate (EVA) to provide mechanical support, optical coupling, electrical isolation, and protection against environmental exposure. Under exposure to atmospheric water and/or ultraviolet radiation, EVA will decompose to produce acetic acid, lowering the pH and increasing the surface corrosion rates of embedded devices. Even though acetic acid is produced at a very slow rate, it may not take much to catalyze reactions that lead to rapid module deterioration. Another consideration is that the glass transition of EVA, as measured using dynamic mechanical analysis, begins at temperatures of about -15 degC. Temperatures lower than this can be reached for extended periods of time in some climates. Because of increased moduli below the glass transition temperature, a module may be more vulnerable to damage if a mechanical load is applied by snow or wind at low temperatures. Modules using EVA should not be rated for use at such low temperatures without additional low-temperature mechanical testing beyond the scope of UL1703.

  15. Ethylene-Vinyl Acetate Potential Problems for Photovoltaic Packaging: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kempe, M. D.; Jorgensen, G. J.; Terwilliger, K. M.; McMahon, T. J.; Kennedy, C. E.; Borek, T. T.

    2006-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Photovoltaic (PV) devices are typically encapsulated using ethylene-vinyl acetate (EVA) to provide mechanical support, optical coupling, electrical isolation, and protection against environmental exposure. Under exposure to atmospheric water and/or ultraviolet radiation, EVA will decompose to produce acetic acid, lowering the pH and increasing the surface corrosion rates of embedded devices. Even though acetic acid is produced at a very slow rate, it may not take much to catalyze reactions that lead to rapid module deterioration. Another consideration is that the glass transition of EVA, as measured using dynamic mechanical analysis, begins at temperatures of about ?15 C. Temperatures lower than this can be reached for extended periods of time in some climates. Because of increased moduli below the glass transition temperature, a module may be more vulnerable to damage if a mechanical load is applied by snow or wind at low temperatures. Modules using EVA should not be rated for use at such low temperatures without additional low-temperature mechanical testing beyond the scope of UL 1703.

  16. Room Temperature Copper(II)-Catalyzed Oxidative Cyclization of Enamides to 2,5-Disubstituted Oxazoles via Vinylic C–H Functionalization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cheung, Chi Wai

    A copper(II)-catalyzed oxidative cyclization of enamides to oxazoles via vinylic C–H bond functionalization at room temperature is described. Various 2,5-disubstituted oxazoles bearing aryl, vinyl, alkyl, and heteroaryl ...

  17. Hot Pin Welding of Thin Poly(vinyl chloride) Sheet James D. Van de Ven, Arthur G. Erdman

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Van de Ven, James D.

    Hot Pin Welding of Thin Poly(vinyl chloride) Sheet James D. Van de Ven, Arthur G. Erdman Mechanical of welding two thin sheets of poly(vinyl chloride) (PVC) with a heated pin, thus allowing construction of a relationship between the weld temperature and weld strength. Constructing a relationship between weld strength

  18. Structural and electronic properties of poly(vinyl alcohol) using density functional theory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dabhi, Shweta, E-mail: shwetadabhi1190@gmail.com; Jha, Prafulla K., E-mail: shwetadabhi1190@gmail.com [Department of Physics, Maharaja Krishnakumasinhji Bhavnagar University, Bhavnagar-364001 (India)

    2014-04-24T23:59:59.000Z

    The first principles calculations have been carried out to investigate the structural, electronic band structure density of states along with the projected density of states for poly(vinyl alcohol). Our structural calculation suggests that the poly(vinyl alcohol) exhibits monoclinic structure. The calculated structural lattice parameters are in excellent agreement with available experimental values. The band structure calculations reveal that the direct and indirect band gaps are 5.55 eV and 5.363 eV respectively in accordance with experimental values.

  19. Transition-metal pi-complexes of vinyl alcohol: platinum and palladium

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ori, Masaru

    1971-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of acetylacetonato- chl oro(n-vinyl alcohol) platinum( I I ) in d -tetrahydrofuran 8 17 19 21 23 Page Figure 9 Figure 10 Figure 11 Figure 12 Geometry of the methyl groups of acetylacetonatochloro(olefin)- platinum(II) with respect to the olefin ligand...~( Pl H H C-O C~ HsC HO H I CI 2210 IGG IOGI IM 17W INO . 500 IOG 1100 WO ENUNOEO ON I Figure 1 Ir spectrum of acetyl acetonatochl oro(n-vinyl alcohol)platinum(II) Nujol mull between CsI plates Beckman IR12 3. 0 35 4P MICRONS 5P 6. 0 7. 0 8. 0...

  20. Kinetic and spectroscopic studies of vinyl acetate synthesis over Pd(100)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goodman, Wayne

    ,b , M.S. Chena , and D.W. Goodmana, * a Department of Chemistry, Texas A&M University, P.O. Box 30012 for the production of polymers such as, polyvinyl acetate and vinyl acetate copolymers [1]. Currently, VA), For XPS analysis, Mg­Karadiation (300 W, pass energy 58.7 eV) was used, and the spectra referenced

  1. Simultaneous measurement of laser reflection and transmission of poly,,vinyl chloride...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Van de Ven, James D.

    , unpigmented state are highly transmissive of light in the near-infrared range, al- lowing laser transmissionSimultaneous measurement of laser reflection and transmission of poly,,vinyl chloride... James D reflection, emphasizing the light transmitted through a material. This paper presents work creating a low

  2. Near-Infrared Laser Absorption of Poly(vinyl chloride) at Elevated Temperatures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Van de Ven, James D.

    Near-Infrared Laser Absorption of Poly(vinyl chloride) at Elevated Temperatures James D. Van de Ven, unpigmented state are highly transmissive of light in the near-infrared range, thus allowing laser of light detection [2, 3]. Within the near-infrared region nat- ural polymers have nearly no absorption [2

  3. Palladium-Catalyzed Enantioselective ?-Arylation and ?-Vinylation of Oxindoles Facilitated by an Axially Chiral P-Stereogenic Ligand

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Taylor, Alexander M.

    The enantioselective ?-arylation and ?-vinylation of oxindoles catalyzed by Pd and a biarylmonophosphine ligand with both axial and phosphorus-based chirogenicity is reported. The resultant quaternary carbon stereocenters ...

  4. Effect of composite microstructure on electrical and mechanical properties of poly(vinyl acetate) composites with carbon black and clay.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Miriyala, Sethu M.

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The electrical and mechanical behavior of carbon black filled poly(vinyl acetate) latex-based and solution-based polymer composites was examined. A set of experiments were performed to distinguish composites with a segregated network (emulsion...

  5. The effect of temperature and relative humidity levels upon charcoal tube sampling for vinyl choloride

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McCaskill, Gerald Daniel

    1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    their cooperation, this research would not have been possible. I also wish to express my appreciation to the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health which prov ided an educational grant. DEDICATION To Ann, Your love, words of encouragement... of their employees from angiosarcoma to prolonged vinyl chloride monomer (UCM) exposure. (I) The government immediately stepped in, and by Febr uary 1974, the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) had issued a set of recommendations...

  6. Evaluation of the association between birth defects and exposure to ambient vinyl chloride

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Theriault, G.; Iturra, H.; Gingras, S.

    1983-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Birth defects incidence for infants born to residents of Shawinigan, Canada in 1966-1979 were significantly higher than in three comparison communities. Since there has been a vinyl chloride polymerization plant in this town since 1943 from which ten cases of angiosarcoma of the liver have been identified, this study explores the possible association between exposure to vinyl chloride monomer (VCM) in ambient air and the occurrence of birth defects in the community. The excess of birth defects fluctuated seasonally in a way that corresponded to changes in VCM concentration in the environment. Mothers who gave birth to malformed children were younger on average in Shawinigan than in the comparison communities. However, there was no excess of still-births in Shawinigan. The excess in birth defects involved most organ systems, and variation in birth-defect rates among school districts could not be accounted for by estimates of VCM in the atmosphere. The occupational and residential histories of parents who gave birth to malformed infants were compared with those of parents of normal infants. The two groups did not differ in occupational exposure or closeness of residence to the vinyl chloride polymerization plant. Some descriptive data from this study raised the hypothesis of an association between VCM in the air and birth defects in the exposed community, but as a whole, within the sample size available, such an association could not be substantiated.

  7. Crystallization in the Thin and Ultrathin Films of Poly(ethylene-vinyl acetate) and Linear Low-Density Polyethylene

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    -Density Polyethylene Y. Wang, S. Ge, M. Rafailovich,*, J. Sokolov, Y. Zou, H. Ade, J. Lu1 ning,§ A. Lustiger, and G(ethylene-vinyl acetate) and linear low-density polyethylene (LLDPE) films spun-cast from the polymer/toluene solutions spherulite to sheaflike ag- gregates in polyethylene thin films at a critical thickness of 400 nm. Scho

  8. Coking phenomena in the pyrolysis of ethylene dichloride into vinyl chloride

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sotowa, Chiaki; Korai, Yozo; Mochida, Isao [Kyushu Univ., Kasuga, Fukuoka (Japan)] [and others

    1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Pyrolysis of ethylene dichloride (EDC) into vinyl chloride (VCM) which is the monomer for polyvinyl chloride, one of the most popular polymers, has been established commercially for quite a time. The process around 500{degrees}C has been proved to give VCM of high purity at very high selectivity about 99% and a reasonable conversion about 50%. However, the coking is a major problem in the long run, requiring decoking treatment every two months. The present paper describes features of carbons produced in the pyrolysis process. Coke of respective features was found in the reactor, the transfer line, the heat exchanger and the rapid quencher. Typical pyrolytic carbon, anisotropic coke produced in the liquid phase, isotropic carbon was produced on the reactor wall as low as 500{degrees}C. The mechanisms for their formation are discussed.

  9. Endovascular Embolization of Visceral Artery Aneurysms with Ethylene-vinyl Alcohol (Onyx): A Case Series

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bratby, M.J.; Lehmann, E.D. [St. George's Hospital, Department of Radiology (United Kingdom); Bottomley, J.; Kessel, D.O.; Nicholson, A.A.; McPherson, S.J. [Leeds Teaching Hospitals NHS Trust, Department of Radiology (United Kingdom); Morgan, R.A.; Belli, A.-M. [St. George's Hospital, Department of Radiology (United Kingdom)], E-mail: Anna.Belli@stgeorges.nhs.uk

    2006-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We report the application of the liquid embolic agent ethylene-vinyl alcohol (Onyx; MicroTherapeutics, Irvine, CA, USA) in the management of visceral artery aneurysms. The technique and indications for using Onyx are discussed with emphasis on the management of wide-necked aneurysms and maintenance of patency of the parent vessel. None of the cases was considered suitable for stent-grafting or embolization with conventional agents. Two aneurysms of the renal artery bifurcation and one aneurysm of the inferior pancreaticoduodenal artery were treated. Following treatment there was complete exclusion of all aneurysms. There was no evidence of end-organ infarction. Follow-up with intervals up to 6 months has shown sustained aneurysm exclusion. Onyx is known to be effective in the management of intracranial aneurysms. Our experience demonstrates the efficacy and applicability of the use of Onyx in the treatment of complex visceral artery aneurysms.

  10. Plug repairs of marine glass fiber / vinyl ester laminates subjected to in-plane shear stress or in-plane bending moment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Urrutia Valenzuela, Roberto

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Glass fiber / vinyl ester composite laminates represent an important class of modem fiber composites being proposed or used in state-of-the-art shipbuilding. This thesis examined the effectiveness of chopped strand mat ...

  11. Procedures for Harvesting tissue for Genotyping with SolCAP Vinyl mesh (not metal) screen from local hardware store cut in plate size rectangles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Douches, David S.

    Procedures for Harvesting tissue for Genotyping with SolCAP Supplies: Vinyl mesh (not metal) screen (Fisher part# 14-387-90) 1 quart Ziploc bags Silca: Fisher part# s161-212 Procedures 1. Label plate

  12. Potential Problems with Ethylene-Vinyl Acetate for Photovoltaic Packaging (Poster)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kempe, M. D.; Jorgensen, G. J.; Terwilliger, K, M.; McMahon, T. J.; Kennedy, C. E.; Borek, T. T.

    2006-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Photovoltaic (PV) devices are typically encapsulated using ethylene-vinyl acetate (EVA) to provide mechanical support electrical isolation, optical coupling, and protection against environmental exposure. Under exposure to atmospheric water and/or ultraviolet radiation, EVA will decompose to produce acetic acid, lowering the pH and increasing the surface corrosion rates of embedded devices. Even though acetic acid is produced at a very slow rate it may not take much to catalyze reactions that lead to rapid module deterioration. Another consideration is that the glass transition of EVA, as measured using dynamic mechanical analysis, begins at temperatures of about -15 C. Temperatures lower than this can be reached for extended periods of time in some climates. Due to increased moduli below the glass transition temperature, a module may be more vulnerable to damage if a mechanical load is applied by snow or wind at low temperatures. Modules using EVA should not be rated for use at such low temperatures without additional low-temperature mechanical testing beyond the scope of UL 1703.

  13. Mechanisms, Chemistry, and Kinetics of Anaerobic Biodegradation of cis-Dichloroethene and Vinyl Chloride

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McCarty, P.L.; Spormann, A.M.

    2000-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Anaerobic biological processes can result in PCE and TCE destruction through conversion to cis-dichloroethene (cDCE) then to vinyl chloride (VC), and finally to ethene. Here, the chlorinated aliphatic hydrocarbons (CAHs) serve as electron acceptors in energy metabolism, requiring electron donors such as hydrogen from an external source. The purpose of this study was to learn more about the biochemistry of cDCE and VC conversion to ethene, to better understand the requirements for electron donors, and to determine factors affecting the rates of CAH degradation and organism growth. The biochemistry of reductive dehalogenation of VC was studied with an anaerobic mixed culture enriched on VC. In other studies on electron donor needs for dehalogenation of cDCE and VC, competition for hydrogen was found to occur between the dehalogenators and other microorganisms such as methanogens and homoacetogens in a benzoate-acclimated dehalogenating methanogenic mixed culture. Factors affecting the relative rates of destruction of the solvents and their intermediate products were evaluated. Studies using a mixed PCE-dehalogenating culture as well as the VC enrichment for biochemical studies suggested that the same species was involved in both cDCE and VC dechlorination, and that cDCE and VC competitively inhibited each other's dechlorination rate.

  14. Effect of solvents on the radiation-induced polymerization of ethyl and isopropyl vinyl ethers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hsieh, W.C.

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The effect of solvents on the radiation-induced cationic polymerization of ethyl and isopropyl vinyl ethers (EVE and IPVE, respectively) was investigated. EVE and IPVE polymerizations were carried out in bulk and in solution under superdry conditions in which polar impurities, especially water, have been reduced to negligible levels. This was accomplished by means of a sodium mirror technique using joint free baked out glass equipment and high vacuum. Plots of the monomer conversions and irradiation times were obtained for EVE and IPVE polymerizations in bulk and in benzene solution at constant monomer concentrations. The monomer concentration dependence of the polymerization rate was studied for EVE polymerization in bulk and in benzene, diethlyl ether, diglyme and methylene chloride, and for IPVE polymerization in bulk and in benzene. Solvent effect on the estimated propagating rate constants was examined for EVE and IPVE polymerization in bulk and in solution. The effect of temperature on the polymerization rate was also investigated for EVE polymerization in bulk ad in benzene, diethyl and diisopropyl ethers, methylene chloride and nitromethane, and for IPVE ploymerization in bulk and in benzene.

  15. Alternate fuels and chemicals from synthesis gas: Vinyl acetate monomer. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Richard D. Colberg; Nick A. Collins; Edwin F. Holcombe; Gerald C. Tustin; Joseph R. Zoeller

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    There has been a long-standing desire on the part of industry and the U.S. Department of Energy to replace the existing ethylene-based vinyl acetate monomer (VAM) process with an entirely synthesis gas-based process. Although there are a large number of process options for the conversion of synthesis gas to VAM, Eastman Chemical Company undertook an analytical approach, based on known chemical and economic principles, to reduce the potential candidate processes to a select group of eight processes. The critical technologies that would be required for these routes were: (1) the esterification of acetaldehyde (AcH) with ketene to generate VAM, (2) the hydrogenation of ketene to acetaldehyde, (3) the hydrogenation of acetic acid to acetaldehyde, and (4) the reductive carbonylation of methanol to acetaldehyde. This report describes the selection process for the candidate processes, the successful development of the key technologies, and the economic assessments for the preferred routes. In addition, improvements in the conversion of acetic anhydride and acetaldehyde to VAM are discussed. The conclusion from this study is that, with the technology developed in this study, VAM may be produced from synthesis gas, but the cost of production is about 15% higher than the conventional oxidative acetoxylation of ethylene, primarily due to higher capital associated with the synthesis gas-based processes.

  16. Free radical production from the interaction of 2-chloroethyl vesicants (mustard gas) with pyridine nucleotide-driven flavoprotein electron transport systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brimfield, A.A. [U.S. Army Medical Research Institute of Chemical Defense, Aberdeen Proving Ground, MD, 21010 (United States)], E-mail: alan.a.brimfield@us.army.mil; Mancebo, A.M. [U.S. Army Medical Research Institute of Chemical Defense, Aberdeen Proving Ground, MD, 21010 (United States); Mason, R.P.; Jiang, J.J.; Siraki, A.G. [Laboratory of Pharmacology and Chemistry, NIEHS, Research Triangle Park, NC, 27709 (United States); Novak, M.J. [Department of Chemistry, Florida Institute of Technology, Melbourne, FL, 32901 (United States)

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The biochemical sequelae to chloroethyl mustard exposure correspond very well to toxic processes initiated by free radicals. Additionally, mustard solutions contain spontaneously formed cyclic onium ions which produce carbon free radicals when reduced electrochemically. Therefore, we hypothesized that the onium ions of sulfur or nitrogen mustards might produce carbon free radicals upon being reduced enzymatically, and that these radicals might constitute a metabolic activation. We set out to document radical production using an in vitro metabolic system and electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR). Our system consisted of NADPH, one of several pyridine nucleotide-driven flavoprotein reductases, cytochrome c as a terminal electron acceptor, various sulfur or nitrogen mustards and the spin trap {alpha}-[4-pyridyl-1-oxide]-N-tert-butylnitrone in buffer. Reactions were started by adding the reductase to the other materials, vortexing and immediately transferring the mixture to a 10 mm EPR flat cell. Repeated scans on a Bruker ESP 300E EPR spectrometer produced a triplet of doublets with hyperfine splitting constants of a{sub N} = 15.483 G and a{sub H} = 2.512 G. The outcome supported our hypothesis that carbon-centered free radicals are produced when mustard-related onium ions are enzymatically reduced. The EPR results varied little with the chloroethyl compound used or with porcine or human cytochrome P450 reductase, the reductase domain of rat brain neuronal nitric oxide synthase or rat liver thioredoxin reductase. Our results offer new insight into the basis for mustard-induced vesication and the outcome of exposure to different mustards. The free radical model provides an explanation for similarities in the lesions arising from mustard exposure and energy-based lesions such as those from heat, ultraviolet and nuclear radiation as well as damage across tissue types such as skin, eyes or airway epithelium.

  17. Synthesis and characterization of redox polymers of (M(4-vinyl-4 prime -methyl-2,2 prime -bipyridine) sub 3 )(PF sub 6 ) sub 2 (M = Ru, Os)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bommarito, S.L.; Lowery-Bretz, S.P.; Abruna, H.D. (Cornell Univ., Ithaca, NY (United States))

    1992-02-05T23:59:59.000Z

    The authors have prepared polymers of (M(vbpy){sub 3}(PF{sub 6}){sub 2}) (M = Ru, Os) (vbpy = 4-vinyl-4{prime}-methyl-2,2{prime}-bipyridine) in solution via free-radical polymerization and fractionated them according to molecular weight using size exclusion chromatography. Different fractions have been characterized by electrochemical and spectroscopic means. The authors find that whereas for the osmium containing polymers the relative polymer size varies in proportion to the number of vinyl groups consumed during the polymerization reaction, the same is not true for the analogous ruthenium polymers. In addition, the emission energy of both the ruthenium and osmium polymers is also related to the concentration of residual vinyl groups in the polymer. Upon polymerization, there is a shift in the emission toward higher energies. Electrochemically determined diffusion coefficients are consistent with the relative size of the various fractions.

  18. Ionization and dissociation dynamics of vinyl bromide probed by femtosecond extreme ultraviolet transient absorption spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lin, Ming-Fu; Neumark, Daniel M. [Ultrafast X-ray Science Laboratory, Chemical Sciences Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States) [Ultrafast X-ray Science Laboratory, Chemical Sciences Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Department of Chemistry, University of California, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Gessner, Oliver [Ultrafast X-ray Science Laboratory, Chemical Sciences Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States)] [Ultrafast X-ray Science Laboratory, Chemical Sciences Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Leone, Stephen R. [Ultrafast X-ray Science Laboratory, Chemical Sciences Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States) [Ultrafast X-ray Science Laboratory, Chemical Sciences Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Department of Chemistry, University of California, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Department of Physics, University of California, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States)

    2014-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Strong-field induced ionization and dissociation dynamics of vinyl bromide, CH{sub 2}=CHBr, are probed using femtosecond extreme ultraviolet (XUV) transient absorption spectroscopy. Strong-field ionization is initiated with an intense femtosecond, near infrared (NIR, 775 nm) laser field. Femtosecond XUV pulses covering the photon energy range of 50-72 eV probe the subsequent dynamics by measuring the time-dependent spectroscopic features associated with transitions of the Br (3d) inner-shell electrons to vacancies in molecular and atomic valence orbitals. Spectral signatures are observed for the depletion of neutral C{sub 2}H{sub 3}Br, the formation of C{sub 2}H{sub 3}Br{sup +} ions in their ground (X{sup ~}) and first excited (A{sup ~}) states, the production of C{sub 2}H{sub 3}Br{sup ++} ions, and the appearance of neutral Br ({sup 2}P{sub 3/2}) atoms by dissociative ionization. The formation of free Br ({sup 2}P{sub 3/2}) atoms occurs on a timescale of 330 ± 150 fs. The ionic A{sup ~} state exhibits a time-dependent XUV absorption energy shift of ?0.4 eV within the time window of the atomic Br formation. The yield of Br atoms correlates with the yield of parent ions in the A{sup ~} state as a function of NIR peak intensity. The observations suggest that a fraction of vibrationally excited C{sub 2}H{sub 3}Br{sup +} (A{sup ~}) ions undergoes intramolecular vibrational energy redistribution followed by the C–Br bond dissociation. The C{sub 2}H{sub 3}Br{sup +} (X{sup ~}) products and the majority of the C{sub 2}H{sub 3}Br{sup ++} ions are relatively stable due to a deeper potential well and a high dissociation barrier, respectively. The results offer powerful new insights about orbital-specific electronic processes in high field ionization, coupled vibrational relaxation and dissociation dynamics, and the correlation of valence hole-state location and dissociation in polyatomic molecules, all probed simultaneously by ultrafast table-top XUV spectroscopy.

  19. Nonlinear optical properties of ZnO/poly (vinyl alcohol) nanocomposite films

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jeeju, P. P., E-mail: jeejupp@gmail.com [Department of Physics, S N M College, Maliankara, Ernakulam, Kerala (India); Jayalekshmi, S., E-mail: jayalekshmi@cusat.ac.in [Division for Research in Advanced Materials, Department of Physics, Cochin University of Science and Technology, Kochi 682 022 (India); Chandrasekharan, K. [Department of Physics, National Institute of Technology, Calicut, Kerala (India)

    2014-01-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Extensive studies have already been reported on the optical characteristics of ZnO/polymer nanocomposite films, using a variety of polymers including transparent polymers such as polystyrene, polymethyl methacrylate etc and many interesting results have been established regarding the non linear optical characteristics of these systems. Poly (vinyl alcohol)(PVA) is a water soluble polymer. Though the structural and optical studies of ZnO/PVA nanocomposite films have already been investigated, there are no detailed reports on the nonlinear optical characteristics of ZnO/PVA nanocomposite films, irrespective of the fact that these nanocomposite films can be synthesized using quite easy and cost effective methods. The present work is an attempt to study in detail the nonlinear optical behaviour of ZnO/PVA nanocomposite films using Z-scan technique. Highly transparent ZnO/PVA nanocomposite films were prepared from the ZnO incorporated PVA solution in water using spin coating technique. The ZnO nanoparticles were synthesized by the simple chemical route at room temperature. High-resolution transmission electron microscopy studies show that the ZnO nanoparticles are of size around 10 nm. The ZnO/PVA nanocomposite films were structurally characterized by X-ray diffraction technique, from which the presence of both PVA and ZnO in the nanocomposite was established. The optical absorptive nonlinearity in the nanocomposite films was investigated using open aperture Z-scan technique. The results indicate optical limiting type nonlinearity in the films due to two photon absorption in ZnO with efficiency more than 50%. These films also show a self defocusing type negative nonlinear refraction in closed aperture Z-scan experiment. The present studies indicate that, highly transparent and homogeneous films of ZnO/PVA nanocomposite can be obtained on glass substrates using simple methods, in a highly cost effective way, since PVA is water soluble. These nanocomposite films offer prospects of application as efficient optical limiters to protect light sensitive devices from the possible damage on exposure to high intensity radiation.

  20. 3 Micro-mechanics based derivation of the materials constitutive 4 relations for carbon-nanotube reinforced poly-vinyl-ester-epoxy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grujicic, Mica

    , carbon nanotube-reinforced polymer-ma- 45trix composite) materials have spurred considerable 46interest relations for carbon-nanotube reinforced poly-vinyl-ester-epoxy 5 based composites 6 Mica Grujicic Y. P. Sun mechanical reinforcements for 59lightweight composite systems. However, the material 60and the processing

  1. The formation of PdCx over Pd-based catalysts in vapor-phase vinyl acetate synthesis: does a PdAu alloy catalyst resist carbide formation?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goodman, Wayne

    ­Au alloy catalyst resist carbide formation? Y.-F. Han, D. Kumar, C. Sivadinarayana, A. Clearfield, and D October 2003; accepted 24 February 2004 The formation of Pd carbide (PdCx) during the synthesis of vinyl­Au/SiO2; XRD. 1. Introduction The formation of carbides over supported Pd catalysts was first reported

  2. Development of a copper-catalyzed amidation-base-promoted cyclization sequence for the synthesis of 2-aryl- and 2-vinyl1-4 quinolones

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jones, Carrie Preston

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A direct two-step method for the preparation of 2-aryl- and 2-vinyl-4-quinolones that utilizes a copper-catalyzed amidation of ortho-halophenones followed by a base-promoted Camps cyclization of the resulting N-(2-keto-aryl)amides ...

  3. Journal of Materials Science, 2012, 47(14): p. 5596-5604 Thermal expansion behavior of hollow glass particle/vinyl ester composites

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gupta, Nikhil

    with the addition of glass microballoons for the twelve compositions of syntactic foams characterized using glass particle/vinyl ester composites Vasanth Chakravarthy Shunmugasamy, Dinesh Pinisetty and Nikhil filled composites (syntactic foams), the coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE) can be controlled by two

  4. Osha`s 1974 vinyl chloride standard. Retrospective evaluation of the rulemaking`s feasibility/impact estimates. Case study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boroush, M.A.

    1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report documents a case study of the Occupational Safety and Health Administration`s (OSHA) permanent health standard of 1974 for workplace exposures to vinyl chloride (monomer). OSHA`s assessment of hazard control options and estimates of compliance costs and other regulatory impacts prepared as part of the rationale for the rulemaking are reviewed and then compared and contrasted with the actual post-promulgation outcomes as affected industries adjusted to the new compliance requirements. This case study has been prepared as part of a larger Office of Technology Assessment (OTA) evaluation of the control technology and regulatory impact analyses that OSHA prepares to support its rulemakings. Congress requested in May 1992 that OTA examine OSHA`s procedures and methods in these regards. The case reported here is one of eight OSHA health and safety standards that have been similarly studied on a pre- and post-promulgation basis.

  5. Mortality and cancer morbidity in workers exposed to low levels of vinyl chloride monomer at a polyvinyl chloride processing plant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hagmar, L.; Akesson, B.; Nielsen, J.; Andersson, C.; Linden, K.; Attewell, R.; Moeller, T. (University Hospital, Lund (Sweden))

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    To study whether exposure to low levels of vinyl chloride monomer (VCM) causes increased risk for cancer morbidity and death from ischemic heart disease, a cohort study was performed among 2,031 male workers at a polyvinyl chloride (PVC) processing plant who had been employed for at least 3 months during the period 1945-1980. An almost significantly increased total mortality (SMR = 116, 95% CI 99-136) was found. Deaths caused by violence or intoxication were significantly increased (SMR = 153, 95% CI 109-213), but not deaths from ischemic heart disease (SMR = 100, 95% CI 73-135). A significant increase in total cancer morbidity was observed (SMR = 128, 95% CI 101-161). Respiratory cancers were significantly increased (SMR = 213, 95% CI 127-346). Furthermore, six brain tumors (vs. 2.6 expected) were observed. This increase, however, was not significant (SMR = 229, 95% CI 84-498). No liver hemangiosarcoma was observed. Applying a latency period of greater than or equal to 10 years from start of employment did not change the risk patterns. There were no significant exposure-response associations between exposure estimates for VCM, asbestos, and plasticizers and cancer morbidity.

  6. Study of vinyl chloride formation at landfill sites in California. Final report, 16 July 1985-15 January 1987

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Molton, P.M.; Hallen, R.T.; Payne, J.W.

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this study was to determine if vinyl chloride (VC) detected in air above California landfills is produced in situ. Experiments were performed with N and S California landfill samples and anaerobic-digestor sewage sludge. Test materials were incubated with various chlorocarbons and with /sup 13/C-trichloroethylene (TCE) to confirm biological production of /sup 13/C-VC. These experiments confirmed the biological dechlorination of chloroethylenes as the most likely route for VC emission from landfills, rather than chemical or photochemical routes, or PVC degradation. Leaching from PVC could be a minor source of VC, though there was less than 0.1% (estimated) plastic in the landfill samples, containing at most 330 ppm of VC monomer. A landfill sample known to produce VC was used to start an anaerobic chemostat using methanol as sole carbon source. The enriched culture resulting was homogeneous, and when incubated with /sup 13/C-TCE, produced (13)C-VC, confirmed by GC/MS.

  7. Reactive Surfaces and Interfaces utilizing 2-Vinyl-4,4-Dimethylazlactone (VDMA): An Example of ??Click?? Chemistry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Messman, Jamie M [ORNL; Kilbey, II, S Michael [ORNL; Lokitz, Bradley S [ORNL; Hinestrosa Salazar, Juan Pablo [Clemson University; Ankner, John Francis [ORNL

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Creating polymer-modified interfaces decorated with biologically-relevant materials V so-called bio-interfaces V with precise control over the nanoscale structure and properties is of increasing technological importance for a large number of advanced materials applications, including adaptive and/or lubricious biomaterial coatings, electro-actuators (synthetic muscles), biosensors with amplified response, coatings for stealth drug delivery, supports for enzymatic catalysts, protein or antibody arrays, and high affinity separation agents. The ability to design and decorate interfaces with biologically-relevant molecules and understand synthesis-structure-function relationships remains a significant challenge. The overarching objective of this research program is to investigate the polymerization and functionalization of a new class of polymeric materials that are capable of serving as a versatile platform from which bio-interfaces for specific applications can be created and evaluated. Stimuli-responsive (co)polymers containing vinyl dimethyl azlactone (VDMA) have been prepared using free radical polymerization techniques (controlled and conventional). Subsequent immobilization of biomolecules (e.g., dansylcadaverine, N ,N -bis(carboxymethyl)-L-lysine hydrate) on PVDMA-containing surface scaffolds affords bio-interfaces. Reaction of nucleophiles with the azlactone moiety proceeds rapidly, quantitatively, and in the absence of byproducts, which are essential criteria governing the click-type nature of this procedure. The conversion of these materials into polyelectrolytes and bioconjugates can be monitored in real-time using infrared spectroscopy. Additionally, pVDMA polymers prepared using reversible addition fragmentation chain transfer (RAFT) polymerization are the basis for creating polymer brushes by a grafting to approach. We will describe how compositional differences and changes in molecular weight affect the solubility and responsiveness of pVDMA-based polymers and surface layers when functionalized with various biomolecules.

  8. Scanning tunneling microscopy of dimeric and polymeric products of electroreduced (Re(CO) sub 3 (4-vinyl,4 prime -methyl-2,2 prime -bipyridine)Cl)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Snyder, S.R.; White, H.S. (Univ. of Minnesota, Minneapolis (USA)); Lopez, S.; Abruna, H.D. (Cornell Univ., Ithaca, NY (USA))

    1990-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) was used to image adsorbed products resulting from electroreduction of (Re(CO){sub 3}(vbpy)Cl) (vbpy = 4-vinyl,4{prime}-methyl-2,2{prime}-bipyridine) on highly oriented pyrolytic graphite (HOPG). STM images, in air, of HOPG electrodes following electroreduction of (Re(CO){sub 3}(vbpy)Cl) (in acetonitrile/0.1 M tetra-n-butylammonium perchlorate) by cycling the potential between 0 and {minus}2.0 V vs a sodium saturated colomel electrode (SSCE) show molecular species uniformly distributed on the surface including approximately dumbbell shaped molecules ({approx} 40 {times} 20 {angstrom}). The size and shape of these aggregates is consistent with products derived from vinyl-vinvyl coupling of Re-Re bonded dimers: ((vbpy)(CO){sub 3}Re-Re(CO){sub 3}(vbpyH-vbpyH)(CO){sub 3}Re-Re(CO){sub 3}(vbpy)). STM images of electrodes prepared by cycling the potential between 0 and {minus}1.45 V vs SSCE (less reducing conditions) show highly nonuniform coating of the surface by polymer. Several polymer morphologies were observed with polymer nucleation preferentially occurring at step sites on HOPG.

  9. Radiation crosslinking of poly(vinyl chloride) with trimethylolpropanetrimethacrylate. IV. Effect of diundecyl phthalate: dependence of physical properties on composition. [Electron beam ion sources

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bowmer, T.N.; Vroom, W.I.

    1983-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Blends of poly(vinyl chloride)(PVC) with polyfunctional monomers may be crosslinked by ionizing radiation. The physical properties of PVC blended with trimethylolpropanetrimethacrylate (TMPTMA) and diundecyl phthalate (DUP) were studied. The TMPTMA monomer crosslinked the blend by homopolymerization and/or grafting to PVC. The plasticizer, DUP, was chemically inert under irradiation but, by plasticizing the macromolecules and diluting the monomer, changed the kinetics extensively. Characteristics of the glass transitions and the tensile mechanical properties have been correlated with blend composition and radiation dose. Before irradiation, poly(vinyl chloride) was plasticized by both DUP and TMPTMA monomer. The increase in glass transition temperature and mechanical strength following irradiation to 5 Mrad was correlated with the TMPTMA content of the blend. Both the molecular structure of the network and the DUP content of the blend were factors in determining the physical properties of the final crosslinked blend. The molecular structure was determined by the kinetics of the crosslinking reactions, which in turn were determined by the blend composition. A molecular interpretation consistent with the physical properties, chemical kinetics, and mechanism of the crosslinking system has been presented. 24 figures, 2 tables.

  10. Northern Tool + Equipment Find the Right Fitting for Your Pressure Washer at Northern Tool! NorthernTool.com/PressureWashers Pristine Pressure Pressure/power washing in Maryland Vinyl siding cleaned, decks cleaned www.pristinepressure.com

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sóbester, András

    ability to clean while saving on our most important resources, water and energy." In recognition! NorthernTool.com/PressureWashers Pristine Pressure Pressure/power washing in Maryland Vinyl siding cleaned, decks cleaned www.pristinepressure.com Siding Cleaning Bring back the life to your siding! Estimates

  11. European Photovoltaic Solar Energy Conference, Valencia, Spain, 6-10 September 2010, 4AV.3.115 NON-LINEAR MECHANICAL PROPERTIES OF ETHYLENE-VINYL ACETATE (EVA) AND ITS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    25th European Photovoltaic Solar Energy Conference, Valencia, Spain, 6-10 September 2010, 4AV.3,2 1 Institute for Solar Energy Research Hamelin (ISFH), Am Ohrberg 1, D-31860 Emmerthal, Germany 2 ABSTRACT: Polymers such as ethylene-vinyl acetate (EVA) encapsulants are known for their non

  12. JOURNAL OF MATERIALS SCIENCE 2012, IN PRESS DOI: 10.1007/S10853-012-6927-8 Viscoelastic properties of hollow glass particle filled vinyl ester matrix syntactic foams: effect of temperature and loading

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gupta, Nikhil

    properties of hollow glass particle filled vinyl ester matrix syntactic foams: effect of temperature compositions of syntactic foams. Storage modulus, loss modulus, and glass transition temperature (Tg@poly.edu Abstract Viscoelastic properties of hollow particle reinforced composites called syntactic foams

  13. Synthesis and characterization of redox copolymers of (Ru(4-vinyl-4 prime -methyl-2,2 prime -bipyridine) sub 3 ) sup 2+ and (Os(4-vinyl-4 prime -methyl-2,2 prime -bipyridine) sub 3 ) sup 2+ : Unusual energy-transfer dynamics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bommarito, S.L.; Lowery-Bretz, S.P.; Abruna, H.D. (Cornell Univ., Ithaca, NY (United States))

    1992-02-05T23:59:59.000Z

    Copolymers of (Ru(vbpy){sub 3}(PF{sub 6}){sub 2}) and (Os(vbpy){sub 3}(PF{sub 6}){sub 2}) (vbpy = 4-vinyl-4{prime}-methyl-2,2{prime}-bipyridine) have been prepared in solution and by electropolymerization. The ruthenium and osmium monomers were incorporated in the copolymers in different ratios depending on the polymerization method. These results point to fundamental differences between solution polymerization and electropolymerization. In addition, luminescence experiments at liquid-nitrogen temperature and room temperature point to a significant degree of energy transfer from ruthenium to osmium states in the polymer.

  14. The germination and development of seedlings from seeds treated with growth regulators: (2-chloroethyl) trimethylammonium chloride, succinic acid 2,2 dimethylhydrazide and 2,3-dihydro-5-6-diphenyl-1,4 oxathiin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kamp, Marihelen

    1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    . (May 1976) Marihelen Kamp, B. S. Texas Tech University Chairman of Advisory Committee: Dr. Arthur F. . Nightingale 0 th d ' h d d 'gl t. y 1 f I ~1 c. v. cactus flowered were soaked in each of three different growth retarding chemicals SADH... E NIE N T The author of this thesis extends most sincere thanks to Dr. Arthur E. Nightingale for his assistance in the preparation of this thesis and for his invaluable guidance in her graduate studies. Special appreciation is given also to Dr...

  15. The radiation crosslinking of poly(vinyl chloride) with trimethylolpropanetrimethacrylate. III. Effect of diundecyl phthalate: chemical kinetics of a three-component system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bowmer, T.N.; Vroom, W.I.; Hellman, M.Y.

    1983-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The radiation chemistry of poly(vinyl chloride) (PVC) blended with trimethylolpropanetrimethacrylate (TMPTMA) and diundecyl phthalate (DUP) has been examined. This three-component mixture contains a base resin (PVC), a crosslinking sensitizer (TMPTMA), and a physical modifier (DUP). These are the basic components in any radiation-curable coating. The kinetics and mechanism of the crosslinking reactions were studied with reference to the dependence on radiation dose and blend composition. The polyfunctional TMPTMA underwent polymerization incorporating the PVC into a 3-dimensional network. DUP remained chemically inert during the irradiation, not being bound to the network. However, DUP by plasticizing the macromolecules and diluting the monomer, changed the kinetics extensively. DUP enhanced TMPTMA homopolymerization, TMPTMA grafting, and PVC crosslinking reaction rates. The effect of the competition between polymerization, grafting, and degradation reactions was examined in terms of enhanced mobility of the reacting species. The influence of these kinetics considerations in selecting a blend composition for a coating application was discussed.

  16. Process for the polymerization of vinyl chloride in aqueous suspension utilizing an oil-soluble initiator and subsequently a water-soluble initiator and use of the powders obtained thereby

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Petit, A.

    1981-01-06T23:59:59.000Z

    Process for the polymerization of vinyl chloride in aqueous suspension in the presence of a dispersing system comprising a cellulosic derivative and an anionic emulsifying agent wherein the polymerizaton is initiated by an oil-soluble initiator and a water-soluble free radical polymerization initiator is added in the course of polymerization. The thus obtained polyvinyl chloride powders are particularly suitable for the production of battery separators.

  17. Public health assessment for tri-county landfill waste management of Illinois, South Elgin, Kane County, Illinois, Region 5. Cerclis No. ILD048306183. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

    The Tri-County and Elgin Landfills pose a public health hazard because the concentrations of lead in downgradient private wells are high enough to be a long-term health concern. Completed exposure pathways include the exposure to contaminated water from on- and off-site private wells (inhalation, ingestion, dermal contact; past, present, future). Contaminants of concern in on-site groundwater include bis(2-chloroethyl)ether, vinyl chloride, antimony, arsenic, barium, cadmium, fluoride, lead, manganese, nickel, nitrate + nitrite, and thallium. Chemicals of concern in on-site surface soil and sediments include PCBs, arsenic, cadmium, and nickel. Contaminants of concern in on-site subsurface soil include PCBs, arsenic, cadmium, lead, and nickel. This public health assessment recommends health professionals education and community health education be conducted for the community impacted by the landfills.

  18. Acetylene Inhibition of Trichloroethene and Vinyl Chloride

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Semprini, Lewis

    and enhanced anaerobic remediation of chloroethenes at contaminated sites. The results also suggest that acetylene produced abiotically by reactions of chlorinated ethenes with zero-valent iron could inhibit water standard (2 µg/L) (3). A variety of biochemical tools have been used to probe the complexity

  19. Vinyl Siding Institute (VSI) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia:FAQ < RAPID Jump to:Seadov PtyInformation UCOpenVerona,HamptonVinland, Wisconsin: EnergySiding Institute

  20. Density functional theory study of the interaction of vinyl radical, ethyne, and ethene with benzene, aimed to define an affordable computational level to investigate stability trends in large van der Waals complexes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Maranzana, Andrea, E-mail: andrea.maranzana@unito.it, E-mail: anna.giordana@hotmail.com, E-mail: vincenzo.barone@sns.it, E-mail: mauro.causa@unina.it, E-mail: mipavone@unina.it; Giordana, Anna, E-mail: andrea.maranzana@unito.it, E-mail: anna.giordana@hotmail.com, E-mail: vincenzo.barone@sns.it, E-mail: mauro.causa@unina.it, E-mail: mipavone@unina.it; Indarto, Antonius, E-mail: antonius.indarto@che.itb.ac.id; Tonachini, Glauco, E-mail: glauco.tonachini@unito.it [Dipartimento di Chimica, Universitŕ di Torino, Corso Massimo D’Azeglio 48, I-10125 Torino (Italy)] [Dipartimento di Chimica, Universitŕ di Torino, Corso Massimo D’Azeglio 48, I-10125 Torino (Italy); Barone, Vincenzo, E-mail: andrea.maranzana@unito.it, E-mail: anna.giordana@hotmail.com, E-mail: vincenzo.barone@sns.it, E-mail: mauro.causa@unina.it, E-mail: mipavone@unina.it [Scuola Normale Superiore, Piazza dei Cavalieri 7, I-56126, Pisa (Italy)] [Scuola Normale Superiore, Piazza dei Cavalieri 7, I-56126, Pisa (Italy); Causŕ, Mauro, E-mail: andrea.maranzana@unito.it, E-mail: anna.giordana@hotmail.com, E-mail: vincenzo.barone@sns.it, E-mail: mauro.causa@unina.it, E-mail: mipavone@unina.it [Dipartimento di Ingegneria Chimica, dei Materiali e della Produzione Industriale, Universitŕ di Napoli “Federico II,” Via Cintia, 80126 Napoli (Italy)] [Dipartimento di Ingegneria Chimica, dei Materiali e della Produzione Industriale, Universitŕ di Napoli “Federico II,” Via Cintia, 80126 Napoli (Italy); Pavone, Michele, E-mail: andrea.maranzana@unito.it, E-mail: anna.giordana@hotmail.com, E-mail: vincenzo.barone@sns.it, E-mail: mauro.causa@unina.it, E-mail: mipavone@unina.it [Dipartimento di Scienze Chimiche, Universitŕ di Napoli “Federico II,” Complesso Universitario di Monte Sant’Angelo, Via Cintia, I-80126 Napoli (Italy)] [Dipartimento di Scienze Chimiche, Universitŕ di Napoli “Federico II,” Complesso Universitario di Monte Sant’Angelo, Via Cintia, I-80126 Napoli (Italy)

    2013-12-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Our purpose is to identify a computational level sufficiently dependable and affordable to assess trends in the interaction of a variety of radical or closed shell unsaturated hydro-carbons A adsorbed on soot platelet models B. These systems, of environmental interest, would unavoidably have rather large sizes, thus prompting to explore in this paper the performances of relatively low-level computational methods and compare them with higher-level reference results. To this end, the interaction of three complexes between non-polar species, vinyl radical, ethyne, or ethene (A) with benzene (B) is studied, since these species, involved themselves in growth processes of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and soot particles, are small enough to allow high-level reference calculations of the interaction energy ?E{sub AB}. Counterpoise-corrected interaction energies ?E{sub AB} are used at all stages. (1) Density Functional Theory (DFT) unconstrained optimizations of the A?B complexes are carried out, using the B3LYP-D, ?B97X-D, and M06-2X functionals, with six basis sets: 6-31G(d), 6-311 (2d,p), and 6-311++G(3df,3pd); aug-cc-pVDZ and aug-cc-pVTZ; N07T. (2) Then, unconstrained optimizations by Mřller-Plesset second order Perturbation Theory (MP2), with each basis set, allow subsequent single point Coupled Cluster Singles Doubles and perturbative estimate of the Triples energy computations with the same basis sets [CCSD(T)//MP2]. (3) Based on an additivity assumption of (i) the estimated MP2 energy at the complete basis set limit [E{sub MP2/CBS}] and (ii) the higher-order correlation energy effects in passing from MP2 to CCSD(T) at the aug-cc-pVTZ basis set, ?E{sub CC-MP}, a CCSD(T)/CBS estimate is obtained and taken as a computational energy reference. At DFT, variations in ?E{sub AB} with basis set are not large for the title molecules, and the three functionals perform rather satisfactorily even with rather small basis sets [6-31G(d) and N07T], exhibiting deviation from the computational reference of less than 1 kcal mol{sup ?1}. The zero-point vibrational energy corrected estimates ?(E{sub AB}+ZPE), obtained with the three functionals and the 6-31G(d) and N07T basis sets, are compared with experimental D{sub 0} measures, when available. In particular, this comparison is finally extended to the naphthalene and coronene dimers and to three ??? associations of different PAHs (R, made by 10, 16, or 24 C atoms) and P (80 C atoms)

  1. Preliminary Evaluation of the Field and Laboratory Emission Cell (FLEC) for Sampling Attribution Signatures from Building Materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harvey, Scott D.; He, Lijian; Wahl, Jon H.

    2012-08-30T23:59:59.000Z

    This study provides a preliminary evaluation of the Field and Laboratory Emission Cell (FLEC) for its suitability for sampling building materials for toxic compounds and their associated impurities and residues that might remain after a terrorist chemical attack. Chemical warfare (CW) agents and toxic industrial chemicals were represented by a range of test probes that included CW surrogates. The test probes encompassed the acid-base properties, volatilities, and polarities of the expected chemical agents and residual compounds. Results indicated that dissipation of the test probes depended heavily on the underlying material. Near complete dissipation of almost all test probes occurred from galvanized stainless steel within 3.0 hrs, whereas far stronger retention with concomitant slower release was observed for vinyl composition floor tiles. The test probes displayed immediated permanence on Teflon. FLEC sampling was further evaluated by profiling residues remaining after the evaporation of 2-chloroethyl ethyl sulfide, a sulfur mustard simulant. This study lays the groundwork for the eventual goal of applying this sampling approach for collection of forensic attribution signatures that remain after a terrorist chemical attack.

  2. Natural attenuation of organophosphates in river systems: Chattahoochee River case study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Andrews, Matthew B. (Matthew Bryan), 1981-

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Three organophosphoric acid triesters, tributyl phosphate (TBP), tris(2-chloroethyl) phosphate (TCEP), and tris(2-butoxyethyl) phosphate (TBEP) have been detected in surface waters across the world, primarily the result ...

  3. Synthesis of vinyl acetate on palladium-based catalysts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kumar, Dheeraj

    2009-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

    ...................................................................................8 Surface Science Techniques..............................................................................................10 X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS)...................................................................11 Auger... the energy level diagram of Auger electron emission process............................................................................................................................15 Fig. 5. Schematic diagram of the Michelson interferometer used...

  4. Methods for the synthesis of deuterated vinyl pyridine monomers

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hong, Kunlun; Yang, Jun; Bonnesen, Peter V

    2014-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

    Methods for synthesizing deuterated vinylpyridine compounds of the Formula (1), wherein the method includes: (i) deuterating an acyl pyridine of the Formula (2) in the presence of a metal catalyst and D.sub.2O, wherein the metal catalyst is active for hydrogen exchange in water, to produce a deuterated acyl compound of Formula (3); (ii) reducing the compound of Formula (3) with a deuterated reducing agent to convert the acyl group to an alcohol group, and (iii) dehydrating the compound produced in step (ii) with a dehydrating agent to afford the vinylpyridine compound of Formula (1). The resulting deuterated vinylpyridine compounds are also described.

