Sample records for 10-kilometer km satellite

  1. Daylight quantum key distribution over 1.6 km

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    W. T. Buttler; R. J. Hughes; S. K. Lamoreaux; G. L. Morgan; J. E. Nordholt; C. G. Peterson

    2000-01-25T23:59:59.000Z

    Quantum key distribution (QKD) has been demonstrated over a point-to-point $\\sim1.6$-km atmospheric optical path in full daylight. This record transmission distance brings QKD a step closer to surface-to-satellite and other long-distance applications.

  2. Satellite-Based Quantum Communications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hughes, Richard J [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Nordholt, Jane E [Los Alamos National Laboratory; McCabe, Kevin P [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Newell, Raymond T [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Peterson, Charles G [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2010-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Single-photon quantum communications (QC) offers the attractive feature of 'future proof', forward security rooted in the laws of quantum physics. Ground based quantum key distribution (QKD) experiments in optical fiber have attained transmission ranges in excess of 200km, but for larger distances we proposed a methodology for satellite-based QC. Over the past decade we have devised solutions to the technical challenges to satellite-to-ground QC, and we now have a clear concept for how space-based QC could be performed and potentially utilized within a trusted QKD network architecture. Functioning as a trusted QKD node, a QC satellite ('QC-sat') could deliver secret keys to the key stores of ground-based trusted QKD network nodes, to each of which multiple users are connected by optical fiber or free-space QC. A QC-sat could thereby extend quantum-secured connectivity to geographically disjoint domains, separated by continental or inter-continental distances. In this paper we describe our system concept that makes QC feasible with low-earth orbit (LEO) QC-sats (200-km-2,000-km altitude orbits), and the results of link modeling of expected performance. Using the architecture that we have developed, LEO satellite-to-ground QKD will be feasible with secret bit yields of several hundred 256-bit AES keys per contact. With multiple ground sites separated by {approx} 100km, mitigation of cloudiness over any single ground site would be possible, potentially allowing multiple contact opportunities each day. The essential next step is an experimental QC-sat. A number of LEO-platforms would be suitable, ranging from a dedicated, three-axis stabilized small satellite, to a secondary experiment on an imaging satellite. to the ISS. With one or more QC-sats, low-latency quantum-secured communications could then be provided to ground-based users on a global scale. Air-to-ground QC would also be possible.

  3. Teleportation of entanglement over 143 km

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas Herbst; Thomas Scheidl; Matthias Fink; Johannes Handsteiner; Bernhard Wittmann; Rupert Ursin; Anton Zeilinger

    2015-02-06T23:59:59.000Z

    As a direct consequence of the no-cloning theorem, the deterministic amplification as in classical communication is impossible for quantum states. This calls for more advanced techniques in a future global quantum network, e.g. for cloud quantum computing. A unique solution is the teleportation of an entangled state, i.e. entanglement swapping, representing the central resource to relay entanglement between distant nodes. Together with entanglement purification and a quantum memory it constitutes a so-called quantum repeater. Since the aforementioned building blocks have been individually demonstrated in laboratory setups only, the applicability of the required technology in real-world scenarios remained to be proven. Here we present a free-space entanglement-swapping experiment between the Canary Islands of La Palma and Tenerife, verifying the presence of quantum entanglement between two previously independent photons separated by 143 km. We obtained an expectation value for the entanglement-witness operator, more than 6 standard deviations beyond the classical limit. By consecutive generation of the two required photon pairs and space-like separation of the relevant measurement events, we also showed the feasibility of the swapping protocol in a long-distance scenario, where the independence of the nodes is highly demanded. Since our results already allow for efficient implementation of entanglement purification, we anticipate our assay to lay the ground for a fully-fledged quantum repeater over a realistic high-loss and even turbulent quantum channel.

  4. NOAA Technical Report NESDIS 143 NOAA Coral Reef Watch 50 km Satellite Sea Surface

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , and solar-terrestrial sciences. From these sources, it develops and disseminates environmental data, energy development and distribution, global food supplies, and the development of natural resources. Mark Eakin1 William Skirving2,3 Tyler R. L. Christensen1,2 Alan E. Strong1,2 Jianke Li1,2 1 NOAA Coral

  5. Daylight quantum key distribution over 1.6 km

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Buttler, W T; Lamoreaux, S K; Morgan, G L; Nordholt, J E; Peterson, C G

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Quantum key distribution (QKD) has been demonstrated over a point-to-point transmission distance brings QKD a step closer to surface-to-satellite and other long-distance applications.