  5. Research Needs: Glass Solar Reflectance and Vinyl Siding

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hart, Robert

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    U.S. Department of Energy and model energy codes have madethe most commonly adopted model energy code in the U.S. for

  6. Vinyl Kraft Windows and Doors | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia:FAQ < RAPID Jump to:Seadov PtyInformation UCOpenVerona,HamptonVinland, Wisconsin: Energy

  7. Research Needs: Glass Solar Reflectance and Vinyl Siding

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hart, Robert

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    properties of reflected solar radiation from glass surfaces,transfer at the siding surface. Direct solar radiation tosiding, reflected solar radiation from nearby surfaces,

  8. acid vinyl ester: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    stable thermodynamically and hydration free energies obtained Yu, Fangqun 280 ANTIBODY PURIFICATION USING CAPRYLIC ACID In mildly acidic conditions, the addition of short-chain...

  9. The Palladium-Catalyzed Trifluoromethylation of Vinyl Sulfonates

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cho, Eun Jin

    A method for the palladium-catalyzed trifluoromethylation of cyclohexenyl sulfonates has been developed. Various cyclohexenyl triflates and nonaflates underwent trifluoromethylation under mild reaction conditions using a ...

  10. Studies of Various Hydrocarbon Conversion Reactions on Pt Catalysts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kaneko, Shinji

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    with various reactants. Acrolein, methyl vinyl ketone,hydrogenation products. Acrolein, methyl vinyl ketone,

  11. Plant Physiol. (1991) 97, 409-414 0032-0889/91 /97/0409/06/$01 .00/0

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jacobsen, Steve

    inhibitor (2-chloroethyl)trimethylammonium chloride can cause abortion of flowers in Pharbitis if applied 7 Institutes of Health grant GM40553. Abbreviations: GA, gibberellin; PMC(s), pollen mother cell to a certain point, but then normal development ceases and flower buds eventually abort. Nester and Zeevaart

  12. Monodisperse SiC/vinyl ester nanocomposites: Dispersant formulation, synthesis, and characterization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yong, Virginia; Hahn, H. Thomas

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and composites with epoxy resins: Topography, fractographyreinforced polypropylene and epoxy resin composites. Compos.filled polypropylene and epoxy resin com- posites, 22 carbon

  13. Localized Plasticity in the Streamlined Genomes of Vinyl Chloride Respiring Dehalococcoides

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McMurdie, Paul J.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    2005) Genome sequence of the PCE-dechlorinating bacteriumlevels and pseudo-steady-state PCE respiration rates inreductive dehalogenases in a PCE-dechlorinating flow column.

  14. Rate-dependent deformation behavior of poss-filled and plasticized poly(vinyl chloride)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Soong, Sharon Yu-Wen

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Polymers are known to exhibit strong time-dependent mechanical behavior. In different temperatures or frequency regimes, the rate sensitivities of polymers change as various primary and secondary molecular mobility mechanisms ...

  15. The impact of improved materials in poly(vinyl chloride)-based endotracheal tubes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Domike, Kristin Rebecca, 1981-

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Endotracheal tubes (ETs) are used to aid artificial ventilation in millions of medical patients every year and are known to invoke the proliferative phase in the cell linings. The technical objective of this work was to ...

  16. anhydride-methyl vinyl ether: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Low Band Gap Polymers" Weibin Cui and Fred Wudl Macromolecules, 46 (18): 7232-7238 (2013). DOI Link "A Montarnal, Nancy D. Eisenmenger, Sung-Yu Ku, Michael L....

  17. acid-methyl vinyl ether: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Low Band Gap Polymers" Weibin Cui and Fred Wudl Macromolecules, 46 (18): 7232-7238 (2013). DOI Link "A Montarnal, Nancy D. Eisenmenger, Sung-Yu Ku, Michael L....

  18. Synthetic Approaches to Skeletally Diverse Sultams Using Vinyl- and ?-Halo Benzenesulfonamides

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jeon, KyuOk

    2012-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

    ranging from chiral auxiliaries in asymmetric synthesis,2 , 3 artificial sweeteners (saccharin) in the food industry,4 and ionic liquids serving as novel reaction media,5 to a growing number of medicinal agents. To date, there are several sultam..., in 2004, reported an innovative approach for secondary amine synthesis using the pKa properties nitrobenzenesulfonamides.10 This method has been widely utilized in both industry and academia. S NH MeOO Calculations NH MeO-0.58 -0.62+1.26-0.30 +0...

  19. E-Print Network 3.0 - anhydride-vinyl methyl ether Sample Search...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    4-Methyl-2-pentanol Other secondary alcohols... - quire handling with precautions. Acrolein tert-Butyl methyl ether Di(1-propynl) ether n... Methoxy-1,3,5,7- cyclooctatetraene...

  20. Poly(vinyl alcohol)-based buffering membranes for isoelectric trapping separations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Craver, Helen C.

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Isoelectric trapping (IET) in multicompartment electrolyzers (MCE) has been widely used for the electrophoretic separation of ampholytic compounds such as proteins. In IET, the separation occurs in the buffering membranes that form a step-wise p...

  1. E-Print Network 3.0 - acid-labile cholesterol-vinyl ether-peg...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Crystallization of Recombinant Crithidia fasciculata Tryparedoxin Summary: of 30% polyethylene glycol monomethyl ether (PEG MME) 2000, 0.1 M TrisHCl, pH 8.2, 1% dimethyl Source:...

  2. aerobic vinyl chloride-assimilating: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    organic sulfides,6 and perfluorinated polyesters,7,8 have been used to create release coatings Chaudhury, Manoj K. 425 1283J. Blumel, F. H. Kohler Metallated...

  3. Localized Plasticity in the Streamlined Genomes of Vinyl Chloride Respiring Dehalococcoides

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McMurdie, Paul J.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Conceived and designed the experiments: PJM SFB FEL AMS.Performed the experiments: PJM SFB KMR.Analyzed the data: PJM SFB JAM JG KMR RW EG AL SH FEL AMS.

  4. Synthesis and Modification of Alternating Copolymers Based on Vinyl Ethers, Chlorotrifluoroethylene, and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    , in dynamic mode, under air, showed decomposition temperatures (Td,10%) higher than 200 °C. Electrochemical recent fuel cells technology, combining the best of both alkaline batteries and solid polymer electrolyte-exchange membranes, do not require noble metals (Pt, Ru...) as catalysts to function, which is one of the main

  5. Tetrahedron: Asymmetry report number 86 a-Vinylic amino acids: occurrence, asymmetric synthesis,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Berkowitz, David

    -Substituted . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 871 2.3. c-Substituted . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 871 2.3.1. MVG . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 871 2.3.2. AVG

  6. Vinyl Ester Resin: Rheological Behaviors, Curing Kinetics, Thermomechanical, and Tensile Properties

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Guo, John Zhanhu

    , Integrated Composites Laboratory (ICL), Lamar University, Beaumont, TX 77710 Xi Zhang and Suying Wei Dept. of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Lamar University, Beaumont, TX 77710 Henry A. Colorado Dept. of Mechanical

  7. Energetics of Homogeneous Intermolecular Vinyl and Allyl Carbon-Hydrogen Bond Activation by the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jones, William D.

    oxidation of methane, the primary component of natural gas, to methanol.1 This challenge may be generalized, but loss of olefin is observed at 22 °C in benzene solution to generate TpRh(CNneo)(Ph)H (t1/2 ) 16.6 h alkyl amido species. Despite the disparate nature of these systems, a common theme in their respective

  8. Localized Plasticity in the Streamlined Genomes of Vinyl Chloride Respiring Dehalococcoides

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McMurdie, Paul J.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    dehalogenation of chlorinated dioxins by an anaerobic14], phenols [15], dibenzo-p-dioxins [16], dibenzofurans,

  9. Effect of pulse intensity distributions on fragment internal energy in the infrared multiphoton dissociation of vinyl

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zare, Richard N.

    Effect of pulse intensity distributions on fragment internal energy in the infrared multiphoton of laser intensity on the production of fragment energy distribu- tions. Laser induced fluorescence (LIF pumping is pro- portional to the light intensity, the final energy of the parent molecule

  10. Effect of thermal history on the molecular orientation in polystyrene/poly(vinyl methyl ether) blends

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pezolet, Michel

    ether) (PS/PVME) has been studied using polarization modulation infrared linear dichroism (PM to an increased orientation if the heating time at 51 8C is kept short. Moreover, PS and PVME develop a larger) blends; Thermal history; Polarization modulation infrared linear dichroism 1. Introduction The influence

  11. Anodic polymerization of vinyl ethylene carbonate in Li-Ion battery electrolyte

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Guoying; Zhuang, Guorong V.; Richardson, Thomas J.; Gao, Liu; Ross Jr., Philip N.

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Ethylene Carbonate in Li-Ion Battery Electrolyte Guoyingof a commercial Li-ion battery electrolyte containing 2 %are an important part of Li-ion battery technology yet their

  12. Poly (vinyl alcohol)/3-(trimethylammonium) propyl-functionalized silica hybrid membranes for alkaline

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhao, Tianshou

    oxidation and oxygen reduction reactions. As a result, the overall cost of the fuel cell system can for alkaline direct ethanol fuel cells E.D. Wang, T.S. Zhao*, W.W. Yang Department of Mechanical Engineering Accepted 29 December 2009 Available online 8 January 2010 Keywords: Fuel cell Direct ethanol fuel cell

  13. Poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA)/sulfonated polyhedral oligosilsesquioxane (sPOSS) hybrid membranes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mather, Patrick T.

    minimal resources, and are cost and energy efficient. Direct methanol fuel cells (DMFCs), in particular for direct methanol fuel cell applications Young-Wook Chang1*, Erdong Wang1y , Geumsig Shin1 , Jung-Eun Han1 exchange membranes in direct methanel fuel cell (DMFC) applications. Fourier transform infrared (FT

  14. Beam Damage of Poly(Vinyl Chloride) [PVC] Film as Observed by X-ray

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsruc DocumentationP-Series to someone6 M. Babzien, I. Ben-Zvi, P. Study

  15. Beam damage of poly(vinyl chloride) [PVC] as observed by x-ray

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsruc DocumentationP-Series to someone6 M. Babzien, I. Ben-Zvi, P. StudyBeam Historyby

  16. Electron Beam Damage in Poly(Vinyl Chloride) and Poly(Acrylonitrile) as

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation ProposedUsing Zirconia Nanoparticles as Selective Sorbents . |of ZnOdensityVerticalObserved by

  17. Energy Efficiency Improvement and Cost Saving Opportunities for the Petrochemical Industry - An ENERGY STAR(R) Guide for Energy and Plant Managers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Neelis, Maarten

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    930°F) to produce vinyl chloride monomer. VCM is convertedDichloride / Vinyl Chloride Monomer Optimize recycle loopsEthylene dichloride and vinyl chloride monomer. A number of

  18. HOSPITAL VENTILATION STANDARDS AND ENERGY CONSERVATION: A SUMMARY OF THE LITERATURE WITH CONCLUSIONS AND RECOMMENDATIONS, FY 78 FINAL REPORT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    DeRoos, R.L.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    TLV (EEm) ACGIH Vinyl Chloride (Monomer) 5 mg/m ACGIH NPPainters - Solvent Vinyl Chloride (Monomer) Engineering -IUPAC Naming System Vinyl Chloride (monomer) Route of Entry:

  19. A BRIEF HISTORY OF INDUSTRIAL CATALYSIS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Heinemann, Heinz

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    HYDROGENATIONS VINYL CHLORIDE MONOMER ( OXYCHLORINA'I'ION)and other monomers, such as vinyl- chloride, which cannot be

  20. E-Print Network 3.0 - acetylenes Sample Search Results

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Collection: Materials Science 2 Acetylene Inhibition of Trichloroethene and Vinyl Chloride Summary: Acetylene Inhibition of Trichloroethene and Vinyl Chloride Reductive...

  1. E-Print Network 3.0 - acetylene Sample Search Results

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Collection: Materials Science 2 Acetylene Inhibition of Trichloroethene and Vinyl Chloride Summary: Acetylene Inhibition of Trichloroethene and Vinyl Chloride Reductive...

  2. An investigation in the hygrothermal degradation of an E- glass/vinyl-ester composite in humid and immersion environments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Svetlik, Stephanie Laura

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Water transport in epoxy resins. ” Progress in PolymerWater transport in epoxy resins. ” Prog. Polym. Sci. Vol.Diffusion Studies in an Epoxy Resin System. ” J. of Polymer

  3. Model Predictive Control of a Nonlinear Large-Scale Process Network Used in the Production of Vinyl Acetate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tu, TungSheng

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    columns. Industrial & Engineering Chemistry, 20:1196–1200,process. Industrial & Engineering Chemistry Research, 42:process. Industrial & Engineering Chemistry Research, 50:

  4. Photoredox Vinylation of Amino Acids and NAryl Amines Adam Noble and David W. C. MacMillan*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    MacMillan, David W. C.

    -tert- butoxycarbonyl (N-Boc) -amino acids,7,8 a CO2-extrusion mechanism that has implications for the use of biomass feedstocks in conjugate additions and organometallic couplings. Allylic amines have long been attractive

  5. Ambipolar Behavior in All-Carbon-Nanotube Field-Effect Transistors by Poly(Vinyl Alcohol) Coating

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maruyama, Shigeo

    parameter analyzer (Agilent 4156C) at room temperature under ambient conditions. Fig. 1 Schematic of device including SWNT diameter distribution, capacitances of PVA film, and I-V characteristics when coating. Wang, M. Shim, K. Roy, M. A. Alam and J. A. Rogers, Nature 454, 495 (2008). 2. D. M. Sun, M. Y

  6. An investigation in the hygrothermal degradation of an E- glass/vinyl-ester composite in humid and immersion environments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Svetlik, Stephanie Laura

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    known to accelerate UV degradation of polymer materials [with increased UV exposure [13], the degradation of materialthe UV spectrum has been observed to result in degradation

  7. Model Predictive Control of a Nonlinear Large-Scale Process Network Used in the Production of Vinyl Acetate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tu, TungSheng

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    both dynamic economic optimization and process control isand R. Amrit. Optimizing process economic performance usingOptimizing chemical processes from an economic perspective

  8. Control technology of vinyl chloride in EDC-VCM and PVC plants at main source points and fugitive emissions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Parra, Dario Antonio

    1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    in a boiler and the combustion gases scrubbed with water or a caustic solution to remove the hydrogen chloride to form hydrochloric acid or sodium chloride. According to the Trane Thermal Company, thermal incineration is a basic proven process... and fugitive emissions, (b) collection of data by using a questionaire ? survey from industries located in the United States, and (c) a statistical analysis of the data. It was found that thermal incineration is considered the best approach to control...

  9. Model Predictive Control of a Nonlinear Large-Scale Process Network Used in the Production of Vinyl Acetate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tu, TungSheng

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    kcal/kg ? C a Ż i Liquid heat capacity/enthalpy coefficientkg ? C 2 Ż b i Liquid heat capacity/enthalpy coefficient fori kmol/m 3 c ? i Liquid heat capacity of species i kcal/

  10. Polymer Preprints 2004, 45(2), CHARGE DENSITY EFFECTS IN SALT -FREE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Colby, Ralph H.

    -methyl-2-vinyl pyridinium chloride (PMVP-Cl) with various charge density and uncharged neutral parent poly of the random copolymers of 2-vinyl pyridine and N- methyl-2-vinyl pyridinium chloride. First, the parent dry P2 by serial dilution. Polymer concentration is reported in moles of monomers (vinyl pyridine or vinyl

  11. The synthesis of symmetrical bis-1,2,5-thiadiazole ligandsq Dean M. Philipp,a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goddard III, William A.

    for coordination catalysts for the copolymerization of polar monomers (such as vinyl chloride and vinyl acetate there have been no reliable reports of the coordination polymerization of vinyl acetate or vinyl chloride-hydroxy thia- diazole; Vinyl chloride. q Supplementary data associated with this article can be found

  12. Guidance Document Peroxide-FormingChemicals

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    months. Acrylic acid Tetrafluoroethylene Acrylonitrile Vinyl acetate 1,3-Butadiene Vinyl acetylene months. Acetal Diethylene glycol dimethyl ether (diglyme) Isopropyl alcohol Acetaldehyde Diethyl ether Isopropyl propyl ether Acrylamide Diethyl fumatate Isopropyl vinyl ether Allyl ethyl ether Diethylketene 2

  13. Open Archive TOULOUSE Archive Ouverte (OATAO) OATAO is an open access repository that collects the work of Toulouse researchers and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    performed on stationary vinyl chloride monomer droplets and has provided values of effective reaction orders into the vinyl chloride monomer (VCM). As a c, ThierryOnline Monitoring of Vinyl Chloride Polymerization in a Microreactor Using Raman Spectroscopy

  14. Polymer Reactor Design, Optimization and Control in Latex Production Technology.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Penlidis, Alexander

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ?? During continuous emulsion polymerization of many monomers (e.g. vinyl acetate, vinyl chloride), sustained oscillations (limit cycles) occur in conversion and all the latex and… (more)

  15. E-Print Network 3.0 - agent-loaded polymeric nanocapsules Sample...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Collection: Chemistry ; Engineering 63 New Aspects of the Suspension Polymerization of Vinyl Chloride in Relation to the Low Thermal Stability of Poly(Vinyl Chloride) Summary: New...

  16. E-Print Network 3.0 - acid monomer induced Sample Search Results

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of Vinyl Chloride in Relation to the Low Thermal Stability of Poly(Vinyl Chloride) Summary: to be immediately attached to a monomer molecule, initiating new chain...

  17. Palladium-Catalyzed Asymmetric Alkylation in the Synthesis of Cyclopentanoid and Cycloheptanoid Core Structures Bearing All-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stoltz, Brian M.

    , iodoethane, acrylonitrile, methyl vinyl ketone, and acrolein were distilled prior to use. Purified water

  18. Chemico-Biological Interactions 166 (2007) 301316 Mortality patterns among industrial workers exposed to

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Illinois at Chicago, University of

    of industrial workers exposed to chloroprene (CD) and other substances, including vinyl chloride monomer (VC

  19. Engineering and Health Impact Methods in Green Design Student projects PH 290 Sec 07

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Iglesia, Enrique

    materials; process chemistry in producing vinyl chloride monomer; choices of antibacterial agents; need

  20. Charge Density Effects in Salt-Free Polyelectrolyte Solution Rheology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Colby, Ralph H.

    of 2-vinyl pyridine and N-methyl-2-vinyl pyridinium chloride random copolymers in ethylene glycol of 2-vinyl pyridine and N- methyl-2-vinyl pyridinium chloride (PMVP-Cl) of any charge density was studied over wide ranges of con- centration and effective charge. The fraction of quaternized monomers

  1. Intersections: SOURCE Symposium & Poster Session 2007 Winners

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rollins, Andrew M.

    Weight in Poly(vinyl Alcohol) Clay Aerogel Composites." Mentor: Professor David Schiraldi, Macromolecular

  2. European Photovoltaic Solar Energy Conference, Valencia, Spain, 6-10 September 2010, 4AV.3.25 MODELLING THE CURING DYNAMICS OF ETHYLENE-VINYL ACETATE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    25th European Photovoltaic Solar Energy Conference, Valencia, Spain, 6-10 September 2010, 4AV.3. Alshuth2 , M. Köntges1 and R. Brendel1,3 1 Institute for Solar Energy Research Hamelin (ISFH), Am Ohrberg 1, D-31860 Emmerthal, Germany 2 German Institute of Rubber Technology, Eupener Stra�e 33, D-30519

  3. 168 JOURNAL OF VINYL & ADDITIVE TECHNOLOGY, DECEMBER 2004, Vol. 10, No. 4 Thirty-Year Durability of a 20-Mil PVC Geomembrane

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of a 20-Mil PVC Geomembrane E. J. NEWMAN and T. D. STARK* Department of Civil & Environmental Engineering, Michigan. The 30.5-m-diameter re- search ponds were lined using a 0.51-mm-thick fish-grade PVC geomembrane behavior of the nearly 30-year-old PVC geomembrane is within current specifications for new 0.51-mm

  4. Poly(vinyl alcohol) based hydrogen-bonded multilayers : from pH-controlled multi-stage dissolution to zwitter-wettable surfaces

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Hyomin, Ph. D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Understanding the mechanisms that govern the structure and function of synthetic polymer thin films is of fundamental and practical significance for developing a diverse range of functional surfaces including antifogging ...

  5. E-Print Network 3.0 - acyl-coa esters antagonize Sample Search...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    B. Magnetic properties a b s t r a c t FeVinyl ester... surfactant or coupling agent. Vinyl ester monomer serves as a coupling agent with one side covalently bound Source: Guo,...

  6. Gold catalysts for the hydrochlorination of acetylene.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Davies, Catherine

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ??The direct, gas-phase hydrochlorination of acetylene is a method by which vinyl chloride monomer (VCM) is produced industrially. VCM is polymerised to produce poly-vinyl chloride… (more)

  7. E-Print Network 3.0 - acetate bia 2-093 Sample Search Results

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of PdAu(001) Bimetallic Surfaces toward Vinyl Acetate... to elucidate the mechanism of vinyl acetate (VA) synthesis on PdAu(001). Atomic geometries, activation... and acetate; -H...

  8. Method of recovering uranium from aqueous solution

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Albright, R.L.

    1980-01-22T23:59:59.000Z

    Anion exchange resin derived from insoluble crosslinked polymers of vinyl benzyl chloride which are prepared by polymerizing vinyl benzyl chloride and a crosslinking monomer are particularly suitable in the treatment of uranium bearing leach liquors.

  9. activity-dependent polyadenylation site: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    commercial setting. Contaminants: Contaminants: Vinyl Chloride 37 Clinical Research Site Management Engineering Websites Summary: Clinical Research Site Management Dan...

  10. alpine site jungfraujoch: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    commercial setting. Contaminants: Contaminants: Vinyl Chloride 166 Clinical Research Site Management Engineering Websites Summary: Clinical Research Site Management Dan...

  11. allosteric site: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    commercial setting. Contaminants: Contaminants: Vinyl Chloride 69 Clinical Research Site Management Engineering Websites Summary: Clinical Research Site Management Dan...

  12. affect redd site: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    commercial setting. Contaminants: Contaminants: Vinyl Chloride 62 Clinical Research Site Management Engineering Websites Summary: Clinical Research Site Management Dan...

  13. allosteric citalopram-binding site: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    commercial setting. Contaminants: Contaminants: Vinyl Chloride 69 Clinical Research Site Management Engineering Websites Summary: Clinical Research Site Management Dan...

  14. agnostic splice site: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    commercial setting. Contaminants: Contaminants: Vinyl Chloride 279 Clinical Research Site Management Engineering Websites Summary: Clinical Research Site Management Dan...

  15. adenine dinucleotide-binding site: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    commercial setting. Contaminants: Contaminants: Vinyl Chloride 43 Clinical Research Site Management Engineering Websites Summary: Clinical Research Site Management Dan...

  16. Model Estimates of the Contributions of Environmental Tobacco Smoke to Volatile Organic Compound Exposures in Office Buildings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Daisey, J.M.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    vinyl ketone 2,3-Butadione Acrolein Limonene 1,3-Butadieneconcentrations for for acrolein, acetaldehyde and 1,3-

  17. E-Print Network 3.0 - acetate phthalate film Sample Search Results

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    insecticides... acetate, tetrahydrofuran, cyclohexanone, organic tin compounds, and vinyl chloride TeflonTM nothing... polypropylene and polyethylene plasticizers and...

  18. Prototyping Process and Tools An abbreviated overview of lifecycle

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Golub, Evan

    Woomoo) · Physical objects ­ cardboard, clay, vinyl, etc. ­ 3D-printed Realistic Interaction · More

  19. Highly Enantioselective Syntheses of Functionalized r-Methylene--butyrolactones via Rh(I)-catalyzed Intramolecular Alder Ene

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Xumu

    the utility of our methodology, we introduced various functional groups at the allylic position (Table 3). If R2 is an acetyl group, the desired product is a vinyl acetate-substituted -lactone. If R2 is an alkyl group, a vinyl ether is the corresponding product. Due to the wide applications of vinyl acetates

  20. Chemico-Biological Interactions 166 (2007) 264276 Chemical process-based reconstruction of exposures for an

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Illinois at Chicago, University of

    , the chloroprene (CD) and vinyl chloride monomer (VCM) exposures were modeled for plant specific job title classes to chloroprene (CD) and vinyl chloride monomer (VCM), the historical exposure levels were reconstructed of exposures for an epidemiological study Part II. Estimated exposures to chloroprene and vinyl chloride Nurtan

  1. Environmentally-friendly organochlorine waste processing and recycling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Volinsky, Alex A.

    vinyl chloride monomer production more efficient, and on possible ways of industrial organochlorine, and vinyl chloride monomer. Polymerization and copolymeriza- tion of typical waste with and without the C5e and polymers. Ă? 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved. 1. Introduction Vinyl chloride monomer (VCM) is one

  2. Open Archive TOULOUSE Archive Ouverte (OATAO) OATAO is an open access repository that collects the work of Toulouse researchers and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mailhes, Corinne

    . Real-time non-invasive Raman measurement has been performed on stationary vinyl chloride monomer of vinyl chloride (S-PVC) by a free-radical mechanism consists in dispersing liquid monomer under its-decomposition of the organic initiator into the vinyl chloride monomer (VCM). As a consequence, the reaction proceeds

  3. Validation of a personal sampling method for 2-ethylhexyl acrylate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Albert, David Lynn

    2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

    in copolymer applications. Copolymers with low priced, hard monomers such as vinyl acetat, e, vinyl chloride, methyl methacrylate, and acrylonitrile are used to produce commercial paint latexes, paper and paper board coatings, nonwoven fabric adhesives... present a significant toxicological hazard. The chemical and physi- cal properties of EHA are presented in Table l. Uses of EHA The acrylic monomer esters are versatile raw materials. They 5 have both vinyl and ester functionality and are useful...

  4. Sustainable syntrophic growth of Dehalococcoides ethenogenes strain 195 with Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough and Methanobacterium congolense: Global transcriptomic and proteomic analyses

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Men, Y.

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    2005). Genome sequence of the PCE-dechlorinating bacteriumHong Kong. chloroethene (PCE) and trichloroethene (TCE) toexperimental co-culture, PCE was dechlorinated to vinyl

  5. JOURNAL OF BACTERIOLOGY, Aug. 2009, p. 52245231 Vol. 191, No. 16 0021-9193/09/$08.00 0 doi:10.1128/JB.00085-09

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alvarez-Cohen, Lisa

    in Clostridium kluyveri. Chlorinated organic compounds, such as tetrachloroethene (PCE) and trichloroethene (TCE reductively dechlorinate PCE, TCE, and their daughter compounds di- chloroethene (DCE) and vinyl chloride (VC

  6. The Dalhousie Employee Guide to Materials Management on Campus Look for the 4 system bins around campus designated for recyclables, paper/cardboard, organics and garbage.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brownstone, Rob

    cans Tetra juice packs & mini sips All plastic bags and containers, except Styrofoam Clean aluminum Clean & painted wood Drywall & ceiling tiles Vinyl Plastic Glass Insulation Styro Tar Gravel

  7. Techniques and Technologies for Field Detection of Asbestos Containing Materials

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Asbestos has been used in numerous applications at DOE sites including sprayed-on fireproofing, asphalt and vinyl floor tile, and asbestos-cement(transite) siding.

  8. E-Print Network 3.0 - a-007 topical gel Sample Search Results

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    and poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA) gel Switching... , copoly(AamvdMG) gel and electrochromic polymer, ProDOT-(CH3) Development of Durable Coating Systems Source: Taya,...

  9. High temperature, optically transparent plastics from biomass

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    temperature, optically transparent plastics from biomass At a Glance Rapid, selective catalytic system to produce vinyl plastics from renewable biomass Stereoregular...

  10. E-Print Network 3.0 - asymmetric hetero-diels-alder reactions...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Correction Paper No. b927076k Summary: . The classic hetero-Diels Alder reaction of acrolein with methyl vinyl ketone (Scheme 3) was examined in great... is unsymmetrically...

  11. acetal benzoic acids: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    blend. Inthe present investigation, densities and viscosities have been measured in 4 % solution of polyAcrylic Acid and Poly vinyl Acetate in DMSO using calculated and reduced...

  12. Novel mixed organoboranes for the reductive alkylation of p-benzoquinone

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hincapié, Gloria

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    with methyl vinyl ketone or acrolein 20 was found to beWhen this is reacted with acrolein, 15% of the product is 4-

  13. Modeling an EDC Cracker using Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD).

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kaggerud, Torbjřrn Herder

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ?? The process used by the Norwegian company Hydro for making Vinyl Chloride Monomer (VCM) from natural gas and sodium chloride has been studied. A… (more)

  14. E-Print Network 3.0 - acid derivatives sorbtsionnye Sample Search...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Aliphatic Tertiary Amines. Summary: , 6 due to increased demands for derivatives like vinyl acetate monomer (VAM). Currently, acetic acid... CHAPTER 6 Acetic Acid Recovery from...

  15. E-Print Network 3.0 - anionic linear-globular dendrimer-cis-platinum...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Science 47 Computational Study of 10-X-2 Ate Complexes Derived from Vinyllithiums and Vinyl Halides Summary: complexes, and removal of the formally cationic lithium from the...

  16. E-Print Network 3.0 - acrylic acid synthesized Sample Search...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    peracetic acid in an overnight... % trifluoroacetic acid (TFA) solution in methylene chloride, allowing for high conversion to the final vinyl product Source: Harth, Eva M. -...

  17. E-Print Network 3.0 - aspect ratio domains Sample Search Results

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    University of California, Irvine Collection: Mathematics 73 Weld line strength of poly(vinyl chloride)polyethylene blends , J.W. Summersb Summary: Image Analysis System. The...

  18. E-Print Network 3.0 - anions Sample Search Results

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Science 45 Computational Study of 10-X-2 Ate Complexes Derived from Vinyllithiums and Vinyl Halides Summary: complexes, and removal of the formally cationic lithium from the...

  19. E-Print Network 3.0 - acid bilayers observed Sample Search Results

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of Docosahexaenoic Acid-Containing Phospholipid Bilayers as Studied by 2H NMR... of vinyl perdeuterated arachidonic acid chains in bilayers of 1-palmitoyl-2-vinylperdeuterioara...

  20. E-Print Network 3.0 - anacardic acid derivatives Sample Search...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Aliphatic Tertiary Amines. Summary: , 6 due to increased demands for derivatives like vinyl acetate monomer (VAM). Currently, acetic acid... CHAPTER 6 Acetic Acid Recovery from...

  1. E-Print Network 3.0 - active polymeric functional Sample Search...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Collection: Biology and Medicine ; Environmental Sciences and Ecology 39 Poly(vinyl chloride) (PVC) is one of the most successful modern synthetic materials. Because of its...

  2. E-Print Network 3.0 - acid derivative hs-1200-induced Sample...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Aliphatic Tertiary Amines. Summary: , 6 due to increased demands for derivatives like vinyl acetate monomer (VAM). Currently, acetic acid... CHAPTER 6 Acetic Acid Recovery from...

  3. E-Print Network 3.0 - aqueous sodium dodecyl Sample Search Results

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of Sodium Dodecyl Sulfate and Sodium Dodecyl Benzenesulfonate on Poly(Vinyl Chloride) Latexes Summary: 1 Adsorption of Sodium Dodecyl Sulfate and Sodium Dodecyl...

  4. E-Print Network 3.0 - aqueous ki hio3 Sample Search Results

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Biology and Medicine 86 Utilization of Fluoroethene as a Surrogate for Aerobic Vinyl Chloride Summary: ) is a stable molecule in aqueous solution and its aerobic...

  5. E-Print Network 3.0 - acrylic acid moieties Sample Search Results

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    at Austin Collection: Biology and Medicine ; Materials Science 7 Poly(acrylic acid)Poly(vinyl alcohol) Copolymers with Superabsorbent Properties Summary: Poly(acrylic...

  6. E-Print Network 3.0 - alternating romp aromp Sample Search Results

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    introduced enough variation in the meth- ylene sequence length that model... (vinyl chloride) (PVC); ethylene copolymers; ROMP INTRODUCTION The development of metallocene and...

  7. E-Print Network 3.0 - aqueous crown ethers Sample Search Results

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ether recognition agent, as well as a glucose sensor, which utilizes... -3760, USA. vinyl crown ether into the PCCA 1,5-8. In contrast, we fab- ricatedaglucosesensing......

  8. E-Print Network 3.0 - acid dehalogenase enzyme Sample Search...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of halorespi- ration in Desulfitobacterium dehalogenans. J. Biol. Chem... of vinyl chloride (VC) to ethene. Degenerate primers targeting conserved regions in reductive...

  9. E-Print Network 3.0 - acid-based supramolecular structure Sample...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Supramolecular Thin Films as a Nanotemplate... of Structural Defects in Poly(vinyl chloride) Jindra Purmova, Kim F. D. Pauwels, Wendy van Zoelen, ... Source: Groningen,...

  10. E-Print Network 3.0 - anions organic acids Sample Search Results

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    is determined by the acidity of the reaction intermediate, vinyldiazomethane. Thus, the vinyl- diazomethyl anion... Structure of the Vinyldiazomethyl Anion and Energetic Comparison...

  11. E-Print Network 3.0 - aqueous solutions gels Sample Search Results

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Group Collection: Physics 47 Mechanistic analysis of protein delivery from porous poly(vinyl alcohol) systems Summary: by freezing and thawing of aqueous PVA solutions, while...

  12. E-Print Network 3.0 - anomalous bcd mrk Sample Search Results

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of peracetylated b-Cyclodextrin (perBCD) on the suspension... polymerization of vinyl chloride was studied. Addition of perBCD resulted in larger particles with broader......

  13. E-Print Network 3.0 - alkyl benzenesulfonates Sample Search Results

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    7 Adsorption of Sodium Dodecyl Sulfate and Sodium Dodecyl Benzenesulfonate on Poly(Vinyl Chloride) Latexes Summary: 1 Adsorption of Sodium Dodecyl Sulfate and Sodium Dodecyl...

  14. E-Print Network 3.0 - acetate allyl alcohol Sample Search Results

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of the acetate protecting group afforded alcohol 17, which... , a stereoselective vinyl addition remained elusive. The allylic ... Source: Crimmins, Michael T.- Department of...

  15. Specimen-Specific Method for Quantifying Glenohumeral Joint Kinematics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Yeon Soo; Lee, Thay Q.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    poly- vinyl chloride (PVC) cylinder using screws and plasteraxial center line of the PVC pipe was matched to thewas determined with two PVC cylinder circumferences formed

  16. Low pour crude oil compositions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Motz, K.L.; Latham, R.A.; Statz, R.J.

    1990-05-22T23:59:59.000Z

    This patent describes and improvement in the process of transporting waxy crude oils through a pipeline. It comprises: incorporating into the crude oil an effective pour point depressant amount of an additive comprising a polymer selected from the group consisting of copolymers of ethylene and acrylonitrile, and terpolymers of ethylene, acrylonitrile and a third monomer selected from the group consisting of vinyl acetate, carbon monoxide, alkyl acrylates, alkyl methacrylates, alkyl vinyl ethers, vinyl chloride, vinyl fluoride, acrylic acid, and methacrylic acid, wherein the amount of third monomer in the terpolymer ranges from about 0.1 to about 10.0 percent by weight.

  17. aldosterone modulates cell: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Renewable Energy Websites Summary: the benefit of using optically superior silicone encapsulant materials over the incumbent ethylene vinyl in the UV region of the solar...

  18. Epoxy Resin-Photopolymer Composites for Volume Timothy J. Trentler, Joel E. Boyd, and Vicki L. Colvin*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Epoxy Resin-Photopolymer Composites for Volume Holography Timothy J. Trentler, Joel E. Boyd by mixing photopo- lymerizable vinyl monomers with a liquid epoxy resin and an amine hardener. A solid matrix is formed in situ as the epoxy cures at room temperature. The unreacted vinyl monomers

  19. APPLIED AND ENVIRONMENTAL MICROBIOLOGY, 0099-2240/98/$04.00 0

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lovley, Derek

    Acceptors for Anaerobic Microbial Oxidation of Vinyl Chloride and Dichloroethene PAUL M. BRADLEY,1 * FRANCIS Received 24 March 1998/Accepted 4 June 1998 Anaerobic oxidation of [1,2-14 C]vinyl chloride and [1,2-14 C. The chlorinated solvents tetrachloroethene (PCE) and tri- chloroethene (TCE) are common groundwater contaminants

  20. AIAA-2000-0057 This work was supported by Sandia National Laboratories under

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ABSTRACT The DOE/MSU Fatigue Database has been expanded Delamination is a dominant failure mode purpose polyesters, vinyl esters, and epoxies) used in characteristics (all materials were prepared unsaturated delamination resistance of most blade materials is polyesters, vinyl esters, epoxies

  1. Appendix A: The Names of Polymers and Polymeric

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hall, Christopher

    or methylpentene polymethylpentene vinyl chloride poly(vinyl chloride) co-aminocaproic poly(co-aminocaproic acid MATERIALS For homopolymers Monomer name Polymer name X polyX XY poiy(XY) for example ethylene polyethylene acid) [nylon 6] Where the monomer name consists of two words, it should be bracketed in the polymer

  2. Graphene Quantum Dots Embedded in a Polymer Film S. Ushiba1,2, X. He2, E. Haroz2, J. Peng3, P. M. Ajayan3 and J. Kono2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mellor-Crummey, John

    -polymer composite film by drying a mixture solution of GQD and poly-vinyl alcohol (PVA). GQDs were homogeneously-polymer composite. Here we demonstrate the composite film by drying a mixture solution of GQD and poly-vinyl alcohol Photoluminescence of GQDs Daylight UV light GQDs in water The absorbance peak at 310 nm is a feature of GQDs due

  3. Characterization of Arsenic Contamination on Rust from Ton Containers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gary S. Groenewold; Recep Avci; Robert V. Fox; Muhammedin Deliorman; Jayson Suo; Laura Kellerman

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The speciation and spatial distribution of arsenic on rusted steel surfaces affects both measurement and removal approaches. The chemistry of arsenic residing in the rust of ton containers that held the chemical warfare agents bis(2-chloroethyl)sulfide (sulfur mustard) and 2-chlorovinyldichloroarsine (Lewisite) is of particular interest, because while the agents have been decontaminated, residual arsenic could pose a health or environmental risk. The chemistry and distribution of arsenic in rust samples was probed using imaging secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), Auger electron spectroscopy, and scanning electron microscopy/energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (SEM/EDX). Arsenic in the +3 and or +5 oxidation state is homogeneously distributed at the very top-most layer of the rust samples, and is intimately associated with iron. Sputter depth profiling followed by SIMS and XPS shows As at a depth of several nm, in some cases in a reduced form. The SEM/EDX experiments show that As is present at a depth of several microns, but is inhomogeneously distributed; most locations contained oxidized As at concentrations of a few percent, however several locations showed very high As in a metallic form. These results indicate that the rust material must be removed if the steel containers are to be cleared of arsenic.

  4. Effect in the KHT sarcoma of CCNU and MISO on cell cycle progression evaluated by flow-cytometry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hill, S.A.; Bauer, K.D.; Keng, P.C.; Siemann, D.W.

    1984-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Previous studies using the KHT sarcoma have shown that misonidazole (MISO) enhances the cytotoxicity of 1-(2-chloroethyl)-3-cyclohexyl-1-nitrosourea (CCNU) by as much as a factor of 2.0. In the present study flow cytometry was used to monitor the changing DNA distributions of cells dissociated from solid tumors at successive times following treatment with CCNU, applied either alone or in combination with 0.5 mg/g MISO. The proportion of cells in late S and the G/sub 2/M phases of the cell cycle increased gradually after CCNU treatment. MISO did not significantly change this block in cell progression, which persisted for at least 48 hr after treatment in all cases. CCNU shows marked carbamoylating activity, which has been associated with inhibition of RNA processing and with the degree of chemopotentiation achieved with MISO. By 24 hr after treatment, CCNU clearly altered the distribution of RNA, but no significant differences could be detected between results obtained from drug and drug plus sensitizer treated groups. These studies demonstrate the effect of CCNU on cell cycle progression in vivo. The addition of MISO did not result in further perturbation of the total tumor population, suggesting that cell cycle redistribution does not play a major role in chemopotentiation by MISO.

  5. Survival in subpopulations of cells derived from solid KHT sarcomas by centrifugal elutriation following treatment with CCNU and MISO

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hill, S.A.; Keng, P.C.; Siemann, D.W.

    1984-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Misonidazole (MISO) has been shown to enhance the cytotoxicity of 1-(2-chloroethyl)-3-cyclohexyl-1-nitrosourea (CCNU) in a number of different animal tumor systems. The authors have investigated the response to therapy of the various subpopulations of cells comprising the KHT sarcoma, to determine whether chemopotentiation occurred as a preferential enhancement of killing in one subpopulation of cells. Twenty-four hr after drug treatment, cells dissociated from solid tumors were separated into homogeneous populations based on cell size by the technique of centrifugal elutriation. Clonogenic cell survival was measured for each elutriated fraction. In vivo treatment with MISO produced no measurable cell-kill across the cell cycle. Those cells in late G/sub 1/ and S phase 24 hr after treatment were most sensitive to CCNU alone. The enhancement of CCNU cytotoxicity by MISO occurred primarily in the early G/sub 1/ and S fractions. These data suggest that chemopotentiation does not occur equally in all tumor cell subpopulations and that some specificity of enhanced cell killing exists.

  6. Enhanced tumor responses through therapies combining CCNU, MISO and radiation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Siemann, D.W.; Hill, S.A.

    1984-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Studies were performed to determine whether the radiation sensitizer misonidazole (MISO) could enhance the tumor control probability in a treatment strategy combining radiation and the nitrosourea 1-(2-chloroethyl)-3-cyclohexyl-1-nitrosourea (CCNU). In initial experiments KHT sarcoma-bearing mice were injected with 1.0 mg/g of MISO simultaneously with a 20 mg/kg dose of CCNU 30-40 min prior to irradiation (1500 rad). With this treatment protocol approximately 60% of the mice were found to be tumor-free 100 days post treatment. By comparison all 2 agent combinations led to 0% cures. To evaluate the relative importance of chemopotentiation versus radiosensitization in the 3 agent protocol, tumors were treated with MISO plus one anti-tumor agent (either radiation of CCNU) and then at times ranging from 0 to 24 hr later exposed to the other agent. When the time between treatments was 0 to 6 hr, a 60 to 80% tumor control rate was achieved for both MISO plus radiation followed by CCNU and MISO plus CCNU followed by radiation. However if the time interval was increased to 18 or 24 hr, the cure rate in the former treatment regimen dropped to 10% while that of the latter remained high at 40%. The data therefore indicate that (1) improved tumor responses may be achieved when MISO is added to a radiation-chemotherapy combination and (2) MISO may be more effective in such a protocol when utilized as a chemopotentiator.

  7. Next Generation Non-particulate Dry Nonwoven Pad for Chemical Warfare Agent Decontamination

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ramkumar, S S; Love, A; Sata, U R; Koester, C J; Smith, W J; Keating, G A; Hobbs, L; Cox, S B; Lagna, W M; Kendall, R J

    2008-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    New, non-particulate decontamination materials promise to reduce both military and civilian casualties by enabling individuals to decontaminate themselves and their equipment within minutes of exposure to chemical warfare agents or other toxic materials. One of the most promising new materials has been developed using a needlepunching nonwoven process to construct a novel and non-particulate composite fabric of multiple layers, including an inner layer of activated carbon fabric, which is well-suited for the decontamination of both personnel and equipment. This paper describes the development of a composite nonwoven pad and compares efficacy test results for this pad with results from testing other decontamination systems. The efficacy of the dry nonwoven fabric pad was demonstrated specifically for decontamination of the chemical warfare blister agent bis(2-chloroethyl)sulfide (H or sulfur mustard). GC/MS results indicate that the composite fabric was capable of significantly reducing the vapor hazard from mustard liquid absorbed into the nonwoven dry fabric pad. The mustard adsorption efficiency of the nonwoven pad was significantly higher than particulate activated carbon (p=0.041) and was similar to the currently fielded US military M291 kit (p=0.952). The nonwoven pad has several advantages over other materials, especially its non-particulate, yet flexible, construction. This composite fabric was also shown to be chemically compatible with potential toxic and hazardous liquids, which span a range of hydrophilic and hydrophobic chemicals, including a concentrated acid, an organic solvent and a mild oxidant, bleach.

  8. Electrophilic Metal Alkyl Chemistry in New Ligand Environments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jordan, Richard F. [University of Chicago] University of Chicago

    2013-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The goals of this project were to design new electrophilic metal alkyl complexes and to exploit these systems in fundamental studies of olefin polymerization and other important and new catalytic reactions. A key target reaction is insertion copolymerization of olefins and polar CH2=CHX vinyl monomers such as vinyl halides and vinyl ethers. During the period covered by this report we (i) investigated the properties of ortho-alkoxy-arylphosphine ligands in Ni-based olefin polymerization catalysts, (ii) studied the synthesis of double-end-capped polyethylene using group 4 metal catalysts that contain tris-pyrazolylborate ligands, (iii) explored the ethylene insertion reactivity of group 4 metal tris-pyrazolyl-borate complexes, (iv) showed that (?-diimine)PdMe{sup +} species undergo multiple insertion of silyl vinyl ethers, (v) synthesized and explored the reactivity of base-free Ni benzyl complexes that contain ortho-phosphino-arene sulfonate ligands, (vi) established the mechanism of the reaction of vinyl chloride with (?-diimine)PdMe{sup +} catalysts, (vii) explored the role of cationic polymerization and insertion chemistry in the reactions of vinyl ethers with (?-diimine)PdMe{sup +} species, (viii) discovered a new class of self-assembled tetranuclear Pd catalysts that produce high molecular weight linear polyethylene and copolymerize ethylene and vinyl fluoride, and (ix) developed model systems that enabled investigation of cis-trans isomerization of {phosphine-sulfonate}Pd(II) complexes.

  9. Mohamed, Tarek Said. Fabrication and Behavior of Three-Dimensionally Woven Glass Fiber Reinforced Polymeric Bridge Deck. (Under the direction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    deck. The use of epoxy resin versus vinyl ester resin in the fabrication process was examined a textile machine and resin infusion process. The research investigated the mechanical properties of 3-D

  10. ambipolar nanotube field: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    in All-Carbon-Nanotube Field-Effect Transistors by Poly(Vinyl Alcohol) Coating Materials Science Websites Summary: Ambipolar Behavior in All-Carbon-Nanotube Field-Effect...

  11. GENERAL SUPPLIES Required Optional

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thompson, Michael

    HB H F 2H 3H Vinyl Gloves Other CHEMISTRY Stealth Safety Goggles MUSIC Col-erase Pencil (specifyNumber Professor EstimatedEnrollment DateSignature Specialized Course Materials Adoption Form FAX: (905) 572

  12. Comparison of QM-Only and QM/MM Models for the Mechanism of Tungsten-Dependent Acetylene Hydratase

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liao, Rongzhen

    Comparison of QM-Only and QM/MM Models for the Mechanism of Tungsten-Dependent Acetylene Hydratase study on the formation of vinyl alcohol in the catalytic cycle of tungsten-dependent acetylene hydratase

  13. The development of palladium-catalysts for organic synthesis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Martinelli, Joseph R

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Chapter 1. Suzuki-Miyaura coupling reactions of aryl and heteroaryl halides with aryl-, heteroaryl and vinyl boronic acids proceed in very good to excellent yield with the use of 2-(2',6'-dimethoxybiphenyl)-dicyclohexylphosphine, ...

  14. affect dielectric membrane: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    how relaxation dynamics of a poly-vinyl-acetate ultra-thin film is influenced by inorganic nano-inclusions of a layered silicate (montmorillonite). Dielectric loss spectra are...

  15. Any correspondence concerning this service should be sent to the repository administrator: staff-oatao@inp-toulouse.fr

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mailhes, Corinne

    Toulouse, France 3 INEOS - Société Artésienne de Vinyle, Chemin des soldats 62670 Mazingarbe, France Tel.: +33 3 21 72 83 17, E-mail: Thierry.lasuye@ineos.com Abstract: A one-dimensional steady-state model

  16. The effect of moisture on a glass/epoxy composite

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chatawanich, Candy Suda

    2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

    Research was done to determine the effect of moisture on the transverse tensile strength and the interfacial shear strength of a glass/epoxy composite. Specimens with two different fiber sizings, one epoxy compatible and one vinyl-ester compatible...

  17. A MILD OXIDJ.TION OF ALDEHYDES TO ir,B-LMATURATEU ALDEHYDES David K. Willm~s"' and Klyoshl Nishltani

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Williams, David R.

    led to mixtures. - Notably enol acetates and ethers have been recognized as excellent substrates-hydroxy selenldes which are conven- iently transformed into vinyl selenides, epoxldes, olefins, and allylic alcohols

  18. E-Print Network 3.0 - acid crosslinked polyelectrolyte Sample...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    For a crosslinking ratio of X 0.01, 0.2 ml sulfuric acid, 0.4 ml methanol, 0.6 ml... (vinyl alcohol) and poly(acrylic acid) Nicholas A. Peppas*, Shelia L. Wright Purdue...

  19. E-Print Network 3.0 - aromatic siloxane segments Sample Search...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    and lactones.15 The ability to mono-cap poly(3-hexylthiophene) (PHT) with allyl or vinyl Source: McCullough, Richard D. - Department of Chemistry, Carnegie Mellon University...