  6. THE 300 km s[superscript –1] STELLAR STREAM NEAR SEGUE 1: INSIGHTS FROM HIGH-RESOLUTION SPECTROSCOPY OF ITS BRIGHTEST STAR

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lunnan, Ragnhild

    We present a chemical abundance analysis of 300S-1, the brightest likely member star of the 300 km s[superscript –1] stream near the faint satellite galaxy Segue 1. From a high-resolution Magellan/MIKE spectrum, we determine ...

  7. Offshore wind resources from satellite SAR Charlotte Bay Hasager, Merete Bruun Christiansen, Morten Nielsen,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Offshore wind resources from satellite SAR Charlotte Bay Hasager, Merete Bruun Christiansen, Morten ocean wind maps were described. For offshore wind resource estimation based on satellite observations and the near-coastal zone (up to 40 km offshore) is not mapped. In contrast, Envisat ASAR wind maps can

  8. Accelerated Aging Effects on Kevlar KM2 Fiber Survivability

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yang, Tony

    2013-04-12T23:59:59.000Z

    as an alternative test method to the pneumatic grip setup. ........................................ 87 ix LIST OF TABLES Page Table 1. DuPont?s Kevlar fiber grades and their tensile material properties ranked by ascending tensile modulus.... ................................................................................. 5 Table 2. Kevlar KM2 properties given by DuPont. ........................................................... 6 Table 3. Fiber rapid degradation Design of Experiment factors and levels. .................... 36 Table 4. Recorded experimentally...

  9. An exact sequence for KM /2 with applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vishik, Alexander

    of characteristics zero. For a sequence a = (a1, . . . , an) of invertible elements of k consider the homomorphism KM the authors were members of the Institute for Advanced Study in Princeton. We would like to thank both the small Pfister quadric or the norm quadric associated with the symbol a. Denote by k(Qa) the function

  10. Enhancement of satellite precipitation estimation via unsupervised dimensionality reduction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mahrooghy, Majid [Mississippi State University (MSU); Younan, Nicolas H. [Mississippi State University (MSU); Anantharaj, Valentine G [ORNL; Aanstoos, James [Mississippi State University (MSU)

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A methodology to enhance Satellite Precipitation Estimation (SPE) using unsupervised dimensionality reduction (UDR) techniques is developed. This enhanced technique is an extension to the Precipitation Estimation from Remotely Sensed Imagery using an Artificial Neural Network (PERSIANN) and Cloud Classification System (CCS) method (PERSIANN-CCS) enriched using wavelet features combined with dimensionality reduction. Cloud-top brightness temperature measurements from Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite (GOES-12) are used for precipitation estimation at 4 km 4 km spatial resolutions every 30 min. The study area in the continental United States covers parts of Louisiana, Arkansas, Kansas, Tennessee, Mississippi, and Alabama. Based on quantitative measures, root mean square error (RMSE) and Heidke skill score (HSS), the results show that the UDR techniques can improve the precipitation estimation accuracy. In addition, ICA is shown to have better performance than other UDR techniques; and in some cases, it achieves 10% improvement in the HSS.

  11. Basic Properties Radius: = RRSun 109km1096.6 5

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Basu, Shantanu

    of the Sun radius T (K) (kg/m3) Core: 57 106.1106.125.0 ×× SunRr Radiative zone: 46 1021087.025.0 ×× Sun 10810km2000 - ×r Corona: 116 10101.00.01 - - SunSun RRr Upper corona merges into the Solar Wind. #12;Interior Nuclear reactions in core via p-p chain: MeV)(12.9HHHeHeHe MeV)(5.49HeHH MeV)44.1(HHH 11433 312

  12. Free-Space distribution of entanglement and single photons over 144 km

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    R. Ursin; F. Tiefenbacher; T. Schmitt-Manderbach; H. Weier; T. Scheidl; M. Lindenthal; B. Blauensteiner; T. Jennewein; J. Perdigues; P. Trojek; B. Oemer; M. Fuerst; M. Meyenburg; J. Rarity; Z. Sodnik; C. Barbieri; H. Weinfurter; A. Zeilinger