  20. Chemico-Biological Interactions 166 (2007) 277284 Chemical process based reconstruction of exposures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Illinois at Chicago, University of

    the chemical structure is similar to that of vinyl chloride, a known human carcinogen, a concern arose. Introduction -Chloroprene (2-chloro-1,3-butadiene) ( -CD) is a monomer used exclusively for the production

  1. Subscriber access provided by University Libraries | University of Notre Dame Organic Letters is published by the American Chemical Society. 1155 Sixteenth

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Smith, Bradley D.

    primarily for use as a precursor monomer for poly(vinyl chloride).5 More reactive chloroalkanes are em NH residues which greatly accelerate N-alkylation by activating the chloride leaving group

  2. Cathodic disbondment resistance with reactive ethylene terpolymer blends and composite coatings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Love, Corey T.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    EPDM EVA ethylene vinyl acetate FBE fusion-bonded epoxy GMACoating Thickness on FBE ………………. Figure 7.13: NormalizedWhen XANES was applied to FBE-coated iron, the cathodically

  3. Observation and Nature of Non-statistical Dynamic Effects in Ordinary Organic Reactions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Quijano, Larisa Mae Mangaliman 1984-

    2012-10-17T23:59:59.000Z

    .? Such * Reprinted with permission from ?Competition between Reaction and Intramolecular Energy Redistribution in Solution: Observation and Nature of Nonstatistical Dynamics in the Ozonolysis of Vinyl Ethers? by L.M. Quijano and D. A. Singleton. Journal...

  4. EAST CAROLINA UNIVERSITY HAZARDOUS CHEMICAL USE GRANT REVIEW FORM ECU policy requires that all grant proposals involving the use of hazardous chemicals be reviewed by an institutional review committee or

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    -benezene 4-Aminodiphenyl Asbestos Coal tar pitch volatiles Methyl chloromethyl ether Formaldehyde Vinyl chloride Coke oven emissions 1,2-dibromo-3-chloropropane Lead Cadmium Benzene Cotton dust Chromium VI

  5. Design and synthesis of novel isoelectric buffers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lalwani, Sanjiv Kumar Shankerdass

    2006-04-12T23:59:59.000Z

    Hydrolytically stable, low- and high-pI isoelectric hydrogel membranes were prepared from poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA) as alternatives to polyacrylamide-based isoelectric membranes that hydrolyze in acidic and basic solutions. Low-pI membranes were...

  6. Zinc oxide nanoparticle-polymeric thin films for dynamic strain sensing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Loh, Kenneth J.; Chang, Donghee

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    onto poly(vinyl chloride) PVC Type I plates (McMaster- Carr)cm wide, and 0.3-cm thick PVC plate. It should be noted thatduring free vibration of the PVC cantilevered beam the CN-Y

  7. INHIBITION EFFECTS ON EXTINCTION OF POLYMER BURNING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pitz, W.J.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and poly(vinyl chloride) (PVC) in N /0 2 mixtures . Thesein comparison to Cl being added to the fuel side of PVC .Impurities in this commercial PVC and PE may have had an

  8. An analysis of residential window waterproofing systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Parsons, Austin, 1959-

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The prevalence of vinyl nail-on windows in the North American new home construction market has prompted ASTM International to write ASTM E2112-01 "Standard Practice for Installation of Exterior Windows, Doors and Skylights". ...

  9. Enhanced phytoremediation of volatile environmental pollutants with transgenic trees

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    trichloroethylene, vinyl chloride, carbon tetrachloride, benzene, and chloroform, are com- mon environmental conventional techniques. CYP2E1 P450 poplar trichloroethylene carbon tetrachloride Phytoremediation is the use greater public approval. Phytoremediation also yields other benefits including carbon sequestration, soil

  10. Catalytic studies of supported Pd-Au catalysts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boopalachandran, Praveenkumar

    2006-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

    reaction conditions is the ultimate goal. This thesis is mainly focused on the application of Pd-Au supported catalysts for vinyl acetate synthesis and CO oxidation reactions using highsurface area catalysts. We have attempted to improve the conventional Pd...

  11. BEESE ET AL. VOL. 7 ' NO. 4 ' 34343446 ' 2013 www.acsnano.org

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Espinosa, Horacio D.

    , spinning from CNT aerogel, and twisting or rolling of CNT films, as summarized in a recent review article coating on the surface of the DWNT bundles interacts strongly with poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA) through

  12. Direct synthesis of pyridine and pyrimidine derivatives

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hill, Matthew D. (Matthew Dennis)

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    I. Synthesis of Substituted Pyridine Derivatives via the Ruthenium-Catalyzed Cycloisomerization of 3-Azadienynes. The two-step conversion of various N-vinyl and N-aryl amides to the corresponding substituted pyridines and ...

  13. Green chemistry : dense carbon dioxide and water as environmentally benign reaction media

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Allen, Andrew J. (Andrew John), 1978-

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    (cont.) was investigated in scCO?, and the cycloaddition between cyclopentadiene and methyl vinyl ketone (MVK) was studied in an scCO?/liquid water environment. Nitrogen chemistry, specifically the synthesis of nitrogen ...

  14. Expensive Moisture/Insulation System Problems at Several Central Florida and South Texas Nursing Homes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lotz, W. A.

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    . There was mold and mildew everywhere including on lamp shades, on beds and behind the vinyl wall covering. There were low cost thru - the -wall air conditionexs that removed minimal humidity. There were also 70 tempomy portable dehumidifiers in one... building! The walls were stucco over polystyrene foam (commonly called E.I.F.S.). The caulk in construction joints left much to be desired (it was terrible - holes everywhere). There was no vapor banier in the ceilings. There was vinyl wall covering...

  15. Nonaqueous composition for slip casting or cold forming refractory material into solid shapes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Montgomery, L.C.

    1993-08-24T23:59:59.000Z

    A composition is described for slip casting or cold forming non-oxide refractory material(s) into solid shape comprising finely divided solid refractory materials selected from the group consisting of metal boride, refractory carbide, nitride, silicide and a refractory metal of tungsten, molybdenum, tantalum and chromium suspended in a nonaqueous liquid slip composition consisting essentially of a deflocculent composed of a vinyl chloride-vinyl acetate resin dissolved in an organic solvent.

  16. Indentation and Recovery Tests of Common Resilient Floor Coverings.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stewart, B. R.; Kunze, O. R.; Hobgood, Price

    1960-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    the total indentation character- istics of rubber, vinyl-asbestos and cork tile. The total indentation was smaller under the heavy and medium loads for the thinner materials. Little effect was noted under the light load. Differences in residual... indentation of materials due to material thickness was significant for cork and vinyl-asbestos tile. Tests indicated that residual indentation was greater for the thicker samples. The thinner gage of rubber tile tended to retain more residual indentation...

  17. Repair of O sup 6 -ethylguanine in DNA protects rat 208F cells from tumorigenic conversion by N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thomale, J.; Huh, Namho; Nehls, P.; Eberle, G.; Rajewsky, M.F. (Univ. of Essen Medical School (West Germany))

    1990-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    O{sup 6}-Ethylguanine (O{sup 6}-EtGua) is one of about a dozen different alkylation products formed in the DNA of cells exposed to the alkylating N-nitroso carcinogen N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea (EtNU). The authors have evaluated selectively the relative capacity of cells for the specific enzymatic repair of O{sup 6}-EtGua as a determinant for the probability of malignant conversion. Eleven O{sup 6}-EtGua-repair-proficient (R{sup +}) variant subclones were isolated from the O{sup 6}-EtGua-repair-deficient (R{sup {minus}}) clonal rat fibroblast line 208F by selection for resistance to 1,3-bis-(2-chloroethyl)-1-nitrosourea. Contrary to the 208F wild-type cells, all variants expressed O{sup 6}-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase activity, while both kinds of cells were deficient for repair of the DNA ethylation products O{sup 2}- and O{sup 4}-ethylthymine. After exposure to EtNU cells were analyzed for the formation of piled-up foci in monolayer culture and of anchorage-independent colonies in semisolid agar medium. No significant differences in the frequencies of piled-up foci were found between wild-type and variant cells after exposure to the major reactive metabolite of benzo(a)pyrene, (+)-7{beta},8{alpha}-dihydroxy-9,10{alpha}-epoxy7,8,9,10{alpha}-tetrahydrobenzo(a)pyrene, for which stable binding to guanine O{sup 6} in cellular DNA has not been observed. The relative capacity of cells for repair of O{sup 6}-alkylguanine is, therefore, a critical determinant for their risk of malignant conversion by N-nitroso carcinogens.

  18. Discoloration resistant, flexible, radiation curable coating compositions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cassatta, J.C.; Garrett, D.L. Jr.; Van Oene, H.

    1984-10-16T23:59:59.000Z

    A low dosage radiation polymerizable protective and decorative coating composition or paint, coated articles bearing such a protective coating and processess for preparing such articles. The radiation polymerizable coating composition comprises an organic resin/monomer mixture of: (A) between about 97 and about 3 weight percent alphabeta olefinically unsaturated organic resin containing between about 0.5 and about 5 vinyl unsaturation units per 1000 molecular weight of said resin, and (B) between about 3 and about 97 weight percent vinyl monomers polymerizable with said resin upon exposure to radiation, characterized in that said vinyl monomers include N-vinyl-2-pyrrolidone in an amount of from about 3 and up to about 10 weight percent based on the total weight of (A) and (B). The flexible coating exhibits excellent physical qualtities and good adhesion to a variety of substrates being particularly suitable for use on vinyl chloride fabric, wherein it is discoloration resistant after heat aging. Preferred articles bearing such a coating, which may comprise large amounts of pigment, are preferably cured by exposure to electron beam radiation.

  19. Method for making carbon films

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tan, M.X.

    1999-07-29T23:59:59.000Z

    A method for treating an organic polymer material, preferably a vinylidene chloride/vinyl chloride copolymer (Saran) to produce a flat sheet of carbon film material having a high surface area ([approx equal]1000 m[sup 2] /g) suitable as an electrode material for super capacitor applications. The method comprises heating a vinylidene chloride/vinyl chloride copolymer film disposed between two spaced apart graphite or ceramic plates to a first temperature of about 160 C for about 14 hours to form a stabilized vinylidene chloride/vinyl chloride polymer film, thereafter heating the stabilized film to a second temperature of about 750 C in an inert atmosphere for about one hour to form a carbon film; and finally activating the carbon film to increase the surface area by heating the carbon film in an oxidizing atmosphere to a temperature of at least 750--850 C for between 1--6 hours. 2 figs.

  20. Radionuclides in the terrestrial ecosystem near a Canadian uranium mill -- Part 3: Atmospheric deposition rates (pilot test)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thomas, P.A.

    2000-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Atmospheric deposition rates of uranium series radionuclides were directly measured at three sites near the operating Key Lake uranium mill in northern Saskatchewan. Sites impacted by windblown tailings and mill dusts had elevated rates of uranium deposition near the mill and elevated {sup 226}Ra deposition near the tailings compared to a control site. Rainwater collectors, dust jars, and passive vinyl collectors previously used at the Ranger Mine in Australia were pilot-tested. Adhesive vinyl surfaces (1 m{sup 2}) were oriented horizontally, vertically, and facing the ground as a means of measuring gravitational settling, wind impaction, and soil resuspension, respectively. Although the adhesive glue on the vinyls proved difficult to digest, relative differences in deposition mode were found among radionuclides and among sites. Dry deposition was a more important transport mechanism for uranium, {sup 226}Ra, and {sup 210}Pb than rainfall, while more {sup 210}Po was deposited with rainfall.

  1. Iron porphyrin polymer films: Materials for the modification of electrode surfaces and the detection of nitric oxide

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McGuire, M.; Drew, S.M. [Carleton College, Northfield, MN (United States)

    1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We are currently investigating a new method for the detection and quantification of nitric oxide (NO) based on a carbon electrode chemically modified with an iron porphyrin polymer film. Commercially available vinyl-substituted iron porphyrin monomers can be polymerized directly onto electrode surfaces through a published electrochemical polymerization process. We are also developing a synthesis for a new vinyl-substituted monomer, iron 5,10,15-triphenyl-20-vinyl porphyrin chloride, in hopes of improving polymer film stability. The electrochemistry of NO is also being investigated at electrodes chemically modified with an iron porphyrin polymer film. We are studying the catalytic oxidation of iron porphyrin bound NO to nitrate by molecular oxygen. The reaction with molecular oxygen is preceded by a one electron reduction of the iron porphyrin-NO complex. If currents proportional to nitric oxide concentration can be measured, a new NO electrochemical sensor will be designed.

  2. Electronic effects in the Diels-Alder reactions of vinylboranes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Watson, Jose Vernon

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    &H NMR spectrum of the oxidized products in the competitive reaction of 4a and 4b with vinyl-9-BBN 10 tH NMR spectrum of the oxidized products in the competitive reaction of 4b and 4c with vinyl-9-BBN 11 tH NMR spectrum of trivinylborane. 12 t...~C NMR spectrum of trivinylborane . 13 Plot of the reaction ratio versus time 17 21 22 26 27 in the reaction of 4a with trivinylborane 31 LIST OF FIGURES (Continued) 14 Plot of the reaction ratio versus time in the reaction of cyclopentadiene...

  3. Passivation-free solid state battery

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Abraham, K.M.; Peramunage, D.

    1998-06-16T23:59:59.000Z

    This invention pertains to passivation-free solid-state rechargeable batteries composed of Li{sub 4}Ti{sub 5}O{sub 12} anode, a solid polymer electrolyte and a high voltage cathode. The solid polymer electrolyte comprises a polymer host, such as polyacrylonitrile, poly(vinyl chloride), poly(vinyl sulfone), and poly(vinylidene fluoride), plasticized by a solution of a Li salt in an organic solvent. The high voltage cathode includes LiMn{sub 2}O{sub 4}, LiCoO{sub 2}, LiNiO{sub 2} and LiV{sub 2}O{sub 5} and their derivatives. 5 figs.

  4. Passivation-free solid state battery

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Abraham, Kuzhikalail M. (Needham, MA); Peramunage, Dharmasena (Norwood, MA)

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This invention pertains to passivation-free solid-state rechargeable batteries composed of Li.sub.4 Ti.sub.5 O.sub.12 anode, a solid polymer electrolyte and a high voltage cathode. The solid polymer electrolyte comprises a polymer host, such as polyacrylonitrile, poly(vinyl chloride), poly(vinyl sulfone), and poly(vinylidene fluoride), plasticized by a solution of a Li salt in an organic solvent. The high voltage cathode includes LiMn.sub.2 O.sub.4, LiCoO.sub.2, LiNiO.sub.2 and LiV.sub.2 O.sub.5 and their derivatives.

  5. Synthesis of Dihydrobenzofurans via Palladium-Catalyzed Heteroannulations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Roman Vladimirovich Rozhkov

    2004-12-19T23:59:59.000Z

    Palladium-catalyzed heteroannulation of 1,3-dienes with 3-iodo-2-alkenols, and 2-iodo-2-alkenols, as well as their amino analogs, affords the corresponding cyclic ethers and amines respectively. The presence of a {beta}-hydrogen in the vinylic halide results in {beta}-hydride elimination giving the corresponding alkyne. The presence of a bulky group in the {alpha}-position of the vinylic halide results in failure or reduced amounts of annulation products. A chloride source, pyridine base and electron-rich phosphine are essential for this reaction.

  6. Separation of gases through gas enrichment membrane composites

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Swedo, R.J.; Kurek, P.R.

    1988-07-19T23:59:59.000Z

    Thin film composite membranes having as a permselective layer a film of a homopolymer of certain vinyl alkyl ethers are useful in the separation of various gases. Such homopolymers have a molecular weight of greater than 30,000 and the alkyl group of the vinyl alkyl monomer has from 4 to 20 carbon atoms with branching within the alkyl moiety at least at the carbon atom bonded to the ether oxygen or at the next adjacent carbon atom. These membranes show excellent hydrolytic stability, especially in the presence of acidic or basic gaseous components.

  7. Vinylboranes as trans-dihydroxyethylene equivalents in Diels-Alder reactions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Redman, Aniko Maria

    2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

    -Bicyclo[2. 2. 1]hept-5-en-2, 3-diol (54), . trans-3-Methyl-3-cyclohexen-1, 6-diol (55) . . REFERENCES VITA Page 65 66 66 67 68 69 69 70 70 71 72 73 74 74 75 77 80 LIST OF TABLES TABLE I Reaction Conditions and Yields of the Oxidized... is the opposite of vinyl-9-BBN, which forms mainly the meta-substituted product. 15 Scheme 10 CHs 3 1. 144 h, 85 C 2. HzOz, NaOH 63% CHs OH + SiMes 88: 12 CHs , , SiMes OH Other dialkyl-vinylboranes, such as vinyl-3, 6-dimethylborepane...

  8. Modified epoxy coatings on mild steel: Tribology and surface energy Witold Brostow a,b

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    North Texas, University of

    . used Cu and Ni powders as fillers in an epoxy resin and in poly(vinyl chloride) and studiedModified epoxy coatings on mild steel: Tribology and surface energy Witold Brostow a,b , Madhuri in revised form 25 May 2010 Accepted 10 August 2010 Available online 21 September 2010 Keywords: Epoxy

  9. Adsorption and chemical reaction of Cu(hfac)(vtms) on Young Su Chung, Hyoo Suk Lee, Yoon Sup Lee, Sehun Kim *

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kim, Sehun

    Adsorption and chemical reaction of Cu(hfac)(vtms) on Cu(1 1 1) Young Su Chung, Hyoo Suk Lee, Yoon the adsorption and reaction of Cu(hfac) (vtms) (hexaÂŻuoroacetylacetonate, hfac; vinyl tri- methyl silane, vtms between adsorbed Cu(hfac) molecules were observed to occur between 240 and 400 K. The adsorption geo

  10. List of Journal Publications T. Wu, M. Frydrych, K. O'Kelly, B. Chen*: Poly(glycerol sebacate urethane)-cellulose

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ojovan, Michael

    List of Journal Publications · T. Wu, M. Frydrych, K. O'Kelly, B. Chen*: Poly(glycerol sebacate and Engineering C: Materials for Biological Applications. 2014, 34, 50-53. · T. Wu, R. Farnood, K. O'Kelly, B, K. O'Kelly, B. Chen*: Poly(vinyl alcohol) particle-reinforced elastomer composites with water

  11. (N-heterocyclic-carbene)Copper(I)-catalyzed carbon-carbon bond formation using carbon dioxide

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sirokman, Gergely

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis presents work towards the development of a new catalytic C-C bond forming reaction. Alkynes and olefins insert into [(IPr)CuH]2 (IPr = N,N-bis-(2,6-diisopropylphenyl)-1,3-imidazol-2-ylidene) to give copper vinyl ...

  12. APPLIED AND ENVIRONMENTAL MICROBIOLOGY, May 2007, p. 28472853 Vol. 73, No. 9 0099-2240/07/$08.00 0 doi:10.1128/AEM.02574-06

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alvarez-Cohen, Lisa

    ). Tetra- chloroethene (PCE) and trichlorethene (TCE) are the most prevalent chlorinated organic compounds a key role in the complete detoxification of chloroethenes as these organisms are the only microbes known to be capable of dechlorination beyond dichloroethenes to vinyl chloride (VC) and ethene. However

  13. The effect of a carbon-nanotube forest-mat strike face on the ballistic-protection performance of E-glass

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grujicic, Mica

    . Keywords: vinyl ester epoxy, carbon nanotubes, composite materials, armour 1 INTRODUCTION Recent efforts on the in-plane and the through-the-thickness properties of fibre-mat/polymer-matrix composite materials-weight materials development and multi-functional integration of armour. The earliest reports of composite light

  14. Treatment for obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) and OCD-related disorders using GVG

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dewey, Stephen L. (Manorville, NY); Brodie, Jonathan D. (Cos Cob, CT); Ashby, Jr., Charles R. (Miller Place, NY)

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention relates to the use of gamma vinyl-GABA (GVG) to treat obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) and OCD-related disorders, and to reduce or eliminate behaviors associated with obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) and OCD-related disorders.

  15. Kinetic isotope effects, dynamic effects, and mechanistic studies of organic reactions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Zhihong

    2007-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

    ŹÂ?-conjugating substituent is distal to the oxazolidinone but decreased steric interaction when the ĂŹÂ?-conjugating substituent is proximal to the oxazolidinone. Dynamic effects were studied in Diels-Alder reaction between acrolein and methyl vinyl ketone. This reaction...

  16. J. Am. Chem. SOC.1992, 114, 4265-4268 4265 allyl alcohol vs that of acrolein). Alternatively, one could argue

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Helgaker, Trygve

    J. Am. Chem. SOC.1992, 114, 4265-4268 4265 allyl alcohol vs that of acrolein). Alternatively, one could argue that acrolein liberates vinyl groups and allyl alcohol liberates acetylene; the former would The principal influences of the C = C group of allyl alcohol and acrolein are on the bonding configuration

  17. Initiated chemical vapor deposition of fluoropolymer coatings for the surface modification of complex geometries

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gupta, Malancha, 1980-

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Initiated chemical vapor deposition (iCVD) is a one-step, soventless process that can be used to produce polymeric thin films. The iCVD technique has been used to polymerize a wide variety of vinyl monomers such as glycidyl ...

  18. Division of Administration and Finance University Services

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Azevedo, Ricardo

    FORMAT PRINTER ON CAMPUS AT THE UNIVERSITY COPY CENTER Houston, July 26, 2011 ­ Services expand at the University Copy Center. "As the University of Houston continues to expand their facilities and grow. Projects can be printed on gloss paper, vinyl, banner paper, wall paper, polyester, and more. The latex ink

  19. Carbon-Oxygen Bond Activation in Esters by Platinum(0): Cleavage of the Less Reactive Bond

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jones, William D.

    esters in the presence of trialkylphosphines to give -allyl addition products.2 Acetate and benzoate-O oxidative addition to give -allyl products. Vinyl esters (acetate and benzoate) were also reported of the solution. Reaction with Allyl Acetate. Treatment of 1 with 10 equiv of allyl acetate in p-xylene-d10 at 160

  20. Degradation of polymer/substrate interfaces an attenuated total reflection Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy approach

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Degradation of polymer/substrate interfaces ­ an attenuated total reflection Fourier transform-co-vinyl acetate) (PVB) and ZnSe upon exposure to ozone, humidity and UV-B light. Also, the response of PVB ether of bisphenol A)-aluminum interfaces. In the presence of ozone, humidity and UV-B radiation

  1. Shrink Sleeve Flexo Inks Veronika Pekarovicova*, Alexandra Pekarovicova*, and Paul D. Fleming III*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fleming, Paul D. "Dan"

    containing monomers such as amide, ester, and/or ethylene/vinyl acetate are also frequently used. Shrink rate as the substrates. Several film materials are available such as polyvinyl chloride (PVC), oriented be also formed from polymers and copolymers of olefin monomers containing from 2 to about 12 carbon atoms

  2. Plasmachemical Amine Functionalization of Porous Polystyrene Spheres: The Importance of Particle Size

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Davis, Ben G.

    dissolving stabilizers (2 g of poly- (vinyl alcohol) and 2 g of sodium chloride) in 400 mL of hot water. Upon polymer structure by copolymerization of monomers.8 However, the number of commercial monomers is limited by the addition of a mixture of monomer (5 mL of styrene), cross-linker (45 mL of divinylbenzene), porogen (50 m

  3. Synthesis of an A/B/C Triblock Copolymer for Battery Materials Applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rubloff, Gary W.

    Section tert-Butylamine, cobalt chloride, and ethyl vinyl ether were purchased from Aldrich. Butyllithium incorporate metal salts. The organocobalt monomer was chosen due to the difficulty of polymerizing a lithium- containing monomer. The electrochemical reaction shown in reaction 1 is different from other lithium battery

  4. Peroxide grafted PDMS: hydrosilylation reaction study and thiol-ene chemistry as an alternative pathway

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    of azobiscyanopentanoyl chloride with amino terminated polysiloxane1 , and peroxycarbamate groups were introduced) groups were inserted in a polydimethylsiloxane backbone by hydrosilylation of a vinyl functional silaneBAP with mercaptopropylsilane monomer (DM3PSi) affords functionalized monomer (BP3DM2Si). Polycondensation of this monomer

  5. Acetic Acid from the Carbonylation of Chloride Methane Over Rhodium Based Catalysts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bao, Xinhe

    of commercially important materials like vinyl acetate monomer (VAM), cellulose acetate, and acetate esters. MoreAcetic Acid from the Carbonylation of Chloride Methane Over Rhodium Based Catalysts Yafang Fan Ă? that makes use of the latest advance in methyl chloride production is reported. Acetic acid was produced from

  6. Glossary of Colloid and Polymer Science Adrian R. Rennie, 2008.1 Glossary of Terms in Colloid and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rennie, Adrian

    are based on olefinic and other monomers that react like this such as styrene, vinyl chloride, butadiene etc that occurs by addition of a monomer to a double bond between two carbon atoms. The reaction will remove © Adrian R. Rennie, 2008.3 An alternating copolymer is a polymer formed from two monomers in a regular

  7. Proton-conducting polymer electrolyte membranes based on fluoropolymers incorporating perfluorovinyl ether sulfonic acids and fluoroalkenes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    acids. A novel synthetic route describing the preparation of perfluorovinyl ether monomer containing. The radical (co) and terpolymerization of 4-[(,,-trifluorovinyl)oxy]benzene sulfonyl chloride (TFVOBSC) with 1,1-difluoroethylene (or vinylidene fluoride, VDF), hexafluoropropene (HFP), and perfluoromethyl vinyl ether (PMVE

  8. E-Print Network 3.0 - aliii- tetraphenylporphyrin derivatives...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    were effective smoke sup- pressants and fire retardants for plasticized poly(vinyl chloride... as with sources of Zn(II) and Al(III), which were ZnSO4H2O and Al2(SO4)318H2O,...

  9. Mesogen-jacketed liquid crystalline polymers via stable free radical polymerization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mather, Patrick T.

    polymers have been prepared using multi- site initiators. Unusual monomers such as vinylbenzyl chloride main chain9) . In these materials, the side group was attached to a vinyl phenol group, a monomer showed that the PBBOS polymerized with a significantly higher reaction rate and monomer conversion

  10. Random and Sequential Radical Cotelomerizations of 3,3,3-Trifluoropropene (TFP, H2C=CHCF3) with Vinylidene

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    is quite reactive in contrast to longer perfluorinated chain vinyl-type monomers (e.g. CnF2n+1-CH=CH2, benzyl chloride, under redox complexes (e.g. Fe(CO)5), UV or gamma rays initiatons.7-19 In addition

  11. oceanservice.noaa.gov Activity 6: I Didn't Do It...Did I?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    plastic drinking water bottles, about 500 ml (1 pt) capacity 1 ­Vinyl tubing, about 3 mm (1/8 in) inside to use the scratch awl to punch a hole in the caps of the drinking water bottles. The holes in two large enough to fit the plastic tubing. Ask your partner to also punch a hole in the side of one

  12. Radioiodinated glucose analogues for use as imaging agents

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Goodman, Mark M. (Knoxville, TN); Knapp, Jr., Furn F. (Oak Ridge, TN)

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A radioiodinated branched carbohydrate for tissue imaging. Iodine-123 is stabilized in the compound by attaching it to a vinyl functional group that is on the carbohydrate. The compound exhibits good uptake and retention and is promising in the development of radiopharmaceuticals for brain, heart and tumor imaging.

  13. Radioiodinated branched carbohydrates

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Goodman, Mark M. (Knoxville, TN); Knapp, Jr., Furn F. (Oak Ridge, TN)

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A radioiodinated branched carbohydrate for tissue imaging. Iodine-123 is stabilized in the compound by attaching it to a vinyl functional group that is on the carbohydrate. The compound exhibits good uptake and retention and is promising in the development of radiopharmaceuticals for brain, heart and tumor imaging.

  14. Inorganic Surface Nanostructuring by Atmospheric Pressure Plasma-Induced Graft Polymerization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hicks, Robert F.

    Inorganic Surface Nanostructuring by Atmospheric Pressure Plasma-Induced Graft PolymerizationVed February 27, 2007. In Final Form: May 29, 2007 Surface graft polymerization of 1-vinyl-2-pyrrolidone onto by graft polymerization in both N-methyl-2-pyrrolidone (NMP) and in an NMP/water solvent mixture

  15. Stresa, Italy, 25-27 April 2007 BIODEGRADABLE POLYLACTIC ACID (PLA) MICROSTRUCTURES FOR SCAFFOLD

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    Stresa, Italy, 25-27 April 2007 BIODEGRADABLE POLYLACTIC ACID (PLA) MICROSTRUCTURES FOR SCAFFOLD present a simple and cost effective soft lithographic process to fabricate PLA scaffolds for tissue(vinyl alcohol) (PVA) layer was used as a mode release such that the PLA scaffold can be easily peeled off

  16. MATURITY, SEX RATIO, AND SIZE COMPOSITION OF THE NATURAL POPULATION OF AMERICAN LOBSTER, HOMARUS A MERICANUS,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . The following types of gear were used: (1) rectangular vinyl-coated lobster traps (1- X 2-inch and 1- X 1-inch supplemental data were obtained for our maturity studies. Of the aforementioned types of gear, consid- erably Whaler.' Sub- sequently, only 67 (2.6 %) of 2,582 lobsters were captured with the other types of gear

  17. Polymerizable 2(2-hydroxynaphthyl)2H-benzotriazole compounds

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gomez, P.M.; Neidlinger, H.H.

    1991-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

    Benzotriazole compounds having the formula: ##STR1## wherein R.sub.1 is H, Cl, or OCH.sub.3 ; R.sub.2 is a hydroxynaphthyl group; and R.sub.3 is a vinyl unsaturated polymerizable group. Homopolymers or copolymers thereof are effective as UV light stabilizers and absorbers.

  18. Composites: Part B 41 (2010) 8693 86 Analysis of flexural properties of hollow-particle filled composites

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gupta, Nikhil

    Composites: Part B 41 (2010) 86­93 86 Analysis of flexural properties of hollow-particle filled composites G. Tagliavia, M. Porfiri1 , and N. Gupta Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering properties of vinyl ester-glass hollow-particle filled composites, which are used in marine applications

  19. UBC Social Ecological Economic Development Studies (SEEDS) Student Report Bryan Major, Frederick Lee, Ibnul Hussain, Peter Wittstock

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Ibnul Hussain, Peter Wittstock An Investigation Into Alternatives to PVC Flooring Vinyl Chloride (PVC) within UBC buildings. PVC has been a common choice for flooring material around the years it has become more apparent that PVC is not the miracle material it was hailed as. We now know

  20. JOURNAL DE PHYSIQUE Colloque C3, supplement au n6, Tome 44, juin 1983 page C3-701

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    DECOMPOSED PVC G. Vancso, T.T. Nagy, B. Turcsanyi, T. Kelen and F. Tiidos Central Research Institute in thermally decomposed poly(vinyl chloride), PVC. Experimental - Ongrovil S 470, a suspension polymerized PVC powder (Borsod Chemical Works, Hungary), was used for preparation of the samples. PVC powder was degraded

  1. IMPROVED SPECTRAL RESPONSE OF SILICONE ENCAPSULANTED PHOTOVOLTAIC MODULES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    IMPROVED SPECTRAL RESPONSE OF SILICONE ENCAPSULANTED PHOTOVOLTAIC MODULES Nick E. Powell 1* , Byung the benefit of using optically superior silicone encapsulant materials over the incumbent ethylene vinyl in the UV region of the solar spectrum. Single cell mini-modules were prepared using two different

  2. Synthesis of Mixed Ceramic MgxZn1-xO Nanofibers via Mg2+ Using Sol-Gel Electrospinning

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Khan, Saad A.

    acetate (MgAc) and zinc acetate (ZnAc) with poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA), electrospinning is performed and then as- spun nanofibers are calcined in an air atmosphere at 600 °C for 3 h. As-spun and calcined are promising candidates for various usage, from batteries to solar cells and catalysts. Sol-gel electrospinning

  3. Enhanced biodegradation of phenol by a microbial consortium in a solidliquid two phase partitioning bioreactor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Daugulis, Andrew J.

    partitioning bioreactor George P. Prpich & Andrew J. Daugulis* Department of Chemical Engineering, Queen polymer beads (com- prised of ethylene vinyl acetate, or EVA) as the second phase. Polymer modification, and detrimentally, from indus- trial activities such as petroleum processing, plastic manufacturing

  4. High temperature polymer concrete

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Fontana, J.J.; Reams, W.

    1984-05-29T23:59:59.000Z

    This invention is concerned with a polymer concrete composition, which is a two-component composition useful with many bases including metal. Component A, the aggregate composition, is broadly composed of silica, silica flour, portland cement, and acrylamide, whereas Component B, which is primarily vinyl and acrylyl reactive monomers, is a liquid system.

  5. Hybrid Silica-PVA Nanofibers via Sol-Gel Electrospinning Tahira Pirzada,,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Khan, Saad A.

    Hybrid Silica-PVA Nanofibers via Sol-Gel Electrospinning Tahira Pirzada,,§ Sara A. Arvidson,,§ Carl: We report on the synthesis of poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA)-silica hybrid nanofibers via sol-gel electro is under- taken and reveals a composition window in which defect-free hybrid nanofibers with diameters

  6. Thermochemical study of liquid and solid organosilicon compounds

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Voronkov, M.G.; Klyuchnikov, V.A.; Danilova, T.F.; Korchagina, A.N.; Baryshok, V.P.; Landa, L.M.

    1987-03-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Simple and reliable methods of combustion of liquid and solid organosilicon compounds which ensure a high degree of completeness of combustion were proposed. The standard enthalpies of combustion and formation of 11 tetraalkyl(vinyl)silanes and 15 silatranes were determined.

  7. The Dalhousie Employee Guide to Materials Management on Campus Look for the 4 system bins around campus designated for recyclables, paper/cardboard, organics and garbage.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brownstone, Rob

    , straws, and dvd cases (garbage) Foams & soft # 6 plastics (garbage) Broken glass (garbage) What belongs cans, liquor/beer containers Milk containers Glass bottles and containers Tin, steel, and aluminum sweepings Broken glass (must be boxed & taped) Disposable gloves (latex, vinyl, etc.) Ceramics Packaging

  8. Prediction of the dynamic response of composite sandwich beams under shock loading

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fleck, Norman A.

    reported measured response of end-clamped sandwich beams, made from face sheets of glass fibre reinforced vinyl ester and a core of PVC foam or balsa wood (Tagarielli V.L., Deshpande V.S. and Fleck N core, such as polymer foams or balsa wood, are extensively employed in marine structures

  9. Spatially resolved mineral deposition on patterned self-assembled monolayers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rieke, P.C.; Tarasevich, B.J.; Wood, L.L.; Engelhard, M.H.; Baer, D.R.; Fryxell, G.E. (Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States)); John, C.M. (Charles Evans Associates, Redwood City, CA (United States)); Laken, D.A.; Jaehnig, M.C. (FEI Corp., Beaverton, OR (United States))

    1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Electron and ion beam lithographic techniques were used to pattern self-assembled monolayers with organic functional groups. Nucleation and growth of minerals from aqueous solution were confined to the patterned regions. A vinyl-terminated self-assembled monolayer (SAM) was selectively deposited in ion and electron beam etched regions of a methyl-terminated SAM. Sulfonation of the vinyl groups produced a surface patterned in either hydrophobic methyl groups or hydrophilic sulfonate groups. Subsequent growth of FeOOH films was confined to the sulfonated regions. Condensation images were used to image each step in the lithographic scheme. Resolution of the SAM patterning step was 1-3 [mu]m, while resolution of the mineral deposition step was 10-15 [mu]m. 15 refs., 3 figs.

  10. Comparative laboratory selection and field testing of polymers for selective control of water production in gas wells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ranjbar, M. [Technical Univ., Clausthal (Germany); Czolbe, P. [DBI-GUT, Freiberg (Germany); Kohler, N. [IFP, Rueil-Malmaison (France)

    1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Intensive comparative feasibility studies were performed in different laboratories in order to select the most promising polymer based technology for water control in gas production and storage wells exhibiting low matrix permeability, high temperature and high produced brine salinity. Core flow experiments performed under reservoir conditions with different commercially available chemical systems have pointed to the superiority of two relatively low-molecular-weight vinyl sulfonated/vinyl amide/acrylamide terpolymers over other polymers to decrease selectively and effectively the water permeability without affecting the gas flow. These polymers have excellent compatibility with all types of reservoir brines and good thermal stability up to 150 C. Furthermore, because of their high shear resistance, and excellent injectability even in low permeability cores, solutions of these polymers can be pumped at high injection rates with a moderate wellhead pressure.

  11. Georgia gulf widens the loop

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mullin, R.

    1992-12-09T23:59:59.000Z

    In describing Georgia Gulf's experience with Responsible Care, president and CEO Jerry Satrum turns first to the pollution prevention code. Noting that the $838-million/year commodities and vinyl resins producer is not on the list of companies with the highest reportable emissions, Satrum says that Georgia Gulf has, nonetheless, reduced emissions from 4.5 million tons in 1987 to 1 million tons. The waste minimization element of pollution prevention has also had a profound effect on a compelling challenge to the company - getting its smaller operations into the loop on Responsible Care. It also brings to bear the product stewardship code - waste and materials management programs at Georgia Gulf's three vinyl compounding operations address waste issues for suppliers and customers.

  12. Synthesis and thermal chemistry of selected N-vinylisoquinuclidenes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Beamer, Ralph Lewis

    1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    . wi th thi onyl 0 Ph I 0 H02C H02C / N 0 CH 0 C CH 02C Ph g=0 OCH3 CH302C CH3 2 =0 27 chloride in anhydrous methanol at 25'C t'o furnish, in 81K yield, an interesting product g. This new product contained not only the desired..., 690 cm 1 UV (CH3CN) ~ 287 nm (c 20, 900; H-NMR (CDC13)6 3. 75 (m, 2H, H-5 and H-6), 4. 1 (m, 1H, H-4), 4. 0 (s, 6H, OCH3), 5. 4 (m, 1H, H-l), 6. 4 (d, 1H, J=16 Hz, N-vinyl), 6. 9 (m, 2H, H-7 and H-8 vinyl), 7. 6 (m, SH, aromatic), 7. 8 (d, 1H, J=16...

  13. General engineering specifications for 6000 tpd SRC-I Demonstration Plant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1981-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This volume contains specifications for architectural features of buildings for the SRC-1 Demonstration Plant: skylights, ventilators, sealants, doors, mirrors, furring and lathing, gypsum plaster, lightweight plaster, wallboard, ceramic tile, acoustic ceiling systems, resilient flooring, carpeting, brick flooring, architectural painting, vinyl wall covering, chalkboards, tackboards, toilets, access flooring, lockers, partitions, washroom accessories, unit kitchens, dock levels, seals, shelters, custom casework, auditorium seats, drapery tacks, prefabricated buildings, stairs, elevators, shelves, etc. (LTN).

  14. Composite bipolar plate for electrochemical cells

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wilson, Mahlon S. (Los Alamos, NM); Busick, Deanna N. (Los Alamos, NM)

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A bipolar separator plate for fuel cells consists of a molded mixture of a vinyl ester resin and graphite powder. The plate serves as a current collector and may contain fluid flow fields for the distribution of reactant gases. The material is inexpensive, electrically conductive, lightweight, strong, corrosion resistant, easily mass produced, and relatively impermeable to hydrogen gas. The addition of certain fiber reinforcements and other additives can improve the properties of the composite material without significantly increasing its overall cost.

  15. Cyanoethylated compounds as additives in lithium/lithium batteries

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Nagasubramanian, Ganesan (Albuquerque, NM)

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The power loss of lithium/lithium ion battery cells is significantly reduced, especially at low temperatures, when about 1% by weight of an additive is incorporated in the electrolyte layer of the cells. The usable additives are organic solvent soluble cyanoethylated polysaccharides and poly(vinyl alcohol). The power loss decrease results primarily from the decrease in the charge transfer resistance at the interface between the electrolyte and the cathode.

  16. Solid polymer electrolytes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Abraham, Kuzhikalail M. (Needham, MA); Alamgir, Mohamed (Dedham, MA); Choe, Hyoun S. (Waltham, MA)

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This invention relates to Li ion (Li.sup.+) conductive solid polymer electrolytes composed of poly(vinyl sulfone) and lithium salts, and their use in all-solid-state rechargeable lithium ion batteries. The lithium salts comprise low lattice energy lithium salts such as LiN(CF.sub.3 SO.sub.2).sub.2, LiAsF.sub.6, and LiClO.sub.4.

  17. Method of making carbon nanotube composite materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    O'Bryan, Gregory; Skinner, Jack L; Vance, Andrew; Yang, Elaine Lai; Zifer, Thomas

    2014-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention is a method of making a composite polymeric material by dissolving a vinyl thermoplastic polymer, un-functionalized carbon nanotubes and hydroxylated carbon nanotubes and optionally additives in a solvent to make a solution and removing at least a portion of the solvent after casting onto a substrate to make thin films. The material has enhanced conductivity properties due to the blending of the un-functionalized and hydroxylated carbon nanotubes.

  18. Optimum energy and by-product recovery in chlorinated hydrocarbon disposal systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Santoleri, J.J.

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper covers the three principal areas of a chlorinated hydrocarbon waste disposal system for a typical vinyl chloride monomer facility. These are the incineration, the energy recovery system, and the by-product recovery system. It is shown that the overall efficiency of the energy and by-product recovery systems is dependent on the optimization of the primary combustor (incineration system). 11 refs.

  19. Solid polymer electrolyte lithium batteries

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Alamgir, M.; Abraham, K.M.

    1993-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

    This invention pertains to Lithium batteries using Li ion (Li[sup +]) conductive solid polymer electrolytes composed of solvates of Li salts immobilized in a solid organic polymer matrix. In particular, this invention relates to Li batteries using solid polymer electrolytes derived by immobilizing solvates formed between a Li salt and an aprotic organic solvent (or mixture of such solvents) in poly(vinyl chloride). 3 figures.

  20. Solid polymer electrolytes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Abraham, K.M.; Alamgir, M.; Choe, H.S.

    1995-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

    This invention relates to Li ion (Li{sup +}) conductive solid polymer electrolytes composed of poly(vinyl sulfone) and lithium salts, and their use in all-solid-state rechargeable lithium ion batteries. The lithium salts comprise low lattice energy lithium salts such as LiN(CF{sub 3}SO{sub 2}){sub 2}, LiAsF{sub 6}, and LiClO{sub 4}. 2 figs.

  1. Solid polymer electrolyte lithium batteries

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Alamgir, Mohamed (Dedham, MA); Abraham, Kuzhikalail M. (Needham, MA)

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This invention pertains to Lithium batteries using Li ion (Li.sup.+) conductive solid polymer electrolytes composed of solvates of Li salts immobilized in a solid organic polymer matrix. In particular, this invention relates to Li batteries using solid polymer electrolytes derived by immobilizing solvates formed between a Li salt and an aprotic organic solvent (or mixture of such solvents) in poly(vinyl chloride).

  2. Neutron Absorbing Alloys

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Zhong, Yuanzhen (Wayne, NJ), Parikh, Hemant (Harriman, NY); Smith, Terry E. (Murray, KY)

    2002-05-28T23:59:59.000Z

    A process for making homogeneous copolymers of vinylpyrrolidone (VP) and vinyl acetate (VA) which form clear aqueous solutions and have high cloud points. The process involves precharging VP and VA monomers in a predetermined ratio, and then feeding VP and VA at a predetermined rate, the ratio of the components in the initial charge and the feeding rates for the monomer being selected in accordance with the reactivity rates of the monomers towards copolymerization as opposed to homopolymerization.

  3. CuC1 thermochemical cycle for hydrogen production

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Fan, Qinbai (Chicago, IL); Liu, Renxuan (Chicago, IL)

    2012-01-03T23:59:59.000Z

    An electrochemical cell for producing copper having a dense graphite anode electrode and a dense graphite cathode electrode disposed in a CuCl solution. An anion exchange membrane made of poly(ethylene vinyl alcohol) and polyethylenimine cross-linked with a cross-linking agent selected from the group consisting of acetone, formaldehyde, glyoxal, glutaraldehyde, and mixtures thereof is disposed between the two electrodes.

  4. EMI shield enhancement through the addition of copper coated glass fibers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Montanye, Jeffrey Richard

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    E. , University of Wisconsin-Madison Chair of Committee: Dr. G. W. Halldin This research investigated the feasibility of using copper coated glass fibers to increase the EMI shielding characteristics of vinyl ester thermosetting resin. The fibers were coated... 35 36 37 41 41 48 55 57 58 58 58 58 60 61 62 62 62 Plate Times. Surface Area Analysis Scanning Electron Microscopy. MOLDED COMPOSITE MATERIALS. Resin. Sample Preparation. Evaluation. Scanning Electron Microscopy Flexural...

  5. Radiation-hardened polymeric films

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Arnold, C. Jr.; Hughes, R.C.; Kepler, R.G.; Kurtz, S.R.

    1984-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

    The radiation-induced conductivity of polymeric dielectrics with low electronic mobility is reduced by doping with electron donor or electron acceptor compounds at a level of 10/sup 15/ to 10/sup 21/ molecules of dopant/cm/sup 3/. Polyesters, polyolefins, perfluoropolyolefins, vinyl polymers, vinylidene polymers, polycarbonates, polysulfones and polyimides can benefit from such a treatment. Usable dopants include 2,4,7-trinitro-9-fluorenone, tetracyanethylene, 7,7,8,8-tetracyanoquinodimethane, m-dinitrobenzene, 2-isopropylcarbazole, and triphenylamine.

  6. Microbial based chlorinated ethene destruction

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bagwell, Christopher E. (Aiken, SC); Freedman, David L. (Clemson, SC); Brigmon, Robin L. (North Augusta, SC); Bratt, William B. (Atlanta, GA); Wood, Elizabeth A. (Marietta, GA)

    2009-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

    A mixed culture of Dehalococcoides species is provided that has an ability to catalyze the complete dechlorination of polychlorinated ethenes such as PCE, TCE, cDCE, 1,1-DCE and vinyl chloride as well as halogenated ethanes such as 1,2-DCA and EDB. The mixed culture demonstrates the ability to achieve dechlorination even in the presence of high source concentrations of chlorinated ethenes.

  7. Radiation-hardened polymeric films

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Arnold, Jr., Charles (Albuquerque, NM); Hughes, Robert C. (Albuquerque, NM); Kepler, R. Glen (Albuquerque, NM); Kurtz, Steven R. (Albuquerque, NM)

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The radiation-induced conductivity of polymeric dielectrics with low electronic mobility is reduced by doping with electron donor or electron acceptor compounds at a level of 10.sup.15 to 10.sup.21 molecules of dopant/cm.sup.3. Polyesters, polyolefins, perfluoropolyolefins, vinyl polymers, vinylidene polymers, polycarbonates, polysulfones and polyimides can benefit from such a treatment. Usable dopants include 2,4,7-trinitro-9-fluorenone, tetracyanethylene, 7,7,8,8-tetracyanoquinodimethane, m-dinitrobenzene, 2-isopropylcarbazole, and triphenylamine.

  8. Silicon dendritic web material process development. First quarterly report, March 28-June 30, 1980

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Campbell, R. B.; Stapleton, R. E.; Sienkiewicz, L.; Rai-Choudhury, P.

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Initial values of pressure, power, and speed have been determined for seam bonding interconnects to dendritic web solar cells. Satisfactory bond strengths and high yield have been achieved without cell damage. However, in case of processing large numbers of cells for module fabrication, further testing is required to assure reproducibility of this technique. Various techniques have been developed for fabricating solar modules by lamination using ethylene vinyl acetate with a glass superstrate, and no cell breakage has been noted.

  9. Electrically conductive polymer concrete coatings

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Fontana, J.J.; Elling, D.; Reams, W.

    1988-05-26T23:59:59.000Z

    A sprayable electrically conductive polymer concrete coating for vertical and overhead applications is described. The coating is permeable yet has low electrical resistivity (<10 ohm-cm), good bond strength to concrete substrates, and good weatherability. A preferred formulation contains about 60 wt% calcined coke breeze, 40 wt% vinyl ester resin with 3.5 wt% modified bentonite clay. Such formulations apply evenly and provide enough rigidity for vertical or overhead structures so there is no drip or sag. 4 tabs.

  10. Electrically conductive polymer concrete coatings

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Fontana, Jack J. (Shirley, NY); Elling, David (Centereach, NY); Reams, Walter (Shirley, NY)

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A sprayable electrically conductive polymer concrete coating for vertical d overhead applications is described. The coating is permeable yet has low electrical resistivity (<10 ohm-cm), good bond strength to concrete substrates, and good weatherability. A preferred formulation contains about 60 wt % calcined coke breeze, 40 wt % vinyl ester with 3.5 wt % modified bentonite clay. Such formulations apply evenly and provide enough rigidity for vertical or overhead structures so there is no drip or sag.

  11. Electrically conductive polymer concrete coatings

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Fontana, J.J.; Elling, D.; Reams, W.

    1990-03-13T23:59:59.000Z

    A sprayable electrically conductive polymer concrete coating for vertical d overhead applications is described. The coating is permeable yet has low electrical resistivity (<10 ohm-cm), good bond strength to concrete substrates, and good weatherability. A preferred formulation contains about 60 wt % calcined coke breeze, 40 wt % vinyl ester with 3.5 wt % modified bentonite clay. Such formulations apply evenly and provide enough rigidity for vertical or overhead structures so there is no drip or sag.

  12. Hydrocarbon Processing`s petrochemical processes `97

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1997-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The paper compiles information on numerous petrochemical processes, describing the application, the process, yields, economics, commercial plants, references, and licensor. Petrochemicals which are synthesized include: alkylbenzene, methylamines, ammonia, benzene, bisphenol-A, BTX aromatics, butadiene, butanediol, butyraldehyde, caprolactam, cumene, dimethyl terephthalate, ethanolamines, ethylbenzene, ethylene, ethylene glycols, ethylene oxide, formaldehyde, maleic anhydride, methanol, olefins, paraxylene, phenol, phthalic anhydride, polycaproamide, polyethylene, polyethylene terephthalate, polypropylene, PVC, styrene, terephthalic acid, urea, vinyl chloride, and xylene isomers.