    2006-07-27T23:59:59.000Z

    Quantum Entanglement is the essence of quantum physics and inspires fundamental questions about the principles of nature. Moreover it is also the basis for emerging technologies of quantum information processing such as quantum cryptography, quantum teleportation and quantum computation. Bell's discovery, that correlations measured on entangled quantum systems are at variance with a local realistic picture led to a flurry of experiments confirming the quantum predictions. However, it is still experimentally undecided whether quantum entanglement can survive global distances, as predicted by quantum theory. Here we report the violation of the Clauser-Horne-Shimony-Holt (CHSH) inequality measured by two observers separated by 144 km between the Canary Islands of La Palma and Tenerife via an optical free-space link using the Optical Ground Station (OGS) of the European Space Agency (ESA). Furthermore we used the entangled pairs to generate a quantum cryptographic key under experimental conditions and constraints characteristic for a Space-to-ground experiment. The distance in our experiment exceeds all previous free-space experiments by more than one order of magnitude and exploits the limit for ground-based free-space communication; significantly longer distances can only be reached using air- or space-based platforms. The range achieved thereby demonstrates the feasibility of quantum communication in space, involving satellites or the International Space Station (ISS).

  13. Physics-Based GOES Satellite Product for Use in NREL's National Solar Radiation Database: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sengupta, M.; Habte, A.; Gotseff, P.; Weekley, A.; Lopez, A.; Molling, C.; Heidinger, A.

    2014-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), University of Wisconsin, and National Oceanic Atmospheric Administration are collaborating to investigate the integration of the Satellite Algorithm for Shortwave Radiation Budget (SASRAB) products into future versions of NREL's 4-km by 4-km gridded National Solar Radiation Database (NSRDB). This paper describes a method to select an improved clear-sky model that could replace the current SASRAB global horizontal irradiance and direct normal irradiances reported during clear-sky conditions.

  14. Dynamical friction on satellite galaxies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Michiko Fujii; Yoko Funato; Junichiro Makino

    2006-06-23T23:59:59.000Z

    For a rigid model satellite, Chandrasekhar's dynamical friction formula describes the orbital evolution quite accurately, when the Coulomb logarithm is chosen appropriately. However, it is not known if the orbital evolution of a real satellite with the internal degree of freedom can be described by the dynamical friction formula. We performed N-body simulation of the orbital evolution of a self-consistent satellite galaxy within a self-consistent parent galaxy. We found that the orbital decay of the simulated satellite is significantly faster than the estimate from the dynamical friction formula. The main cause of this discrepancy is that the stars stripped out of the satellite are still close to the satellite, and increase the drag force on the satellite through two mechanisms. One is the direct drag force from particles in the trailing tidal arm, a non-axisymmetric force that slows the satellite down. The other is the indirect effect that is caused by the particles remaining close to the satellite after escape. The force from them enhances the wake caused in the parent galaxy by dynamical friction, and this larger wake in turn slows the satellite down more than expected from the contribution of its bound mass. We found these two have comparable effects, and the combined effect can be as large as 20% of the total drag force on the satellite.

  15. Laser satellite power systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Walbridge, E.W.

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A laser satellite power system (SPS) converts solar power captured by earth-orbiting satellites into electrical power on the earth's surface, the satellite-to-ground transmission of power being effected by laser beam. The laser SPS may be an alternative to the microwave SPS. Microwaves easily penetrate clouds while laser radiation does not. Although there is this major disadvantage to a laser SPS, that system has four important advantages over the microwave alternative: (1) land requirements are much less, (2) radiation levels are low outside the laser ground stations, (3) laser beam sidelobes are not expected to interfere with electromagnetic systems, and (4) the laser system lends itself to small-scale demonstration. After describing lasers and how they work, the report discusses the five lasers that are candidates for application in a laser SPS: electric discharge lasers, direct and indirect solar pumped lasers, free electron lasers, and closed-cycle chemical lasers. The Lockheed laser SPS is examined in some detail. To determine whether a laser SPS will be worthy of future deployment, its capabilities need to be better understood and its attractiveness relative to other electric power options better assessed. First priority should be given to potential program stoppers, e.g., beam attenuation by clouds. If investigation shows these potential program stoppers to be resolvable, further research should investigate lasers that are particularly promising for SPS application.

  16. A 233 km tunnel for lepton and hadron colliders

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Summers, D. J.; Cremaldi, L. M.; Datta, A.; Duraisamy, M.; Luo, T.; Lyons, G. T. [Dept. of Physics and Astronomy, University of Mississippi-Oxford, University, MS 38677 (United States)

    2012-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

    A decade ago, a cost analysis was conducted to bore a 233 km circumference Very Large Hadron Collider (VLHC) tunnel passing through Fermilab. Here we outline implementations of e{sup +}e{sup -}, pp-bar , and {mu}{sup +}{mu}{sup -} collider rings in this tunnel using recent technological innovations. The 240 and 500 GeV e{sup +}e{sup -} colliders employ Crab Waist Crossings, ultra low emittance damped bunches, short vertical IP focal lengths, superconducting RF, and low coercivity, grain oriented silicon steel/concrete dipoles. Some details are also provided for a high luminosity 240 GeV e{sup +}e{sup -} collider and 1.75 TeV muon accelerator in a Fermilab site filler tunnel. The 40 TeV pp-bar collider uses the high intensity Fermilab p-bar source, exploits high cross sections for pp-bar production of high mass states, and uses 2 Tesla ultra low carbon steel/YBCO superconducting magnets run with liquid neon. The 35 TeV muon ring ramps the 2 Tesla superconducting magnets at 9 Hz every 0.4 seconds, uses 250 GV of superconducting RF to accelerate muons from 1.75 to 17.5 TeV in 63 orbits with 71% survival, and mitigates neutrino radiation with phase shifting, roller coaster motion in a FODO lattice.

  17. Experimental Single-Photon Transmission from Satellite to Earth

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Juan Yin; Yuan Cao; Shu-Bin Liu; Ge-Sheng Pan; Jin-Hong Wang; Tao Yang; Zhong-Ping Zhang; Fu-Min Yang; Yu-Ao Chen; Cheng-Zhi Peng; Jian-Wei Pan

    2013-06-04T23:59:59.000Z

    Free-space quantum communication with satellites opens a promising avenue for global secure quantum network and large-scale test of quantum foundations. Recently, numerous experimental efforts have been carried out towards this ambitious goal. However, one essential step - transmitting single photons from the satellite to the ground with high signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) at realistic environments - remains experimental challenging. Here, we report a direct experimental demonstration of the satellite-ground transmission of a quasi-single-photon source. In the experiment, single photons (~0.85 photon per pulse) are generated by reflecting weak laser pulses back to earth with a cube-corner retro-reflector on the satellite Champ, collected by a 600-mm diameter telescope at the ground station, and finally detected by single-photon counting modules (SPCMs) after 400-km free-space link transmission. With the help of high accuracy time synchronization, narrow receiver field-of-view (FOV) and high-repetition-rate pulses (76 MHz), a SNR of better than 16:1 is obtained, which is sufficient for a secure quantum key distribution. Our experimental results represent an important step towards satellite-ground quantum communication.

  18. Identifying clouds over the Pierre Auger Observatory using infrared satellite data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abreu, Pedro; et al.,

    2013-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We describe a new method of identifying night-time clouds over the Pierre Auger Observatory using infrared data from the Imager instruments on the GOES-12 and GOES-13 satellites. We compare cloud identifications resulting from our method to those obtained by the Central Laser Facility of the Auger Observatory. Using our new method we can now develop cloud probability maps for the 3000 km^2 of the Pierre Auger Observatory twice per hour with a spatial resolution of ~2.4 km by ~5.5 km. Our method could also be applied to monitor cloud cover for other ground-based observatories and for space-based observatories.

  19. Satellite-Based Solar Resource Data Sets for India 2002-2012

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sengupta, M.; Perez, R.; Gueymard, C.; Anderberg, M.; Gotseff, P.

    2014-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A new 10-km hourly solar resource product was created for India. This product was created using satellite radiances from the Meteosat series of satellites. The product contains global horizontal irradiances (GHI) and direct normal irradiances (DNI) for the period from 2002 to 2011. An additional solar resource data set covering the period from January 2012 to June 2012 was created solely for validation because this period overlaps ground measurements that were made available from the Indian Ministry of New and Renewable Energy's (MNRE's) National Institute for Solar Energy for five stations that are part of MNRE's solar resource network. These measurements were quality checked using the SERI QC software and used to validate the satellite product. A comparison of the satellite product to the ground measurements for the five stations shows good agreement. This report also presents a comparison of the new version of solar resource data to the previous version, which covered the period from 2002 to 2008.

  20. afm-12 1-km avhrr: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    unsupervised classi ? cation of 1 km monthly Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR) Normalized Di ? erence Vegetation Index (NDVI) composites covering...