  13. Packaging and fabrication systems for extending storage life and subsequent retail caselife of pork

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rape, Steven Wayne

    1973-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    These chops were changes were (1973) further reported that bacterial counts (log ) from cuts stored in poly- vinyl chloride film were 100 to 1, 000 fold higher than those from vacuum packaged cuts. Ashby and James (1973 b) compared the effects of certain... was created by use of a stationary nozzle type vacuum n&n- Table l. Experimental design for comparisons of packaging systems for fresh pork cuts Packaging treatment Cut Number of samples Storage temperature (' C) Storage intervals (days) Retail...

  14. Biomimetic hydrogel materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bertozzi, Carolyn (Albany, CA); Mukkamala, Ravindranath (Houston, TX); Chen, Qing (Albany, CA); Hu, Hopin (Albuquerque, NM); Baude, Dominique (Creteil, FR)

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Novel biomimetic hydrogel materials and methods for their preparation. Hydrogels containing acrylamide-functionalized carbohydrate, sulfoxide, sulfide or sulfone copolymerized with a hydrophilic or hydrophobic copolymerizing material selected from the group consisting of an acrylamide, methacrylamide, acrylate, methacrylate, vinyl and a derivative thereof present in concentration from about 1 to about 99 wt %. and methods for their preparation. The method of use of the new hydrogels for fabrication of soft contact lenses and biomedical implants.

  15. Biomimetic Hydrogel Materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bertozzi, Carolyn (Albany, CA), Mukkamala, Ravindranath (Houston, TX), Chen, Oing (Albany, CA), Hu, Hopin (Albuquerque, NM), Baude, Dominique (Creteil, FR)

    2003-04-22T23:59:59.000Z

    Novel biomimetic hydrogel materials and methods for their preparation. Hydrogels containing acrylamide-functionalized carbohydrate, sulfoxide, sulfide or sulfone copolymerized with a hydrophilic or hydrophobic copolymerizing material selected from the group consisting of an acrylamide, methacrylamide, acrylate, methacrylate, vinyl and a derivative thereof present in concentration from about 1 to about 99 wt %. and methods for their preparation. The method of use of the new hydrogels for fabrication of soft contact lenses and biomedical implants.

  16. Effect of turing pattern indicators on CIMA oscillators

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Noszticzius, Z. [Univ. of Texas, Austin, TX (United States)]|[Technical Univ. of Budapest (Hungary); Qi Ouyang; McCormick, W.D.; Swinney, H.L. [Univ. of Texas, Austin, TX (United States)

    1992-07-23T23:59:59.000Z

    Past experiments on Turing patterns have all been conducted using the chlorite-iodide-malonic acid (CIMA) reaction with Thiodene from Prolabo as an indicator. In this work two other indicators have been examined and found to yield Turing patterns similar to those obtained with Thiodene: soluble starch and poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA). The present work shows that Thiodene is not simply a soluble starch, as previously assumed, but is probably made by mixing about 7% starch with 93% molten urea. To determine whether the indicators might also effect the chemical kinetics, the effect of the indicators was examined in batch studies of two CIMA systems: the minimal CIMA system (chlorine dioxide-iodine-malonic acid) and the CIMA-Cl system (chlorine dioxide-iodomalonic acid-chloride). It was found that starch and poly(vinyl alcohol) affect the dynamics of the minimal CIMA oscillator but they have no effect on the CIMA-Cl system. On the other hand, in the same or even larger weight/volume concentration glucose and 2-propanol has no effect on the minimal CIMA system. These finding prove that starch and poly(vinyl alcohol) participate exclusively in triiodide complex-forming reactions: they react with an enzyme-like selectivity. Thiodene, however, has an effect on the CIMA-Cl reaction because of its urea content. 19 refs., 6 figs.

  17. Polysulfones for conservation in the ethylene polymer industry. Progress report No. 7, October 1979-March 1980

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Steinberg, M.; Johnson, R.; Elling, D.; Bernstein, P.; Varker, A.E.

    1980-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Ethylene-SO/sub 2/ polysulfone copolymers were prepared by /sup 60/Co gamma radiation, as well as by electron-beam radiation and by thermocatalysis, as a means of incorporating a polluting waste product material such as SO/sub 2/ into ethylene polymers for the purpose of conserving ethylene feedstock. Ethylene-SO/sub 2/ copolymer was pressure molded into discs which had a high degree of hardness as well as partial transparency, but were also very brittle. Differential Scanning Calorimetry (DSC) and Thermal Gravimetric Analysis (TGA) indicated peak decomposition at 350/sup 0/C. Long term heat aging tests showed stability to 175/sup 0/C and initiation of decomposition at 200/sup 0/C in air after 900 h. Decomposition became severe as the temperature was increased to 300/sup 0/C. The activation energies for decomposition were 57.3 and 56.8 kcal/mole for liquid-phase and gas-phase formed copolymers, respectively. The ethylene-SO/sub 2/ copolymer was modified by the incorporation of monomeric styrene, 2-vinyl pyridine, 4-vinyl pyridine, and N-vinyl pyrrolidine. A summary of characterization studies by INCO which includes solubility, infra-red and x-ray analysis of the ethylene-SO/sub 2/ copolymer and with additives are presented.

  18. Mixed Waste Management Facility (MWMF) groundwater monitoring report. Second quarter 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Groundwater monitoring continued at the Savannah River Plant. During second quarter 1993, nine constituents exceeded final Primary Drinking Water Standards in groundwater samples from downgradient monitoring wells at the Mixed Waste Management Facility, the Old Burial Ground, the E-Area Vaults, and the proposed Hazardous Waste/Mixed Waste Disposal Vaults. As in previous quarters, tritium and trichloroethylene were the most widespread constituents. Chloroethene (vinyl chloride), dichloromethane (methylene chloride), 1,1-dichloroethylene, gross alpha, lead, nonvolatile beta, or tetrachloroethylene also exceeded standards in one or more wells. The groundwater flow directions and rates in the three hydrostratigraphic units were similar to those of previous quarters.

  19. Novel chemical pathways and charge-transport dynamics of electrodes modified with electropolymerized layers of (Co(v-terpy)/sub 2/)/sup 2 +/

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Guadalupe, A.R.; Usifer, D.A.; Potts, K.T.; Hurrell, H.C.; Mogstad, A.E.; Abruna, H.D.

    1988-05-25T23:59:59.000Z

    Electropolymerized films of (Co(v-terpy)/sub 2/)/sup 2 +/ (v-terpy is 4'-vinyl-2,2':6',2''-terpyridinyl) exhibit reactivity patterns, especially with regard to ligand exchange, that differ significantly from those exhibited by (Co(terpy)/sub 2/)/sup 2 +/ in solution. These differences are attributed to the physically constrained environment present in the polymer film. The charge-transport properties follow the model of Dahms and Ruff and the predicted concentration dependence of the diffusion coefficient. These electropolymerized films are also active in the electrocatalytic reduction of carbon dioxide.

  20. Identification and Developmental Expression of Xenopus laevis SUMO Proteases

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Yonggang; Mukhopadhyay, Debaditya; Mathew, Smita; Hasebe, Takashi; Heimeier, Rachel A.; Azuma, Yoshiaki; Kolli, Nagamalleswari; Shi, Yun-bo; Wilkinson, Keith D.; Dasso, Mary

    2009-12-24T23:59:59.000Z

    ]. Human SENP1 and SENP2 are most closely related to each other, and can catalyze processing and deconjugation of all SUMO paralogues [12,13,14]. Human SENP3 and SENP5 are likewise most closely related to each other, but they show a strong preference... derivatives of tagged SUMO-1 and -2 (HA-SU1-VME and HA-SU2-VME; [44]). In all cases, actin was used as a loading control to assure that equivalent amounts of protein were loaded in each lane. In a manner similar to their vinyl sulfone counterparts, HA-SU1-VME...

  1. Treatment of addiction to ethanol and addictive-related behavior

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dewey, Stephen L. (Manorville, NY); Brodie, Jonathan D. (Cos Cob, CT); Ashby, Jr., Charles R. (Miller Place, NY)

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention provides a highly efficient method for treating alcohol addiction and for changing addiction-related behavior of a mammal suffering from alcohol addiction. The method includes administering to a mammal an effective amount of gamma vinylGABA or a pharmaceutically acceptable salt thereof. In one embodiment, the method of the present invention includes administering to the mammal an effective amount of a composition which increase central nervous system GABA levels wherein the effective amount is sufficient to diminish, inhibit or eliminate behavior associated with craving or use of alcohol.

  2. Method for controlling clathrate hydrates in fluid systems

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sloan, Jr., Earle D. (Golden, CO)

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Discussed is a process for preventing clathrate hydrate masses from impeding the flow of fluid in a fluid system. An additive is contacted with clathrate hydrate masses in the system to prevent those clathrate hydrate masses from impeding fluid flow. The process is particularly useful in the natural gas and petroleum production, transportation and processing industry where gas hydrate formation can cause serious problems. Additives preferably contain one or more five member and/or six member cyclic chemical groupings. Additives include poly(N-vinyl-2-pyrrolidone) and hydroxyethylcellulose, either in combination or alone.

  3. Fluorescence emission as a probe to investigate electrochemical polymerization of 9-vinylanthracene

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kamat, P.V.

    1987-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The cationic polymerization of 9-vinylanthracene can be initiated at a transparent SnO/sub 2/ electrode with the application of anodic potentials (E > 1.1 V vs. saturated sodium chloride calomel electrode) in acetonitrile solutions. The excimer emission (emission maximum approx.500 nm) of poly(9-vinyl-anthracene) which is distinguishable from the monomer fluorescence emission (emission maxima 410, 430 nm) has been used to probe the electrochemical polymerization process directly. The in situ spectroelectrochemical technique, which would be useful in obtaining kinetic and mechanistic information of the electropolymerization process, is described.

  4. Resource recovery - a byproduct of hazardous waste incineration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Santoleri, J.J.

    1982-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Three principal areas of a chlorinated hydrocarbon waste disposal system for a typical vinyl chloride monomer (VCM) facility are described: the incinerator, the energy-recovery system, and the byproduct-recovery system. The overall efficiency of the energy- and *byproduct-recovery systems is dependent on the optimization of the primary combustor. An example is presented in table form which lists typical waste quantities for the plant and operating costs, including utility requirements for the incinerator system, the quench, absorber and scrubber. Savings that can result by the addition of the energy- and acid-recovery systems can pay for the waste disposal system and return money to the plant.

  5. Cationically polymerizable monomers derived from renewable sources

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Crivello, J.V.

    1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The objectives of this project are to design and synthesize novel monomers which orginate from renewable biological sources and to carry out their rapid, efficient, pollution-free and energy efficient cationic polymerization to useful products under the influence of ultraviolet light or heat. A summary of the results of the past year's research on cationically polymerizable monomers derived from renewable sources is presented. Three major areas of investigation corresponding to the different classes of naturally occurring starting materials were investigated; epoxidized terpenes and natural rubber and vinyl ethers from alcohols and carbohydrates.

  6. Temperature-responsive surface-functionalized polyethylene films

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ponder, Bill C.

    2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

    precursors. PhotograAing on these surfaces (Equation 1) in the presence of various vinyl monomers was found to be very effective, as XPS and ATR-IR data indicated the extent of grafting could be controlled by monomer concentration and the solvent employed... in this case was measured by following the percent quenching of pyrene as these films were suspended in varying concentrations of a quenching agent, such as N-N'-dimethylethanolamine, in solvents such as THF, methylene chloride and ethanol. The value...

  7. Global petrochemical R and D focus on projects that provide a return

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Knott, D.

    1996-08-26T23:59:59.000Z

    Because of tough market conditions, the research and development of new petrochemical products is down along with spending. The paper discusses the new marketing strategy used by petrochemical developers while relenting all blue sky research to academia. The paper discusses developments and research in the four main targeted research areas. These include basic petrochemicals such as ethylene an propylene; petrochemical intermediates such as 1,4 butanediol and vinyl chloride monomer; commodity polymers, notably linear low density polyethylene; and, specialty polymers such as engineering plastics. The advances in production technologies in these areas are then discussed.

  8. Polymerization of acetaldehyde using tetraiso-Propyl titanate as a catalyst

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Makita, Muneharu

    2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

    with palladous chloride as a catalyst forms vinylacetate and water. ~ CH =CHO CDCH i (CH -CHQ CDCH l 2 3 n Vinylacetate monomers are polymerized by radical initiation to form polyvinyl acetate. (CH2-CHO ~ COCH3) n H or OH (CH -CH)n n OH polyvinyl... of tetravinyl titanate by procedure (B) (21) Hydrolysis reaction of vinyl titanate RESULTS AND DISCUSSION The materials obtained from the polymerization reaction at high temperature The materials obtained from the polymerization of acetaldehyde at 200'C...

  9. Cationically polymerizable monomers derived from renewable sources. Annual performance report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Crivello, J.V.

    1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The objectives of this project are to design and synthesize novel monomers which orginate from renewable biological sources and to carry out their rapid, efficient, pollution-free and energy efficient cationic polymerization to useful products under the influence of ultraviolet light or heat. A summary of the results of the past year`s research on cationically polymerizable monomers derived from renewable sources is presented. Three major areas of investigation corresponding to the different classes of naturally occurring starting materials were investigated; epoxidized terpenes and natural rubber and vinyl ethers from alcohols and carbohydrates.

  10. Hydrocarbon Processing`s HPI construction boxscore update

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Data are compiled for oil and gas industry construction projects worldwide, listing country (and state or province, when appropriate), company, location of the project, purpose, plant capacity, estimated cost, current status, licensor, engineering firm, and construction company. Projects include carbon monoxide, urea, ammonia, isomerizer, hydrogen, alkylation, TAME, desalter, hydrotreating, sulfur, waste gas cleanup, catalytic reformer, ethylene recovery, natural gas helium, nitrogen removal, NGL recovery, cumene, dewaxer, polystyrene, vinyl chloride, synthesis gas, formaldehyde, FCC cracker, isobutylene, H{sub 2}S removal, cogeneration, methanol, delayed coker, gas oil treater, NGL fractionation, BTX, information systems, control systems, waste water cleanup, glycol treater, acid gas removal, LPG, MTBE, caustic cleanup, visbreaker, naphtha treater, and others.

  11. Development of Damp-Heat Resistant Self-Primed EVA and Non-EVA Encapsulant Formulations at NREL

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pern, F. J.; Jorgensen, G. J.

    2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Self-primed ethylene-vinyl acetate (EVA) and non-EVA (PMG) encapsulant formulations were developed that have greater resistance to damp heat exposure at 85 deg C and 85% relative humidity (RH) (in terms of adhesion strength to glass substrates) than a commonly used commercial EVA product. The self-primed EVA formulations were developed on the basis of high-performing glass priming formulations that have previously proven to significantly enhance the adhesion strength of unprimed and primed EVA films on glass substrates during damp heat exposure. The PMG encapsulant formulations were based on an ethylene-methylacrylate copolymer containing glycidyl methacrylate.

  12. High temperature polymer concrete compositions

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Fontana, Jack J. (Shirley, NY); Reams, Walter (Shirley, NY)

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This invention is concerned with a polymer concrete composition, which is a two-component composition useful with many bases including metal. Component A, the aggregate composition, is broadly composed of silica, silica flour, portland cement, and acrylamide, whereas Component B, which is primarily vinyl and acrylyl reactive monomers, is a liquid system. A preferred formulation emphasizing the major necessary components is as follows: ______________________________________ Component A: Silica sand 60-77 wt. % Silica flour 5-10 wt. % Portland cement 15-25 wt. % Acrylamide 1-5 wt. % Component B: Styrene 50-60 wt. % Trimethylolpropane 35-40 wt. % trimethacrylate ______________________________________ and necessary initiators, accelerators, and surfactants.

  13. Nanopatterns by phase separation of patterned mixed polymer monolayers

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Huber, Dale L; Frischknecht, Amalie

    2014-02-18T23:59:59.000Z

    Micron-size and sub-micron-size patterns on a substrate can direct the self-assembly of surface-bonded mixed polymer brushes to create nanoscale patterns in the phase-separated mixed polymer brush. The larger scale features, or patterns, can be defined by a variety of lithographic techniques, as well as other physical and chemical processes including but not limited to etching, grinding, and polishing. The polymer brushes preferably comprise vinyl polymers, such as polystyrene and poly(methyl methacrylate).

  14. Effect of flame-retarding additives on surface chemistry in Li-ion batteries

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nam, N.D.; Park, I.J. [Department of Advanced Materials Science and Engineering, Sungkyunkwan University, 300 Chunchun-Dong, Jangan-Gu, Suwon 440-746 (Korea, Republic of)] [Department of Advanced Materials Science and Engineering, Sungkyunkwan University, 300 Chunchun-Dong, Jangan-Gu, Suwon 440-746 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, J.G., E-mail: kimjg@skku.ac.kr [Department of Advanced Materials Science and Engineering, Sungkyunkwan University, 300 Chunchun-Dong, Jangan-Gu, Suwon 440-746 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, H.S. [Battery Research Group, Korea Electrotechnology Research Institute, Changwon 641-120 (Korea, Republic of)] [Battery Research Group, Korea Electrotechnology Research Institute, Changwon 641-120 (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    This study examined the properties of 1 wt.% vinylene carbonate (VC), vinyl ethylene carbonate (VEC), and diphenyl octyl phosphate (DPOF) additive electrolytes as a promising way of beneficially improving the surface and cell resistance of Li-ion batteries. Surface film formation on the negative and positive electrodes was analyzed by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS), Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy, and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). In conclusion, EIS, FT-IR spectroscopy and SEM results confirmed that DPOF is an excellent additive to the electrolyte in the Li-ion batteries due to the improved co-intercalation of the solvent molecules.

  15. Age and growth of black drum (Pogonias cromis) from Galveston Bay, Texas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    King, John Mark

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Bertalanffy Growth Equation SUMMARY RECOMMENDATIONS FOR FUTURE STUDIES REFERENCES VITA Page 1 8 10 10 16 20 21 24 24 24 25 25 27 28 29 31 32 33 36 LIST OF TABLES Total number, mean lengths (mm) and weight (g) for black drum from... mixture poured into plastic peel- away molds (22 mm wide x 25 mm tong x 22 mm deep). The embedding mixture was produced by mixing vinyl cyclohexene dioxide, diglycidyl ether and nonenyl succinic anhydride in concentrations of 10. 0, 4. 0, and 26. 0 g...

  16. Field lysimeter investigations: Low-level waste data base development program for fiscal year 1995. Volume 8, Annual report, October 1994-- September 1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McConnell, J.W. Jr.; Rogers, R.D.; Larsen, I.L. [Lockheed Idaho Technologies Co., Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Jastrow, J.D. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Sanford, W.E. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Sullivan, T.M. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States)

    1996-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Field Lysimeter Investigations: Low-Level Waste Data Base Development Program, funded by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission, is (a) studying the degradation effects in organic ion-exchange resins caused by radiation, (b) examining the adequacy of test procedures recommended in the Branch Technical Position on Waste Form to meet the requirements of 10 CFR 61 using solidified ion-exchange resins, (c) obtaining performance information on solidified ion- exchange resins in a disposal environment, and (d) determining the condition of liners used to dispose the ion-exchange resins. Compressive test results of 12-year-old cement and vinyl ester- styrene solidified waste form samples are presented, which show effects of aging and self-irradiation. Results of the tenth year of data acquisition from the field testing are presented and discussed. During the continuing field testing, both portland type I-II cement and Dow vinyl ester-styrene waste form samples are being tested in lysimeter arrays located at Argonne National Laboratory-East in Illinois and at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The study is designed to provide continuous data on nuclide release and movement, as well as environmental conditions, over a 20-year period.

  17. Synthesis and characterization of self-assembling water-soluble polymers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hogen-Esch, T.E.; Amis, E.J.

    1992-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The synthesis is proposed of water-soluble vinyl and other polymers capable of self-assembly through hydrophobic bonding of pendent fluorocarbon and other hydrophobic groups. The self-assembly process will be studied by viscometry and dynamic viscoelasticity, and by static and dynamic light scattering. These investigations are aimed at identifying the structural features of polymers that are important in enhancing the viscosity of aqueous polymer solutions at very low polymer concentrations (< 1,000 ppm). The authors also initiate small angle neutron scattering (SANS) measurements aimed at the determination of the size of the fluorocarbon-containing hydrophobic aggregates. They will be interested in the degree of self assembly as a function of the type and length of the hydrophobic groups and of the type and length of the flexible spacer group linking the hydrophobic to the polymer backbone. The nature of the hydrophilic chain will also be of interest. Thus, they investigate a number of hydrophilic comonomers such as acrylamide, N-vinylpyrrolidone and anionic or cationic vinyl monomers. Surface interactions of these interesting copolymers will be studied by adsorption onto appropriate modified latex spheres. Finally, they propose to explore the synthesis of water-soluble polymers capable of self assembly through interactions of pendent polyanions and polycations.

  18. Treatment of addiction and addiction-related behavior

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dewey, Stephen L. (Manorville, NY); Brodie, Jonathan D. (Cos Cob, CT); Ashby, Jr., Charles R. (Miller Place, NY)

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention provides a highly efficient method for treating substance addiction and for changing addiction-related behavior of a mammal suffering from substance addiction. The method includes administering to a mammal an effective amount of gamma vinylGABA or a pharmaceutically acceptable salt thereof. The present invention also provides a method of treatment of cocaine, morphine, heroin, nicotine, amphetamine, methamphetamine, or ethanol addiction by treating a mammal with an effective amount of gamma vinylGABA or a pharmaceutically acceptable salt thereof. In one embodiment, the method of the present invention includes administering to the mammal an effective amount of a composition which increases central nervous system GABA levels wherein the effective amount is sufficient to diminish, inhibit or eliminate behavior associated with craving or use of drugs of abuse. The composition includes GVG, gabapentin, valproic acid, progabide, gamma-hydroxybutyric acid, fengabine, cetylGABA, topiramate or tiagabine or a pharmaceutically acceptable salt thereof, or an enantiomer or a racemic mixture thereof.

  19. Virtual Optical Comparator

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thompson, Greg

    2008-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

    The Virtual Optical Comparator, VOC, was conceived as a result of the limitations of conventional optical comparators and vision systems. Piece part designs for mechanisms have started to include precision features on the face of parts that must be viewed using a reflected image rather than a profile shadow. The VOC concept uses a computer generated overlay and a digital camera to measure features on a video screen. The advantage of this system is superior edge detection compared to traditional systems. No vinyl charts are procured or inspected. The part size and expensive fixtures are no longer a concern because of the range of the X-Y table of the Virtual Optical Comparator. Product redesigns require only changes to the CAD image overlays; new vinyl charts are not required. The inspection process is more ergonomic by allowing the operator to view the part sitting at a desk rather than standing over a 30 inch screen. The procurement cost for the VOC will be less than a traditional comparator with a much smaller footprint with less maintenance and energy requirements.

  20. (Development of Br-77 from LAMPF Facility)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The research goals of 1984--1985 included continued studies of the 1-halogenated estradiol derivatives and preparation of B- and C- ring vinyl halides of estradiol. The radiohalogenated analogs of these target compounds are proposed to be useful as receptor-binding radiopharmaceuticals in breast cancer therapy. To date, all 1-halogenated derivatives have been prepared and studied. Their 17 {proportional to}-ethynyl derivatives have also been prepared. In vitro receptor-binding studies with estrogen receptors show definite trends with respect to type of halogen attached versus observed receptor-binding affinity. These results were further substantiated using x-ray crystallographic methods. The proposed B- and C- ring vinyl halides have not been successfully synthesized; however, work toward these target compounds is still underway. Other related compounds of current interest include the B-, C-, and D- ring substituted estradiol derivatives. Much of the synthetic work leaking to these compounds has been accomplished and in vitro studies will be performed soon. 10 refs.

  1. Blower upkeep, energy savings estimated at $20,000/yr

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Diehl, R.; Powers, J.

    1987-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Vinyl chloride gas must be removed from operating vessels in a polymerization process at Occidental Chemical, Addis, LA. If left intact, the gases can polymerize and form deposits. Considered for this function were reciprocating and liquid ring type compressors. They were rejected, however, because of anticipated high valve maintenance and energy consumption. Since high reliability and leak-free performance are essential, two double-mechanical-sealed, positive displacement blowers were installed with water injection in 1980. The blowers are designed for those special applications where gas leak tightness is required or where continuous, high-pressure or vacuum, single-stage or two-stage is needed. The lobe-type blowers were selected by Occidental because they were considered to be best suited for the low-pressure differential operation. All internal surfaces are specially cleaned to reduce contamination and may be operated with non-hydrocarbon lubricants. A back-up seal on the drive shaft provides protection against leakage of process gas to the atmosphere. Maintenance and energy savings are estimated at $20,000/yr. The blowers were used with the water injection technique because previous experience vinyl chloride monomer indicated that there were major deposits inside the compressors and ring units. The blowers have provided contaminant-free (oil-free) monomer, and the water injection has prevented the polymerization material from sticking to the surfaces of the blowers. This has ensured practically trouble-free operation, and has greatly reduced maintenance and operation downtime, significantly reducing cost.

  2. [Aluminum coordination and active sites on aluminas, Y-zeolites and pillared layered silicates]. Progress report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fripiat, J.J.

    1994-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report is organized in four sections. In the first the authors will outline structural features which are common to all fine grained alumina, as well as to non-framework alumina in zeolites. This section will be followed by a study of the surface vs. bulk coordination of aluminum. The third section will deal with measurement of the number of acid sites and the scaling of their strength. The fourth and last section will describe three model reactions: the isomerization of 1-butene and of 2 cis-butene; the isomerization and disproportionation of oxtho-xylene; and the transformation of trichloroethane into vinyl chloride followed by the polymerization of the vinyl chloride. The relationship between chemical activity and selectivity and what is known of the local structure of the active catalytic sites will be underlined. Other kinds of zeolites besides Y zeolite have been studied. Instead of the aluminum pillared silicates they found it more interesting to study the substitution of silicon by aluminum in a layered structure containing a permanent porosity (aluminated sepiolite).

  3. Design of new polymers to improve radiation stability of plastic scintillators

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barashkov, N.; Korotkikh, N.; Novikova, T. [Karpov Inst. of Physical Chemistry (Russian Federation); Markley, F.; Pla-Dalmau, A.; Foster, G. [Fermi National Accelerator Lab., Batavia, IL (United States); Rivard, M. [Michigan Univ., Ann Arbor, MI (United States)

    1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Diffusion enhancers have been used to increase the radiation stability of scintillators. There is a danger that such additions will also allow the scintillation dyes to diffuse out of the matrix. Covalent bonding of the dyes into the matrix would eliminate any luminophore migration. We have demonstrated that dyes with vinyl and divinyl groups can be successfully bonded into a styrene matrix. Both primary and secondary luminophores have been bonded into the matrix and in several cases they have been compared with similar luminophores without the vinyl groups in otherwise identical compositions. In general the bonding does not greatly affect either the radiation stability of the composition or its light output, but is therefore proven to be an acceptable method of preventing luminophore migration. Scintillators with a base of aromatic or alicyclic epoxy resins have also been made with bonded luminophores. In these compositions the bonding is accomplished by using luminophores with one or two amine groups or epoxy groups. When using the amines, they are first prereacted with the epoxy resin and the modified epoxy is then cured with hexahydrophthalic anhydride or trimethoxyboroxine. The emission and absorption spectra of many of these reactive luminophores are given, along with the light outputs and radiation stability of the resulting scintilators.

  4. Mixed Waste Management Facility (MWMF) groundwater monitoring report. Fourth quarter 1993 and 1993 summary

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Butler, C.T.

    1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    During fourth quarter 1993, 10 constituents exceeded final Primary Drinking Water Standards in groundwater samples from downgradient monitoring wells at the Mixed Waste Management Facility, the Old Burial Ground, the E-Area Vaults, and the proposed Hazardous Waste/Mixed Waste Disposal Vaults. As in previous quarters, tritium and trichloroethylene were the most widespread elevated constituents. Carbon tetrachloride, chloroform, chloroethane (vinyl chloride), 1,1-dichloroethylene, dichloromethane (methylene chloride), lead, mercury, or tetrachloroethylene also exceeded standards in one or more wells. Elevated constituents were found in numerous Aquifer Zone 2B{sub 2} (Water Table) and Aquifer Zone 2B{sub 1}, (Barnwell/McBean) wells and in two Aquifer Unit 2A (Congaree) wells. The groundwater flow direction and rates in the three hydrostratigraphic units were similar to those of previous quarters.

  5. Mixed Waste Management Facility (MWMF) groundwater monitoring report: Third quarter 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    During third quarter 1993, eight constituents exceeded final Primary Drinking Water Standards in groundwater samples from downgradient monitoring wells at the Mixed Waste Management Facility, the Old Burial Ground, the E-Area Vaults, and the proposed Hazardous Waste/Mixed Waste Disposal Vaults. As in previous quarters, tritium and trichloroethylene were the most widespread constituents Chloroethene (vinyl chloride), 1,1-dichloroethylene, dichloromethane (methylene chloride), lead, mercury, or tetrachloroethylene also exceeded standards in one or more wells. The elevated constituents were found in Aquifer Zone IIB{sub 2} (Water Table) and Aquifer Zone IIB{sub 1} (Barnwell/McBean) wells. No elevated constituents were exhibited in Aquifer Unit IIA (Congaree) wells. The groundwater flow directions and rates in the three hydrostratigraphic units were similar to those of previous quarters.

  6. Mixed Waste Management Facility groundwater monitoring report, First quarter 1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    During first quarter 1994, nine constituents exceeded final Primary Drinking Water Standards in groundwater samples from downgradient monitoring wells at the Mixed Waste Management Facility, the Old Burial Ground, the E-Area Vaults, the proposed Hazardous Waste/Mixed Waste Disposal Vaults, and the F-Area Sewage Sludge Application Site. As in previous quarters, tritium and trichloroethylene were the most widespread elevated constituents. Chloroethene (vinyl chloride), copper, 1,1-dichloroethylene, lead, mercury, nonvolatile beta, or tetrachloroethylene also exceeded standards in one or more wells. Elevated constituents were found in numerous Aquifer Zone IIB{sub 2} (Water Table) and Aquifer Zone IIB{sub 1}, (Barnwell/McBean) wells and in one Aquifer Unit IIA (Congaree) well. The groundwater flow directions and rates in the three hydrostratigraphic units were similar to those of previous quarters.

  7. Composite Materials for Hazard Mitigation of Reactive Metal Hydrides.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pratt, Joseph William; Cordaro, Joseph Gabriel; Sartor, George B.; Dedrick, Daniel E.; Reeder, Craig L.

    2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In an attempt to mitigate the hazards associated with storing large quantities of reactive metal hydrides, polymer composite materials were synthesized and tested under simulated usage and accident conditions. The composites were made by polymerizing vinyl monomers using free-radical polymerization chemistry, in the presence of the metal hydride. Composites with vinyl-containing siloxane oligomers were also polymerized with and without added styrene and divinyl benzene. Hydrogen capacity measurements revealed that addition of the polymer to the metal hydride reduced the inherent hydrogen storage capacity of the material. The composites were found to be initially effective at reducing the amount of heat released during oxidation. However, upon cycling the composites, the mitigating behavior was lost. While the polymer composites we investigated have mitigating potential and are physically robust, they undergo a chemical change upon cycling that makes them subsequently ineffective at mitigating heat release upon oxidation of the metal hydride. Acknowledgements The authors would like to thank the following people who participated in this project: Ned Stetson (U.S. Department of Energy) for sponsorship and support of the project. Ken Stewart (Sandia) for building the flow-through calorimeter and cycling test stations. Isidro Ruvalcaba, Jr. (Sandia) for qualitative experiments on the interaction of sodium alanate with water. Terry Johnson (Sandia) for sharing his expertise and knowledge of metal hydrides, and sodium alanate in particular. Marcina Moreno (Sandia) for programmatic assistance. John Khalil (United Technologies Research Corp) for insight into the hazards of reactive metal hydrides and real-world accident scenario experiments. Summary In an attempt to mitigate and/or manage hazards associated with storing bulk quantities of reactive metal hydrides, polymer composite materials (a mixture of a mitigating polymer and a metal hydride) were synthesized and tested under simulated usage and accident conditions. Mitigating the hazards associated with reactive metal hydrides during an accident while finding a way to keep the original capability of the active material intact during normal use has been the focus of this work. These composites were made by polymerizing vinyl monomers using free-radical polymerization chemistry, in the presence of the metal hydride, in this case a prepared sodium alanate (chosen as a representative reactive metal hydride). It was found that the polymerization of styrene and divinyl benzene could be initiated using AIBN in toluene at 70 degC. The resulting composite materials can be either hard or brittle solids depending on the cross-linking density. Thermal decomposition of these styrene-based composite materials is lower than neat polystyrene indicating that the chemical nature of the polymer is affected by the formation of the composite. The char-forming nature of cross-linked polystyrene is low and therefore, not an ideal polymer for hazard mitigation. To obtain composite materials containing a polymer with higher char-forming potential, siloxane-based monomers were investigated. Four vinyl-containing siloxane oligomers were polymerized with and without added styrene and divinyl benzene. Like the styrene materials, these composite materials exhibited thermal decomposition behavior significantly different than the neat polymers. Specifically, the thermal decomposition temperature was shifted approximately 100 degC lower than the neat polymer signifying a major chemical change to the polymer network. Thermal analysis of the cycled samples was performed on the siloxane-based composite materials. It was found that after 30 cycles the siloxane-containing polymer composite material has similar TGA/DSC-MS traces as the virgin composite material indicating that the polymer is physically intact upon cycling. Hydrogen capacity measurements revealed that addition of the polymer to the metal hydride in the form of a composite material reduced the inherent hydrogen storage capacity of the material. This

  8. Barrier properties of PE, PP and EVA (nano)composites - The influence of filler type and concentration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Merinska, D.; Kalendova, A. [Department of Polymer Engineering, Faculty of Technology, Tomas Bata University in Zlin, Nam. T. G. Masaryka 275, 762 72 Zlin, Czech Republic and Centre of Polymer Systems, University Institute, Tomas Bata University in Zlin, Nad Ovcirnou 3685, 760 0 (Czech Republic); Tesarikova, A. [Department of Polymer Engineering, Faculty of Technology, Tomas Bata University in Zlin, Nam. T. G. Masaryka 275, 762 72 Zlin (Czech Republic)

    2014-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Nanocomposite materials with layered clay used as nanofiller and polyethylene (PE), polypropylene (PP) and copolymer ethylene and vinyl acetate matrix (EVA, the content of VA component 19 wt. %) were prepared by compounding the individual components in Brabender kneader. The MMT Na+ and four types of commercial products such as Nanofil N 5 and N3000, Cloisite 93A and 30B were used as nanofillers. Next to the clays microprecipitated CaHCO{sub 3}, nanosilica and Halloysite tubes were used. The quantity of all the above-mentioned (nano)fillers was 1, 3 and 5 wt. % in relation to the content of montmorillonite. The aim was to evaluate the influence of (nano)filler type and concentration on nanocomposite barrier properties. The morphology of nanocomposite samples was examined by means of XRD analysis illustrated by transmission electronic microscopy TEM. Furthermore, permeability for O{sub 2} and CO{sub 2} were observed.

  9. Greenbelt Homes Pilot Energy Efficiency Program Phase 1 Summary: Existing Conditions and Baseline Energy Use

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wiehagen, J.; Del Bianco, M.; Wood, A.

    2013-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A multi-year pilot energy efficiency retrofit project has been undertaken by Greenbelt Homes, Inc, (GHI) a 1,566 co-operative of circa 1930 and '40 homes. The three predominate construction methods of the townhomes in the community are materials common to the area and climate zone including 8" CMU block, wood frame with brick veneer and wood frame with vinyl siding. GHI has established a pilot project that will serve as a basis for decision making for the roll out of a decade-long community upgrade program that will incorporate energy efficiency to the building envelope and equipment with the modernization of other systems like plumbing, mechanical equipment, and cladding.

  10. Lithium ion battery with improved safety

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Chen, Chun-hua; Hyung, Yoo Eup; Vissers, Donald R.; Amine, Khalil

    2006-04-11T23:59:59.000Z

    A lithium battery with improved safety that utilizes one or more additives in the battery electrolyte solution wherein a lithium salt is dissolved in an organic solvent, which may contain propylene, carbonate. For example, a blend of 2 wt % triphenyl phosphate (TPP), 1 wt % diphenyl monobutyl phosphate (DMP) and 2 wt % vinyl ethylene carbonate additives has been found to significantly enhance the safety and performance of Li-ion batteries using a LiPF6 salt in EC/DEC electrolyte solvent. The invention relates to both the use of individual additives and to blends of additives such as that shown in the above example at concentrations of 1 to 4-wt % in the lithium battery electrolyte. This invention relates to additives that suppress gas evolution in the cell, passivate graphite electrode and protect it from exfoliating in the presence of propylene carbonate solvents in the electrolyte, and retard flames in the lithium batteries.

  11. In-service filter testing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Terada, K.; Woodard, R.W.; Jensen, R.T.

    1985-04-29T23:59:59.000Z

    This report contains the observations, test results, and conclusions of three separate in-service tests beginning in November 1979 and concluding in September 1983. The in-service tests described in this report produced encouraging results on filters constructed with fiberglass medium containing 5% Nomex and separators of aluminum foil coated with a thin film of vinyl-epoxy polymer. Filters containing medium with Kevlar fiber additives demonstrated they merited further evaluation. Other types of filters tested include separatorless filters (Flanders SuperFlow) and one filter with fiberglass separators. Asbestos-containing filters were used for comparison until their supply was exhausted. All filters tested were judged to have performed satisfactorily under the test conditions.

  12. Experimental Design for a Macrofoam Swab Study Relating the Recovery Efficiency and False Negative Rate to Low Concentrations of Two Bacillus anthracis Surrogates on Four Surface Materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Piepel, Gregory F.; Hutchison, Janine R.

    2014-04-16T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes the experimental design for a laboratory study to quantify the recovery efficiencies and false negative rates of a validated, macrofoam swab sampling method for low concentrations of Bacillus anthracis Sterne (BAS) and Bacillus atrophaeus (BG) spores on four surface materials (stainless steel, glass, vinyl tile, plastic light cover panel). Two analytical methods (plating/counting and polymerase chain reaction) will be used. Only one previous study has investigated false negative as a function of affecting test factors. The surrogates BAS and BG have not been tested together in the same study previously. Hence, this study will provide for completing gaps in the available information on the performance of macrofoam swab sampling at low concentrations.

  13. Embedded Piezoresistive Microcantilever Sensors Functionalized for the Detection of Methyl Salicylate

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Porter, T. L. [UNLV; Venedam, R. J. [NSTec

    2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Sensors designed to detect the presence of methyl salicylate (MeS) have been tested. These sensors use a sensor platform based on the embedded piezoresistive microcantilever (EPM) design. Sensing materials tested in this study included the polymer poly (ethylene vinyl acetate), or PEVA as well as a composite sensing material consisting of the enzyme SA-binding protein 2, or SABP-2. The SABP-2 was immobilized within a biocompatible Hypol gel matrix. The PEVA-based sensors exhibited slower but reversible responses to MeS vapors, recovering fully to their initial state after the analyte was removed. SABP-2 sensors exhibited faster overall response to the introduction of MeS, responding nearly instantly. These sensors, however, do not recover after exposures have ended. Sensors using the SABP-2 sensing materials act instead as integrating sensors, measuring irreversibly the total MeS dose obtained.

  14. Image analysis of jet structure on electrospinning from free liquid surface

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kula, Jiri, E-mail: jiri.kula@tul.cz; Linka, Ales, E-mail: ales.linka@tul.cz; Tunak, Maros, E-mail: maros.tunak@tul.cz [Department of Textile Evaluation, Faculty of Textile Engineering, Technical University of Liberec, Studentska 2, 461 17 Liberec (Czech Republic); Lukas, David, E-mail: david.lukas@tul.cz [Department of Nonwoven and Nanofibrous Materials, Faculty of Textile Engineering, Technical University of Liberec, Studentska 2, 461 17 Liberec (Czech Republic); Centre for Nanomaterials Advanced Technologies and Innovation, Technical University of Liberec, Studentska 2, 461 17 Liberec (Czech Republic)

    2014-06-16T23:59:59.000Z

    The work analyses intra-jet distances during electrospinning from a free surface of water based poly(vinyl alcohol) solution confined by two thin metallic plates employed as a spinning electrode. A unique computer vision system and digital image processing were designed in order to track position of every polymer jet. Here, we show that jet position data are in good compliance with theoretically predicted intra-jet distances by linear stability analysis. Jet density is a critical parameter of electrospinning technology, since it determines the process efficiency and homogeneity of produced nanofibrous layer. Achievements made in this research could be used as essential approach to study jetting from two-dimensional spinning electrodes, or as fundamentals for further development of control system related to Nanospider{sup ™} technology.

  15. Experimental Design for a Macrofoam-Swab Study Relating the Recovery Efficiency and False Negative Rate to Low Concentrations of Two Bacillus anthracis Surrogates on Four Surface Materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Piepel, Gregory F.; Hutchison, Janine R.

    2014-12-05T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes the experimental design for a laboratory study to quantify the recovery efficiencies and false negative rates of a validated, macrofoam-swab sampling method for low concentrations of Bacillus anthracis Sterne (BAS) and Bacillus atrophaeus (BG) spores on four surface materials (stainless steel, glass, vinyl tile, plastic light cover panel). Two analytical methods (culture and polymerase chain reaction) will be used. Only one previous study has investigated how the false negative rate depends on test factors. The surrogates BAS and BG have not been tested together in the same study previously. Hence, this study will provide for completing gaps in the available information on the performance of macrofoam-swab sampling at low concentrations.

  16. Rheological and Mechanical Considerations for Photovoltaic Encapsulants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kempe, M. D.

    2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Photovoltaic (pv) devices are encapsulated in polymeric materials not only for corrosion protection, but also for mechanical support. Even though ethylene-vinyl acetate (EVA) suffers from having both glass and melting phase transitions at temperatures experienced under environmental exposure, its low cost and good optical transmission made EVA the most commonly used material for PV modules. These transitions, however, cause EVA to embrittle at low temperatures (~ -15 deg C) and to be very soft at high temperatures (>40 deg C). From mechanical considerations, one would prefer a material that was relatively unchanged under a wide temperature range. This would produce a more predictable and reliable package. These concerns are likely to become more important as silicon based cells are made thinner.

  17. Control of Moisture Ingress into Photovoltaic Modules

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kempe, M. D.

    2005-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    During long-term exposure of photovoltaic modules to environmental stress, the ingress of water into the module is correlated with decreased performance. By using diffusivity measurements for water through encapsulants such as ethylene vinyl acetate (EVA), we have modeled moisture ingress using a finite-element analysis with atmospheric data from various locations such as Miami, Florida. This analysis shows that because of the high diffusivity of EVA, even an impermeable glass back-sheet alone is incapable of preventing significant moisture ingress from the edges for a 20-year lifecycle. This result has led us to investigate ways to protect modules from moisture through the use of different encapsulating chemistries and materials.

  18. Coated metal fiber coalescing cell

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rutz, W.D.; Swain, R.J.

    1980-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

    A cell is described for coalescing oil droplets dispersed in a water emulsion including an elongated perforated tube core into which the emulsion is injected, layers of oleophilic plastic covered metal mat wound about the core through which the emulsion is forced to pass, the fibers of the metal mat being covered by oleophilic plastic such as vinyl, acrylic, polypropylene, polyethylene, polyvinyl chloride, the metal being in the form of layers of expanded metal or metal fibers, either aluminum or stainless steel. In manufacturing the cell a helix wound wire is formed around the cylindrical plastic coated metal to retain it in place and resist pressure drop of fluid flowing through the metal fibers. In addition, the preferred arrangement includes the use of an outer sleeve formed of a mat of fibrous material such as polyester fibers, acrylic fibers, modacrylic fibers and mixtures thereof.

  19. Alkyne Activation DOI: 10.1002/anie.201101090

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lepore, Salvatore D.

    2 T [8C] t [h] Yield [%][a] 1 CO2tBu Ph TES iPr RT 12 83 2 CO2Et H TES iPr 0 4 87 3 CO2Et H TES Bn 0 4 67 4 COSBu Ph TES iPr Ă?20 1 69 5 COStBu Ph TMS iPr Ă?20 1 67 6 COStBu Ph TIPS iPr Ă?20 1 75 7 COStBu Ph TES tBu Ă?20 1 78 8 COStBu vinyl TES iPr Ă?20 1 71 9 COStBu 2-naph TES iPr Ă?20 1 76 10 COStBu o

  20. Microwavable thermal energy storage material

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Salyer, Ival O. (Dayton, OH)

    1998-09-08T23:59:59.000Z

    A microwavable thermal energy storage material is provided which includes a mixture of a phase change material and silica, and a carbon black additive in the form of a conformable dry powder of phase change material/silica/carbon black, or solid pellets, films, fibers, moldings or strands of phase change material/high density polyethylene/ethylene-vinyl acetate/silica/carbon black which allows the phase change material to be rapidly heated in a microwave oven. The carbon black additive, which is preferably an electrically conductive carbon black, may be added in low concentrations of from 0.5 to 15% by weight, and may be used to tailor the heating times of the phase change material as desired. The microwavable thermal energy storage material can be used in food serving applications such as tableware items or pizza warmers, and in medical wraps and garments.

  1. Microwavable thermal energy storage material

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Salyer, I.O.

    1998-09-08T23:59:59.000Z

    A microwavable thermal energy storage material is provided which includes a mixture of a phase change material and silica, and a carbon black additive in the form of a conformable dry powder of phase change material/silica/carbon black, or solid pellets, films, fibers, moldings or strands of phase change material/high density polyethylene/ethylene vinyl acetate/silica/carbon black which allows the phase change material to be rapidly heated in a microwave oven. The carbon black additive, which is preferably an electrically conductive carbon black, may be added in low concentrations of from 0.5 to 15% by weight, and may be used to tailor the heating times of the phase change material as desired. The microwavable thermal energy storage material can be used in food serving applications such as tableware items or pizza warmers, and in medical wraps and garments. 3 figs.

  2. Accelerated leach test development program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fuhrmann, M.; Pietrzak, R.F.; Heiser, J.; Franz, E.M.; Colombo, P.

    1990-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In FY 1989, a draft accelerated leach test for solidified waste was written. Combined test conditions that accelerate leaching were validated through experimental and modeling efforts. A computer program was developed that calculates test results and models leaching mechanisms. This program allows the user to determine if diffusion controls leaching and, if this is the case, to make projections of releases. Leaching mechanisms other than diffusion (diffusion plus source term partitioning and solubility limited leaching) are included in the program is indicators of other processes that may control leaching. Leach test data are presented and modeling results are discussed for laboratory scale waste forms composed of portland cement containing sodium sulfate salt, portland cement containing incinerator ash, and vinyl ester-styrene containing sodium sulfate. 16 refs., 38 figs., 5 tabs.

  3. Quarterly sampling of the wetlands along the old F-Area effluent ditch: August 1994. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cummins, C.L.; Dixon, K.L.

    1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In August 1994, well point water and near-surface water samples were collected to further characterize tritium and volatile organic compounds in the Wetlands along the old F-Area effluent ditch south of 643-E at the Savannah River Plant. Well point samples were collected from seven locations and near-surface water samples were collected at four locations. Results of the August 1994 sampling event further support findings that tritium and volatile organic compounds are outcropping in the Wetlands near the old F-area effluent ditch. Four analytes (1,2-dichloroethylene, trichloroethylene, tritium, and vinyl chloride) were detected at least once at concentrations above the primary Drinking Water Standards or the Maximum Contaminant Levels. Five analytes (the above chemicals plus tetrachloroethylene) were detected at least once in the near-surface water samples at concentrations greater than the method detection limit.

  4. Sanitary landfill groundwater monitoring report. Fourth quarter 1994 and 1994 summary

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Eighty-nine wells of the LFW series monitor groundwater quality in the Steed Pond Aquifer (Water Table) beneath the Sanitary Landfill at the Savannah River Site (SRS). These wells are sampled quarterly to comply with the South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control Domestic Waste Permit DWP-087A and as part of the SRS Groundwater Monitoring Program. Dichloromethane, a common laboratory contaminant, and trichloroethylene were the most widespread constituents exceeding standards during 1994. Benzene, chloroethene (vinyl chloride), 1,2-dichloroethane, 1,1-dichloroethylene, 1,2-dichloropropane, gross alpha, mercury, nonvolatile beta, tetrachloroethylene, and tritium also exceeded standards in one or more wells. The groundwater flow direction in the Steed Pond Aquifer (Water Table) beneath the Sanitary Landfill was to the southeast (universal transverse Mercator coordinates). The flow rate in this unit was approximately 140 ft/year during first and fourth quarters 1994.

  5. Sanitary Landfill Groundwater Monitoring Report. Fourth Quarter 1997 and 1997 Summary

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chase, J. [Westinghouse Savannah River Company, AIKEN, SC (United States)

    1998-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A maximum of forty-eight wells of the LFW series monitor groundwater quality in the Steed Pond Aquifer (Water Table) beneath the Sanitary Landfill at the Savannah River Site (SRS). These wells are sampled quarterly to comply with the South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control Domestic Water Permit DWP-087A and as part of the SRS Groundwater Monitoring Program. Chloroethene (vinyl chloride) and trichloroethylene were the most widespread constituents exceeding standards during 1997. Lead (total recoverable), 1,4-dichlorobenzene, mercury, benzene, dichloromethane (methylene chloride), a common laboratory contaminant, tetrachloroethylene, 1,2-dichloroethane, gross alpha, tritium, and 1.2-dichloropropane also exceeded standards in one or more wells. The groundwater flow direction in the Steed Pond Aquifer (Water Table) beneath the Sanitary Landfill was to the southeast (universal transverse Mercator coordinates). The flow rate in this unit was approximately 139 ft/year during first quarter 1997 and 132 ft/year during fourth quarter.