  1. High rate, long-distance quantum key distribution over 250km of ultra low loss fibres

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    D. Stucki; N. Walenta; F. Vannel; R. T. Thew; N. Gisin; H. Zbinden; S. Gray; C. R. Towery; S. Ten

    2009-03-23T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a fully automated quantum key distribution prototype running at 625 MHz clock rate. Taking advantage of ultra low loss fibres and low-noise superconducting detectors, we can distribute 6,000 secret bits per second over 100 km and 15 bits per second over 250km.

  2. An exact sequence for KM* =2 with applications to quadratic forms

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ) of invertible elements of k consider the homomorphism KM*(k)=2 ! KM*+n(k)=2. In its present form the paper was written while the authors were members of the Institute for Advanced* * or the norm quadric associated with the symbol a_. Denote by k(Qa_) the function field of Qa_and by (Qa_)0

  3. Eleutherodactylus discoidalis BOLIVIA: Departamento Tarija: 12.3 km NW of Entre

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Castoe, Todd A.

    Eleutherodactylus discoidalis BOLIVIA: Departamento Tarija: 12.3 km NW of Entre Ri´os, on the road to Tarija, MNK-A 3877­97. Eleutherodactylus ibischi BOLIVIA: Departamento Santa Cruz: Km 68.5 on Santa Cruz- Samaipata road, MNK-A 6612. Eleutherodactylus zongoensis BOLIVIA: Departamento La Paz: Valle de Zongo, 1250

  4. Deactivation & Decommissioning Knowledge Management Information Tool (D&D KM-IT)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Deactivation and Decommissioning Knowledge Management Information Tool (D&D KM-IT) serves as a centralized repository providing a common interface for all D&D related activities.

  5. Comparison And Discussion Of The 6 Km Temperature Maps Of The...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Discussion Of The 6 Km Temperature Maps Of The Western Us Prepared By The Smu Geothermal Lab And The Usgs Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library...

  6. Wind: wind power density GIS data at 50m above ground and 1km...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    GIS ... Dataset Activity Stream Wind: wind power density GIS data at 50m above ground and 1km resolution for Ghana from NREL (Abstract):  Raster GIS data, exported as BIL...

  7. atmosphere 0-70 km: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ramps the 2 Tesla superconducting magnets at 9 Hz every 0.4 seconds, uses 250 GV of superconduct... Summers, D J; Datta, A; Duraisamy, M; Luo, T; Lyons, G T 2012-01-01 100 A 233 km...

  8. CCRS Landcover Maps From Satellite Data

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Trishchenko, Alexander

    The Canadian Centre for Remote Sensing (CCRS) presents several landcover maps over the SGP CART site area (32-40N, 92-102W) derived from satellite data including AVHRR, MODIS, SPOT vegetation data, and Landsat satellite TM imagery.

  9. Distribution of Time-Energy Entanglement over 100 km fiber using superconducting single-photon detectors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Qiang Zhang; Hiroki Takesue; Sae Woo Nam; Carsten Langrock; Xiuping Xie; M. M. Fejer; Yoshihisa Yamamoto

    2007-12-25T23:59:59.000Z

    In this letter, we report an experimental realization of distributing entangled photon pairs over 100 km of dispersion-shifted fiber. In the experiment, we used a periodically poled lithium niobate waveguide to generate the time-energy entanglement and superconducting single-photon detectors to detect the photon pairs after 100 km. We also demonstrate that the distributed photon pairs can still be useful for quantum key distribution and other quantum communication tasks.

  10. Satellite Radio: Its Global Impact

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Udgaonkar, Jayant B.

    Satellite Radio: Its Global Impact TIFR Alumni Lecture By S.Rangarajan #12;1 A wonder called RADIO "No wonder so many physicists started as radio tinkers, and no wonder, before physicist became on Richard Feynmann We will stick to the definition of Radio as · Wireless Audio Delivery ·Listener cannot

  11. Satellite Meteorology and Climatology Division Roadmap

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kuligowski, Bob

    Satellite Meteorology and Climatology Division Roadmap NOAA NESDIS Center for Satellite Applications and Research #12;SMCD Roadmap 2 NOAA/NESDIS/STAR Satellite Meteorology and Climatology Division Roadmap September 2005 NOAA Science Center, 5200 Auth Road, Room 712, Camp Springs, MD 20746 #12;SMCD