  6. Method for controlling clathrate hydrates in fluid systems

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sloan, E.D. Jr.

    1995-07-11T23:59:59.000Z

    Discussed is a process for preventing clathrate hydrate masses from impeding the flow of fluid in a fluid system. An additive is contacted with clathrate hydrate masses in the system to prevent those clathrate hydrate masses from impeding fluid flow. The process is particularly useful in the natural gas and petroleum production, transportation and processing industry where gas hydrate formation can cause serious problems. Additives preferably contain one or more five member, six member and/or seven member cyclic chemical groupings. Additives include poly(N-vinyl-2-pyrrolidone) and hydroxyethylcellulose, either in combination or alone. Additives can also contain multiple cyclic chemical groupings having different size rings. One such additive is sold under the name Gaffix VC-713.

  7. Method for controlling clathrate hydrates in fluid systems

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sloan, Jr., Earle D. (Golden, CO)

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Discussed is a process for preventing clathrate hydrate masses from impeding the flow of fluid in a fluid system. An additive is contacted with clathrate hydrate masses in the system to prevent those clathrate hydrate masses from impeding fluid flow. The process is particularly useful in the natural gas and petroleum production, transportation and processing industry where gas hydrate formation can cause serious problems. Additives preferably contain one or more five member, six member and/or seven member cyclic chemical groupings. Additives include poly(N-vinyl-2-pyrrolidone) and hydroxyethylcellulose, either in combination or alone. Additives can also contain multiple cyclic chemical groupings having different size rings. One such additive is sold under the name Gaffix VC-713.

  8. Functionalization of carbon nanotubes by argon plasma-assisted ultraviolet grafting

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yan, Y.H.; Chan-Park, M.B.; Zhou, Q.; Li, C.M.; Yue, C.Y. [School of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering and School of Chemical and Biomedical Engineering, Nanyang Technological University, Singapore 639798 (Singapore); School of Chemical and Biomedical Engineering, Nanyang Technological University, Singapore 639798 (Singapore); School of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, Nanyang Technological University, Singapore 639798 (Singapore)

    2005-11-21T23:59:59.000Z

    We have demonstrated the functionalization of single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) by argon (Ar) plasma-assisted ultraviolet (UV) grafting of 1-vinylimidazole (VZ). The Ar plasma treatment generates defect sites at the tube ends and sidewalls, which act as the active sites for the subsequent UV grafting of VZ monomer. Atomic force microscopy analyses indicate that the original nanotube bundles exfoliate to individual tubes after the VZ grafting. By control of the deposited energy of Ar plasma treatment (200 W) and treatment time (5 min), no visible chopping of the functionalized SWNT was observed. This method may be extended to other vinyl monomers and offers another diverse way of sidewall functionalization of SWNT.

  9. Porosity in Polysilsesquioxane Xerolgels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baugher, B.M.; Loy, D.A.; Rahimian, K.

    1999-08-17T23:59:59.000Z

    Polymerization of organotrialkoxysilanes is a convenient method for introducing organic functionality into hybrid organic-inorganic materials. However, not much is known about the effects of the organic substituent on the porosity of the resulting xerogels. In this study, we prepared a series of polysilsesquioxane xerogels from organotrialkoxysilanes, RSi(OR{sup 1}){sub 3}, with different organic groups (R = H, Me, Et dodecyl, hexadecyl, octadecyl, vinyl, chloromethyl, (p-chloromethyl) phenyl, cyanoethyl). Polymerizations of the monomers were carried out under a variety of conditions, varying monomer concentration, type of catalyst, and alkoxide substituent. The effect of the organic substituent on the sol-gel process was often dramatic. In many cases, gels were formed only at very high monomer concentration and/or with only one type of catalyst. All of the gels were processed as xerogels and characterized by scanning electron microscopy and nitrogen sorption porosimetry to evaluate their pore structure.

  10. Waste management health risk assessment: A case study of a solid waste landfill in South Italy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Davoli, E., E-mail: enrico.davoli@marionegri.i [Istituto di Ricerche Farmacologiche 'Mario Negri', Environmental Health Sciences Department, Via Giuseppe La Masa 19, 20156 Milano (Italy); Fattore, E.; Paiano, V.; Colombo, A.; Palmiotto, M. [Istituto di Ricerche Farmacologiche 'Mario Negri', Environmental Health Sciences Department, Via Giuseppe La Masa 19, 20156 Milano (Italy); Rossi, A.N.; Il Grande, M. [Progress S.r.l., Via Nicola A. Porpora 147, 20131 Milano (Italy); Fanelli, R. [Istituto di Ricerche Farmacologiche 'Mario Negri', Environmental Health Sciences Department, Via Giuseppe La Masa 19, 20156 Milano (Italy)

    2010-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    An integrated risk assessment study has been performed in an area within 5 km from a landfill that accepts non hazardous waste. The risk assessment was based on measured emissions and maximum chronic population exposure, for both children and adults, to contaminated air, some foods and soil. The toxic effects assessed were limited to the main known carcinogenic compounds emitted from landfills coming both from landfill gas torch combustion (e.g., dioxins, furans and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, PAHs) and from diffusive emissions (vinyl chloride monomer, VCM). Risk assessment has been performed both for carcinogenic and non-carcinogenic effects. Results indicate that cancer and non-cancer effects risk (hazard index, HI) are largely below the values accepted from the main international agencies (e.g., WHO, US EPA) and national legislation ( and ).

  11. OMV studies ethylene expansion in Germany

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-10-23T23:59:59.000Z

    OMV(Vienna) is evaluating plans to debottleneck its ethylene plant at Burghausen from 310,000 m.t./year to at least 400,000 m.t./year. Senior v.p. Jochen Berger says OMV is studying the limits to which the cracker can be expanded. {open_quotes}We`re pretty sure we can go to 400,000 m.t./year, but in two months we`ll have a better idea,{close_quotes} says Berger. The expansion will also depend on the future requirements of downstream operations at the Burghausen site, which include OMV plastics subsidiary PCD`s high-density polyethylene and polypropylene units and the vinyl chloride monomer and polyvinyl chloride units operated by Hoechst-Wacker joint venture Vinnolit.

  12. Liver and biliary tract cancer among chemical workers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bond, G.G.; McLaren, E.A.; Sabel, F.L.; Bodner, K.M.; Lipps, T.E.; Cook, R.R. (Dow Chemical Company, Midland, MI (USA))

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A recent cohort mortality study of male, hourly wage employees of a large Michigan chemical production and research facility had found a greater than expected number of deaths coded to liver and biliary tract cancer. In response, an additional investigation was then undertaken of the 44 liver and biliary tract cancer deaths observed between 1940 and 1982. A random sample (N = 1,888) of subjects was selected from the total cohort (N = 21,437) to serve as referents. Company work history records were used to classify cases and referents by work area assignment and potential for exposure to 11 selected chemical agents which have been shown to produce cancer of the liver or biliary passages in experimental animals. Statistically significant associations in both positive and negative directions were found for several work areas within the facility. A suggestive association was found for vinyl chloride monomer, based on five cases with presumed exposure.

  13. Responsive copolymers for enhanced petroleum recovery. Quarterly technical progress report, June 23--September 21, 1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McCormick, C.; Hester, R.

    1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Summaries are given on the technical progress on three tasks of this project. Monomer and polymer synthesis discusses the preparation of 1(7-aminoheptyloxymethyl)naphthalene and poly(maleic anhydride-alt-ethyl vinyl ether). Task 2, Characterization of molecular structure, discusses terpolymer solution preparation, UV analysis, fluorescence analysis, low angle laser light scattering, and viscometry. The paper discusses the effects of hydrophobic groups, the effect of pH, the effect of electrolyte addition, and photophysical studies. Task 3, Solution properties, describes the factorial experimental design for characterizing polymer solutions by light scattering, the light scattering test model, orthogonal factorial test design, linear regression in coded space, confidence level for coded space test mode coefficients, coefficients of the real space test model, and surface analysis of the model equations.

  14. Low-temperature emission spectra of 9-alkylanthracene esters: Dimer photodecomposition and monomer pair interactions in polymer hosts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Salt, K.; Scott, G.W. (Univ. of California, Riverside, CA (United States))

    1994-10-06T23:59:59.000Z

    Effects due to variation in the alkyl chain length of photodimers of 9-alkylanthracene esters on their photodecomposition efficiencies at 12 K and, by implication, the photoproduct migration as a function of temperature within polymer hosts are investigated. It is shown that dimers with longer alkyl chains have a lower photodecomposition efficiency. The extent of photoproduct migration within the polymer following photodecomposition was also studied as a function of alkyl chain length. This migration and its modulation of the interaction between the separating monomers is shown to affect the emission spectrum. Thus, monomer migration was studied in temperature cycling experiments. It was also found, for the polymer hosts investigated - poly(methyl methacrylate), poly(vinyl chloride), and polystyrene - that these properties are host dependent. This result is probably due to the void space differences that exist among these polymers. 17 refs., 10 figs.

  15. Apply reliability centered maintenance to sealless pumps

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pradhan, S. (Exxon Chemicals Canada, Ontario (Canada))

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper reports on reliability centered maintenance (RCM) which is considered a crucial part of future reliability engineering. RCM determines the maintenance requirements of plants and equipment in their operating context. The RCM method has been applied to the management of critical sealless pumps in fire/toxic risk services, typical of the petrochemical industry. The method provides advantages from a detailed study of any critical engineering system. RCM is a team exercise and fosters team spirit in the plant environment. The maintenance strategy that evolves is based on team decisions and relies on maximizing the inherent reliability built into the equipment. RCM recommends design upgrades where this inherent reliability is being questioned. Sealless pumps of canned motor design are used as main reactor charge pumps in PVC plants. These pumps handle fresh vinyl chloride monomer (VCM), which is both carcinogenic and flammable.

  16. Revamp of Ukraine VCM plant will boost capacity, reduce emissions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-05-13T23:59:59.000Z

    Oriana Concern (formerly P.O. Chlorvinyl) is revamping its 250,000 metric ton/year (mty) vinyl chloride monomer (VCM) plant at Kalusch, Ukraine. At the core of the project area new ethylene dichloride (EDC) cracking furnace and direct chlorination unit, and revamp of an oxychlorination unit to use oxygen rather than air. The plant expansion and modernization will boost capacity to 370,000 mty. New facilities for by-product recycling and recovery, waste water treatment, and emissions reduction will improve the plant`s environmental performance. This paper shows expected feedstock and utility consumption for VCM production. Techmashimport and P.O. Chlorvinyl commissioned the Kalusch plant in 1975. The plant was built by Uhde GmbH, Dortmund, Germany. The paper also provides a schematic of the Hoechst/Uhde VCM process being used for the plant revamp. The diagram is divided into processing sections.

  17. Thailand's downstream projects proliferate

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1991-06-03T23:59:59.000Z

    Thailand continues to press expansion and modernization of its downstream sector. Among recent developments: Construction of an olefins unit at Thailand's second major petrochemical complex and a worldscale aromatics unit in Thailand is threatened by rising costs. Thailand's National Petrochemical Corp (NPC) let a 9 billion yen contract to Mitsui Engineering and Shipbuilding Co. and C. Itoh and Co. for a dual fuel cogeneration power plant at its Mab Ta Phud, Rayong province, petrochemical complex. Financing is in place to flash a green light for a $530 million Belgian-Thai joint venture sponsoring a worldscale polyvinyl chloride/vinyl chloride monomer plant in Thailand. Work is more than 50% complete on the $345 million second phase expansion of Thai Oil's Sri Racha refinery in Chon Buri province. Petroleum Authority of Thailand (PTT) endorsed a plan to install two more natural gas processing plants in Thailand to meet rapidly growing domestic demand for petroleum gas.

  18. Polybenzimidazole compounds, polymeric media, and methods of post-polymerization modifications

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Klaehn, John R. (Idaho Falls, ID); Peterson, Eric S. (Idaho Falls, ID); Wertsching, Alan K. (Idaho Falls, ID); Orme, Christopher J. (Shelley, ID); Luther, Thomas A. (Idaho Falls, ID); Jones, Michael G. (Pocatello, ID)

    2007-08-21T23:59:59.000Z

    A PBI compound includes imidazole nitrogens at least a portion of which are substituted with an organic-inorganic hybrid moiety. At least 85% of the imidazole nitrogens may be substituted. The organic-inorganic hybrid moiety may be an organosilane moiety, for example, (R)Me.sub.2SiCH.sub.2-- where R is selected from among methyl, phenyl, vinyl, and allyl. The PBI compound may exhibit similar thermal properties in comparison to the unsubstituted PBI. The PBI compound may exhibit a solubility in an organic solvent greater than the solubility of the unsubstituted PBI. The PBI compound may be included in separatory media. A substituted PBI synthesis method may include providing a parent PBI in a less than 5 wt % solvent solution. Substituting may occur at about room temperature and/or at about atmospheric pressure. Substituting may use at least 5 equivalents in relation to the imidazole nitrogens to be substituted or, preferably, about 15.

  19. Polybenzimidazole compounds

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Klaehn, John R. (Idaho Falls, ID); Peterson, Eric S. (Idaho Falls, ID); Wertsching, Alan K. (Idaho Falls, ID); Orme, Christopher J. (Shelley, ID); Luther, Thomas A. (Idaho Falls, ID); Jones, Michael G. (Pocatello, ID)

    2010-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

    A PBI compound that includes imidazole nitrogens, at least a portion of which are substituted with an organic-inorganic hybrid moiety. At least 85% of the imidazole nitrogens may be substituted. The organic-inorganic hybrid moiety may be an organosilane moiety, for example, (R)Me.sub.2SiCH.sub.2--, where R is selected from among methyl, phenyl, vinyl, and allyl. The PBI compound may exhibit similar thermal properties in comparison to the unsubstituted PBI. The PBI compound may exhibit a solubility in an organic solvent greater than the solubility of the unsubstituted PBI. The PBI compound may be included in separatory media. A substituted PBI synthesis method may include providing a parent PBI in a less than 5 wt % solvent solution. Substituting may occur at about room temperature and/or at about atmospheric pressure. Substituting may use at least five equivalents in relation to the imidazole nitrogens to be substituted or, preferably, about fifteen equivalents.

  20. Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy with laser irradiation resonant with vibrational transitions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Khachatrian, Ani; Dagdigian, Paul J.

    2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An investigation of laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) of polymers, both in bulk form and spin coated on Si wafers, with laser irradiation in the mid-infrared spectral region is presented. Of particular interest is whether the LIBS signals are enhanced when the laser wavelength is resonant with a fundamental vibrational transition of the polymer. Significant increases in the LIBS signals were observed for irradiation on hydride stretch fundamental transitions, and the magnitude of the enhancement showed a strong dependence on the mode excited. The role of the substrate was investigated by comparison of results for bulk and spin-coated samples. The polymers investigated were Nylon 12 and poly(vinyl alcohol-co-ethylene).

  1. Biodegradable Polylactic Acid (PLA) Microstructures for Scaffold Applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, G -J; Hsueh, C -C

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this research, we present a simple and cost effective soft lithographic process to fabricate PLA scaffolds for tissue engineering. In which, the negative photoresist JSR THB-120N was spun on a glass subtract followed by conventional UV lithographic processes to fabricate the master to cast the PDMS elastomeric mold. A thin poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA) layer was used as a mode release such that the PLA scaffold can be easily peeled off. The PLA precursor solution was then cast onto the PDMS mold to form the PLA microstructures. After evaporating the solvent, the PLA microstructures can be easily peeled off from the PDMS mold. Experimental results show that the desired microvessels scaffold can be successfully transferred to the biodegradable polymer PLA.

  2. Density Functional Investigation of Melamine-Formaldehyde Crosslinking Agents Part 1: Partially Substituted Melamine

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Benson, Michael Timothy

    2003-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Computational modeling has been performed on the cross-linking mechanism of partially substituted melamine reacting with poly(vinyl alcohol). Ab initio calculations were performed with density functional theory employing the BLYP functional and double numerical DND basis set. The mechanism, general acid catalysis, has been modeled with respect to structures, protonation, and reaction with a polymer. Protonation of the oxygen is required initially, followed by liberation of methanol. The reaction can take one of two pathways after methanol liberation. The conjugate base of the weak acid can abstract a proton, generating a Schiff-base intermediate. The O-H on the polymer then adds to the C-N double bond, producing the polymer-melamine bond. The alternative is that the polymer adds to the charged melamine, using the specific acid catalysis mechanism. After polymer addition, the proton is abstracted, producing the product.

  3. Copolymers useful as additives for lowering the cloud point of middle hydrocarbon distillates, and compositions of middle hydrocarbon distillates comprising them

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Durand, J. P.; Damin, B.; Dawans, F.; Leger, R.

    1985-03-05T23:59:59.000Z

    Products useful as additives for lowering the cloud point of middle distillates have a molecular weight from 1,000 to 50,000, and are obtained by reacting a compound of the formula R-Z((CH/sub 2/) /SUB n/ NH) /SUB m/ H or HO-CH/sub 2/-R'-NH/sub 2/ where R is a monovalent saturated aliphatic radical of 1-30 carbon atoms, Z is -NH- or oxygen, n is 2 to 4, m is zero or 1 to 4 and R' is a saturated divalent aliphatic radical of 1-18 carbon atoms, with a copolymer comprising recurrent units (A) from an alkyl ester of an unsaturated monocarboxylic acid and/or a vinyl ester of a saturated monocarboxylic acid, recurrent units (B) from diisobutylene and recurrent units (C) from an unsaturated a,b-dicarboxylic compound.

  4. Composition and method for encapsulating photovoltaic devices

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Pern, Fu-Jann (Golden, CO)

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A composition and method for encapsulating a photovoltaic device which minimizes discoloration of the encapsulant. The composition includes an ethylene-vinyl acetate encapsulant, a curing agent, an optional ultraviolet light stabilizer, and/or an optional antioxidant. The curing agent is preferably 1,1-di-(t-butylperoxy)-3,3,5-trimethylcyclohexane; the ultraviolet light stabilizer is bis-(N-octyloxy-tetramethyl) piperidinyl sebacate and the antioxidant is selected from the group consisting of tris (2,4-di-tert-butylphenyl) phosphite, tetrakis methylene (3,5-di-tert-butyl-4-hydroxyhydrocinnamate) methane, octadecyl 3,5-di-tert-butyl-4-hydroxyhydrocinnamate, and 2,2'-ethylidene bis(4,6-di-t-butylphenyl) fluorophosponite. The composition is applied to a solar cell then cured. The cured product contains a minimal concentration of curing-generated chromophores and resists UV-induced degradation.

  5. Method of making gold thiolate and photochemically functionalized microcantilevers

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Boiadjiev, Vassil I. (Knoxville, TN) [Knoxville, TN; Brown, Gilbert M. (Knoxville, TN) [Knoxville, TN; Pinnaduwage, Lal A. (Knoxville, TN) [Knoxville, TN; Thundat, Thomas G. (Knoxville, TN) [Knoxville, TN; Bonnesen, Peter V. (Knoxville, TN) [Knoxville, TN; Goretzki, Gudrun (Nottingham, GB) [Nottingham, GB

    2009-08-25T23:59:59.000Z

    Highly sensitive sensor platforms for the detection of specific reagents, such as chromate, gasoline and biological species, using microcantilevers and other microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) whose surfaces have been modified with photochemically attached organic monolayers, such as self-assembled monolayers (SAM), or gold-thiol surface linkage are taught. The microcantilever sensors use photochemical hydrosilylation to modify silicon surfaces and gold-thiol chemistry to modify metallic surfaces thereby enabling individual microcantilevers in multicantilever array chips to be modified separately. Terminal vinyl substituted hydrocarbons with a variety of molecular recognition sites can be attached to the surface of silicon via the photochemical hydrosilylation process. By focusing the activating UV light sequentially on selected silicon or silicon nitride hydrogen terminated surfaces and soaking or spotting selected metallic surfaces with organic thiols, sulfides, or disulfides, the microcantilevers are functionalized. The device and photochemical method are intended to be integrated into systems for detecting specific agents including chromate groundwater contamination, gasoline, and biological species.

  6. Health assessment for Shpack Landfill, Attleboro/North, Massachusetts, Region 1. CERCLIS No. MAD980503973. Preliminary report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1989-04-18T23:59:59.000Z

    The Shpack Landfill site is on the National Priorities List (NPL). The landfill received both domestic and industrial waste, including inorganic and organic chemicals as well as radioactive waste. Ground water contains vinyl chloride, trichloroethylene, trans-1,2-dichloroethylene, tetrachloroethylene, chromium, barium, copper, nickel, manganese, arsenic, cadmium, lead, polychlorinated biphenyl-1260 (Aroclor-1260), radium-226, alpha particles and beta particles. Surface and subsurface soil samples contained radium-226, uranium-238, uranium-235, uranium-234, and visual evidence of metal plating waste sludges. The site is considered to be of potential health concern because of the risk to human health caused by the potential for exposure to hazardous substances via ingestion of contaminated soils at the site and future ingestion of contaminated domestic well water.

  7. Commodity chemicals from natural gas by methane chlorination

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Che, S.C.; Minet, R.G.; Giacobbe, F.; Mullick, S.L.

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Ethylene and vinyl chloride monomer (VCM) can be produced from natural gas through methane chlorination by reacting methane and chlorine at 900/sup 0/C or higher. Experimental results indicate total ethylene equivalent yield from methane of 45%(wt) and marginal process economics. Fundamental kinetic modeling predicts improved C/sub 2/ yields of up to 70%(wt) at optimum reaction conditions. This optimum condition established the basis for the process design study to evaluate the potential for producing ethylene and VCM from natural gas. HCl by-product is recycled for economic viability. Using the Kel-Chlor process for recycling HCl, the proposed plant produces 27,200 TPA of C/sub 2/H/sub 4/ and 383,800 TPA of VCM. The Midwest is an ethylene consumption area requiring imports of ethylene derivatives from other regions. A methane chlorination plant located on a Midwestern natural gas pipeline network has a good commercial potential.

  8. Module Encapsulant Diagnostic and Modeling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kempe, M.

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Encapsulant materials are used in photovoltaic devices for mechanical support, electrical isolation, and protection against corrosion. The ability of an encapsulant to protect against surface corrosion is related to its adhesional strength. The adhesion of candidate encapsulants under accelerated environmental stress was examined to determine what materials have the best hydrolytic stability and are more likely to reduce corrosion rates. Under environmental exposure, the ingress of water has been correlated with increased corrosion rates. The diffusivity of different encapsulants has been measured to determine how long it takes for water to enter a module. The high diffusivity of ethylene vinyl acetate indicates that, even with the use of an impermeable back-sheet, moisture from the sides will diffuse throughout the entire module. To significantly reduce moisture ingress requires a true hermetic seal, the use of an encapsulant loaded with desiccant, or the use of a very low diffusivity encapsulant.

  9. Use of Melt Flow Rate Test in Reliability Study of Thermoplastic Encapsulation Materials in Photovoltaic Modules

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moseley, J.; Miller, D.; Shah, Q.-U.-A. S. J.; Sakurai, K.; Kempe, M.; Tamizhmani, G.; Kurtz, S.

    2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Use of thermoplastic materials as encapsulants in photovoltaic (PV) modules presents a potential concern in terms of high temperature creep, which should be evaluated before thermoplastics are qualified for use in the field. Historically, the issue of creep has been avoided by using thermosetting polymers as encapsulants, such as crosslinked ethylene-co-vinyl acetate (EVA). Because they lack crosslinked networks, however, thermoplastics may be subject to phase transitions and visco-elastic flow at the temperatures and mechanical stresses encountered by modules in the field, creating the potential for a number of reliability and safety issues. Thermoplastic materials investigated in this study include PV-grade uncured-EVA (without curing agents and therefore not crosslinked); polyvinyl butyral (PVB); thermoplastic polyurethane (TPU); and three polyolefins (PO), which have been proposed for use as PV encapsulation. Two approaches were used to evaluate the performance of these materials as encapsulants: module-level testing and a material-level testing.

  10. Synthesis, growth, structure determination and optical properties of chalcone derivative single crystal

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Karthi, S., E-mail: girijaeaswaradas@gmail.com; Girija, E. K., E-mail: girijaeaswaradas@gmail.com [Department of Physics, Periyar University, Salem - 636011 (India)

    2014-04-24T23:59:59.000Z

    Acquiring large nonlinear optical (NLO) efficient organic material is essential for the development of optoelectronics and photonic devices. Chalcone is the donor - ? - acceptor - ? - donor (D-?-A-?-D) type conjugated molecule with appreciable hyperpolarizability of potential interest in NLO applications. The addition of vinyl and electron donor groups in the chalcone molecule may enhance the second harmonic generation (SHG) efficiency. Here we report the synthesis, crystal growth and characterization of a chalcone derivative 1-(4-methylphenyl)-5-(4-methoxyphenyl)-penta-2,4-dien-1-one (MPMPP). The MPMPP crystal was grown by slow evaporation solution growth technique from acetone. The grown crystal structure was studied by single crystal X-ray diffraction. The SHG efficiency of the grown crystal was determined by Kurtz and Perry method.

  11. Responses of the L51781Y tk/sup +//tk/sup -/ mouse lymphoma cell forward mutation assay: III. 72 coded chemicals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McGregor, D.B.; Brown, A.; Cattanach, P.; Edwards, I.; McBride, D.; Riach, C.; Caspary, W.J.

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Seventy-two chemicals were tested for their mutagenic potential in the L51781Y tk/sup +///sup -/ mouse lymphoma cell forward mutation assay, using procedures based upon those described previously. Cultures were exposed to the chemicals for 4 hr, then cultured for 2 days before planting in soft agar with or without trifluorothymidine (TFT), 3 ..mu..g/ml. The chemicals were tested at least twice. Significant responses were obtained with allyl isothiocyanate, p-benzoquinone dioxime, benzyl acetate, 2-biphenylamine HCl, bis(2-chloro-1-methylethyl)ether, cadmium chloride, chlordane, chlorobenzene, chlorobenzilate, 2-chloroethanol, chlorothalonil, cytarabine x HCl, p,p'-DDE, diazinon, 2,6-dichloro-p-phenylenediamine, N,N-diethylthiourea, diglycidylresorcinol ether, 2,4-dimethoxy aniline x HCl, disperse yellow 3, endosulfan, 1,2-epoxyhexadecane, ethyl acrylate, ethyl benzene, ethylene thiourea, F D and C yellow Number 6, furan, heptachlor, isophorone, mercuric chloride, 4,4'-methylenedianiline x 2 HCl, methyl viologen, nickel sulfate x 6H/sub 2/O, 4,4'-oxydianiline, pentachloroethane, piperonyl butoxide, propyl gallate, quinoline, rotenone, 2,4,5,6-tetrachloro-4-nitro-anisole, 1,1,1,2-tetrachloroethane, trichlorfon, 2,4,6-trichlorophenol, 2,4,5-trimethoxybenzaldehyde, 1,1,3-trimethyl-2-thiourea, 1-vinyl-3-cyclopetene dioxide, vinyl toluene, and ziram. The assay was incapable of providing a clear indication of whether some chemicals were mutagens; these benzyl alcohol, 1,4-dichlorobenzene, phenol, succinic acid-2,2-dimethyl hydrazide, and toluene.

  12. Solidification of ion exchange resin wastes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1982-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Solidification media investigated included portland type I, portland type III and high alumina cements, a proprietary gypsum-based polymer modified cement, and a vinyl ester-styrene thermosetting plastic. Samples formulated with hydraulic cement were analyzed to investigate the effects of resin type, resin loading, waste-to-cement ratio, and water-to-cement ratio. The solidification of cation resin wastes with portland cement was characterized by excessive swelling and cracking of waste forms, both after curing and during immersion testing. Mixed bed resin waste formulations were limited by their cation component. Additives to improve the mechanical properties of portland cement-ion exchange resin waste forms were evaluated. High alumina cement formulations dislayed a resistance to deterioration of mechanical integrity during immersion testing, thus providing a significant advantage over portland cements for the solidification of resin wastes. Properties of cement-ion exchange resin waste forms were examined. An experiment was conducted to study the leachability of /sup 137/Cs, /sup 85/Sr, and /sup 60/Co from resins modified in portland type III and high alumina cements. The cumulative /sup 137/Cs fraction release was at least an order of magnitude greater than that of either /sup 85/Sr or /sup 60/Co. Release rates of /sup 137/Cs in high alumina cement were greater than those in portland III cement by a factor of two.Compressive strength and leach testing were conducted for resin wastes solidified with polymer-modified gypsum based cement. /sup 137/Cs, /sup 85/Sr, and /sup 60/Co fraction releases were about one, two and three orders of magnitude higher, respectively, than in equivalent portland type III cement formulations. As much as 28.6 wt % dry ion exchange resin was successfully solidified using vinyl ester-styrene compared with a maximum of 25 wt % in both portland and gypsum-based cement.

  13. Thai group set to invest in Chinese petchem complex

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alperowicz, N.

    1993-01-06T23:59:59.000Z

    A $5-billion refinery and petrochemical complex is planned by Thailand's Charoen Pokphand (Bangkok) at the seaport of Nimpoh, near Shanghai. The company has discussed the project with the central government of China, and state oil and petrochemicals company Sinopec (Beijing) is due to complete a feasibility study within the next two months. Charoen's plastics processing subsidiary, Kuo Shen (Hong Kong), is expected to hold 70% in the venture, Sinopec 20%, and the Chinese government the remaining 10%. Western companies have been invited to participate. Solvay (Brussels), a 49% partner with Charoen Pokphand in the Vinythai polyvinyl chloride (PVC) joint venture at Map Ta Pud, Thailand, has not yet made a commitment. The 5-million m.t./year oil refinery would feed the complex, which will be based on a 450,000-m.t./year ethylene plant, downstream aromatics units, and a range of derivatives plants. The complex, which falls outside the many announced for Thailand's current five-year economic plan, is expcted to be implemented in stages. To begin with, a 120,000-m.t./year PVC plant will be built that will be fed on imported vinyl chloride monomer. Charoen is in discussions with process licensers, including Solvay, European Vinyl Corp., BFGoodrich, and Shinetsu. Half the PVC output will be consumed by Kuo Shen in China, where Charoen has several plastics processing units, including one in Shanghai and one in Nimpoh. Meanwhile, Sinopec's Hong Kong subsidiary is seeking partners to invest in joint venture projects in China. Sinopec president Liu Xuemin says the company is willing to cooperate with overseas companies to establish small petrochemical projects. In addition, Sinopec is negotiating with officials of Dayang in Jiangsu province and the special economic zone of Shen Zhen, near Hong Kong, on joint ventures for plastics and food additives.

  14. Vapor-liquid equilibria for copolymer+solvent systems: Effect of intramolecular repulsion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gupta, R.B.; Prausnitz, J.M.

    1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Role of intramolecular interactions in blend miscibility is well documented for polymer+copolymer mixtures. Some copolymer+polymer mixtures are miscible although their corresponding homopolymers are not miscible; for example, over a range of acrylonitrile content, styrene/acrylonitrile copolymers are miscible with poly(methyl methacrylate) but neither polystyrene nor polyacrylonitrile is miscible with poly(methyl methacrylate). Similarly, over a composition range, butadiene/acrylonitrile copolymers are miscible with poly(vinyl chloride) while none of the binary combinations of the homopolymers [polybutadiene, polyacrylonitrile, and poly(vinyl chloride)] are miscible. This behavior has been attributed to ``intramolecular repulsion`` between unlike copolymer segments. We have observed similar behavior in vapor-liquid equilibria (VLE) of copolymer+solvent systems. We find that acrylonitrile/butadiene copolymers have higher affinity for acetonitrile solvent than do polyacrylonitrile or polybutadiene. We attribute this non-intuitive behavior to ``intramolecular repulsion`` between unlike segments of the copolymer. This repulsive interaction is weakened when acetonitrile molecules are in the vicinity of unlike copolymer segments, favoring copolymer+solvent miscibility. We find similar behavior when acetonitrile is replaced by methyl ethyl ketone. To best knowledge, this effect has not been reported previously for VLE. We have obtained VLE data for mixtures containing a solvent and a copolymer as a function of copolymer composition. It appears that, at a given solvent partial pressure, there may be copolymer composition that yields maximum absorption of the solvent. This highly non-ideal VLE phase behavior may be useful for optimum design of a membrane for a separation process.

  15. Influence of relaxation transitions on radiation-initiated cationic graft polymerization. [Gamma radiation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kudryavtsev, V.N.; Kabanov, V.Ya.; Chalykh, A.E.; Spitsyn, V.I.

    1982-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Radiation grafting of vinyl n-butyl ether (VBE) to polyvinyl chloride (PVC) over a broad temperature range was investigated. The relaxation transitions in the PVC/VBE system were also determined. Grafting of vinyl alkyl ethers proceeds entirely by a cationic mechanism in a reaction medium that has been dried to a water concentration no greater than 0.1-1.0 ppm. In this connection, the diffusion properties of water in the temperature region were studied. Commercial films of unplasticized PVC (thickness 200 M); were subjected to swelling in two systems: in a 50% solution of VBE in benzene at 25/sup 0/C, and in the pure monomer at 40/sup 0/C. The reaction mixtures were first dried over metallic sodium in a deaerated atmosphere. The specimens were irradiated in a Co gamma-radiation unit to a dose of 10 kGy at a dose rate of 3 Gy/sec. The first reaction mixture was investigated over a range of temperatures from -60/sup 0/ to +70/sup 0/C, and the second from -15/sup 0/ to +50/sup 0/C. The degree of grafting was determined from the increase in weight of the original ungrafted film. The temperature was held to within +/-1/sup 0/C. The relaxation transitions in the swollen polymer systems were determined by two methods, thermostimulated current (TSC) and thermomechanics (TM). It was found that in the region of the glass transition of a swollen PVC-VBE system, radiation-initiated cationic graft polymerization proceeds at a maximal rate, and there are changes in state of the water molecules (the agents of breaking the ion reaction chain) and in their diffusion properties within the matrix.

  16. Occupational health and safety regulation in the coal mining industry: public health at the workplace

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Weeks, J.L. (Department of Occupational Health and Safety, United Mine Workers of America, Washington, DC (USA))

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The strategy for preventing occupational disease and injury in the coal mining industry employs several elements. Standards are set and enforced; technical assistance, research, and development are provided; and surveillance is conducted. Compensation for black lung is a vivid reminder of the consequences of failure to prevent disease. And, workers are represented by a union that encourages active participation in all aspects of this strategy. There are significant problems in each of these elements. Regulatory reform threatens to weaken many standards, there is a decline in government research budgets, surveillance is not well monitored, and compensation for black lung is significantly more difficult to obtain now than in the past. Moreover, the conservative governments of the past decade are not friendly towards unions. Nevertheless, the fundamental structure of disease and injury prevention remains intact and, more importantly, it has a historical record of success. The Mine Safety and Health Act provided for a wide array of basic public health measures to prevent occupational disease and injury in the mining industry. These measures have been effective in reducing both risk of fatal injury and exposure to respirable coal mine dust. They are also associated with temporary declines in productivity. In recent years, however, productivity has increased, while risk of fatal injury and exposure to respirable dust have declined. At individual mines, productivity with longwall mining methods appear to be associated with increases in exposure to respirable dust. These trends are not inconsistent with similar trends following implementation of regulations by OSHA. When OSHA promulgated regulations to control exposure to vinyl chloride monomer, enforcement of the standard promoted significant efficiencies in vinyl chloride production (5).21 references.

  17. Mechamisms of gas permeation through polymer membranes. Progress report, July 1, 1982-May 31, 1983

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stern, S.A.; Mauze, G.R.; Sampat, S.R.

    1983-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The main objective of this study is to assess the validity of a free-volume model of gas permeation through rubbery polymer membranes. Such information is of importance for the development of new membrane processes for the separation of gas mixtures. Steady-state permeability coefficients for N/sub 2/O in polyethylene between 20 and 50/sup 0/C and at pressures up to 15 atm were found to be 45% higher (on the average) than values predicted by the free-volume model. The difference between the experimental and theoretical permeability coefficients for N/sub 2/O is about twice as large as observed with many other gases in polyethylene. Permeability, diffusion time-lags, and absorption measurements were made with n-C/sub 4/H/sub 10/ in poly(eta-butyl methacrylate) at 30/sup 0/C and subatmospheric pressures. The experimental time-lags agreed satisfactorily with values predicted by the free-volume model, using model parameters obtained from gas absorption measurements. However, the experimental permeability coefficients were substantially higher than the theoretical values. This may be due to a non-Fickian transport component because the measurements were made at only 3/sup 0/C above the glass transition temperature of the polymer. This study was recently extended to the solution and transport of gases and vapors in glassy polymers. Satisfactory agreement between experiment and theory was found for the solution, permeation, and diffusion of acetone, benzene, and methanol in ethyl cellulose and water vapor in poly(acrylonitrile) and for the solution of vinyl chloride monomer in poly(vinyl chloride). A generalized model of transport of small molecules in polymers has been developed. The model incorporates free-volume and dual-mode sorption concepts, and should be applicable both to rubbery and glassy polymers.

  18. Special waste-form lysimeters - arid: 1984--1992 data summary and preliminary interpretation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jones, T.L. [New Mexico State Univ., Las Cruces, NM (United States); Serne, R.J. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States)

    1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A lysimeter facility constructed at the Hanford Site in south-central Washington State has been used since 1984 to monitor the leaching of buried waste forms under natural conditions. The facility is generating data that are useful in evaluating source-term models used in radioactive waste transport analyses. The facility includes ten bare-soil lysimeters (183 cm diameter by 305 cm depth) containing buried waste forms generated at nuclear reactors in the United States and solidified with Portland M cement, masonry cement, bitumen, and vinyl-ester styrene. The waste forms contained in the lysimeters have been leached under natural, semiarid conditions. In spite of the semiarid conditions, from 1984 through 1992, an average of 45 cm of water leached through the lysimeters, representing 27% of area precipitation. Leachate samples have been routinely collected and analyzed for radionuclide and chemical content. To date, tritium, cobalt-60, and cesium-137 have been identified in the lysimeter leachate samples. From 1984 through 1992, over 4000 {mu}Ci of tritium, representing 76 and 71 % of inventory (not decay corrected), have been leached from the two waste forms containing tritium. Cobalt-60 has been found in the leachate from all six of the waste forms that originally contained > 1 mCi of inventory. The leached amounts of cobalt-60 represent < 0.1 % of original cobalt inventories. Mobile cobalt is believed to be chelated with organic compounds, such as ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA), that are present in the waste. Trace amounts of cesium-137 have occasionally been identified in leachate from two waste forms since 1991. Qualitatively, the field leaching results confirm laboratory studies suggesting that tritium is readily leached from cement, and that cobalt-60 is generally leached more easily from cement than from vinyl-ester styrene.

  19. Pathways, kinetics, and mechanisms for 2-dodecyl-9,10-dihydrophenanthrene pyrolysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Savage, P.E.; Baxter, K.L. [Univ. of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States). Dept. of Chemical Engineering] [Univ. of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States). Dept. of Chemical Engineering

    1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The authors pyrolyzed 2-dodecyl-9,10-dihydrophenanthrene (DDPh) in batch microreactors. The reaction conditions included neat pyrolyses between 375--450C for times of 15--240 min and also pyrolyses in benzene at 400 C and 90 min but at different initial DDPh concentrations ranging from 0.0095 to 0.238 mol/L. The disappearance of DDPh followed first-order kinetics, and the global first-order rate constant had Arrhenius parameters of log{sub 10} A (s{sup {minus}1}) = 13.6 {+-} 2.8 and E (kcal/mol) = 54.5 {+-} 9.1, where the uncertainties are the 95% confidence intervals. The decomposition of DDPh can be described by a reaction network that possesses four parallel primary pathways. The major primary path, which involves dehydrogenation, leads to 2-dodecylphenanthrene. The other three primary paths involve C{single_bond}C bond cleavage, and they lead to 2-methyl-9,10-dihydrophenanthrene plus undecene, to 2-vinyl-9,10-dihydrophenanthrene plus decane, and to numerous minor products. Important secondary and tertiary reactions include the rapid reduction of 2-vinyl-9,10-dihydrophenanthrene to 2-ethyl-9,10-dihydrophenanthrene and the facile dehydrogenation of 2-methyl- and 2-ethyl-9,10-dihydrophenanthrene to form 2-methyl- and 2-ethylphenanthrene, respectively. The identities and relative abundances of the major products are consistent with a free-radical chain reaction mechanism for DDPh pyrolysis. Application is to the processing of hydrocarbon resources such as coals and heavy crude oils.

  20. Energy Saving Glass Lamination via Selective Radio Frequency Heating

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Allan, Shawn M.

    2012-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

    This project focused on advancing radio-frequency (RF) lamination technology closer to commercial implementation, in order to reduce the energy intensity of glass lamination by up to 90%. Lamination comprises a wide range of products including autoglass, architectural safety and innovative design glass, transparent armor (e.g. bullet proof glass), smart glass, mirrors, and encapsulation of photovoltaics. Lamination is also the fastest growing segment of glass manufacturing, with photovoltaics, architectural needs, and an anticipated transition to laminated side windows in vehicles. The state-of-the-art for glass lamination is to use autoclaves, which apply heat and uniform gas pressure to bond the laminates over the course of 1 to 18 hours. Laminates consist of layers of glass or other materials bonded with vinyl or urethane interlayers. In autoclaving, significant heat energy is lost heating the chamber, pressurized air, glass racks, and the glass. In RF lamination, the heat is generated directly in the vinyl interlayer, causing it to heat and melt quickly, in just 1 to 10 minutes, without significantly heating the glass or the equipment. The main purpose of this project was to provide evidence that low energy, rapid RF lamination quality met the same standards as conventionally autoclaved windows. The development of concepts for laminating curved glass with RF lamination was a major goal. Other primary goals included developing a stronger understanding of the lamination product markets described above, and to refine the potential benefits of commercial implementation. The scope of the project was to complete implementation concept studies in preparation for continuation into advanced development, pilot studies, and commercial implementation. The project consisted of 6 main tasks. The first dealt with lamination with poly-vinyl butyral (PVB) interlayers, which prior work had shown difficulties in achieving good quality laminates, working with Pilkington North America. The second task dealt with a study of current lamination processes in the various laminate industries, and development of concepts for integrating RF lamination into new or existing processes. The third task explored the use of a non-destructive technique for analyzing laminate adhesion with the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. The fourth task focused on developing concepts for curved glass lamination using RF lamination. The fifth and sixth tasks together comprised an analysis of laminate product markets, ranking for applicability and commercialization potential, and the development of commercialization strategies for those products. In addition, throughout the project as new experimental data and conventional process data were obtained, the benefits analysis of RF lamination was refined. The goals of the project described above were achieved, positioning RF lamination for the next stage growth envisioned in the original Industrial Grand Challenge proposal. Working with Pilkington North America, lamination of flat autoglass with PVB was achieved, meeting all 16 stringent industry tests. In particular, PVB laminates made with RF lamination passed environmental tests including the high temperature, 120 C bake test, without significant formation of bubbles (defects). The adhesion of PVB to glass was measured using the pummel method. Adhesion values ranging from 1 to 7 out of 10 were obtained. The significant process parameters affecting the environmental and adhesion performance were identified through a designed experiment. Pre-lamination process variables including PVB storage humidity and the de-airing process (vacuum or nip rolling) were significant, as well as the level of pressure applied to the laminate during the RF process. Analysis of manufacturing with RF lamination equipment, based on the processes developed indicated that 3 RF presses could replace a typical auto-industry autoclave to achieve equal or greater throughput with possibly less capital cost and smaller footprint. Concepts for curved lamination identifying castable molds for

  1. Energy Saving Glass Lamination via Selective Radio Frequency Heating

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Allan, Shawn M.; Baranova, Inessa; Poley, Joseph; Reis, Henrique

    2012-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

    This project focused on advancing radio-frequency (RF) lamination technology closer to commercial implementation, in order to reduce the energy intensity of glass lamination by up to 90%. Lamination comprises a wide range of products including autoglass, architectural safety and innovative design glass, transparent armor (e.g. bullet proof glass), smart glass, mirrors, and encapsulation of photovoltaics. Lamination is also the fastest growing segment of glass manufacturing, with photovoltaics, architectural needs, and an anticipated transition to laminated side windows in vehicles. The state-of-the-art for glass lamination is to use autoclaves, which apply heat and uniform gas pressure to bond the laminates over the course of 1 to 18 hours. Laminates consist of layers of glass or other materials bonded with vinyl or urethane interlayers. In autoclaving, significant heat energy is lost heating the chamber, pressurized air, glass racks, and the glass. In RF lamination, the heat is generated directly in the vinyl interlayer, causing it to heat and melt quickly, in just 1 to 10 minutes, without significantly heating the glass or the equipment. The main purpose of this project was to provide evidence that low energy, rapid RF lamination quality met the same standards as conventionally autoclaved windows. The development of concepts for laminating curved glass with RF lamination was a major goal. Other primary goals included developing a stronger understanding of the lamination product markets described above, and to refine the potential benefits of commercial implementation. The scope of the project was to complete implementation concept studies in preparation for continuation into advanced development, pilot studies, and commercial implementation. The project consisted of 6 main tasks. The first dealt with lamination with poly-vinyl butyral (PVB) interlayers, which prior work had shown difficulties in achieving good quality laminates, working with Pilkington North America. The second task dealt with a study of current lamination processes in the various laminate industries, and development of concepts for integrating RF lamination into new or existing processes. The third task explored the use of a non-destructive technique for analyzing laminate adhesion with the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. The fourth task focused on developing concepts for curved glass lamination using RF lamination. The fifth and sixth tasks together comprised an analysis of laminate product markets, ranking for applicability and commercialization potential, and the development of commercialization strategies for those products. In addition, throughout the project as new experimental data and conventional process data were obtained, the benefits analysis of RF lamination was refined. The goals of the project described above were achieved, positioning RF lamination for the next stage growth envisioned in the original Industrial Grand Challenge proposal. Working with Pilkington North America, lamination of flat autoglass with PVB was achieved, meeting all 16 stringent industry tests. In particular, PVB laminates made with RF lamination passed environmental tests including the high temperature, 120 ���°C bake test, without significant formation of bubbles (defects). The adhesion of PVB to glass was measured using the pummel method. Adhesion values ranging from 1 to 7 out of 10 were obtained. The significant process parameters affecting the environmental and adhesion performance were identified through a designed experiment. Pre-lamination process variables including PVB storage humidity and the de-airing process (vacuum or nip rolling) were significant, as well as the level of pressure applied to the laminate during the RF process. Analysis of manufacturing with RF lamination equipment, based on the processes developed indicated that 3 RF presses could replace a typical auto-industry autoclave to achieve equal or greater throughput with possibly less capital cost and smaller footprint. Concepts for curved lamination id

  2. Porphyrin electrode films prepared by electrooxidation of metalloprotoporphyrins

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Macor, K.A.; Spiro, T.G.

    1983-08-24T23:59:59.000Z

    Electrooxidation in organic solvents of the dimethyl esters of several metalloprotoporphyrins (PP) (Ni/sup II/PP, Zn/sup II/PP, Co/sup II/PP, (Fe/sup III/PP)Cl, (Fe/sup III/PP)/sub 2/O, and (Cr/sup III/PP)/sub 2/O) leads to the deposition of thick (approx. 1000 monolayer equivalents), electroactive porphyrin films, which have been characterized by cyclic voltammetry and absorption spectroscopy on transparent SnO/sub 2/ electrodes. The films are stable toward organic solvents and aqueous acids and bases, but are removed by treatment with hot concentrated acids. The resonance Raman spectrum of the NiPP film indicates that one of the two vinyl groups is saturated on most of the porphyrin units. Deposition continues for some minutes after the current is interrupted. This evidence is consistent with a mechanism involving electroinitiated cationic vinyl polymerization. No film is formed if the metal, rather than the ring, is oxidized. Thus the first oxidation step of Co/sup II/PP, to (Co/sup III/PP)/sup +/, does not support film formation (although the potential is as high as for ring oxidation in ZnPP), but the second step, to (Co/sup III/PP)/sup 2 +/, does. Lack of film formation for (Mn/sup III/PP)Cl and (Cr/sup IV/PP)O suggests metal, rather than ring oxidation, to Mn/sup IV/ and Cr/sup V/. However, (CrPP)/sub 2/O oxidation does produce a film, suggesting ring oxidation, analogous to (FePP)/sub 2/O, which also produces a film. However, while (CrPP)/sub 2/O is incorporated intact into the film, the (FePP)/sub 2/O film contains monomer units. Incorporation of other metal ions can be accomplished by soaking a ZnPP-coated electrode in H/sub 2/SO/sub 4/ followed by contact wtih a solution of the metal dihalide in refluxing DMF. The porphyrin sites are accessible to small ions, as shown by chloride coordination of ZnPP film upon soaking in chloride solution. 49 references, 13 figures, 1 table.

  3. Historical Material Analysis of DC745U Pressure Pads

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ortiz-Acosta, Denisse [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2012-07-30T23:59:59.000Z

    As part of the Enhance Surveillance mission, it is the goal to provide suitable lifetime assessment of stockpile materials. This report is an accumulation of historical publication on the DC745U material and their findings. It is the intention that the B61 LEP program uses this collection of data to further develop their understanding and potential areas of study. DC745U is a commercially available silicone elastomer consisting of dimethyl, methyl-phenyl, and methyl-vinyl siloxane repeat units. Originally, this material was manufactured by Dow Corning as Silastic{reg_sign} DC745U at their manufacturing facility in Kendallville, IN. Recently, Dow Corning shifted this material to the Xiameter{reg_sign} brand product line. Currently, DC745U is available through Xiameter{reg_sign} or Dow Corning's distributor R. D. Abbott Company. DC745U is cured using 0.5 wt% vinyl-specific peroxide curing agent known as Luperox 101 or Varox DBPH-50. This silicone elastomer is used in numerous parts, including two major components (outer pressure pads and aft cap support) in the W80 and as pressure pads on the B61. DC745U is a proprietary formulation, thus Dow Corning provides limited information on its composition and properties. Based on past experience with Dow Corning, DC745U is at risk of formulation changes without notification to the costumer. A formulation change for DC745U may have a significant impact because the network structure is a key variable in determining material properties. The purpose of this report is to provide an overview of historical DC745U studies and identify gaps that need to be addressed in future work. Some of the previous studies include the following: 1. Spectroscopic characterization of raw gum stock. 2. Spectroscopic, thermal, and mechanical studies on cured DC745U. 3. Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) and solvent swelling studies on DC745U with different crosslink densities. 4. NMR, solvent swelling, thermal, and mechanical studies on thermally aged DC745U. 5. NMR, solvent swelling, thermal, and mechanical studies on radiolytically aged DC745U. Each area is reviewed and further work is suggested to improve our understanding of DC745U for systems engineering, surveillance, aging assessments, and lifetime assessment.

  4. Sanitary landfill groundwater monitoring report. Fourth quarter 1996 and 1996 summary

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1997-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A maximum of eighty-nine wells of the LFW series monitor groundwater quality in the Steed Pond Aquifer (Water Table) beneath the Sanitary Landfill at the Savannah River Site (SRS). These wells are sampled quarterly to comply with the South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control Domestic Waste Permit DWP-087A and as part of the SRS Groundwater Monitoring Program. Dichloromethane, a common laboratory contaminant, and chloroethene (vinyl chloride) were the most widespread constituents exceeding standards during 1996. Benzene, trichloroethylene, 1,4-dichlorobenzene, 1,1-dichloroethylene, lead (total recoverable), gross alpha, mercury (total recoverable), tetrachloroethylene, fluoride, thallium, radium-226, radium-228, and tritium also exceeded standards in one or more wells. The groundwater flow direction in the Steed Pond Aquifer (Water Table) beneath the Sanitary Landfill was to the southeast (universal transverse Mercator coordinates). The flow rate in this unit was approximately 141 ft/year during first quarter 1996 and 132 ft/year during fourth quarter 1996

  5. Mixed Waste Management Facility groundwater monitoring report. Second quarter 1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chase, J.A.

    1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Currently, 125 wells monitor groundwater quality in the uppermost aquifer beneath the Mixed Waste Management Facility (MWMF) at the Savannah River Site. Samples from the wells are analyzed for selected heavy metals, indicator parameters, radionuclides, volatile organic compounds, and other constituents. During second quarter 1994, chloroethene (vinyl chloride), 1,1-dichloroethylene, gross alpha, lead, tetrachloroethylene, trichloroethylene, or tritium exceeded final Primary Drinking Water Standards (PDWS) in approximately half of the downgradient wells at the MWMF. Consistent with historical trends, elevated constituent levels were found primarily in Aquifer Zone. As in previous quarters, tritium and trichloroethylene were the most widespread elevated constituents during second quarter 1994. Sixty-two of the 125 monitoring wells contained elevated tritium activities. Trichloroethylene concentrations exceeded the final PDWS in 23 wells. Chloroethene, 1,1-dichloroethylene, lead, and tetrachloroethylene, elevated in one or more wells during second quarter 1994, also occurred in elevated levels during first quarter 1994. These constituents generally were elevated in the same wells during both quarters. Gross alpha, which was not elevated in any well during first quarter 1994, was elevated in one well during second quarter. Copper, mercury, and nonvolatile beta were elevated during first quarter 1994 but not during second quarter.

  6. A novel Whole Air Sample Profiler (WASP) for the quantification of volatile organic compounds in the boundary layer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mak, J. E.; Su, L.; Guenther, Alex B.; Karl, Thomas G.

    2013-10-16T23:59:59.000Z

    The emission and fate of reactive VOCs is of inherent interest to those studying chemical biosphere-atmosphere interactions. In-canopy VOC observations are obtainable using tower-based samplers, but the lack of suitable sampling systems for the full boundary 5 layer has limited the data characterizing the vertical structure of such gases above the canopy height and still in the boundary layer. This is the important region where many reactive VOCs are oxidized or otherwise removed. Here we describe an airborne sampling system designed to collect a vertical profile of air into a 3/800 OD tube 150m in length. The inlet ram air pressure is used to flow sampled air through the 10 tube, which results in a varying flow rate based on aircraft speed and altitude. Since aircraft velocity decreases during ascent, it is necessary to account for the variable flow rate into the tube. This is accomplished using a reference gas that is pulsed into the air stream so that the precise altitude of the collected air can be reconstructed post-collection. The pulsed injections are also used to determine any significant effect 15 from diffusion/mixing within the sampling tube, either during collection or subsequent extraction for gas analysis. This system has been successfully deployed, and we show some measured vertical profiles of isoprene and its oxidation products methacrolein and methyl vinyl ketone from a mixed canopy near Columbia, Missouri.

  7. Experimental Results in Support of Simulating Progressive Crush in Carbon-Fiber Textile Composites

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DeTeresa, S J; Allison, L M; Cunningham, B J; Freeman, DC; Saculla, M D; Sanchez, R J; Winchester, S W

    2001-04-02T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes the findings of an experimental program conducted to support the modeling of the crush behavior of triaxial braid carbon fiber composites. The matrix material as well as braided panels and tubes were characterized in order to determine material properties, to assess failure modes, and to provide a test bed for new analytical and numerical tools developed specifically for braided composites. The matrix material selected by the ACC was an epoxy vinyl ester (Ashland Hetron 922). Tensile tests were used to compare two formulations-one used by the ACC and one recommended by the resin supplier. The latter was a faster reacting system and gelled in one-third the time of the ACC formulation. Both formulations had an average elongation at failure that was only half of the resin supplier's reported value. Only one specimen of each type came close to the reported elongation value and it was shown that failure invariably initiated at both surface and internal defects. Overall, the tensile properties of the two formulations were nearly identical, but those of the ACC system were more consistent. The properties of the ACC matrix formulation were measured in tension, shear, and compression and the average properties obtained in these tests are summarized.

  8. Formation and fluidity measurement of supported lipid bilayer on polyvinyl chloride membrane

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kobayashi, Takuji, E-mail: kobayashi-t@int.ee.tut.ac.jp; Kono, Akiteru, E-mail: kobayashi-t@int.ee.tut.ac.jp; Sawada, Kazuaki [Department of Electrical and Electronic Information Engineering, Toyohashi University of Technology, 1-1 Hibarigaoka Tempaku-cho, Toyohashi, 441-8580 (Japan); Futagawa, Masato [Department of Electrical and Electronic Information Engineering and Head Office for the Tailor-Made and Baton-Zone Graduate Course, Toyohashi University of Technology, 1-1 Hibarigaoka Tempaku-cho, Toyohashi, 441-8580 (Japan); Tero, Ryugo, E-mail: tero@tut.jp [Electronics-Inspired Interdisciplinary Research Institute and Department of Environmental and Life Sciences, Toyohashi University of Technology, 1-1 Hibarigaoka Tempaku-cho, Toyohashi, 441-8580 (Japan)

    2014-02-20T23:59:59.000Z

    We prepared an artificial lipid bilayer on a plasticized poly(vinyl chloride) (PVC) membrane on a Si3N4 layer deposited on a Si wafer. We optimized the experimental condition for the fabrication of the PVC membrane, and obtained a PVC membrane with a flat and uniform surface on the scale of several hundreds of micrometer suitable for a substrate for supported lipid bilayers (SLBs). The SLB of 1,2-dioleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DOPC) was formed on the PVC membrane by the vesicle fusion method. The observation with a conventional epi-fluorescence microscope and a confocal laser scanning microscope gave geometrically uniform images of the SLB on the PVC membrane. The fluidity and the mobile fraction of the SLB was evaluated by the fluorescence recovery after photobleaching method, and compared with that on a thermally oxidized SiO{sub 2}/Si substrate. The SLB on the PVC membrane contained immobile fraction ?30%, but the diffusion in the mobile fraction was two times faster than that in the SLB on SiO{sub 2}/Si, which had little immobile fraction.

  9. Synthesis And Characterization of Pt Clusters in Aqueous Solutions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Siani, A.; Wigal, K.R.; Alexeev, O.S.; Amiridis, M.D.

    2009-05-26T23:59:59.000Z

    Extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) and UV-visible (UV-vis) spectroscopies were used to monitor the various steps involved in the synthesis of unprotected and poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA)-protected aqueous colloidal Pt suspensions. The results indicate that on hydrolysis of the H{sub 2}PtCl{sub 6} precursor, the Cl{sup -} ligands were partially replaced by aquo ligands in the first coordination shell of Pt to form [PtCl{sub 2}(H{sub 2}O){sub 4}]{sup 2+}. Treatment of these species with NaBH{sub 4} under controlled pH conditions led to the formation of nearly uniform Pt{sub 4} and Pt{sub 6} clusters in the absence and presence of PVA, respectively. These highly dispersed colloidal Pt suspensions were stable for several months. The addition of 2-propanol (IPA) to both types of Pt suspensions led to some sintering of the Pt clusters, although both suspensions retained their colloidal nature. Less sintering was evident in the PVA-protected Pt suspension. Both the unprotected and the PVA-protected colloidal Pt suspensions were catalytically active for the liquid-phase selective oxidation of 2-propanol to acetone, with the unprotected suspension exhibiting the highest activity.

  10. Advanced development of PV encapsulants. Annual subcontract report, 30 December 1992--31 March 1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Holley, W.; Agro, S.; Galica, J.; Thoma, L.; White, R.; Yorgensen, R. [Springborn Labs., Inc., Enfield, CT (United States)

    1994-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes work under Phase II of a Photovoltaic Manufacturing Technology project to conduct laboratory problem definition with an emphasis on controlled aging studies to evaluate the influence of various compositional, processing, and operating parameters on ethylene vinyl acetate (EVA) discoloration. In support of future accelerated UV aging studies (AAS) of coupon-sized EVA laminates, an Atlas xenon arc Ci35A Weather-Ometer was procured, installed, and calibrated for temperature and irradiance. In preparing for the AAS studies, UV-visible spectroscopy measurements were performed on various types of low-iron glass, representive of materials used for module superstrates. It was discovered that the transmission spectra of some of the grades in the UV region from 250 to 400 nm was significantly different. Older grades of Solatex and solite, and StarPhire 'cut off' well below 290 nm, while newer grades of Solatex and Solite, and StarPhire and Airphire greatly reduce the UV transmittance between 280 and 330 nm. Controlled aging studies are presently underway at 0.55 W/m2, 340 nm, and 100 degrees C, and we expect comparative data on yellowing to be available soon.

  11. Validation of formability of laminated sheet metal for deep drawing process using GTN damage model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lim, Yongbin; Cha, Wan-gi; Kim, Naksoo [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Sogang University, 1 Sinsu-dong, Mapo-gu, Seoul, 121-742 (Korea, Republic of); Ko, Sangjin [Mold/die and forming technology team, Product prestige research lab, LG electronics, 222, LG-ro, Jinwi-myeon, Pyeongtaek-si, Gyeonggi-do, 451-713 (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

    In this study, we studied formability of PET/PVC laminated sheet metal which named VCM (Vinyl Coated Metal). VCM offers various patterns and good-looking metal steel used for appliances such as refrigerator and washing machine. But, this sheet has problems which are crack and peeling of film when the material is formed by deep drawing process. To predict the problems, we used finite element method and GTN (Gurson-Tvergaard-Needleman) damage model to represent damage of material. We divided the VCM into 3 layers (PET film, adhesive and steel added PVC) in finite element analysis model to express the crack and peeling phenomenon. The material properties of each layer are determined by reverse engineering based on tensile test result. Furthermore, we performed the simple rectangular deep drawing and simulated it. The simulation result shows good agreement with drawing experiment result in position, punch stroke of crack occurrence. Also, we studied the fracture mechanism of PET film on VCM by comparing the width direction strain of metal and PET film.

  12. Mesophases in polyethylene, polypropylene, and poly(1-butene)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Androsch, Rene J [ORNL; Di Lorenzo, Maria [ORNL; Schick, Christoph [Rostock University, Rostock, Germany; Wunderlich, Bernhard {nmn} [ORNL

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper contains new views about the amorphous and partially ordered phases of the three polymers listed in the title. The discussion is based on information on structure, thermodynamic stability, and large-amplitude molecular motion. Polyethylene is the basic backbone of all alkene polymers, and the other two are the first members of the vinyl polymers which have stereospecifically placed alkyl side chains. Their multiphase structures consist of metastable crystals, mesophases, and surrounding rigid and mobile amorphous fractions. All these phases have sizes ranging from micrometer dimensions down to nanometers. Besides the phase structures, information about the molecular coupling between the phases must be considered. Depending on temperature, the polymer phases can vary from solid (rigid) to liquid (mobile). New knowledge is also gained by cross-comparison of the title polymers. The experimental information was gained from (a) various forms of slow, fast, and temperature-modulated thermal analysis to identify equilibrium and non-equilibrium states, (b) measurement of structure and morphology at various length scales, and (c) tracing of the large-amplitude molecular motion, the kinetics of order/disorder changes, and the liquid/solid transitions (glass transitions). It is shown that much more needs to be known about the various phases and their coupling to characterize a given polymer and to fine-tune its properties for a given application.

  13. Structural analysis of Bacillus pumilus phenolic acid decarboxylase, a lipocalin-fold enzyme

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Matte, Allan; Grosse, Stephan; Bergeron, Hélčne; Abokitse, Kofi; Lau, Peter C.K. (Biotech Res.)

    2012-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The decarboxylation of phenolic acids, including ferulic and p-coumaric acids, to their corresponding vinyl derivatives is of importance in the flavoring and polymer industries. Here, the crystal structure of phenolic acid decarboxylase (PAD) from Bacillus pumilus strain UI-670 is reported. The enzyme is a 161-residue polypeptide that forms dimers both in the crystal and in solution. The structure of PAD as determined by X-ray crystallography revealed a -barrel structure and two -helices, with a cleft formed at one edge of the barrel. The PAD structure resembles those of the lipocalin-fold proteins, which often bind hydrophobic ligands. Superposition of structurally related proteins bound to their cognate ligands shows that they and PAD bind their ligands in a conserved location within the -barrel. Analysis of the residue-conservation pattern for PAD-related sequences mapped onto the PAD structure reveals that the conservation mainly includes residues found within the hydrophobic core of the protein, defining a common lipocalin-like fold for this enzyme family. A narrow cleft containing several conserved amino acids was observed as a structural feature and a potential ligand-binding site.

  14. Field Lysimeter Investigations - test results: Low-Level Waste Data Base Development Program: Test results for fiscal years 1994-1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McConnell, J.W. Jr.; Rodgers, R.D.; Hilton, L.D.; Neilson, R.M. Jr. [and others

    1996-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Field Lysimeter Investigations: Low-Level Waste Data Base Development Program, funded by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), is (1) studying the degradation effects in EPICOR-II organic ion-exchange resins caused by radiation, (2) examining the adequacy of test procedures recommended in the Branch Technical Position on Waste Form to meet the requirements of 10 CFR 61 using solidified EPICOR-II resins, (3) obtaining performance information on solidified EPICOR-II ion-exchange resins in a disposal environment, and (4) determining the condition of EPICOR-II liners. Results of the final 2 (10 total) years of data acquisition from operation of the field testing are presented and discussed. During the continuing field testing, both portland type I-II cement and Dow vinyl ester-styrene waste forms are being tested in lysimeter arrays located at Argonne National Laboratory-East in Illinois and at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The experimental equipment is described and results of waste form characterization using tests recommended by the NRC`s {open_quotes}Technical Position on Waste Form{close_quotes} are presented. The study is designed to provide continuous data on nuclide release and movement, as well as environmental conditions, over a 20-year period. At the end of the tenth year, the experiment was closed down. Examination of soil and waste forms is planned to be conducted next and will be reported later.

  15. Field lysimeter investigations - test results. Low-level waste data base development program: Test results for fiscal years 1986, 1987, 1988, and 1989

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McConnell, J.W. Jr.; Rogers, R.D.; Findlay, M.W.; Davis, E.C.; Jastrow, J.D.; Neilson, R.M. Jr.; Hilton, L.D.

    1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Field Lysimeter Investigations: Low-Level Waste Data Base Development Program, funded by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), is (a) studying the degradation effects in EPICOR-II organic ion-exchange resins caused by radiation, (b) examining the adequacy of test procedures recommended in the Branch Technical Position on Waste Form to meet the requirements of 10 CFR 61 using solidified EPICOR-II resins, (c) obtaining performance information on solidified EPICOR-II ion-exchange resins in a disposal environment, and (d) determining the condition of EPICOR-II liners. Results of the first 4 years of data acquisition from the field testing are presented and discussed. During the continuing field testing, both Portland type I-II cement and Dow vinyl ester-styrene waste forms are being tested in lysimeter arrays located at Argonne National Laboratory-East in Illinois and at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The experimental equipment is described and results of waste form characterization using tests recommended by the NRC`s {open_quotes}Technical Position on Waste Form{close_quotes} are presented. The study is designed to provide continuous data on nuclide release and movement, as well as environmental conditions, over a 20-year period.

  16. Field Lysimeter Investigations -- Test results. Low-Level Waste Data Base Development Program: Test results for fiscal years 1990, 1991, 1992, and 1993; Volume 2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McConnell, J.W. Jr.; Rogers, R.D.; Brey, R.R.; Neilson, R.M. Jr.; Hilton, L.D. [Lockheed Idaho Technologies Co., Idaho Falls, ID (United States). Idaho National Engineering Lab.; Jastrow, J.D. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Wickliff Hicks, D.S.; Sanford, W.E. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Sullivan, T.M. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States)

    1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Field Lysimeter Investigations: Low-Level Waste Data Base Development Program, funded by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), is (a) studying the degradation effects in EPICOR-II organic ion-exchange resins caused by radiation, (b) examining the adequacy of test procedures recommended in the Branch Technical Position on Waste Form to meet the requirements of 10 CFR 61 using solidified EPICOR-II resins, (c) obtaining performance information on solidified EPICOR-II ion-exchange resins in a disposal environment, and (d) determining the condition of EPICOR-II liners. Results of the second 4 years of data acquisition from the field testing are presented and discussed. During the continuing field testing, both portland type 1--2 cement and Dow vinyl ester-styrene waste forms are being tested in lysimeter arrays located at Argonne National Laboratory-East in Illinois and at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The experimental equipment is described and results of waste form characterization using tests recommended by the NRC`s ``Technical Position on Waste Form`` are presented. The study is designed to provide continuous data on nuclide release and movement, as well as environmental conditions, over a 20-year period.

  17. Health assessment for Fairchild Semiconductor Corporation Proposed National Priorities List Site, Intel Corporation National Priorities List Site, Raytheon Company National Priorities List Site, Mountain View, California, Region 9. CERCLIS No. CAD095989778. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1989-02-07T23:59:59.000Z

    The Fairchild Semiconductor Corporation, the Intel Corporation, and the Raytheon Company each have a facility located approximately 3 miles south of San Francisco Bay in Mountain View, California. The Intel and Raytheon facilities are on the National Priorities List (NPL) while the Fairchild facility is a proposed NPL site. Within the one-half square mile area containing the three sites, 37 potential and two inferred sources of contamination have been identified. The major contaminants for the three sites include trichloroethene, 1,1,1-trichloroethane, 1,1-dichloroethene, 1,2-dichloroethene, 1,1-dichloroethane, chloroform, tetrachloroethene, 1,2-dichlorobenzene, trichlorotrifluoroethane (Freon 113), and vinyl chloride. These contaminants are attributed to the sites and have been found primarily in the ground water and subsurface soil on the sites and in ground water off the sites. Contaminant concentrations in surface soils were within the normal range of background values. Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) have been found in surface water west of the study area in Stevens Creek, an intermittent stream. The source of these contaminants is suspected to be treated ground water that has been pumped from the Fairchild and Raytheon sites and discharged to Stevens Creek under a permit.

  18. Investigation of proposed process sequence for the array automated assembly task. Phase I and II. Final report, October 1, 1977-June 30, 1980

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mardesich, N.; Garcia, A.; Eskenas, K.

    1980-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A selected process sequence for the low cost fabrication of photovoltaic modules was defined during this contract. Each part of the process sequence was looked at regarding its contribution to the overall dollars per watt cost. During the course of the research done, some of the initially included processes were dropped due to technological deficiencies. The printed dielectric diffusion mask, codiffusion of the n+ and p+ regions, wraparound front contacts and retention of the diffusion oxide for use as an AR coating were all the processes that were removed for this reason. Other process steps were retained to achieve the desired overall cost and efficiency. Square wafers, a polymeric spin-on PX-10 diffusion source, a p+ back surface field and silver front contacts are all processes that have been recommended for use in this program. The printed silver solderable pad for making contact to the aluminum back was replaced by an ultrasonically applied tin-zinc pad. Also, the texturized front surface was dropped as inappropriate for the sheet silicon likely to be available in 1986. Progress has also been made on the process sequence for module fabrication. A shift from bonding with a conformal coating to laminating with ethylene vinyl acetate and a glass superstrate is recommended for further module fabrication. The finalized process sequence is described.

  19. Methods of forming single source precursors, methods of forming polymeric single source precursors, and single source precursors formed by such methods

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Fox, Robert V.; Rodriguez, Rene G.; Pak, Joshua J.; Sun, Chivin; Margulieux, Kelsey R.; Holland, Andrew W.

    2014-09-09T23:59:59.000Z

    Methods of forming single source precursors (SSPs) include forming intermediate products having the empirical formula 1/2{L.sub.2N(.mu.-X).sub.2M'X.sub.2}.sub.2, and reacting MER with the intermediate products to form SSPs of the formula L.sub.2N(.mu.-ER).sub.2M'(ER).sub.2, wherein L is a Lewis base, M is a Group IA atom, N is a Group IB atom, M' is a Group IIIB atom, each E is a Group VIB atom, each X is a Group VIIA atom or a nitrate group, and each R group is an alkyl, aryl, vinyl, (per)fluoro alkyl, (per)fluoro aryl, silane, or carbamato group. Methods of forming polymeric or copolymeric SSPs include reacting at least one of HE.sup.1R.sup.1E.sup.1H and MER with one or more substances having the empirical formula L.sub.2N(.mu.-ER).sub.2M'(ER).sub.2 or L.sub.2N(.mu.-X).sub.2M'(X).sub.2 to form a polymeric or copolymeric SSP. New SSPs and intermediate products are formed by such methods.

  20. Sanitary Landfill Groundwater Monitoring Report, Fourth Quarter 1999 and 1999 Summary

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chase, J.

    2000-03-13T23:59:59.000Z

    A maximum of thirty eight-wells of the LFW series monitor groundwater quality in the Steed Pond Aquifer (Water Table) beneath the Sanitary Landfill Area at the Savannah River Site (SRS). These wells are sampled quarterly to comply with the South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control Domestic Water Permit DWP-087A and as part of the SRS Groundwater Monitoring Program. Iron (Total Recoverable), Chloroethene (Vinyl Chloride) and 1,1-Dichloroethane were the most widespread constituents exceeding the Final Primary Drinking Water Standards during 1999. Trichloroethylene, 1,1-Dichloroethylene, 1,2-Dichloroethane, 1,4-Dichlorobenzene, Aluminum (Total Recoverable), Benzene, cis-1,2-Dichloroethylene, Dichlorodifluoromethane, Dichloromethane (Methylene Chloride), Gross Alpha, Mercury (Total Recoverable), Nonvolatile Beta, Tetrachloroethylene, Total Organic Halogens, Trichlorofluoromethane, Tritium also exceeded standards in one or more wells. The groundwater flow direction in the Steed Pond Aquifer (Water Table) beneath the Sanitary Landfill is to the southeast (universal transverse Mercator coordinates). The flow rate in this unit was approximately 144.175 ft/year during first quarter 1999 and 145.27 ft/year during fourth quarter 1999.

  1. Nucleophilic substitutions of 1-alkenylcyclopropyl esters and 1-alkynylcyclopropyl chlorides catalyzed by palladium (0)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stolle, A. [George-August-Universitaet, Goettingen (Germany)]|[Universite de Paris-Sud, Orsay (France); Ollivier, J.; Salauen, J. [Universite de Paris-Sud, Orsay (France)] [and others

    1992-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

    The 1-ethenylcyclopropylsulfonates 2e,f and 2-cyclopropylideneethyl esters 10b,c, readily available from cyclopropanone hemiacetal 1, undergo regioselective Pd(0) catalyzed nucleophilic substitution via the unsymmetric 1,1-dimethylene-{pi}-allyl complex 23. With stabilized anions (enolates of malonic ester, {beta}-dicarbonyl compounds, {beta}-sulfonyl ester, and Schiff bases as well as acetate anion, sulfonamide anion, etc.) the nucleophilic substitution occurs at the terminal vinylic position exclusively, providing cyclopropylideneethyl derivatives as building blocks of high synthetic potential. Competition experiments have disclosed that 1-ethenylcyclopropyl tosylate (2e) and cyclopropylideneethyl acetate (10b) are more reactive than dimethylallyl acetates 19 and 22, respectively. Use of chiral phosphines as ligands in the palladium catalyst can provide optically active methylenecyclopropane derivatives. With phenyl-, methyl-, and even n-butylzinc chloride as nucleophiles, the reaction apparently proceeds with initial transfer of the organic residue to palladium, followed by reductive elimination entailing tertiary substitution on the cyclopropane ring exclusively; the same type of product is obtained with azide and bis(trimethylsilyl)amide. But the site of hydride attack to yield reduction products depends on the hydride source. 1-Alkynylcyclopropyl chlorides 12, 13, and 14 react only with organozinc chlorides (nonstabilized nucleophiles) to provide mixtures of ethenylidenecyclopropanes 65 and alkynylcyclopropanes 66, via the {sigma}-palladium complexes 69 and 70, while chloride 15 undergoes mainly reduction. Other transition metal catalysts (Ni, Mo) also induce substitutions, but with poorer regioselectivity. 81 refs., 9 figs., 3 tabs.

  2. [Transition metal mediated transformations of small molecules

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sen, A.

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Work on organotransition metal chemistry, homogeneous and heterogeneous catalysis is summarized. Several cationic palladium(II) complexes with bulky phosphine or pyridine ligands were discovered that are highly selective catalysts for linear dimerization of vinyl monomers and linear polymerization of p-divinylbenzene, the reactions proceeding through a carbocationic mechanism. Our studies were continued on alternating olefin-carbon monoxide copolymers. The copolymerization reaction and reactivity of copolymers were examined. New catalytic systems for alternating copolymerization of [alpha]-olefins with CO were discovered. In the case of styrene derivatives, tactic copolymers were obtained. Poly(ethylenepyrrolediyl) derivatives were synthesized from alternating ethylene-carbon monoxide copolymer and become electronic conductors when doped with iodine. A catalytic system for direct synthesis of polyureas and polyoxamides from and diamines was also discovered. Pt metal catalyzed the oxidation of ethers, esters, and amines to carboxylic acids and the oxidation of olefins to 1,2-diols. Anaerobic and aerobic decomposition of molybdenum(VI)-oxoalkyl compounds were studied for heterogeneous oxidation of alkanes and olefins on Mo(VI)-oxide surfaces. Synthesis of polymer-trapped metal, metal oxide, and metal sulfide nanoclusters (size <1--10 nm) was studied.

  3. NIOSH Manual of Analytical Methods (third edition). Fourth supplement

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1990-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The NIOSH Manual of Analytical Methods, 3rd edition, was updated for the following chemicals: allyl-glycidyl-ether, 2-aminopyridine, aspartame, bromine, chlorine, n-butylamine, n-butyl-glycidyl-ether, carbon-dioxide, carbon-monoxide, chlorinated-camphene, chloroacetaldehyde, p-chlorophenol, crotonaldehyde, 1,1-dimethylhydrazine, dinitro-o-cresol, ethyl-acetate, ethyl-formate, ethylenimine, sodium-fluoride, hydrogen-fluoride, cryolite, sodium-hexafluoroaluminate, formic-acid, hexachlorobutadiene, hydrogen-cyanide, hydrogen-sulfide, isopropyl-acetate, isopropyl-ether, isopropyl-glycidyl-ether, lead, lead-oxide, maleic-anhydride, methyl-acetate, methyl-acrylate, methyl-tert-butyl ether, methyl-cellosolve-acetate, methylcyclohexanol, 4,4'-methylenedianiline, monomethylaniline, monomethylhydrazine, nitric-oxide, p-nitroaniline, phenyl-ether, phenyl-ether-biphenyl mixture, phenyl-glycidyl-ether, phenylhydrazine, phosphine, ronnel, sulfuryl-fluoride, talc, tributyl-phosphate, 1,1,2-trichloro-1,2,2-trifluoroethane, trimellitic-anhydride, triorthocresyl-phosphate, triphenyl-phosphate, and vinyl-acetate.

  4. Sanitary Landfill Groundwater Monitoring Report - Third and Fourth Quarters 2000 and 2000 Summary

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chase, J.A.

    2001-03-07T23:59:59.000Z

    A maximum of forty wells of the LFW series monitor groundwater quality in the Steed Pond Aquifer (Water Table) beneath the Sanitary Landfill Area at the Savannah River Site (SRS). These wells are sampled quarterly to comply with the South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control Domestic Waste Permit DWP-087A and as part of the Sanitary Landfill Groundwater Quality Assessment Plan. Chloroethene (vinyl chloride) and trichloroethylene were the most widespread constituent exceeding the Final Primary Drinking Water Standards during the calendar year 2000. 1,4-Dichlorobenzene, benzene, dichloromethane (methylene chloride), gross alpha, lead (total recoverable) mercury (total recoverable), thallium (total recoverable), and tritium also exceeded standards in one or more wells. The groundwater flow direction in the Steed Pond Aquifer (Water Table) beneath the Sanitary Landfill is to the southeast (universal transverse Mercator coordinates). The flow rate at this unit was approximately 122.64 ft/year during first quarter 2000 and 132.28 ft/year during fourth quarter 2000.

  5. [Transition metal mediated transformations of small molecules]. Progress report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sen, A.

    1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Work on organotransition metal chemistry, homogeneous and heterogeneous catalysis is summarized. Several cationic palladium(II) complexes with bulky phosphine or pyridine ligands were discovered that are highly selective catalysts for linear dimerization of vinyl monomers and linear polymerization of p-divinylbenzene, the reactions proceeding through a carbocationic mechanism. Our studies were continued on alternating olefin-carbon monoxide copolymers. The copolymerization reaction and reactivity of copolymers were examined. New catalytic systems for alternating copolymerization of {alpha}-olefins with CO were discovered. In the case of styrene derivatives, tactic copolymers were obtained. Poly(ethylenepyrrolediyl) derivatives were synthesized from alternating ethylene-carbon monoxide copolymer and become electronic conductors when doped with iodine. A catalytic system for direct synthesis of polyureas and polyoxamides from and diamines was also discovered. Pt metal catalyzed the oxidation of ethers, esters, and amines to carboxylic acids and the oxidation of olefins to 1,2-diols. Anaerobic and aerobic decomposition of molybdenum(VI)-oxoalkyl compounds were studied for heterogeneous oxidation of alkanes and olefins on Mo(VI)-oxide surfaces. Synthesis of polymer-trapped metal, metal oxide, and metal sulfide nanoclusters (size <1--10 nm) was studied.

  6. Additives and method for controlling clathrate hydrates in fluid systems

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sloan, E.D. Jr.; Christiansen, R.L.; Lederhos, J.P.; Long, J.P.; Panchalingam, V.; Du, Y.; Sum, A.K.W.

    1997-06-17T23:59:59.000Z

    Discussed is a process for preventing clathrate hydrate masses from detrimentally impeding the possible flow of a fluid susceptible to clathrate hydrate formation. The process is particularly useful in the natural gas and petroleum production, transportation and processing industry where gas hydrate formation can cause serious problems. Additives preferably contain one or more five member, six member and/or seven member cyclic chemical groupings. Additives include polymers having lactam rings. Additives can also contain polyelectrolytes that are believed to improve conformance of polymer additives through steric hindrance and/or charge repulsion. Also, polymers having an amide on which a C{sub 1}-C{sub 4} group is attached to the nitrogen and/or the carbonyl carbon of the amide may be used alone, or in combination with ring-containing polymers for enhanced effectiveness. Polymers having at least some repeating units representative of polymerizing at least one of an oxazoline, an N-substituted acrylamide and an N-vinyl alkyl amide are preferred.

  7. Additives and method for controlling clathrate hydrates in fluid systems

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sloan, Jr., Earle Dendy (Golden, CO); Christiansen, Richard Lee (Littleton, CO); Lederhos, Joseph P. (Wheatridge, CO); Long, Jin Ping (Dallas, TX); Panchalingam, Vaithilingam (Lakewood, CO); Du, Yahe (Golden, CO); Sum, Amadeu Kun Wan (Golden, CO)

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Discussed is a process for preventing clathrate hydrate masses from detrimentally impeding the possible flow of a fluid susceptible to clathrate hydrate formation. The process is particularly useful in the natural gas and petroleum production, transportation and processing industry where gas hydrate formation can cause serious problems. Additives preferably contain one or more five member, six member and/or seven member cyclic chemical groupings. Additives include polymers having lactam rings. Additives can also contain polyelectrolytes that are believed to improve conformance of polymer additives through steric hinderance and/or charge repulsion. Also, polymers having an amide on which a C.sub.1 -C.sub.4 group is attached to the nitrogen and/or the carbonyl carbon of the amide may be used alone, or in combination with ring-containing polymers for enhanced effectiveness. Polymers having at least some repeating units representative of polymerizing at least one of an oxazoline, an N-substituted acrylamide and an N-vinyl alkyl amide are preferred.

  8. Ionizing radiation induced degradation of poly (2-methoxy-5-(2'-ethyl-hexyloxy) -1,4-phenylene vinylene) in solution

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bronze-Uhle, E. S.; Batagin-Neto, A.; Lavarda, F. C.; Graeff, C. F. O. [Department of Physics, FC-UNESP, Av. Eng. Luiz Edmundo Carrijo Coube 14-01, 17033-360 Bauru (Brazil)

    2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper we investigate the causes of the chromatic alteration observed in chloroform solutions of poly (2-methoxy-5-(2'-ethyl-hexyloxy)-1,4-phenylene vinylene) (MEH-PPV) after gamma ray irradiation. Structural and chemical changes were analyzed by gel permeation chromatography, fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, and proton nuclear magnetic resonance techniques and complemented by electronic structure calculations. The results indicate chlorine incorporation in the polymer structure and main chain scission after irradiation. Based on our findings we propose that the main mechanism for the blue-shifts, observed in the UV-Vis absorption spectra of MEH-PPV after irradiation, is the result of a radical attack on the polymer main chain. Gamma rays generate radicals, Cl and CHCl{sub 2} from chloroform radiolysis that attack preferentially the vinyl double bonds of the polymer backbone, breaking the electronic conjugation and eventually the chain. Our results indicate that oxygen does not play a major role in the effect. Electronic spectra simulations were performed based on these assumptions reproducing the UV-Vis experimental results.

  9. Fort Devens: Cold Climate Market-Rate Townhomes Targeting HERS Index of 40, Harvard, Massachusetts (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2013-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Achieving aggressive energy efficiency targets requires tight coordination and clear communication among owners, designers, builders, and subcontractors. For this townhome project, MassDevelopment, the quasi-governmental agency owner, selected Metric Development of Boston, teaming with the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Consortium for Advanced Residential Buildings (CARB) and Cambridge Seven Architects, to build very high performing market-rate homes. Fort Devens is part of a decommissioned army base in working-class Harvard, Massachusetts, approximately one hour northwest of Boston. The team proposed 12 net zero energy-ready townhomes, meaning that the application of renewable energy systems would result in annual net zero energy use in the homes. The homes were also designed to achieve a Home Energy Rating System (HERS) Index Score of 41 before adding renewables. For this project, CARB drew on its experience working with Rural Development Inc. on a series of affordable townhomes in northern Massachusetts. The team carefully planned the site to maximize solar access, daylighting, and efficient building forms. The basic strategy was to design a very efficient thermal enclosure while minimizing incremental cost increases compared with standard construction. Using BEopt modeling software, the team established the requirements of the enclosure and investigated multiple assembly options. They settled on double-wall construction with dense-pack cellulose fill. High performance vinyl windows (U-0.24, solar heat gain coefficient [SHGC]-0.22), a vented R-59 attic, and exceptional air sealing completed the package.

  10. Beneficial reuse of treated media from remediation at an industrial site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Erdman, D.E. [Smith Environmental Technologies, Plymouth Meeting, PA (United States); Weston, A.F. [Occidental Chemical Corp., Niagara Falls, NY (United States); Morrissey, B.J. [Occidental Chemical Corp., Houston, TX (United States)

    1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Remediation at an active PVC resin manufacturing plant in southeastern Pennsylvania has involved closure of lagoons under a RCRA plan and design of a groundwater pump and treat program under CERCLA. Both the CERCLA and RCRA programs involve beneficial reuse of the treated media, which in effect has offset some costs of the remediation. The lagoons were used to settle the PVC residual material from wastewater generated by the facility. Analysis of the residual material showed that the polymer content would allow it to be used as a low-grade PVC resin after drying. The treatment process selected for the RCRA lagoon closure involved indirect steam stripping and filter pressing which produced a filter cake that was both nonhazardous and marketable. Approximately 6,000 tons of product was sent to market from the lagoons. The groundwater, which will be remediated at the site, contains trichlorethylene (TCE), vinyl chloride monomer (VCM), and other volatile organic compounds. An average 400 gpm of groundwater will be extracted and treated by carbon absorbents and an air stripper. The groundwater will be used by the plant in the production process after it is treated by the CERCLA remediation system.

  11. Chemical phenomena in solid-state voltammetry in polymer solvents

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Geng, L.; Reed, R.A.; Kim, M.H.; Wooster, T.T.; Oliver, B.N.; Egekeze, J.; Kennedy, R.T.; Jorgenson, J.W.; Parcher, J.F.; Murray, R.W.

    1989-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper, aimed at delineating significant chemical effects in solid-state voltammetry, describes electrochemical oxidations and reductions of electroactive monomer solutes dissolved in and diffusing through rigid and semirigid polymer electrolyte solvents. Sorption of organic monomer vapors into poly(ethylene oxide) films yields polymer solvents whose chemistry is dominated by that of the sorbed monomer as shown by coordination and precipitation effects. The dynamics of plasticization-induced changes in transport rates are quite rapid. Physical diffusion in the polymer solvent in slow enough that electron hopping reactions measurably enhance charge transport rates; the effect was used to estimate a lower limit for the (Co(bpy)/sub 3/)/sup 2+/+/ self-exchange rate constant of 2 /times/ 10/sup 9/ M/sup /minus/1/ s/sup /minus/1/. It is possible to erect polymeric film transport barriers at the electrode/polymer solvent interface and to measure the rate of permeation of monomer complexes from the polymer solvent into the polymer transport barrier film. Polymeric films of Os and Ru polypyridine complexes can be electropolymerized from polymer solutions of the corresponding monomers. Solid-state voltammetry can be extended to other polymer solvents including sulfonated polystyrene, poly(vinyl chloride), Nafion, and poly(acrylamide) gel.

  12. Hoechst and Wacker plan joint venture in PVC

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Young, I.

    1992-12-02T23:59:59.000Z

    Restructuring of Europe's petrochemical industry has taken a further step with the announcement that Hoechst (Frankfurt) and Wacker Chemie (Munich) are planning a joint venture in polyvinyl chloride (PVC). The venture would include production, R D, sales and marketing, plus both companies' PVC recycling activities. However, their vinyl chloride monomer (VCM) plants, and Hoechst's Kalle PVC film business, have been left out. Erich Schnitzler, head of Hoechst's PVC business unit, does not anticipate problems with the European Community's competition directorate. We are both among the middle-sized European PVC producers, and together we would have a 9%-10% market share. Our joint venture would not limit competition. Both partners are hoping for approval from Brussels in first-quarter 1993. Hoechst has 255,000 m.t./year of PVC capacity at Gendorfand Knapsack, while Wacker has 365,000 m.t./year at Burghausen and Cologne. All the units, except Wacker's Cologne plant, are back integrated to VCM. The joint venture would buy VCM from the two parent companies and on the merchant market.

  13. Coke formation during pyrolysis of 1,2-dichloroethane

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Holmen, A. [Norwegian Institute of Technology, Trondheim (Norway); Lindvag, O.A. [SINTEF Applied Chemistry, Trondheim (Norway)

    1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Most processes involving hydrocarbons or carbon oxides at high temperatures suffer from the disadvantage of coke formation. The formation of coke deposits during pyrolysis of hydrocarbons or chlorinated hydrocarbons is of significant practical importance. Examples of such processes are the steam cracking of alkanes to produce olefins and the thermal decomposition of 1,2-dichloroethane (EDC) for the production of vinyl chloride monomer (VCM). Even id the rate of coke production is low, the cumulative nature of the solid product will result in reactor fouling. The present work deals with the thermal decomposition of EDC. Coke formation has been studied on metal surfaces in a quartz tubular reactor. The rate of coke deposition was measures on metal foils hanging from one arm of a microbalance. A complete analysis of the product gas was accomplished using on-line gas chromatography. The results show that coke deposition during thermal decomposition of EDC depends on the composition of the feed as well as on the nature of the surface of the metal foil. Small amounts of other components (contamination with other chlorinated hydrocarbons as an example) may have a large influence on the rate of coke formation. The results are discussed in terms of surface composition/morphology of the metal foil and the free radical mechanism for thermal decomposition of FDC.

  14. Preparation and characterization of gradient polymer films

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, S.C.

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Gradient polymers are multicomponent polymers whose chemical constitution varies with depth in the sample. Although these polymers may possess unique mechanical, optical, and barrier properties they remain relatively unexplored. This work is a study of the preparation of gradient polymers by sequential exposure of films to a diffusing monomer followed by electron beam irradiation. Initial experiments involved immersion of poly(vinyl chloride) (PVC) films in styrene or n-butyl methacrylate (BMA) for various time periods followed by irradiation with 1 or 10 megarads of accelerated electrons. A significant amount of poly(n-butyl methacrylate) (PBMA) formed in PVC/BMA systems, but little polystyrene could be found in the PVC/styrene films. A second set of experiments involved immersion of PVC and polyethylene (PE) films in BMA for 20, 40, 60, and 720 minutes followed by irradiation with 10 megarads of electrons. These films were then characterized using optical microscopy, quantitative transmission Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), and a depth profiling procedure based on quantitative attenuated total reflection (ATR) FTIR. It was concluded that the mechanism of PBMA formation in the polyethylene films was a result of events immediately following irradiation. Atmospheric oxygen diffusing into irradiated films trapped free radicals at the film surfaces. This was followed by storage in an evacuated desiccator where unintentional exposure to BMA vapor took place. This BMA reacted with free radicals that remained within the film cores, polymerizing to PBMA.

  15. Proper design hikes gas-lift system efficiency

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tsai, T.C.

    1986-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Proper design of gas-lift pumping systems, used for pumping corrosive or erosive fluids, involves the correct selection of submergence ratio, flow regime, pipe diameter, and physical properties of the fluid. Correlations for maximum lifting efficiency on a friction-free basis vs. submergence ratio have been developed based on experimental data. The Oshinowo and Charles flow map for vertical upward flow has been chosen for determining the two-phase flow regimes. For large-diameter gas-lifting systems, the effects of fluid physical properties on the maximum lifting efficiency become diminished. Gas-lift pumping systems are widely used in the process industry as well as in oil and gas production. In an ethylene dichloride/vinyl chloride monomer (EDC/VCM) plant, quench column bottoms are recirculated back to the column by gas lift of the EDC/VCM stream from the EDC pyrolysis furnace. Gas lift is utilized instead of pumps to alleviate the plugging and erosion problems caused by the presence of coke/tar particulates. Other process applications include those where pumps suffer severe corrosion from the fluids pumped.

  16. Porosity in polysilsesquioxane xerogels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    LOY,DOUGLAS A.; SCHNEIDER,DUANE A.; BAUGHER,BRIGITTA M.; RAHIMIAN,KAMYAR

    2000-05-09T23:59:59.000Z

    Polysilsesquioxanes, [RSiO{sub 1.5}]{sub n} are a class of hybrid organic-inorganic materials in which silicon atoms are linked with up to three siloxane bonds to other monomer units in the polymer and the organic group is a pendent functionality. Polysilsesquioxanes are prepared by the hydrolysis and condensation of organotrialkoxysilanes (Scheme l). Organotrialkoxysilanes RSi(OR{prime}){sub 3}, have been extensively used as coupling agents for composites or surface treatments for materials. Polysilsesquioxanes have become increasingly popular for generating specialty coatings such as low k dielectric materials for microelectronic applications. While there is extensive information on the formation of polysilsesquioxanes, there has not been a survey of the ability of organotrialkoxysilanes to form gels until recently. The formation of polysilsesquioxanes gels has been shown to be very sensitive to the nature of the organic group. Many monomers will only form soluble oligomers or polymers upon hydrolysis and condensation, even when the reaction is conducted solvent-free with neat monomer and aqueous catalyst. Furthermore, there is little information concerning the influence of the organic group, R, on the porosity of the polysilsesquioxanes gels that are formed. In this paper the authors describe the preparation of polysilsesquioxane gels where R = H, methyl, ethyl, cyanoethyl, vinyl, dodecyl, hexadecyl, octadecyl, chloromethyl, and chloromethylphenyl, and the characterization of the porosity of the respective xerogels. Gels were prepared from the hydrolysis and condensation of organotrimethoxysilanes, RSi(OEt){sub 3}, and organotriethoxy-silanes, RSi(OEt){sub 3}.

  17. Gas chromatograph monitors for VCM, automatically alerts emergency team

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rogers, J.C.; Ormond, D.L.

    1986-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Delaware City, located on the Delaware River with a metropolitan population of around 100,000, has played host to numerous companies in the CPI. The community has witnessed the expansion to a current level of eleven plants and a large oil refinery. Identified by the DNREC as possibly the most serious of recent problems was the potential for release of vinyl chloride monomer (VCM) gas. VCM is a recognized carcinogen and is considered a hazardous waste and a priority pollutant by the EPA. A Citizens' Advisory Committee recommended that a permanent air monitor for detection of VCM be strategically located in Delaware City. It needed to be capable of detecting VCM at 50 ppb and utilize a suitable alarm procedure to alert the public. The committee also recommended the use of a mobile monitor equipped to track a VCM release which could by-pass the Delaware City monitor and threaten nearby residents during certain wind conditions. A gas chromatography with photoionization detector (PID) was selected based on the required specifications and on commercial availability. The Delaware City firehouse was selected as the most publicly acceptable location with sufficient security and unobstructed sampling at an adequate height. The air in Delaware City has been monitored continuously since December 9, 1985. As of April, 1986, the instrument has completed, 30,000 combined sample and calibration runs. No unusual problems have been encountered with maintenance or with anomalous data. It has required only routine service, surpassing the manufacturer's guarantees for parts and service.

  18. Exploratory case-control study of brain tumors in adults

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Burch, J.D.; Craib, K.J.; Choi, B.C.; Miller, A.B.; Risch, H.A.; Howe, G.R.

    1987-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An exploratory study of brain tumors in adults was carried out using 215 cases diagnosed in Southern Ontario between 1979 and 1982, with an individually matched, hospital control series. Significantly elevated risks were observed for reported use of spring water, drinking of wine, and consumption of pickled fish, together with a significant protective effect for the regular consumption of any of several types of fruit. While these factors are consistent with a role for N-nitroso compounds in the etiology of these tumors, for several other factors related to this hypothesis, no association was observed. Occupation in the rubber industry was associated with a significant relative risk of 9.0, though no other occupational associations were seen. Two previously unreported associations were with smoking nonfilter cigarettes with a significant trend and with the use of hair dyes or sprays. The data do not support an association between physical head trauma requiring medical attention and risk of brain tumors and indicate that exposure to ionizing radiation and vinyl chloride monomer does not contribute any appreciable fraction of attributable risk in the population studied. The findings warrant further detailed investigation in future epidemiologic studies.

  19. Detecting and defining air pollutants: one laboratory's experiences and approaches

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lindgren, J.L.; Krauss, H.J.; Mgebroff, J.S.

    1980-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Texas Air Control Board is the agency responsible for maintaining the quality of the ambient air of Texas. An extensive network of continuous and noncontinuous monitors is used to defect air quality trends in the state. The samples submitted may be gaseous, liquid, or solid. X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy (XRF) is used for various elements. XRF was used specifically for lead emissions, sulfur dioxide emissions and toxic metals. However, atomic absorption is better for beryllium and arsenic. Gas chromatography (GC), high pressure liquid chromatography (HPLC), and gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS) are employed in organic analysis as complements to each other. HPLC has been effectively used in the analysis of samples for herbicides. The defection of vinyl chloride monomer (VCM) is accomplished with a photoionization defector (PID) and flame ionization detector (FID) in series. There are many examples of a multi-instrument approach to analysis of samples. Gas chromatography and mass spectroscopy were used for nitrobenzene analysis. The complexity of ambient air sampler often requires a multinstrumental approach if the sample is to be qualitatively and quantitatively analyzed so that the information can be used for corrective action or to identify potential problems of air pollution. 2 figures. (DP)

  20. Understanding Molecular Interactions within Chemically Selective Layered Polymer Assemblies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gary J. Blanchard

    2009-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

    This work focuses on two broad issues. These are (1) the molecular origin of the chemical selectivity achieved with ultrathin polymer multilayers, and (2) how the viscoelastic properties of the polymer layers are affected by exposure to solvent and analytes. These issues are inter-related, and to understand them we need to design experiments that probe both the energetic and kinetic aspects of interfacial adsorption processes. This project focuses on controling the chemical structure, thickness, morphology and sequential ordering of polymer layers bound to interfaces using maleimide-vinyl ether and closely related alternating copolymerization chemistry and efficient covalent cross-linking reactions that allow for layer-by-layer polymer deposition. This chemistry has been developed during the funding cycle of this Grant. We have measure the equilibrium constants for interactions between specific layers within the polymer interfaces and size-controlled, surface-functionalized gold nanoparticles. The ability to control both size and functionality of gold nanoparticle model analytes allows us to evaluate the average “pore size” that characterizes our polymer films. We have measured the “bulk” viscosity and shear modulus of the ultrathin polymer films as a function of solvent overlayer identity using quartz crystal microbalance complex impedance measurements. We have measured microscopic viscosity at specific locations within the layered polymer interfaces with time-resolved fluorescence lifetime and depolarization techniques. We combine polymer, cross-linking and nanoparticle synthetic expertise with a host of characterization techniques, including QCM gravimetry and complex impedance analysis, steady state and time-resolved spectroscopies.

  1. Investigation of test methods, material properties, and processes for solar cell encapsulants. Annual report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Willis, P. B.; Baum, B.; Schnitzer, H. S.

    1980-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The goal of this program is to identify, evaluate, and recommend encapsulant materials and processes for the production of cost-effective, long-life solar cell modules. Technical activities during the past year have covered a number of topics and have emphasized the development of solar module encapsulation technology that employs ethylene/vinyl acetate, copolymer (EVA) as the pottant. These activities have included: (1) continued production of encapsulation grade EVA in sheet form to meet the needs of the photovoltaic industry; (2) investigations of three non-blocking techniques for EVA sheet; (3) performed an economic analysis of the high volume production of each pottant in order to estimate the large volume selling price (EVA, EPDM, aliphatic urethane, PVC plastisol, and butyl acrylate); (4) initiated an experimental corrosion protection program to determine if metal components could be successfully protected by encapsulation; (5) began an investigation to determine the maximum temperature which can be tolerated by the candidate pottant material in the event of hot spot heating or other temperature override; (6) continuation of surveys of potentially useful outer cover materials; and (7) continued with the accelerated artificial weathering of candidate encapsulation materials. Study results are presented. (WHK)

  2. Investigation of mortality from cancer and other causes of death among workers employed at an east Texas chemical plant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sweeney, M.H.; Beaumont, J.J.; Waxweiler, R.J.; Halperin, W.E.

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The cause-specific mortality of 2,510 males employed at an east Texas chemical plant was examined in a historical prospective study to evaluate a suspected increase in deaths from multiple myeloma and brain cancer. Potential exposures from chemicals, either used in manufacturing processes or produced during the study period 1952-1977, included the fuel additive tetraethyl lead, ethylene dibromide and dichloride, inorganic lead, and vinyl chloride monomer. Overall mortality for all workers (156 observed vs. 211.14 expected) and for workers first employed between 1952 and 1959 (131 observed vs. 167.33 expected) when tetraethyl lead was the single major product was lower than expected when compared to the United States general population. There were no significant increases in mortality from malignancies or other causes of death. The deficits may be due to the small number of total deaths, and the low power for detecting excess risk of mortality from multiple myeloma (Z1-beta = 27, alpha = .05), brain cancer (Z1-beta = 31, alpha = .05), or other rare causes of death; lack of complete workplace exposure data for production workers; and the absence of historical measurements on the extent of environmental exposure to tetraethyl lead and other chemicals.

  3. Ceramic membrane treatment of petrochemical wastewater

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lahiere, R.J. (Vista Chemical Co., Houston, TX (United States)); Goodboy, K.P.

    1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Ceramic alumina microfiltration membranes were evaluated for treatment of 3 aqueous streams containing heavy metals, oils, and solids at petrochemical manufacturing facilities. To the best of the author's knowledge, this is the first reported use of ceramic alumina membranes for process water and wastewater treatment in a US petrochemical plant. In a pilot test at a vinyl chloride monomer (VCM) plant, precipitated heavy metal solids were filtered with the membranes. On another stream at that site, the ceramic membrane pilot system successfully treated emulsions of 1,2-dichloroethane (EDC), water, and solids. Membrane filtration of a linear alkyl benzene (LAB) oily wastewater stream produced water with less than 5 ppmw oil and grease, after pretreatment with HCl and ferric chloride. A preliminary financial analysis shows that the installed system cost for a ceramic membrane unit is comparable to other membrane technologies, while operating costs are anticipated to be lower. Specific process conditions that are particularly amenable to treatment by ceramic membrane microfiltration are also given in the paper. 10 refs., 11 figs., 7 tabs.

  4. Subdue solids in towers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sloley, A.W.; Martin, G.R.

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Many distillation, absorption, and stripping columns operate with solids present in the system. The presence of solids may be either intentional or unintentional. But, in all cases, the solids must be handled or tolerated by the vapor/liquid mass-transfer equipment. Such solids should be dealt with by a combination of four methods. From most favorable to least favorable, these are: (1) keep the solids out; (2) keep the solids moving; (3) put the solids somewhere harmless; and (4) make it easier to clean the hardware. The key precept for all these approaches is the realization that solids present in a system just don't disappear. In this article, the authors review the techniques and design issues involved in making a vapor/liquid mass-transfer system operate with solids present. They assume that the solids cannot be kept out, eliminating the first choice. The type of mass-transfer service does not matter. The same principles apply equally well to distillation, adsorption, and stripping. They include equipment design criteria based on the methods outlined above, as well as detailed recommendations for each of the major equipment choices that can be made for mass-transfer devices. Then, they illustrate the approach via an example--a vinyl chloride monomer (VCM) unit having solids as an inherent part of its feed.

  5. Thermal chemistry of the Cu-KI5 atomic layer deposition precursor on a copper surface

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ma, Qiang; Zaera, Francisco, E-mail: zaera@ucr.edu [Department of Chemistry, University of California, Riverside, California 92521 (United States)

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The thermal chemistry of a Cu(I) ketoiminate complex, Cu-KI5, resulting from the modification of the known Air Products CupraSelect{sup ®} copper CVD precursor Cu(hfac)(tmvs) designed to tether the two ligands via an isopropoxide linker, was studied under ultrahigh vacuum on a Cu(110) single-crystal surface by using a combination of temperature programmed desorption (TPD) and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Adsorption at low temperatures was determined to take place via the displacement of the vinyl ligand by the surface. Molecular desorption was seen at 210?K, and the evolution of Cu(II)-KI5{sub 2} was established to take place at 280?K, presumably from a disproportionation reaction that also leads to the deposition of Cu(0). Other sets of desorption products were seen at 150, 250, and 430?K, all containing copper atoms and small organic moieties with molecular masses below 100 amu. The latter TPD peak in particular indicates significant fragmentation of the ligands, likely at the C–N bond that holds the vinylsilane-isopropoxide moiety tethered to the ketoimine fragment, and possibly also at the union between the vinylsilane and the alkoxide linker. The 430?K temperature measured for this chemistry may set an upper limit for clean Cu film deposition, but since reactivity on the surface was also found to be inhibited at higher surface coverages, it may be delayed to higher temperatures under atomic layer deposition conditions.

  6. Predicting Polymeric Crystal Structures by Evolutionary Algorithms

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Qiang Zhu; Vinit Sharma; Artem R Oganov; Rampi Ramprasad

    2014-06-05T23:59:59.000Z

    The recently developed evolutionary algorithm USPEX proved to be a tool that enables accurate and reliable prediction of structures for a given chemical composition. Here we extend this method to predict the crystal structure of polymers by performing constrained evolutionary search, where each monomeric unit is treated as one or several building blocks with fixed connectivity. This greatly reduces the search space and allows the initial structure generation with different sequences and packings using these blocks. The new constrained evolutionary algorithm is successfully tested and validated on a diverse range of experimentally known polymers, namely polyethylene (PE), polyacetylene (PA), poly(glycolic acid) (PGA), poly(vinyl chloride) (PVC), poly(oxymethylene) (POM), poly(phenylene oxide) (PPO), and poly (p-phenylene sulfide) (PPS). By fixing the orientation of polymeric chains, this method can be further extended to predict all polymorphs of poly(vinylidene fluoride) (PVDF), and the complex linear polymer crystals, such as nylon-6 and cellulose. The excellent agreement between predicted crystal structures and experimentally known structures assures a major role of this approach in the efficient design of the future polymeric materials.

  7. Development studies for a novel wet oxidation process

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dhooge, P.M.; Hakim, L.B.

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A catalytic wet oxidation process (DETOX), which uses an acidic iron solution to oxidize organic compounds to carbon dioxide, water, and other simple products, was investigated as a potential method for the treatment of multicomponent hazardous and mixed wastes. The organic compounds picric acid, poly(vinyl chloride), tetrachlorothiophene, pentachloropyridine, Aroclor 1260 (a polychlorinated biphenyl), and hexachlorobenzene were oxidized in 125 ml reaction vessels. The metals arsenic, barium, beryllium, cadmium, cerium (as a surrogate for plutonium), chromium, lead, mercury, neodymium (as a surrogate for uranium), nickel, and vanadium were tested in the DETOX solution. Barium, beryllium, cerium, chromium, mercury, neodymium, nickel, and vanadium were all found to be very soluble (>100 g/l) in the DETOX chloride-based solution. Arsenic, barium, cadmium, and lead solubilities were lower. Lead could be selectively precipitated from the DETOX solution. Chromium(VI) was reduced to relatively non-toxic chromium(III) by the solution. Six soils were contaminated with arsenic, barium, beryllium, chromium, lead, and neodymium oxides at approximately 0.1% by weight, and benzene, trichloroethene, mineral oil, and Aroclor 1260 at approximately 5% by weight total, and 5.g amounts treated with the DETOX solution in unstirred 125. ml reaction bombs. It is felt that soil treatment in a properly designed system is entirely possible despite incomplete oxidation of the less volatile organic materials in these unstirred tests.

  8. Plasma Surface Modification of Polymer Backsheets: Origins of Future Interfacial Barrier/Backsheet Failure (Poster)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pankow, J. W.; Glick, S. H.

    2006-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Flexible polymer substrates coated with inorganic oxide moisture barriers are a potential replacement for glass backsheets in thin-film PV (photovoltaic) modules. Silicon oxynitride (SiO{sub x}N{sub y}) deposited by plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) on polyethylene terephthalate (PET) represents one potential new backsheet candidate. Barrier deposition runs at NREL have included a nitrogen-rich plasma pretreatment prior to barrier deposition with the intention of cleaning the PET surface and enhancing adhesion of the SiO{sub x}N{sub y} barrier film to PET; however, test coupons of PET/barrier/EVA/TPE failed after damp-heat exposure. (EVA is ethylene vinyl acetate and TPE is Tedlar{reg_sign}-PET-EVA). PET substrates exposed to plasma conditions similar to those used in pretreatment were examined by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) to reveal that new low molecular weight PET fragments were created at the PET surface. These fragments are responsible for barrier/PET interfacial failure and barrier transfer to the EVA encapsulant side following damp heat exposure.

  9. Adhesion and Thin-Film Module Reliability

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McMahon, T. J.; Jorgenson, G. J.

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Among the infrequently measured but essential properties for thin-film (T-F) module reliability are the interlayer adhesion and cohesion within a layer. These can be cell contact layers to glass, contact layers to the semiconductor, encapsulant to cell, glass, or backsheet, etc. We use an Instron mechanical testing unit to measure peel strengths at 90deg or 180deg and, in some cases, a scratch and tape pull test to evaluate inter-cell layer adhesion strengths. We present peel strength data for test specimens laminated from the three T-F technologies, before and after damp heat, and in one instance at elevated temperatures. On laminated T-F cell samples, failure can occur uniformly at any one of the many interfaces, or non-uniformly across the peel area at more than one interface. Some peel strengths are Lt1 N/mm. This is far below the normal ethylene vinyl acetate/glass interface values of >10 N/mm. We measure a wide range of adhesion strengths and suggest that adhesion measured under higher temperature and relative humidity conditions is more relevant for module reliability.

  10. Examination of a Standardized Test for Evaluating the Degree of Cure of EVA Encapsulation: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miller, D. C.; Gu, X.; Haldenman, S.; Hidalgo, M.; Malguth, E.; Reid, C. G.; Shioda, T.; Schulze, S. H.; Wang, Z. Y.; Wohlgemuth, J. H.

    2013-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The curing of cross-linkable encapsulation is a critical consideration for photovoltaic (PV) modules manufactured using a lamination process. Concerns related to ethylene-co-vinyl acetate (EVA) include the quality (e.g., expiration and uniformity) of the films or completion (duration) of the cross-linking of the EVA within a laminator. Because these issues are important to both EVA and module manufacturers, an international standard has recently been proposed by the Encapsulation Task-Group within the Working Group 2 (WG2) of the International Electrotechnical Commission (IEC) Technical Committee 82 (TC82) for the quantification of the degree of cure for EVA encapsulation. The present draft of the standard calls for the use of differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) as the rapid, enabling secondary (test) method. Both the residual enthalpy- and melt/freeze-DSC methods are identified. The DSC methods are calibrated against the gel content test, the primary (reference) method. Aspects of other established methods, including indentation and rotor cure metering, were considered by the group. Key details of the test procedure will be described.

  11. Testing Protocol for Module Encapsulant Creep (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kempe, M. D.; Miller, D. C.; Wohlgemuth, J. H.; Kurtz, S. R.; Moseley, J. M.; Shah, Q.; Tamizhmani, G.; Sakurai, K.; Inoue, M.; Doi, T.; Masuda, A.

    2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Recently there has been an interest in the use of thermoplastic encapsulant materials in photovoltaic modules to replace chemically crosslinked materials, e.g., ethylene-vinyl acetate. The related motivations include the desire to: reduce lamination time or temperature; use less moisture-permeable materials; or use materials with better corrosion characteristics. However, the use of any thermoplastic material in a high-temperature environment raises safety and performance concerns, as the standardized tests currently do not expose the modules to temperatures in excess of 85C, yet modules may experience temperatures above 100C in operation. Here we constructed eight pairs of crystalline-silicon modules and eight pairs of glass/encapsulation/glass mock modules using different encapsulation materials of which only two were designed to chemically crosslink. One module set was exposed outdoors with insulation on the back side in Arizona in the summer, and an identical set was exposed in environmental chambers. High precision creep measurements and performance measurements indicate that despite many of these polymeric materials being in the melt state at some of the highest outdoor temperatures achievable, very little creep was seen because of their high viscosity, temperature heterogeneity across the modules, and in the case of the crystalline-silicon modules, the physical restraint of the backsheet. These findings have very important implications for the development of IEC and UL qualification and safety standards, and in regards to the necessary level of cure during the processing of crosslinking encapsulants.

  12. Field Evaluation of the Potential for Creep in Thermoplastic Encapsulant Materials: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kempe, M. D.; Miller, D. C.; Wohlgemuth, J.; Kurtz, S. R.; Moseley, J. M.; Shah, Q.; Tamizhmani, G.; Sakurai, K.; Inoue, M.; Doi, T.; Masuda, A.; Samuels, S. L.; Vanderpan, C. E.

    2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    There has been recent interest in the use of thermoplastic encapsulant materials in photovoltaic modules to replace chemically crosslinked materials, e.g., ethylene-vinyl acetate. The related motivations include the desire to: reduce lamination time or temperature; use less moisture-permeable materials; use materials with better corrosion characteristics or with improved electrical resistance. However, the use of any thermoplastic material in a high-temperature environment raises safety and performance concerns, as the standardized tests currently do not expose the modules to temperatures in excess of 85 degrees C, though fielded modules may experience temperatures above 100 degrees C. Here we constructed eight pairs of crystalline-silicon modules and eight pairs of glass/encapsulation/glass thin-film mock modules using different encapsulant materials of which only two were designed to chemically crosslink. One module set was exposed outdoors with insulation on the back side in Arizona in the summer, and an identical set was exposed in environmental chambers. High precision creep measurements (+/- 20 um) and performance measurements indicate that despite many of these polymeric materials being in the melt state during outdoor deployment, very little creep was seen because of their high viscosity, temperature heterogeneity across the modules, and the formation of chemical crosslinks in many of the encapsulants as they aged. In the case of the crystalline silicon modules, the physical restraint of the backsheet reduced the creep further.

  13. Examination of a Standardized Test for Evaluating the Degree of Cure of EVA Encapsulation (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miller, D.; Wohlgemuth, J.; Gu, X.; Haldeman, S.; Hidalgo, M.; Malguth, E.; Reid, C.; Shioda, T.; Schulze, S.; Wang, Z.

    2013-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The curing of cross-linkable encapsulation is a critical consideration for photovoltaic (PV) modules manufactured using a lamination process. Concerns related to ethylene-co-vinyl acetate (EVA) include the quality (e.g., expiration and uniformity) of the films or completion (duration) of the cross-linking of the EVA within a laminator. Because these issues are important to both EVA and module manufacturers, an international standard has recently been proposed by the Encapsulation Task-Group within the Working Group 2 (WG2) of the International Electrotechnical Commission (IEC) Technical Committee 82 (TC82) for the quantification of the degree of cure for EVA encapsulation. The present draft of the standard calls for the use of differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) as the rapid, enabling secondary (test) method. Both the residual enthalpy- and melt/freeze-DSC methods are identified. The DSC methods are calibrated against the gel content test, the primary (reference) method. Aspects of other established methods, including indentation and rotor cure metering, were considered by the group. Key details of the test procedure will be described.

  14. Ligand field photofragmentation spectroscopy of [Ag(L){sub N}]{sup 2+} complexes in the gas phase: Experiment and theory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Guan, Jingang; Puskar, Ljiljana; Esplugas, Ricardo O.; Cox, Hazel; Stace, Anthony J. [Department of Chemistry, University of Sussex, Falmer, Brighton BN1 9QJ (United Kingdom)

    2007-08-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Experiments have been undertaken to record photofragmentation spectra from a series of [Ag(L){sub N}]{sup 2+} complexes in the gas phase. Spectra have been obtained for silver(II) complexed with the ligands (L): acetone, 2-pentanone, methyl-vinyl ketone, pyridine, and 4-methyl pyridine (4-picoline) with N in the range of 4-7. A second series of experiments using 1,1,1,3-fluoroacetone, acetonitrile, and CO{sub 2} as ligands failed to show any evidence of photofragmentation. Interpretation of the experimental data has come from time-dependent density functional theory (TDDFT), which very successfully accounts for trends in the spectra in terms of subtle differences in the properties of the ligands. Taking a sample of three ligands, acetone, pyridine, and acetonitrile, the calculations show all the spectral transitions to involve ligand-to-metal charge transfer, and that wavelength differences (or lack of spectra) arise from small changes in the energies of the molecular orbitals concerned. The calculations account for an absence in the spectra of any effects due to Jahn-Teller distortion, and they also reveal structural differences between complexes where the coordinating atom is either oxygen or nitrogen that have implications for the stability of silver(II) compounds. Where possible, comparisons have also been made with the physical properties of condensed phase silver(II) complexes.

  15. Polymeric media comprising polybenzimidazoles N-substituted with organic-inorganic hybrid moiety

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Klaehn, John R. (Idaho Falls, ID) [Idaho Falls, ID; Peterson, Eric S. (Idaho Falls, ID) [Idaho Falls, ID; Wertsching, Alan K. (Idaho Falls, ID) [Idaho Falls, ID; Orme, Christopher J. (Shelley, ID) [Shelley, ID; Luther, Thomas A. (Idaho Falls, ID) [Idaho Falls, ID; Jones, Michael G. (Pocatello, ID) [Pocatello, ID

    2009-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A PBI compound includes imidazole nitrogens at least a portion of which are substituted with an organic-inorganic hybrid moiety may be included in a separator medium. At least 85% of the imidazole nitrogens may be substituted. The organic-inorganic hybrid moiety may be an organosilane moiety, for example, (R)Me.sub.2SiCH.sub.2-- where R is selected from among methyl, phenyl, vinyl, and allyl. The separatory medium may exhibit an H.sub.2, Ar, N.sub.2, O.sub.2, CH.sub.3, or CO.sub.2 gas permeability greater than the gas permeability of a comparable separatory medium comprising the PBI compound without substitution. The separatory medium may further include an electronically conductive medium and/or ionically conductive medium. The separatory medium may be used as a membrane (semi-permeable, permeable, and non-permeable), a barrier, an ion exhcange media, a filter, a gas chromatography coating (such as stationary phase coating in affinity chromatography), etc.

  16. Bonding Structure of Phenylacetylene on Hydrogen-Terminated Si(111) and Si(100): Surface Photoelectron Spectroscopy Analysis and Ab Initio Calculations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    M Kondo; T Mates; D Fischer; F Wudl; E Kramer

    2011-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Interfaces between phenylacetylene (PA) monolayers and two silicon surfaces, Si(111) and Si(100), are probed by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), ultraviolet photoelectron spectroscopy (UPS), and near-edge X-ray absorption fine structure (NEXAFS) spectroscopy, and the results are analyzed using ab initio molecular orbital calculations. The monolayer systems are prepared via the surface hydrosilylation reaction between PA and hydrogen-terminated silicon surfaces. The following spectral features are obtained for both of the PA-Si(111) and PA-Si(100) systems: a broad {pi}-{pi}* shakeup peak at 292 eV (XPS), a broad first ionization peak at 3.8 eV (UPS), and a low-energy C 1s {yields} {pi}* resonance peak at 284.3 eV (NEXAFS). These findings are ascribed to a styrene-like {pi}-conjugated molecular structure at the PA-Si interface by comparing the experimental data with theoretical analysis results. A conclusion is drawn that the vinyl group can keep its {pi}-conjugation character on the hydrogen-terminated Si(100) [H:Si(100)] surface composed of the dihydride (SiH{sub 2}) groups as well as on hydrogen-terminated Si(111) having the monohydride (SiH) group. The formation mechanism of the PA-Si(100) interface is investigated within cluster ab initio calculations, and the possible structure of the H:Si(100) surface is discussed based on available data.

  17. Technical support document for proposed 1994 revision of the MEC thermal envelope requirements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Conner, C.C.; Lucas, R.G.

    1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report documents the development of the proposed revision of the Council of American Building Officials` (CABO) 1994 supplement to the 1993 Model Energy Code (MEC) building thermal envelope requirements for maximum component U{sub 0}-value. The 1994 amendments to the 1993 MEC were established in last year`s code change cycle and did not change the envelope requirements. The research underlying the proposed MEC revision was conducted by Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) for the US Department of Energy (DOE) Building Energy Standards program. The goal of this research was to develop revised guidelines based on an objective methodology that determines the most cost-effective (least total cost) combination of energy conservation measures (ECMs) (insulation levels and window types) for residential buildings. This least-cost set of ECMs was used as a basis for proposing revised MEC maximum U{sub 0}-values (thermal transmittances). ECMs include window types (for example, double-pane vinyl) and insulation levels (for example, R-19) for ceilings, walls, and floors.

  18. Methods of forming single source precursors, methods of forming polymeric single source precursors, and single source precursors and intermediate products formed by such methods

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Fox, Robert V.; Rodriguez, Rene G.; Pak, Joshua J.; Sun, Chivin; Margulieux, Kelsey R.; Holland, Andrew W.

    2012-12-04T23:59:59.000Z

    Methods of forming single source precursors (SSPs) include forming intermediate products having the empirical formula 1/2{L.sub.2N(.mu.-X).sub.2M'X.sub.2}.sub.2, and reacting MER with the intermediate products to form SSPs of the formula L.sub.2N(.mu.-ER).sub.2M'(ER).sub.2, wherein L is a Lewis base, M is a Group IA atom, N is a Group IB atom, M' is a Group IIIB atom, each E is a Group VIB atom, each X is a Group VIIA atom or a nitrate group, and each R group is an alkyl, aryl, vinyl, (per)fluoro alkyl, (per)fluoro aryl, silane, or carbamato group. Methods of forming polymeric or copolymeric SSPs include reacting at least one of HE.sup.1R.sup.1E.sup.1H and MER with one or more substances having the empirical formula L.sub.2N(.mu.-ER).sub.2M'(ER).sub.2 or L.sub.2N(.mu.-X).sub.2M'(X).sub.2 to form a polymeric or copolymeric SSP. New SSPs and intermediate products are formed by such methods.

  19. INDEPENDENT TECHNICAL REVIEW OF THE BUILDING 100 PLUME, FORMER DOE PINELLAS SITE (YOUNG - RAINEY STAR CENTER), LARGO, FLORIDA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eddy-Dilek, C.; Rossabi, J.; Amidon, M.; Riha, B.; Kaback, D.

    2010-07-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Contaminated groundwater associated with Building 100 at the Young-Rainey Science, Technology, and Research Center, formerly the DOE Pinellas plant, is the primary remedial challenge that remains to be addressed at the site. Currently, Building 100 is an active industrial facility that is now owned and operated by the Pinellas county government. Groundwater samples collected from monitoring wells recently installed near the southern boundary of the site suggest that contaminated groundwater has migrated off the plant site. In response to the challenges presented by the Building 100 plume, the Office of Legacy Management (LM) requested assistance from the DOE Office of Groundwater and Soil Remediation (EM-32) to provide a review team to make technical recommendations so that they can efficiently and effectively address characterization and remediation of the plume. The review team was unanimous in the conclusion that a dynamic strategy that combines a phased implementation of direct push samplers, sensors, and tools can be used to better delineate the extent of contamination, control plume migration, and rapidly remediate the contaminated groundwater at the site. The initial efforts of the team focused on reviewing the site history and data, organizing the information into a conceptual model, identifying appropriate technologies, and recommending an integrated strategy. The current groundwater data from the site indicate a two-lobed plume extending to the east and south. To the east vinyl chloride is the primary contaminant of concern, to the south, vinyl chloride and cis1, 2-DCE are the primary contaminants. The limited data that are available suggest that reductive dechlorination of the TCE is already occurring but is not sufficient to prevent offsite migration of low concentrations of TCE daughter products. The team recommends that DOE pursue a strategy that builds on the natural cleansing capacity of the subsurface with reductive methods including biostimulation and/or bioaugmentation to provide a sustainable remediation system within the flow path of the plume. Additional data will be required to implement this approach and will include: (1) Better delineation of the nature and extent of contamination; (2) Demonstration the plume is currently stable or shrinking; and (3) Demonstration the full reductive dechlorination is occurring. The technical team recommends that DOE use a phased approach to identify residual contamination and to provide rapid installation of remedies. Matrices of characterization and remediation sensors, technologies, and tools were developed by the team in order to match the specific conditions and requirements of the site. The team provides a specific example of remedy that includes the incorporation of a dynamic characterization strategy moving from minimally invasive to more aggressive field techniques, the consideration of multiple complementary remediation approaches based on a spatiotemporally phased approach keyed to the different demands of different parts of the plume, and the integration and sequencing of the characterization and remediation activities.

  20. Solid Silicone Elastomer Material(DC745U)-Historical Overview and New Experimental Results

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ortiz-Acosta, Denisse [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2012-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

    DC745U is a silicone elastomer used in several weapon systems. DC745U is manufactured by Dow Corning and its formulation is proprietary. Risk changes without notification to the customer. {sup 1}H and {sup 29}Si{l_brace}{sup 1}H{r_brace} NMR have previously determined that DC745U contains {approx} 98.5% dimethyl siloxane, {approx}1.5% methyl-phenyl siloxane, and a small amount (<1%) of vinyl siloxane repeat units that are converted to crosslinking sites. The polymer is filled with {approx} 38 wt.% of a mixture of fumed silica and quartz. Some conclusions are: (1) DMA shows that crystallization does have an effect on the mechanical properties of DC745U; (2) DMA shows that the crystallization is time and temperature dependent; (3) Mechanical tests show that DC745U undergo a crystalline transition at temperatures below -50 C; (4) Rate and temperature does not have an effect above crystalline transition; (5) Crystalline transition occurs faster at colder temperatures; (6) The material remains responsive and recovers after warming it to temperature above -40 C; (7) We were able to review all previous historical data on DC745U; (8) Identified specific gaps in materials understanding; (9) Developed design of experiments and testing methods to address gaps associated with post-curing and low temperature mechanical behavior; (10) Resolved questions of post-cure and alleviated concerns associated with low temperature mechanical behavior with soak time and temperature; and (11) This work is relevant to mission-critical programs and for supporting programmatic work for weapon research.

  1. Measuring the structure of thin soft matter films under confinement: A surface-force type apparatus for neutron reflection, based on a flexible membrane approach

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vos, Wiebe M. de [School of Chemistry, University of Bristol, Cantock's close, BS8 1TS Bristol (United Kingdom); School of Physics, University of Bristol, Tyndall Avenue, BS8 1TL Bristol (United Kingdom); Mears, Laura L. E.; Richardson, Robert M. [School of Physics, University of Bristol, Tyndall Avenue, BS8 1TL Bristol (United Kingdom); Cosgrove, Terence; Prescott, Stuart W. [School of Chemistry, University of Bristol, Cantock's close, BS8 1TS Bristol (United Kingdom); Dalgliesh, Robert M. [ISIS Neutron Source, STFC Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, OX11 0QX Didcot (United Kingdom)

    2012-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A unique surface force type apparatus that allows the investigation of a confined thin film using neutron reflection is described. The central feature of the setup consists of a solid substrate (silicon) and a flexible polymer membrane (Melinex{sup Registered-Sign }). We show that inflation of the membrane against the solid surface provides close and even contact between the interfaces over a large surface area. Both heavy water and air can be completely squeezed out from between the flexible film and the solid substrate, leaving them in molecular contact. The strength of confinement is controlled by the pressure used to inflate the membrane. Dust provides a small problem for this approach as it can get trapped between membrane and substrate to prevent a small part of the membrane from making good contact with the substrate. This results in the measured neutron reflectivity containing a small component of an unwanted reflection, between 10% and 20% at low confining pressures (1 bar) and between 1% and 5% at high confining pressures (5 bar). However, we show that this extra signal does not prevent good and clear information on the structure of thin films being extracted from the neutron reflectivity. The effects of confinement are illustrated with data from a poly(vinyl pyrollidone) gel layer in water, a polyelectrolyte multilayer in water, and with data from a stack of supported lipid-bilayers swollen with D{sub 2}O vapor. The data demonstrates the potential of this apparatus to provide information on the structure of thin films under confinement for a known confining pressure.

  2. The Copper Sulfide Coating on Polyacrylonitrile with Chelating Agents by an Electroless Deposition Method and its EMI Shielding Effectiveness

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Roan, M.-L. [Department of Electro-optical Engineering, Lan-Yan Institute of Technology, Taiwan (China); Chen, Y.-H.; Huang, C.-Y. [Department of Materials Engineering, Tatung University, Taiwan (China)

    2008-08-28T23:59:59.000Z

    In this study, a variety of concentrations of chelating agents were added to obtain the anchoring effect and chelating effect in the electroless plating bath. The mechanism of the Cu{sub x(x=1,2)}S growth and the electromagnetic interference shielding effectiveness (EMI SE) of the composite were studied. It was found that the vinyl acetate residued in PAN substrate would be purged due to the swelling effect by chelating agents solution. And then, the anchoring effect occurred due to the hydrogen bonding between the pits of PAN substrate and the chelating agent. Consequently, the copper sulfide layer deposited by the electroless plating reaction with EDTA and TEA. The swelling degree (S{sub d}) was proposed and evaluated from the FT-IR spectra. The relationship between swelling degree of the PAN films and EDTA (C) is expressed as: S{sub d} = 0.13+0.90xe and (-15.15C). And TEA series is expressed as: S{sub d} = 0.07+1.00xe and (-15.15C). On the other hand, the FESEM micrograph showed that the average thickness of copper sulfide increased from 76 nm to 383 nm when the concentration of EDTA increased from 0.00M to 0.20M. Consequently, the EMI SE of the composites increased from 10{approx}12 dB to 25{approx}27 dB. The GIA-XRD analyze indicated that the deposited layer consisted of CuS and Cu{sub 2}S.

  3. Study on the Volatility of Cesium in Dry Ashing Pretreatment and Dissolution of Ash by Microwave Digestion System - 13331

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Choi, Kwang-Soon; Lee, Chang Heon; Ahn, Hong-Joo; Park, Yong Joon; Song, Kyuseok [Nuclear Chemistry Research Division, Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daedeok-daero 989-111, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon, 305-353 (Korea, Republic of)] [Nuclear Chemistry Research Division, Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daedeok-daero 989-111, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon, 305-353 (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Based on the regulation of the activity concentration of Cs-137, Co-58, Co-60, Fe-55, Ni-59, Ni-63, Sr-90, Nb-94, and Tc-99, and the total alpha from the radioactive waste acceptance criteria, the measurement of the activity concentration of these nuclides in low and intermediate levels of radioactive waste such as in paper, cotton, vinyl and plastic samples was investigated. A dry ashing method was applied to obtain a concentration effect of the samples. Owing to the temperature dependence of the volatility for cesium, the temperature of 300 to 650 deg. C was examined. It was found that 450 deg. C is the optimum dry ashing temperature. After dry ashing, the produced ash was dissolved with HNO{sub 3}, HCl, and HF by a high-performance microwave digestion system. The ash sample, for the most part, was completely dissolved with 10 mL of HNO{sub 3}, 4 mL of HCl, and 0.25 mL of HF by a high-performance microwave digestion system using a nova high temperature rotor at 250 deg. C for 90 min until reaching 0.2 g. To confirm the reliability of cesium loss after the performance of the dry ashing procedure, a cesium standard solution for AAS and a Cs-137 standard solution for gamma spectrometry were added to a paper towel or a planchet of stainless steel, respectively. Cesium was measured by AAS, ICP-MS, and gamma spectrometry. The volatility of cesium did not occur until 450 deg. C ashing. (authors)

  4. Quarterly sampling of the wetlands along the old F-Area effluent ditch: March 1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dixon, K.L.; Cummins, C.L.; Rogers, V.A.

    1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In March 1994, well point water and near surface water (bucket) samples were collected to further characterize tritium and volatile organic compounds (VOC) in the wetlands along the old F-Area effluent ditch south of 643-E (old burial ground). Groundwater flow paths suggest that compounds detected in water table wells around 643-E would migrate towards the old F-Area effluent ditch and Fourmile Branch. Recent analytical results from near surface water sampling in the wetlands that comprise the old F-Area effluent ditch have shown that tritium and small quantities of VOCs are outcropping in the area. Results of the March 1994 sampling event further support findings that tritium and volatile organic compounds originating from 643-E are outcropping in the wetlands near the old F-Area effluent ditch. Six different analytes were detected in the well points at least once at concentrations greater than the method detection limit: d 1,2-dichloroethylene, acetone, methyl ethyl ketone, tetrachloroethylene, trichloroethylene, and tritium. 1,2-dichloroethylene, tetrachloroethylene, trichloroethylene, and tritium were detected at levels above Primary Drinking Water Standards or Maximum Contaminant Levels list. Four analytes, 1,2-dichloroethylene, trichloroethylene, tritium, and vinyl chloride, were detected at least once at concentrations greater than the method detection limit and least once at concentrations above the PDWS or the MCL. Based on differences in tritium concentrations at each location, it was determined that the sampling devices intercepted different groundwater flow paths. This negated direct comparison of analytical results between devices. However, when VOC concentrations measured at each well point and bucket location were normalized, resulting well point and bucket VOC concentrations were comparable in most cases. These results suggest that volatilization losses of VOCs from the buckets were negligible.

  5. Volatile organic chemical emissions from carpets. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hodgson, A.T.; Wooley, J.D.; Daisey, J.M.

    1992-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The primary objective of this research, was to measure the emission rates of selected individual VOC, including low molecular-weight aldehydes, released by samples of four new carpets that are typical of the major types of carpets used in residences, schools and offices. The carpet samples were collected directly from the manufacturers` mills and packaged to preserve their chemical integrity. The measurements of the concentrations and emission rates of these compounds were made under simulated indoor conditions in a 20-M{sup 3} environmental chamber designed specifically for investigations of VOC. The measurements were conducted over a period of one week following the installation of the carpet samples in the chamber. Duplicate experiments were conducted for one carpet. In addition, the concentrations and emission rates of VOC resulting from the installation of a new carpet in a residence were measured over a period of seven weeks. The stabilities of the week-long ventilation rates and temperatures were one percent relative standard deviation. The four carpets emitted a variety of VOC, 40 of which were positively identified. Eight of these were considered to be dominant. They were (in order of chromatographic retention time) formaldehyde, vinyl acetate, 2,2,4-trimethylpentane (isooctane), 1,2-propanediol (propylene glycol), styrene, 2-ethyl-l-hexanol, 4-phenylcyclohexene (4-PCH), and 2,6 di-tert-butyl-4-methylphenol (BHT). With the exception of formaldehyde, only limited data are available on the toxicity and irritancy of these compounds at low concentrations. Therefore, it is difficult to determine at this time the potential magnitude of the health and comfort effects that may occur among the population from exposures to emissions from new carpets. The concentrations and emission rates of most compounds decreased rapidly over the first 12 h of the experiments.

  6. Elf Atochem sets five-year emission targets

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Young, I.

    1993-04-21T23:59:59.000Z

    As part of its first annual environmental report, released this month, Elf Atochem (Paris) has set targets for emission reductions at its sites for the next five years. Under the program, the company aims to slash the level of contaminants in discharge water by 30%; cut by half emissions of 17 [open quotes]priority[close quotes] substances-including ammonia, chlorofluorocarbons, vinyl chloride monomer, methyl methacrylate, aromatics, chlorinated solvent, ethylbenzene, and styrene-for which 1992 emissions totaled 15,996 m.t.; reduce nitrogen oxides (NO[sub x]) emissions by 25%; and increase the proportions of toxic waste treated in installations on the company's own sites, from 90% of 1992's 383,00 m.t., to 95%. Implementation of its environmental policy cost the company about F2 billion ($375 million), or 3.5%-4% of sales, in 1992. The policy focuses on safer and more efficient technologies, toxic emissions and waste, improving energy efficiency, and cooperation with customers and public authorities on the introduction of more environmentally friendly products. Atochem says it has led to a fourfold reduction in accidents at work between 1984 and 1992. Over the same period, water contamination at the company's French sites has been cut by 67%, measured against the French chemical industry association's [open quotes]water index[close quotes]. Some sites did even better than the average, with the Carling steam cracker complex in eastern France registering a drop in water contamination of more than 90% following a F150-million joint project with local French and German water authorities.

  7. Polymerization of trialkoxysilanes. Effect of the organic substituent on the formation of gels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Loy, D.A.; Baugher, B.M.; Schneider, D.A.

    1998-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Hydrolysis and condensation of trialkoxysilanes, R-Si(OR{prime}){sub 3}, generally leads to the formation of silsesquioxane oligomers and polymers. These polymers are composed of a monomer repeat unit, [R-SiO{sub 1.5}]{sub n}, with a single silicon atom attached to other repeat units in the polymer through one to three siloxane bonds. The remaining substituent is an organic group attached to the silicon through a silicon-carbon single bond. Silsesquioxanes have been the subject of intensive study in the past and are becoming important again as a vehicle for introducing organic functionalities into hybrid organic-inorganic materials through sol-gel processing. Despite all of this interest, there has not been a systematic study of the ability of trialkoxysilanes to form gels through the sol-gel process. In fact, it has been noted that silsesquioxanes are generally isolated as soluble resins rather than the highly crosslinked network polymers (gels) one would expect from a tri-functional monomer. In this study, the authors have examined the sol-gel chemistry of a variety of trialkoxysilanes with different organic substituents (R = H, Me, Et, n-Pr, i-Pr, n-Bu, i-Bu, t-Bu, n-octadecyl, n-dodecyl, cyclohexyl, vinyl, phenyl, benzyl, phenethyl), with methoxide or ethoxide substituents on silicon, at varying monomer concentrations ranging up to neat monomer, and with different catalysts (HCl, NaOH, formic acid, fluoride). Gels were prepared from tetramethoxysilane and tetraethoxysilane at identical concentrations for purposes of comparison.

  8. Responsive copolymers for enhanced petroleum recovery. Second annual report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McCormick, C.; Hester, R.

    1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The authors describe second year efforts in synthesis, characterization, and rheology to develop polymers with significantly improved efficiency in mobility control and conformance. These advanced polymer systems would maintain high viscosities or behave as virtual gels under low shear conditions and at elevated electrolyte concentrations. At high fluid shear rates, associates would deaggregate yielding low viscosity solutions, reducing problems of shear degradation or face plugging during injection. Polymeric surfactants were also developed with potential for use in higher salt, higher temperature reservoirs for mobilization of entrapped oil. Chapters include: Ampholytic terpolymers of acrylamide with sodium 3-acrylamido-3-methylbutanoate and 2-acrylamido-2-methylpropanetrimethylammonium chloride; Hydrophilic sulfobetaine copolymers of acrylamide and 3-(2-acrylamido-methylpropane-dimethylammonio)-1-propanesulfonate; Copolymerization of maleic anhydride and N-vinylformamide; Reactivity ratio of N-vinylformamide with acrylamide, sodium acrylate, and n-butyl acrylate; Effect of the distribution of the hydrophobic cationic monomer dimethyldodecyl(2-acrylamidoethyl)ammonium bromide on the solution behavior of associating acrylamide copolymers; Effect of surfactants on the solution properties of amphipathic copolymers of acrylamide and N,N-dimethyl-N-dodecyl-N-(2-acrylamidoethyl)ammonium bromide; Associative interactions and photophysical behavior of amphiphilic terpolymers prepared by modification of maleic anhydride/ethyl vinyl ether copolymers; Copolymer compositions of high-molecular-weight functional acrylamido water-soluble polymers using direct-polarization magic-angle spinning {sup 13}C NMR; Use of factorial experimental design in static and dynamic light scattering characterization of water soluble polymers; and Porous medium elongational rheometer studies of NaAMB/AM copolymer solutions.

  9. Removable fibrous glass insulation fitted to complex equipment shapes results in $178,000/yr savings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1985-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In early 1980, PPG Industries embarked on a general plant energy conservation effort at its Lake Charles, LA plant where chlor-alkalis, various chlorinated hydrocarbons, and vinyl chloride monomer are manufactured. Company engineers sought a means of insulating process steam components that, because of their complex shapes, were not (and normally are not) insulated. These components included flanges on heat exchanger heads and reboilers, steam valves in process areas, manways and other equipment. PPG plant engineers specified removable, reusable blanket insulation. The blankets are constructed of a fibrous glass mat form insulation encased in a silicone-impregnated glass cloth or similar weather barrier. Each insulation blanket was custom-made for its particular equipment shape and service application to ensure a close fit and optimal energy efficiency. Insulation thickness, type of weather barrier, and mesh were specified according to intended use. For protection from abrasion or puncture, some of the blankets also were covered with stainless steel, Monel, or Inconel wire mesh. Overall, the blankets provide high strength, durability, low thermal conductivity ratings, and an operating range of up to 1200/sup 0/F. Reduced maintenance costs and improved worker productivity have been evidenced since installing the blanket insulation. Further, PPG has increased energy efficiency. Project savings were tracked for 30 months (insulation and installation costs vs. fuel and maintenance savings) and revealed annual plant savings of $178,000-$130,000 in energy savings and $48,000 in maintenance savings. With the cost of the insulation blankets being about $125,000, PPG recovered its investment in under a year.

  10. An electrocyclic strategy to poly(triarylmethyl radical) polymers: Potential organic ferromagnets

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Morelli, J.P.

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Recent interest in organic ferromagnetism has been stimulated by the idea that large poly(triarylmethyl radical) polymers in which the radical centers are connected by [open quotes]meta[close quotes]-aryl groups may possess ferromagnetic properties. However, synthesis of these polyradicals has been limited by stepwise methods that are unsuitable for the preparation of large polymers. This limitation represents a primary challenge confronting the field. The authors have developed the first polymeric strategy to poly (m-triarylmethyl radical) precursors that involves an electrocyclic formation of the [open quotes]meta[close quotes]-substituted triarylmethyl chloride repeating unit from a polypropynol precursor. Poly[(E)-6-[beta]-chloroethenyl-1,3-phenylene-1-phenylpropynol-1,3-ylene] was prepared by palladium-catalyzed coupling of a bifunctional acetylene-aryl iodide monomer. The stable polymer reacted with thionyl chloride to form an unstable polychloroallene intermediate that underwent an electrocyclic conversion to the polyradical precursor, poly(1-chloro-2,7-naphthalenechlorobenzylidene). The reduced polyradicals exhibited properties of radical-radical coupling, and preparation of a second generation polymer that would overcome this problem has been initiated. The polymeric strategy was based on model studies that showed that (E)-3-(2-[beta]-chloroethenylphenyl)-1,1-diphenylpropynol, when converted to the corresponding chloroallene with thionyl chloride, underwent an electrocyclic conversion to [beta]-(1-chlornaphthyl)diphenylmethyl chloride. The strategy expanded upon the use of triarylpropynes as precursors to triarylmethyl chlorides, and extension of both approaches to higher analogs was demonstrated with dimeric systems. The electrocyclic processes were found to occur only for the trans-vinyl chlorides; the cis-isomers were found to undergo an alternative concerted cyclization to benzofluorene products.

  11. Dosimetry quality assurance in Martin Marietta Energy Systems' centralized external dosimetry system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Souleyrette, M.L.

    1992-10-23T23:59:59.000Z

    External dosimetry needs at the four Martin Marietta Energy Systems facilities are served by Energy Systems Centralized External Dosimetry System (CEDS). The CEDS is a four plant program with four dosimeter distribution centers and two dosimeter processing centers. Each plant has its own distribution center, while processing centers are located at ORNL and the Y-12 Plant. The program has been granted accreditation by the Department of Energy Laboratory Accreditation Program (DOELAP). The CEDS is a TLD based system which is responsible for whole-body beta-gamma, neutron, and extremity monitoring. Beta-gamma monitoring is performed using the Harshaw/Solon Technologies model 8805 dosimeter. Effective October 1, 1992 the standard silver mylar has been replaced with an Avery mylar foil blackened on the underside with ink. This was done in an effort to reduce the number of light induced suspect readings. At this time we have little operational experience with the new blackened mylars-The CEDS neutron dosimeter is the Harshaw model 8806B. This card/holder configuration contains two TLD-600/TLD-700 chip pairs; one pair is located beneath a cadmium filter and one pair is located beneath a plastic filter. In routine personnel monitoring the CEDS neutron dosimeter is always paired with a CEDS beta-gamma dosimeter.The CEDS extremity dosimeter is composed of a Harshaw thin TLD-700 dosiclip placed inside a Teledyne RB-4 finger sachet. The finger sachet provides approximately 7 mg/cm[sup 2] filtration over the chip. A teflon ring surrounds the dosiclip to help prevent tearing of the vinyl sachet.

  12. Observations of nonmethane hydrocarbons and oxygenated volatile organic compounds at a rural site in the southeastern United States

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Riemer, Daniel; Pos, Willer; Milne, Peter; Farmer, Charlesk; Zika, Rod [Division of Marine and Atmospheric Chemistry, Rosenstiel School of Marine and Atmospheric Science, University of Miami, Miami, Florida (United States)] [Atmospheric Chemistry Division, National Center for Atmospheric Research, Boulder, Colorado (United States)] [Atmospheric Sciences, Tennessee Valley Authority, Muscle Shoals, Alabama (United States)] Apel, Eric [Atmospheric Chemistry Group, Mantech Environmental Research Triangle Park, North Carolina (United States)] Olszyna, Ken [National Environmental Research Laboratory, U.S. EPA. Research Triangle Park, North Carolina (United States)] Kliendienst, Tad [Department of Chemistry, Western Michigan University, Kalamazoo, Michigan (United States)] Lonneman, William [Departments of Chemistry, and Earth and Atmospheric Science, Purdue University, West Lafayette, Indiana (United States); Shepson, Paul; Starn, Tim

    1998-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Measurements of an extensive range of nonmethane hydrocarbons (NMHCs) including alkanes, alkenes, and aromatics, and oxygenated volatile organic compounds (OVOCs) including alcohols, ketones, and aldehydes were conducted for several weeks during the summer of 1995 as part of the Southern Oxidants Study (SOS) at a rural experimental site (Youth, Inc.) 32 km southeast of Nashville, Tennessee, in the southeastern United States. These measurements were conducted to (1) determine the absolute magnitude and variability of oxygenated compounds found in a contemporary rural region; (2) assess the importance of the measured ambient levels of OVOCs on a photochemical reactivity basis relative to the more commonly determined NMHCs; and (3) to evaluate our ability to accurately measure oxygenates by the current techniques employed under a field study scenario. Several other physical (temperature, insolation, etc.), meteorological (wind velocity, wind direction, atmospheric structure, and boundary layer height), and chemical (criterion pollutants, NO{sub x}, SO{sub 2}, CO, O{sub 3}, etc.) parameters were measured concurrently with the NMHC and OVOC measurements. During the study period, OVOCs were consistently the dominant compounds present, and methanol and acetone had the highest mixing ratios. Although OVOCs made up the majority of the volatile organic compound component on a mass basis, a substantial sink for OH was isoprene and its immediate oxidation products, methacrolein and methyl vinyl ketone. In combination with CO and formaldehyde, these compounds comprised about 85{percent} of the observed OH reactivity at the site. Acetaldehyde and methanol were responsible for an additional 10{percent}, with the NMHCs and remaining OVOCs making up the final 5{percent} of the measured OH reactivity at the site. These observed patterns reinforce recent studies which find OVOCs to be an important component of the rural troposphere. {copyright} 1998 American Geophysical Union

  13. US/UK second level panel discussions on the health and value of: Ageing and lifetime predictions (u)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Castro, Richard G [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2011-01-18T23:59:59.000Z

    Many healthy physics, engineering, and materials exchanges are being accomplished in ageing and lifetime prediction that directly supports US and UK Stockpile Management Programs. Lifetime assessment studies of silicon foams under compression - Joint AWE/LANLlLLNL study of compression set in stress cushions completed. Provides phenomenological prediction out to 50 years. Polymer volatile out-gassing studies - New exchange on the out-gassing of Ethylene Vinyl Acetate (EVA) using isotopic {sup 13}C labeling studies to interrogate mechanistic processes. Infra-red (IR) gas cell analytical capabilities developed by AWE will be used to monitor polymer out-gassing profiles. Pu Strength ageing Experiments and Constitutive Modeling - In recently compared modeling strategies for ageing effects on Pu yield strength at high strain rates, a US/UK consensus was reached on the general principle that the ageing effect is additive and not multiplicative. The fundamental mechanisms for age-strengthening in Pu remains unknown. Pu Surface and Interface Reactions - (1) US/UK secondment resulted in developing a metal-metal oxide model for radiation damaged studies consistent with a Modified Embedded Atom Method (MEAM) potential; and (2) Joint US/UK collaboration to study the role of impurities in hydride initiation. Detonator Ageing (wide range of activities) - (1) Long-term ageing study with field trials at Pantex incorporating materials from LANL, LLNL, SNL and AWE; (2) Characterization of PETN growth to detonation process; (3) Detonator performance modeling; and (4) Performance fault tree analysis. Benefits are a unified approach to lifetime prediction that Includes: materials characterization and the development of ageing models through improved understanding of the relationship between materials properties, ageing properties and detonator performance.

  14. Low Cost, Single Layer Replacement for the Back-Sheet and Encapsulant Layers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kempe, M. D.; Thapa, P.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Ethylene propylene diene monomer (EPDM) based polymers have been formulated for specific use in photovoltaic modules to produce better performance and longer term stability at a lower cost than standard materials. EPDM formulations are advantageous over ethylene vinyl-acetate (EVA) because they can use the same lamination/cure cycle as EVA, they do not need a second back-sheet protective material (e.g. PET/Tedlar), they have a lower glass transition temperature, no melting transition, more constant mechanical moduli as a function of temperature, they are less polar than EVA (provides better corrosion protection), and they have excellent damp heat (85 C/85% relative humidity) resistance against delamination. Module designs typically use EVA on the back side of cells despite the fact that transparency is not advantageous. We have developed a single encapsulant layer that will replace standard module back-sheet constructions consisting of EVA/PET/Tedlar. Because a single low-cost material layer is used, it will provide a significant materials cost savings of about $6 to $8/m{sup 2} as compared to traditional back-sheets. Electrical insulation tests were conducted using 0.85 mm thick stainless steel sheets as a model for a cell. It was found that a polymer layer thickness of about 0.33mm provided better high voltage electrical insulation than a combined film of Tedla (0.038 mm)/PET (0.051 mm)/EVA (0.55 mm). When formulated with a white pigment, reflectivity was comparable to Tedlar{trademark}. Upon accelerated exposure to light at 60C and 60% RH it was found that an EVA layer in front of these materials would decompose before significant yellowing and delamination of the back EPDM layer occurs.

  15. Technical area status report for low-level mixed waste final waste forms. Volume 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mayberry, J.L.; DeWitt, L.M. [Science Applications International Corp., Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Darnell, R. [EG and G Idaho, Inc., Idaho Falls, ID (United States)] [and others

    1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Final Waste Forms (FWF) Technical Area Status Report (TASR) Working Group, the Vitrification Working Group (WG), and the Performance Standards Working Group were established as subgroups to the FWF Technical Support Group (TSG). The FWF TASR WG is comprised of technical representatives from most of the major DOE sites, the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), the EPA Office of Solid Waste, and the EPA`s Risk Reduction Engineering Laboratory (RREL). The primary activity of the FWF TASR Working Group was to investigate and report on the current status of FWFs for LLNM in this TASR. The FWF TASR Working Group determined the current status of the development of various waste forms described above by reviewing selected articles and technical reports, summarizing data, and establishing an initial set of FWF characteristics to be used in evaluating candidate FWFS; these characteristics are summarized in Section 2. After an initial review of available information, the FWF TASR Working Group chose to study the following groups of final waste forms: hydraulic cement, sulfur polymer cement, glass, ceramic, and organic binders. The organic binders included polyethylene, bitumen, vinyl ester styrene, epoxy, and urea formaldehyde. Section 3 provides a description of each final waste form. Based on the literature review, the gaps and deficiencies in information were summarized, and conclusions and recommendations were established. The information and data presented in this TASR are intended to assist the FWF Production and Assessment TSG in evaluating the Technical Task Plans (TTPs) submitted to DOE EM-50, and thus provide DOE with the necessary information for their FWF decision-making process. This FWF TASR will also assist the DOE and the MWIP in establishing the most acceptable final waste forms for the various LLMW streams stored at DOE facilities.

  16. The metal carbonyl promoted rearrangement of aryl-cyclopropenes. II. Approaches towards a model system of dynemicin A

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cohen, D.H.

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The ability of 3-vinyl- or 3-phenylcyclopropenes to undergo metal carbonyl promoted rearrangement with CO insertion to yield phenol or naphthol derivatives led to investigations using 3-naphthylcyclopropenes with the goal of producing material containing an anthracene carbon framework. Rearrangement of 1-methyl-3-(1,4-dimethoxynaphth-2-yl)cyclopropene, however, only gave material containing the phenanthrene framework. It is the goal of Part I of this thesis to modify a naphthylcyclopropene so that the metal carbonyl induced rearrangement will yield material containing an anthracene framework. A working hypothesis was put forth that focused on the electronic stabilization of certain aromatic intermediates to explain phenanthrene vs. anthracene formation. Semi-empirical calculations performed on model systems to estimate thermodynamic properties supported the hypothesis. Two naphthoquinone derivatives were prepared based on the hypothesis. In the first case, the cyclopropene substituent is arranged in the 2-position of a naphthoquinone-1,4-bisketal; in the second case, the cyclpropene is at C-2 in a 1,4-naphthoquinone. In both cases, the alkene unit (C-2/C-4) is less aromatic' than an alkene unit in a naphthalene ring, and the expected rearrangement can give only the anthraquinone skeleton. Investigations with the bisketal were unsucessful; attempted rearrangement at low temperatures gave only recovered starting material and experiments at higher temperatures polymerized the sensitive cyclopropene. Investigations with the 1,4-naphthoquinone proved modestly successful. Metal carbonyl catalyzed rearrangement with CO insertion to yield anthraquinone was observed. Additionally, low temperature conditions were developed that may prove useful in future work.

  17. Side-by-Side Field Evaluation of Highly Insulating Windows in the PNNL Lab Homes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Widder, Sarah H.; Parker, Graham B.; Baechler, Michael C.; Bauman, Nathan N.

    2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    To examine the energy, air leakage, and thermal performance of highly insulating windows, a field evaluation was undertaken in a matched pair of all-electric, factory-built “Lab Homes” located on the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) campus in Richland, Washington. The “baseline” Lab Home B was retrofitted with “standard” double-pane clear aluminum-frame slider windows and patio doors, while the “experimental” Lab Home A was retrofitted with Jeld-Wen® triple-pane vinyl-frame slider windows and patio doors with a U-factor of 0.2 and solar heat gain coefficient of 0.19. To assess the window, the building shell air leakage, energy use, and interior temperatures of each home were compared during the 2012 winter heating and summer cooling seasons. The measured energy savings in Lab Home B averaged 5,821 watt-hours per day (Wh/day) during the heating season and 6,518 Wh/day during the cooling season. The overall whole-house energy savings of Lab Home B compared to Lab Home A are 11.6% ± 1.53% for the heating season and 18.4 ± 2.06% for the cooling season for identical occupancy conditions with no window coverings deployed. Extrapolating these energy savings numbers based on typical average heating degree days and cooling degree days per year yields an estimated annual energy savings of 12.2%, or 1,784 kWh/yr. The data suggest that highly insulating windows are an effective energy-saving measure that should be considered for high-performance new homes and in existing retrofits. However, the cost effectiveness of the measure, as determined by the simple payback period, suggests that highly insulating window costs continue to make windows difficult to justify on a cost basis alone. Additional reductions in costs via improvements in manufacturing and/or market penetration that continue to drive down costs will make highly insulating windows much more viable as a cost-effective energy efficiency measure. This study also illustrates that highly insulating windows have important impacts on peak load, occupant comfort, and condensation potential, which are not captured in the energy savings calculation. More consistent and uniform interior temperature distributions suggest that highly insulated windows, as part of a high performance building envelope, may enable more centralized duct design and downsized HVAC systems. Shorter, more centralized duct systems and smaller HVAC systems to yield additional cost savings, making highly insulating windows more cost effective as part of a package of new construction or retrofit measures which achieve significant reductions in home energy use.

  18. Blade System Design Study. Part II, final project report (GEC).

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Griffin, Dayton A. (DNV Global Energy Concepts Inc., Seattle, WA)

    2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    As part of the U.S. Department of Energy's Low Wind Speed Turbine program, Global Energy Concepts LLC (GEC)1 has studied alternative composite materials for wind turbine blades in the multi-megawatt size range. This work in one of the Blade System Design Studies (BSDS) funded through Sandia National Laboratories. The BSDS program was conducted in two phases. In the Part I BSDS, GEC assessed candidate innovations in composite materials, manufacturing processes, and structural configurations. GEC also made recommendations for testing composite coupons, details, assemblies, and blade substructures to be carried out in the Part II study (BSDS-II). The BSDS-II contract period began in May 2003, and testing was initiated in June 2004. The current report summarizes the results from the BSDS-II test program. Composite materials evaluated include carbon fiber in both pre-impregnated and vacuum-assisted resin transfer molding (VARTM) forms. Initial thin-coupon static testing included a wide range of parameters, including variation in manufacturer, fiber tow size, fabric architecture, and resin type. A smaller set of these materials and process types was also evaluated in thin-coupon fatigue testing, and in ply-drop and ply-transition panels. The majority of materials used epoxy resin, with vinyl ester (VE) resin also used for selected cases. Late in the project, testing of unidirectional fiberglass was added to provide an updated baseline against which to evaluate the carbon material performance. Numerous unidirectional carbon fabrics were considered for evaluation with VARTM infusion. All but one fabric style considered suffered either from poor infusibility or waviness of fibers combined with poor compaction. The exception was a triaxial carbon-fiberglass fabric produced by SAERTEX. This fabric became the primary choice for infused articles throughout the test program. The generally positive results obtained in this program for the SAERTEX material have led to its being used in innovative prototype blades of 9-m and 30-m length, as well as other non-wind related structures.

  19. Solar-Powered Air Stripping at the Rocky Flats Site, Colorado - 12361

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boylan, John A. [S.M. Stoller Corporation, Rocky Flats Site, 11025 Dover Street, Suite 1000, Westminster, Colorado 80021 (United States)

    2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. Department of Energy's Rocky Flats Site (the Site), near Denver, Colorado, is a former nuclear weapons facility that was constructed beginning in 1951. With the end of the Cold War, the Site was cleaned up and closed in 2005. Four gravity-driven groundwater treatment systems were installed during cleanup, and their continued operation was incorporated into the final remedy for the Site. All utilities, including electrical power, were removed as part of this closure, so all Site electrical power needs are now met with small solar-powered systems. The Mound Site Plume Treatment System (MSPTS) was installed in 1998 as an innovative system based on zero-valent iron (ZVI). Groundwater flow from the Mound source area containing elevated concentrations of volatile organic compounds (VOCs), primarily in the tetrachloroethene (PCE)-trichloroethene (TCE) family of chlorinated solvents, is intercepted by a collection trench and routed to twin ZVI treatment cells. Later, in 2005, remediation of VOC-contaminated soils at a second up-gradient source area included adding an electron donor to the backfill to help stimulate biodegradation. This reduced concentrations of primary constituents but caused down-gradient groundwater to contain elevated levels of recalcitrant degradation byproducts, particularly cis-1,2-dichloroethene and vinyl chloride. A gravel drain installed as part of the 2005 remediation directs contaminated groundwater from this second source area to the MSPTS for treatment. This additional contaminant load, coupled with correspondingly reduced residence time within the ZVI media due to the increased flow rate, resulted in reduced treatment effectiveness. Elevated concentrations of VOCs were then detected in MSPTS effluent, as well as in surface water at the downstream performance monitoring location for the MSPTS. Subsequent consultations with the Site regulators led to the decision to add a polishing component to reduce residual VOCs in MSPTS effluent. Initially, several alternatives such as commercial air strippers and cascade aerators were evaluated; resulting cost estimates exceeded $100,000. After several simpler alternatives were considered and prototype testing was conducted, the existing effluent metering manhole was converted to house a spray-nozzle based, solar-powered air stripper, at a cost of approximately $20,000. About two-thirds of this cost was for the solar power system, which was initially designed to only provide power for 12 hours per day. Performance data are being collected and adjustments made to optimize the design, determine maintenance requirements, and establish power needs for continuous operation. Analytical data confirm the air stripper is sharply reducing concentrations of residual contaminants. (authors)

  20. Preparation and Characterization of Paints and Coatings from Soy and Corn Oils

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Larock, Richard C.

    2009-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

    This project was highly successful. A series of new waterborne polyurethane (PU)/acrylic hybrid latexes were successfully synthesized by the emulsion polymerization of acrylic monomers (butyl acrylate and methyl methacrylate) in the presence of a soybean oil-based waterborne PU dispersion using potassium persulfate as an initiator. The waterborne PU dispersion was synthesized by a polyaddition reaction of toluene 2,4-diisocyanate and a soybean oil-based polyol (SOL). The resulting hybrid latexes, containing 15-60 wt % SOL as a renewable resource, are very stable and exhibit uniform particle sizes of {approx}125 nm as determined by transmittance electronic microscopy. The structure, thermal, and mechanical properties of the resulting hybrid latex films have been investigated by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, solid state {sup 13}C NMR spectroscopy, dynamic mechanical analysis, extraction, and mechanical testing. Grafting copolymerization of the acrylic monomers onto the PU network occurs during the emulsion polymerization, leading to a significant increase in the thermal and mechanical properties of the resulting hybrid latexes. This work provides a new way of utilizing renewable resources to prepare environmentally friendly hybrid latexes with high performance for coating applications. In addition, a novel soybean oil-based vinyl-containing waterborne polyurethane (VPU) dispersion has been successfully synthesized from toluene 2,4-diisocyanate, dimethylol propionic acid and a 90:10 mixture of chlorinated soybean oil-based polyol and acrylated epoxidized soybean oil (AESO). Then, a series of VPU/acrylic grafted latexes were prepared by emulsion graft copolymerization of acrylic monomers (40 wt% butyl acrylate and 60 wt% methyl methacrylate) in the presence of the VPU dispersion using potassium persulfate as an initiator. The structure, morphology, and thermal and mechanical properties of the resulting latexes, containing 15-60 wt% soybean oil-based polyols as a renewable resource, were investigated by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, solid state {sup 13}C NMR spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy, thermogravimetric analysis, dynamic mechanical analysis and mechanical testing. The results indicated that graft copolymerization of the acrylic monomers onto the VPU network occurs during emulsion polymerization, leading to a significant increase in the thermal stability and mechanical properties of the resulting miscible grafted latexes. This work provides new environmentally-friendly latexes from a renewable resource with high performance for coating applications.

  1. Scaleable production and separation of fermentation-derived acetic acid. Final CRADA report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Snyder, S. W.; Energy Systems

    2010-02-08T23:59:59.000Z

    Half of U.S. acetic acid production is used in manufacturing vinyl acetate monomer (VAM) and is economical only in very large production plants. Nearly 80% of the VAM is produced by methanol carbonylation, which requires high temperatures and exotic construction materials and is energy intensive. Fermentation-derived acetic acid production allows for small-scale production at low temperatures, significantly reducing the energy requirement of the process. The goal of the project is to develop a scaleable production and separation process for fermentation-derived acetic acid. Synthesis gas (syngas) will be fermented to acetic acid, and the fermentation broth will be continuously neutralized with ammonia. The acetic acid product will be recovered from the ammonium acid broth using vapor-based membrane separation technology. The process is summarized in Figure 1. The two technical challenges to success are selecting and developing (1) microbial strains that efficiently ferment syngas to acetic acid in high salt environments and (2) membranes that efficiently separate ammonia from the acetic acid/water mixture and are stable at high enough temperature to facilitate high thermal cracking of the ammonium acetate salt. Fermentation - Microbial strains were procured from a variety of public culture collections (Table 1). Strains were incubated and grown in the presence of the ammonium acetate product and the fastest growing cultures were selected and incubated at higher product concentrations. An example of the performance of a selected culture is shown in Figure 2. Separations - Several membranes were considered. Testing was performed on a new product line produced by Sulzer Chemtech (Germany). These are tubular ceramic membranes with weak acid functionality (see Figure 3). The following results were observed: (1) The membranes were relatively fragile in a laboratory setting; (2) Thermally stable {at} 130 C in hot organic acids; (3) Acetic acid rejection > 99%; and (4) Moderate ammonia flux. The advantages of producing acetic acid by fermentation include its appropriateness for small-scale production, lower cost feedstocks, low energy membrane-based purification, and lower temperature and pressure requirements. Potential energy savings of using fermentation are estimated to be approximately 14 trillion Btu by 2020 from a reduction in natural gas use. Decreased transportation needs with regional plants will eliminate approximately 200 million gallons of diesel consumption, for combined savings of 45 trillion Btu. If the fermentation process captures new acetic acid production, savings could include an additional 5 trillion Btu from production and 7 trillion Btu from transportation energy.

  2. Novel Approaches to Immobilized Heteropoly Acid Systems for High Temperature, Low Relative Humidity Polymer-Type Membranes - Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Herring, Andrew M; Horan, James L; Aieta, Niccolo V; Sachdeva, Sonny; Kuo, Mei-Chen; Ren, Hui; Lingutla, Anitha; Emery, Michael; Haugen, Gregory M; Yandrasits, Michael A; Sharma, Neeraj; Coggio, William D; Hamrock, Steven J; Frey, Matthew H

    2012-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Original research was carried out at the CSM and the 3M Company from March 2007 through September 2011. The research was aimed at developing new to the world proton electrolyte materials for use in hydrogen fuel cells, in particular with high proton conductivity under hot and dry conditions (>100mS/cm at 120°C and 50%RH). Broadly stated, the research at 3M and between 3M and CSM that led to new materials took place in two phases: In the first phase, hydrocarbon membranes that could be formed by photopolymerization of monomer mixtures were developed for the purpose of determining the technical feasibility of achieving the program's Go/No-Go decision conductivity target of >100mS/cm at 120°C and 50%RH. In the second phase, attempts were made to extend the achieved conductivity level to fluorinated material systems with the expectation that durability and stability would be improved (over the hydrocarbon material). Highlights included: Multiple lots of an HPA-immobilized photocurable terpolymer derived from di-vinyl-silicotungstic acid (85%), n-butyl acrylate, and hexanediol diacrylate were prepared at 3M and characterized at 3M to exhibit an initial conductivity of 107mS/cm at 120°C and 47%RH (PolyPOM85v) using a Bekktech LLC sample fixture and TestEquity oven. Later independent testing by Bekktech LLC, using a different preheating protocol, on the same material, yielded a conductivity value of approximately 20mS/cm at 120°C and 50%RH. The difference in measured values is likely to have been the result of an instability of properties for the material or a difference in the measurement method. A dispersed catalyst fuel cell was fabricated and tested using a 150Ľm thick HPA-based photocurable membrane (above, PolyPOM75v), exhibiting a current density of greater than 300mA/cm2 at 0.5V (H2/Air 800/1800sccm 70°C/75%RH ambient outlet pressure). Multiple lots of a co-polymer based on poly-trifluorovinylether (TFVE) derived HPA were synthesized and fabricated into films, Generation II films. These materials showed proton conductivities as high as 1 S/cm under high RH conditions. However, the materials suffered from compromised properties due to impure monomers and low molecular weights. Multiple lots of an HPA-immobilized fluoropolymer derived from preformed PVDF-HFP (Generation III films) were synthesized and formed into membranes at 3M and characterized at 3M to exhibit conductivity reaching approximately 75mS/cm at 120°C/40%RH using a Bekktech sample fixture and TestEquity oven (optimized membrane, at close of program). Initial fuel cell fabrication and testing for this new class of membrane yielded negative results (no measureable proton conductivity); however, the specific early membrane that was used for the two 5cm2 MEAs was later determined to have <1 mS/cm at 80°C/80%RH using the Bekktech fixture, vs. ca. 200 mS/cm at 80°C/80%RH for samples of the later-optimized type described above. Future work in this area (beyond the presently reported contract) should include additional attempts to fabricate and test fuel cells based on the later-optimized Generation II and III polymer. A manufacturing study was performed which predicted no difficulties in any future scale up of the materials.

  3. Parametric Evaluation of an Innovative Ultra-Violet PhotocatalyticOxidation (UVPCO) Air Cleaning Technology for Indoor Applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hodgson, Alfred T.; Sullivan, Douglas P.; Fisk, William J.

    2005-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

    An innovative Ultra-Violet Photocatalytic Oxidation (UVPCO) air cleaning technology employing a semitransparent catalyst coated on a semitransparent polymer substrate was evaluated to determine its effectiveness for treating mixtures of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) representative of indoor environments at low, indoor-relevant concentration levels. The experimental UVPCO contained four 30 by 30-cm honeycomb monoliths irradiated with nine UVA lamps arranged in three banks. A parametric evaluation of the effects of monolith thickness, air flow rate through the device, UV power, and reactant concentrations in inlet air was conducted for the purpose of suggesting design improvements. The UVPCO was challenged with three mixtures of VOCs. A synthetic office mixture contained 27 VOCs commonly measured in office buildings. A building product mixture was created by combining sources including painted wallboard, composite wood products, carpet systems, and vinyl flooring. The third mixture contained formaldehyde and acetaldehyde. Steady state concentrations were produced in a classroom laboratory or a 20-m{sup 3} chamber. Air was drawn through the UVPCO, and single-pass conversion efficiencies were measured from replicate samples collected upstream and downstream of the reactor. Thirteen experiments were conducted in total. In this UVPCO employing a semitransparent monolith design, an increase in monolith thickness is expected to result in general increases in both reaction efficiencies and absolute reaction rates for VOCs oxidized by photocatalysis. The thickness of individual monolith panels was varied between 1.2 and 5 cm (5 to 20 cm total thickness) in experiments with the office mixture. VOC reaction efficiencies and rates increased with monolith thickness. However, the analysis of the relationship was confounded by high reaction efficiencies in all configurations for a number of compounds. These reaction efficiencies approached or exceeded 90% for alcohols, glycol ethers, and other individual compounds including d-limonene, 1,2,4-trimethylbenzene, and decamethylcyclopentasiloxane. This result implies a reaction efficiency of about 30% per irradiated monolith face, which is in agreement with the maximum efficiency for the system predicted with a simulation model. In these and other experiments, the performance of the system for highly reactive VOCs appeared to be limited by mass transport of reactants to the catalyst surface rather than by photocatalytic activity. Increasing the air flow rate through the UVPCO device decreases the residence time of the air in the monoliths and improves mass transfer to the catalyst surface. The effect of gas velocity was examined in four pairs of experiments in which the air flow rate was varied from approximately 175 m{sup 3}/h to either 300 or 600 m{sup 3}/h. Increased gas velocity caused a decrease in reaction efficiency for nearly all reactive VOCs. For all of the more reactive VOCs, the decrease in performance was less, and often substantially less, than predicted based solely on residence time, again likely due to mass transfer limitations at the low flow rate. The results demonstrate that the UVPCO is capable of achieving high conversion efficiencies for reactive VOCs at air flow rates above the base experimental rate of 175 m{sup 3}/h. The effect of UV power was examined in a series of experiments with the building product mixture in which the number of lamps was varied between nine and three. For the most reactive VOCs in the mixture, the effects of UV power were surprisingly small. Thus, even with only one lamp in each section, there appears to be sufficient photocatalytic activity to decompose most of the mass of reactive VOCs that reach the catalyst surface. For some less reactive VOCs, the trend of decreasing efficiency with decreasing UV intensity was in general agreement with simulation model predictions.

  4. Experimental Design for a Sponge-Wipe Study to Relate the Recovery Efficiency and False Negative Rate to the Concentration of a Bacillus anthracis Surrogate for Six Surface Materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Piepel, Gregory F.; Amidan, Brett G.; Krauter, Paula; Einfeld, Wayne

    2010-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

    Two concerns were raised by the Government Accountability Office following the 2001 building contaminations via letters containing Bacillus anthracis (BA). These included the: 1) lack of validated sampling methods, and 2) need to use statistical sampling to quantify the confidence of no contamination when all samples have negative results. Critical to addressing these concerns is quantifying the probability of correct detection (PCD) (or equivalently the false negative rate FNR = 1 ? PCD). The PCD/FNR may depend on the 1) method of contaminant deposition, 2) surface concentration of the contaminant, 3) surface material being sampled, 4) sample collection method, 5) sample storage/transportation conditions, 6) sample processing method, and 7) sample analytical method. A review of the literature found 17 laboratory studies that focused on swab, wipe, or vacuum samples collected from a variety of surface materials contaminated by BA or a surrogate, and used culture methods to determine the surface contaminant concentration. These studies quantified performance of the sampling and analysis methods in terms of recovery efficiency (RE) and not PCD/FNR (which left a major gap in available information). Quantifying the PCD/FNR under a variety of conditions is a key aspect of validating sample and analysis methods, and also for calculating the confidence in characterization or clearance decisions based on a statistical sampling plan. A laboratory study was planned to partially fill the gap in PCD/FNR results. This report documents the experimental design developed by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory and Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) for a sponge-wipe method. The study will investigate the effects on key response variables from six surface materials contaminated with eight surface concentrations of a BA surrogate (Bacillus atrophaeus). The key response variables include measures of the contamination on test coupons of surface materials tested, contamination recovered from coupons by sponge-wipe samples, RE, and PCD/FNR. The experimental design involves 16 test runs, to be performed in two blocks of eight runs. Three surface materials (stainless steel, vinyl tile, and ceramic tile) were tested in the first block, while three other surface materials (plastic, painted wood paneling, and faux leather) will be tested in the second block. The eight surface concentrations of the surrogate were randomly assigned to test runs within each block. Some of the concentrations will be very low and may present challenges for deposition, sampling, and analysis. However, such tests are needed to investigate RE and PCD/FNR over the full range of concentrations of interest. In each run, there will be 10 test coupons of each of the three surface materials. A positive control sample will be generated prior to each test sample. The positive control results will be used to 1) calculate RE values for the wipe sampling and analysis method, and 2) fit RE- and PCD-concentration equations, for each of the six surface materials. Data analyses will support 1) estimating the PCD for each combination of contaminant concentration and surface material, 2) estimating the surface concentrations and their uncertainties of the contaminant for each combination of concentration and surface material, 3) estimating RE (%) and their uncertainties for each combination of contaminant concentration and surface material, 4) fitting PCD-concentration and RE-concentration equations for each of the six surface materials, 5) assessing goodness-of-fit of the equations, and 6) quantifying the uncertainty in PCD and RE predictions made with the fitted equations.

  5. Experimental Design for a Sponge-Wipe Study to Relate the Recovery Efficiency and False Negative Rate to the Concentration of a Bacillus anthracis Surrogate for Six Surface Materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Piepel, Gregory F.; Amidan, Brett G.; Krauter, Paula; Einfeld, Wayne

    2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Two concerns were raised by the Government Accountability Office following the 2001 building contaminations via letters containing Bacillus anthracis (BA). These included the: 1) lack of validated sampling methods, and 2) need to use statistical sampling to quantify the confidence of no contamination when all samples have negative results. Critical to addressing these concerns is quantifying the false negative rate (FNR). The FNR may depend on the 1) method of contaminant deposition, 2) surface concentration of the contaminant, 3) surface material being sampled, 4) sample collection method, 5) sample storage/transportation conditions, 6) sample processing method, and 7) sample analytical method. A review of the literature found 17 laboratory studies that focused on swab, wipe, or vacuum samples collected from a variety of surface materials contaminated by BA or a surrogate, and used culture methods to determine the surface contaminant concentration. These studies quantified performance of the sampling and analysis methods in terms of recovery efficiency (RE) and not FNR (which left a major gap in available information). Quantifying the FNR under a variety of conditions is a key aspect of validating sample and analysis methods, and also for calculating the confidence in characterization or clearance decisions based on a statistical sampling plan. A laboratory study was planned to partially fill the gap in FNR results. This report documents the experimental design developed by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory and Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) for a sponge-wipe method. The testing was performed by SNL and is now completed. The study investigated the effects on key response variables from six surface materials contaminated with eight surface concentrations of a BA surrogate (Bacillus atrophaeus). The key response variables include measures of the contamination on test coupons of surface materials tested, contamination recovered from coupons by sponge-wipe samples, RE, and FNR. The experimental design involves 16 test runs, performed in two blocks of eight runs. Three surface materials (stainless steel, vinyl tile, and ceramic tile) were tested in the first block, while three other surface materials (plastic, painted wood paneling, and faux leather) were tested in the second block. The eight surface concentrations of the surrogate were randomly assigned to test runs within each block. Some of the concentrations were very low and presented challenges for deposition, sampling, and analysis. However, such tests are needed to investigate RE and FNR over the full range of concentrations of interest. In each run, there were 10 test coupons of each of the three surface materials. A positive control sample was generated at the same time as each test sample. The positive control results will be used to 1) calculate RE values for the wipe sampling and analysis method, and 2) fit RE- and FNR-concentration equations, for each of the six surface materials. Data analyses will support 1) estimating the FNR for each combination of contaminant concentration and surface material, 2) estimating the surface concentrations and their uncertainties of the contaminant for each combination of concentration and surface material, 3) estimating RE (%) and their uncertainties for each combination of contaminant concentration and surface material, 4) fitting FNR-concentration and RE-concentration equations for each of the six surface materials, 5) assessing goodness-of-fit of the equations, and 6) quantifying the uncertainty in FNR and RE predictions made with the fitted equations.

  6. Final Report, "Molecular Design of Hydrocarbon Oxidation Catalytic Processes"

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Professor Francisco Zaera

    2007-08-09T23:59:59.000Z

    The main goal of this project had been to use model systems to correlate selectivities in partial oxidation catalysis with the presence of specific sites on the surface of the catalyst. Extensive work was performed this year on characterizing oxygen-treated nickel surfaces by chemical means. Specifically, the surface chemistry of ammonia coadsorbed with atomic oxygen on Ni(110) single-crystal surfaces was studied by temperature-programmed desorption (TPD) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). It was determined that at intermediate oxygen coverages direct ammonia adsorption on nickel sites is suppressed, but a new high-temperature reaction regime is generated at 400 K where NHx surface fragments are rehydrogenated concurrently with the production of water and molecular hydrogen. The extensive isotope scrambling and hydrogen transfer seen from nitrogen- to oxygen-containing surface intermediates, and the optimum yields seen for this 400 K state at intermediate oxygen coverages, strongly suggest the direct interaction of the adsorbed ammonia with oxygen atoms at the end of the –Ni–O- rows that form upon reconstruction of the surface. Hydrogen transfer between ammonia and oxygen appears to take place directly via hydrogen bonding, and to be reversible but biased towards water formation. An equilibrium is reached between the produced water and the reacting surface oxygen and hydrogen. The strong influence of the OH surface groups on the thermal chemistry of the adsorbed ammonia was interpreted in terms of the adsorbing geometry of the OH groups on the surface, and of hydrogen bonding between adsorbed OH and NH3 species. In terms of alcohol reactivity, the adsorption of 2-iodoethanol, a precursor for the preparation of 2-hydroxyethyl and oxametallacycle surface species, was found to lead to two configurations involving either just the iodine atom or both iodine and hydroxyl ends of the molecule. A complex chemical behavior starts around 140 K with the production of small amounts of ethylene and water, most likely via the concerted decomposition or disproportionation of the adsorbed molecular species. The bulk of the 2-iodoethanol decomposes at about 150 K via an initial carbon-iodine scission to form –O(H)CH2CH2– (~80%) and 2-hydroxyethyl (~20%) intermediates. Two competing reactions are involved with the subsequent conversion of the 2-hydroxyethyl species around 160 K, a reductive elimination with surface hydrogen to yield ethanol, and a ?-H elimination to surface vinyl alcohol. The –O(H)CH2CH2–, on the other hand, dehydrogenates to a –OCH2CH2– oxametallacycle species about the same temperature. Both 2-hydroxyethyl and oxametallacycle species tautomerize to acetaldehyde, around 210 K and above 250 K, respectively, and some of that acetaldehyde desorbs while the rest decomposes to hydrogen and carbon monoxide. We contend that a better understanding of the surface chemistry of oxygen-containing surfaces can lead to better selectivities in catalysis. This is arguably the most important issue in the field of catalysis in the near future, and one that impacts several technologies of interest to DOE such as the manufacturing of speciality chemicals and the control and removal of pollutants. Additional work was performed on the characterization of the chemistry of methyl and methylene adsorbed species on oxygen-treated nickel surfaces. Complex chemistry was observed involving not only hydrogenation and dehydrogenation steps, but also C-C couplings and methylene insertions to produce heavier hydrocarbons, and oxygen insertion reactions that yield oxygenates. Finally, a dual titration technique employing xenon and a chemically sensitive probe was developed to identify minority catalytic sites on oxide surfaces. In the case of oxygen-treated Ni(110) single crystals, it was found that both hydrogen transfer with adsorbed water or ammonia and certain hydrocarbon hydrogenation reactions take place at the end of the –Ni–O rows that form in this system. Carbon and nitrogen oxides, on the other hand, display no pre

  7. Reactive Membrane Barriers for Containment of Subsurface Contamination

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    William A. Arnold; Edward L. Cussler

    2007-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

    The overall goal of this project was to develop reactive membrane barriers--a new and flexible technique to contain and stabilize subsurface contaminants. Polymer membranes will leak once a contaminant is able to diffuse through the membrane. By incorporating a reactive material in the polymer, however, the contaminant is degraded or immobilized within the membrane. These processes increase the time for contaminants to breakthrough the barrier (i.e. the lag time) and can dramatically extend barrier lifetimes. In this work, reactive barrier membranes containing zero-valent iron (Fe{sup 0}) or crystalline silicotitanate (CST) were developed to prevent the migration of chlorinated solvents and cesium-137, respectively. These studies were complemented by the development of models quantifying the leakage/kill time of reactive membranes and describing the behavior of products produced via the reactions within the membranes. First, poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA) membranes containing Fe{sup 0} and CST were prepared and tested. Although PVA is not useful in practical applications, it allows experiments to be performed rapidly and the results to be compared to theory. For copper ions (Cu{sup 2+}) and carbon tetrachloride, the barrier was effective, increasing the time to breakthrough over 300 times. Even better performance was expected, and the percentage of the iron used in the reaction with the contaminants was determined. For cesium, the CST laden membranes increased lag times more than 30 times, and performed better than theoretical predictions. A modified theory was developed for ion exchangers in reactive membranes to explain this result. With the PVA membranes, the effect of a groundwater matrix on barrier performance was tested. Using Hanford groundwater, the performance of Fe{sup 0} barriers decreased compared to solutions containing a pH buffer and high levels of chloride (both of which promote iron reactivity). For the CST bearing membrane, performance improved by a factor of three when groundwater was used in place of deionized water. The performance of high density polyethylene (HDPE) membranes containing Fe{sup 0} was then evaluating using carbon tetrachloride as the target contaminant. Only with a hydrophilic additive (glycerol), was the iron able to extend lag times. Lag times were increased by a factor of 15, but only 2-3% of the iron was used, likely due to formation of oxide precipitates on the iron surface, which slowed the reaction. With thicker membranes and lower carbon tetrachloride concentrations, it is expected that performance will improve. Previous models for reactive membranes were also extended. The lag time is a measurement of when the barrier is breached, but contaminants do slowly leak through prior to the lag time. Thus, two parameters, the leakage and the kill time, were developed to determine when a certain amount of pollutant has escaped (the kill time) or when a given exposure (concentration x time) occurs (the leakage). Finally, a model was developed to explain the behavior of mobile reaction products in reactive barrier membranes. Although the goal of the technology is to avoid such products, it is important to be able to predict how these products will behave. Interestingly, calculations show that for any mobile reaction products, one half of the mass will diffuse into the containment area and one half will escape, assuming that the volumes of the containment area and the surrounding environment are much larger than the barrier membrane. These parameters/models will aid in the effective design of barrier membranes.

  8. Probing Interactions at the Nanoscale: Sensing Protein Molecules

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sohn, Lydia; Weiss, Ron; Tavazoie, Saeed

    2003-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Introduction We have developed a high-frequency electronic biosensor of parallel-plate geometry that is embedded within a microfluidic device. This novel biosensor allows us to perform dielectric spectroscopy on a variety of biological samples—from cells to molecules—in solution. Because it is purely electronic, the sensor allows for rapid characterization with no sample preparation or chemical alteration. In addition, it is capable of probing length scales from millimeters to microns over a frequency range 50 MHz to 40 GHz, and sample volumes as small as picoliters [1,2]. Our high-frequency biosensor has evolved from previous device designs based on a coplanar waveguide (CPW) geometry [2]. For our current device, we employ microfluidic tectonics (µFT) [3] to embed two microstrip conductors within a microfluidic channel. The electronic coupling between the two conductors is greater than in our previous CPW design and more importantly, leads to an enhanced sensitivity. Our utilization of µFT allows us to incorporate easily this high-frequency electronic biosensor with a variety of lab-on-a-chip architectures. Device Description Figure 1 is a schematic of our high-frequency electronic biosensor. We fabricate this sensor by first depositing a 500 Ĺ seed layer of gold onto two glass microscope slides. We then use photolithography to pattern the gold that is subsequently electroplated to a thickness of 4-6 µm. After reactive-ion etching the photoresist and removing the unplated gold with a standard iodine-based gold etchant, we align the two slides under a microscope such that the microstrip conductors overlap one another in a parallel-plate geometry (80 µm x 500 µm). We control the separation between the microstrip conductors using gold foil spacers 3–25 µm thick. The foil additionally ensures coupling between the grounds on each slide. Following alignment, we employ µFT to bond the two glass slides together and to create a microfluidic channel running perpendicular to the microstrip conductors (see Figure 1). We complete the device by inserting 0.02” ID vinyl tubing through predrilled input and output holes of the device [3]. All of our devices are designed to have a 50 ? matched impedance and minimal insertion loss for 0.05 – 40 GHz. With these characteristics, we expect a sensitivity of 0.05 dB. Results By accessing frequencies > 20 GHz with our device, we can probe unique low-frequency vibrational or rotational modes of bio-macromolecules, since at these frequencies the counterions have fully relaxed, the dipole moment of water is rapidly decreasing, and the macroscopic distortions of macromolecules become important and are reflected in the obtained spectra. As a first demonstration, we have measured PCR products. We are able to distinguish between non-reacted primers for PCR amplification and reacted PCR products (24 amplification cycles). Figure 2 shows representative spectra of the two different DNA solutions obtained from a single device and scaled to DI water. We have obtained similar spectral features from additional devices and are currently developing a quantitative model to explain our results. This initial demonstration of molecular differentiation using a high-frequency electronic biosensor shows the great promise of electronic biosensing.

  9. ALDEHYDE AND OTHER VOLATILE ORGANIC CHEMICAL EMISSIONS IN FOUR FEMA TEMPORARY HOUSING UNITS ? FINAL REPORT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Salazar, Olivia; Maddalena, Randy L.; Russell, Marion; Sullivan, Douglas P.; Apte, Michael G.

    2008-05-04T23:59:59.000Z

    Four unoccupied FEMA temporary housing units (THUs) were studied to assess their indoor emissions of volatile organic compounds including formaldehyde. Measurement of whole-THU VOC and aldehyde emission factors (mu g h-1 per m2 of floor area) for each of the four THUs were made at FEMA's Purvis MS staging yard using a mass balance approach. Measurements were made in the morning, and again in the afternoon in each THU. Steady-state indoor formaldehyde concentrations ranged from 378 mu g m-3 (0.31ppm) to 632 mu g m-3 (0.52 ppm) in the AM, and from 433 mu g m-3 (0.35 ppm) to 926 mu g m-3 (0.78 ppm) in the PM. THU air exchange rates ranged from 0.15 h-1 to 0.39 h-1. A total of 45 small (approximately 0.025 m2) samples of surface material, 16 types, were collected directly from the four THUs and shipped to Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory. The material samples were analyzed for VOC and aldehyde emissions in small stainless steel chambers using a standard, accurate mass balance method. Quantification of VOCs was done via gas chromatography -- mass spectrometry and low molecular weight aldehydes via high performance liquid chromatography. Material specific emission factors (mu g h-1 per m2 of material) were quantified. Approximately 80 unique VOCs were tentatively identified in the THU field samples, of which forty-five were quantified either because of their toxicological significance or because their concentrations were high. Whole-trailer and material specific emission factors were calculated for 33 compounds. The THU emission factors and those from their component materials were compared against those measured from other types of housing and the materials used in their construction. Whole THU emission factors for most VOCs were typically similar to those from comparative housing. The three exceptions were exceptionally large emissions of formaldehyde and TMPD-DIB (a common plasticizer in vinyl products), and somewhat elevated for phenol. Of these three compounds, formaldehyde was the only one with toxicological significance at the observed concentrations. Whole THU formaldehyde emissions ranged from 173 to 266 mu g m-2 h 1 in the morning and 257 to 347 mu g m-2 h-1 in the afternoon. Median formaldehyde emissions in previously studied site-built and manufactured homes were 31 and 45 mu g m-2 h-1, respectively. Only one of the composite wood materials that was tested appeared to exceed the HUD formaldehyde emission standard (430 mu g/m2 h-1 for particleboard and 130 mu g/m2 h-1 for plywood). The high loading factor (material surface area divided by THU volume) of composite wood products in the THUs and the low fresh air exchange relative to the material surface area may be responsible for the excessive concentrations observed for some of the VOCs and formaldehyde.

  10. Inexpensive CO2 Thickening Agents for Improved Mobility Control of CO2 Floods

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robert Enick; Eric Beckman; Andrew Hamilton

    2005-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this research was the design, synthesis and evaluation of inexpensive, non-fluorous carbon dioxide thickening agents. We followed the same strategy employed in the design of fluorinated CO{sub 2} polymeric thickeners. First, a highly CO{sub 2}-philic, hydrocarbon-based monomer was to be identified. Polymers or oligomers of this monomer were then synthesized. The second step was to design a CO{sub 2}-thickener based on these CO{sub 2}-philic polymers. Two types of thickeners were considered. The first was a copolymer in which the CO{sub 2}-philic monomer was combined with a small proportion of CO{sub 2}-phobic associating groups that could cause viscosity-enhancing intermolecular interactions to occur. The second was a small hydrogen-bonding compound with urea groups in the core to promote intermolecular interactions that would cause the molecules to 'stack' in solution while the arms were composed of the CO{sub 2}-philic oligomers. Although we were not able to develop a viable thickener that exhibited high enough CO{sub 2} solubility at EOR MMP conditions to induce a viscosity increase, we made significant progress in our understanding of CO{sub 2}-soluble compounds that can be used in subsequent studies to design CO{sub 2}-soluble thickeners or CO{sub 2}-soluble surfactant-based foaming agents. These findings are detailed in this final report. In summary, we assessed many polymers and verified that the most CO{sub 2}-soluble oxygenated hydrocarbon polymer is poly(vinyl acetate), PVAc. This is primarily due to the presence of both ether and carbonyl oxygens associated with acetate-rich compounds. In addition to polymers, we also made small acetate-rich molecules that were also capable of associating in solution via the inclusion of hydrogen-bonding groups in hopes of forming viscosity-enhancing macromolecules. Despite the presence of multiple acetate groups in these compounds, which can impart incredible CO{sub 2}-solubility to many compounds, our attempts to make acetate-rich high molecular weight polymers and small hydrogen-bonding compounds did not yield a highly CO{sub 2}-soluble polymer or hydrogen-bonding associative thickener. The conclusions of our molecular modeling calculations confirmed that although acetates are indeed 'CO{sub 2}-philic', nitrogen-containing amines also interact favorably with CO{sub 2} and should also be examined. Therefore we obtained and synthesized many N-rich (e.g. amine-containing) polymers. Unfortunately, we found that the intermolecular polymer-polymer interactions between the amines were so strong that the polymers were essentially insoluble in CO{sub 2}. For the convenience of the reader, a table of all of the polymers evaluated during this research is provided.

  11. Synthesis of main group, rare-earth, and d{sup 0} metal complexes containing beta-hydrogen

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yan, Ka King [Ames Laboratory

    2013-05-02T23:59:59.000Z

    A series of organometallic compounds containing the tris(dimethylsilyl)methyl ligand are described. The potassium carbanions KC(SiHMe{sub 2}){sub 3} and KC(SiHMe{sub 2}){sub 3}TMEDA are synthesized by deprotonation of the hydrocarbon HC(SiHMe{sub 2}){sub 3} with potassium benzyl. KC(SiHMe{sub 2}){sub 3}TMEDA crystallizes as a dimer with two types of three-center-two-electron KH- Si interactions. Homoleptic Ln(III) tris(silylalkyl) complexes containing ?-SiH groups M{C(SiHMe{sub 2}){sub 3}}{sub 3} (Ln = Y, Lu, La) are synthesized from salt elimination of the corresponding lanthanide halide and 3 equiv. of KC(SiHMe{sub 2}){sub 3}. The related reactions with Sc yield bis(silylalkyl) ate-complexes containing either LiCl or KCl. The divalent calcium and ytterbium compounds M{C(SiHMe{sub 2}){sub 3}}{sub 2}L (M = Ca, Yb; L = THF{sub 2} or TMEDA) are prepared from MI{sub 2} and 2 equiv of KC(SiHMe{sub 2}){sub 3}. The compounds M{C(SiHMe{sub 2}){sub 3}}{sub 2}L (M = Ca, Yb; L = THF{sub 2} or TMEDA) and La{C(SiHMe{sub 2}){sub 3}}{sub 3} react with 1 equiv of B(C{sub 6}F{sub 5}){sub 3} to give 1,3- disilacyclobutane {Me2Si-C(SiHMe2)2}2 and MC(SiHMe2)3HB(C6F5)3L, and La{C(SiHMe{sub 2}){sub 3}}{sub 2}HB(C{sub 6}F{sub 5}){sub 3}, respectively. The corresponding reactions of Ln{C(SiHMe{sub 2}){sub 3}}{sub 3} (Ln = Y, Lu) give the ?-SiH abstraction product [{(Me{sub 2}HSi){sub 3}C}{sub 2}LnC(SiHMe{sub 2}){sub 2}SiMe{sub 2}][HB(C{sub 6}F{sub 5}){sub 3}] (Ln = Y, Lu), but the silene remains associated with the Y or Lu center. The abstraction reactions of M{C(SiHMe{sub 2}){sub 3}}{sub 2}L (M = Ca, Yb; L = THF{sub 2 }or TMEDA) and Ln{C(SiHMe{sub 2}){sub 3}}{sub 3} (Ln = Y, Lu, La) and 2 equiv of B(C{sub 6}F{sub 5}){sub 3} give the expected dicationic M{HB(C{sub 6}F{sub 5}){sub 3}}{sub 2}L (M = Ca, Yb; L = THF{sub 2} or TMEDA) and dicationic mono(silylalkyl) LnC(SiHMe{sub 2}){sub 3}{HB(C{sub 6}F{sub 5}){sub 3}}{sub 2} (Ln = Y, Lu, La), respectively. Salt metathesis reactions of Cp{sub 2}(NR{sub 2})ZrX (X = Cl, I, OTf; R = t-Bu, SiHMe{sub 2}) and lithium hydrosilazide ultimately afford hydride products Cp{sub 2}(NR{sub 2})ZrH that suggest unusual ?-hydrogen elimination processes. A likely intermediate in one of these reactions, Cp{sub 2}Zr[N(SiHMe{sub 2})t-Bu][N(SiHMe{sub 2}){sub 2}], is isolated under controlled synthetic conditions. Addition of alkali metal salts to this zirconium hydrosilazide compound produces the corresponding zirconium hydride. However as conditions are varied, a number of other pathways are also accessible, including C-H/Si-H dehydrocoupling, ?-abstraction of a CH, and ?-abstraction of a SiH. Our observations suggest that the conversion of (hydrosilazido)zirconocene to zirconium hydride does not follow the classical four-center ?- elimination mechanism. Elimination and abstraction reactions dominate the chemistry of ligands containing ?- hydrogen. In contrast, Cp{sub 2}Zr{N(SiHMe{sub 2}){sub 2}}H and Cp{sub 2}Zr{N(SiHMe{sub 2}){sub 2}}Me undergo selective ?-CH bond activation to yield the azasilazirconacycle Cp{sub 2Zr}{?{sup 2}-N(SiHMe{sub 2})SiHMeCH{sub 2}}, even though there are reactive ?-hydrogen available for abstraction. The ?-SiH groups in metallacycle provide access to new pathways for sixteen-electron zirconium alkyl compounds, in which Cp{sub 2}Zr{?{sup 2}-N(SiHMe{sub 2})SiHMeCH{sub 2}} undergoes a rare ?-bond metathesis reaction with ethylene. The resulting vinyl intermediate undergoes ?-hydrogen abstraction to reform ethylene and a silanimine zirconium species that reacts with ethylene to give a metallacyclopentane as the isolated product. The pendent ?-SiH in metallocycle also reacts with paraformaldehyde through an uncatalyzed hydrosilylation to form an exocyclic methoxysilyl moiety, while the zirconium-carbon bond in metallocycle is surprisingly inert toward formaldehyde. Still, the Zr-C moiety in metallocycle is available for chemistry, and it interacts with the carbon monoxide and strong electrophile B(C{sub 6}F{sub 5}){sub 3} to provide Cp{sub 2}Zr[?{sup 2}- OC(=CH{sub 2})SiMeHN(SiHMe