  12. 100 km secure differential phase shift quantum key distribution with low jitter up-conversion detectors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eleni Diamanti; Hiroki Takesue; Carsten Langrock; M. M. Fejer; Yoshihisa Yamamoto

    2006-08-13T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a quantum key distribution experiment in which keys that were secure against all individual eavesdropping attacks allowed by quantum mechanics were distributed over 100 km of optical fiber. We implemented the differential phase shift quantum key distribution protocol and used low timing jitter 1.55 um single-photon detectors based on frequency up-conversion in periodically poled lithium niobate waveguides and silicon avalanche photodiodes. Based on the security analysis of the protocol against general individual attacks, we generated secure keys at a practical rate of 166 bit/s over 100 km of fiber. The use of the low jitter detectors also increased the sifted key generation rate to 2 Mbit/s over 10 km of fiber.

  13. On the Penetration of the 660 km Phase Change by Mantle Downflows

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    in an upward force which resists the passage of the downwelling through the phase change. Cold material piles up and spreads lat- erally on the phase-change boundary. Eventu- ally, enough cold materialOn the Penetration of the 660 km Phase Change by Mantle Downflows David Bercovici Department

  14. 21 Nordic Seminar on Computational Mechanics T. Kvamsdal, K.M. Mathisen and B. Pettersen (Eds)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McLachlan, Robert

    ). A B-series for the system y = f(y) is a formal series in powers of the step size h and in terms 121 Nordic Seminar on Computational Mechanics NSCM-21 T. Kvamsdal, K.M. Mathisen and B. Pettersen symmetric integration methods) versus the preservation of symplecticity. 1 INTRODUCTION Given the system

  15. Subsidence in the Michigan basin produced ~5 km of sedimentation over a period of more

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ABSTRACT Subsidence in the Michigan basin produced ~5 km of sedimentation over a period of more a plate tectonic framework for the his- tory of the Michigan basin. INTRODUCTION The Michigan basin of the Michigan basin has led to numerous proposals for basin subsidence mechanisms, including thermal contraction

  16. Large-scale (100s km) distributions of tuna larvae (family Scombridae), par-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    abundance and fecundity of T. albacares (yellowfin tuna) and K. pelamis (skipjack tuna) in the western. pelamis larvae. Other possible explanations, however, are that previous sampling scales of 100s km between waters (Miller, 1979), and Thunnus spp. and K. pelamis larvae were up to 100 times more concentrated

  17. Net Carbon Flux from US Croplands at 1km2 Resolution.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Net Carbon Flux from US Croplands at 1km2 Resolution. This estimate includes all on-site sources and sinks of carbon Agronomic Feedstock Production and Environmental Impact Analyses ORNL uses high-resolution projections of feedstock production in analyses of soil carbon change, soil erosion, energy use, net

  18. Mode-Locking in 25-km Fibre Laser , S.Turitsyn

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kobtsev, Sergei M.

    generation of ultra-short optical pulses with high energy. The extension of the cavity lengthMode-Locking in 25-km Fibre Laser A.Ivanenko (1,2) , S.Turitsyn (1) , S.Kobsev (2) , M.Dubov (1) (1) Photonics Research Group, Aston University, UK, s.k.turitsyn@aston.ac.uk (2) Laser Systems Laboratory

  19. Satellite Ecology: The Dearth of Environment Dependence

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Frank C. van den Bosch; Anna Pasquali; Xiaohu Yang; H. J. Mo; Simone Weinmann; Daniel H. McIntosh; Daniel Aquino

    2008-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Using the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) galaxy group catalogue of Yang et al. (2007), we study the average colour and average concentration of satellite galaxies as function of (i) their stellar mass, (ii) their group mass, and (iii) their group-centric radius. We find that the colours and concentrations of satellite galaxies are (almost) completely determined by their stellar mass. In particular, at fixed stellar mass, the average colours and concentrations of satellite galaxies are independent of either halo mass or halo-centric radius. We find clear evidence for mass segregation of satellite galaxies in haloes of all masses, and argue that this explains why satellites at smaller halo-centric radii are somewhat redder and somewhat more concentrated. In addition, the weak colour and concentration dependence of satellite galaxies on halo mass is simply a reflection of the fact that more massive haloes host, on average, more massive satellites. Combining these results with the fact that satellite galaxies are, on average, redder and somewhat more concentrated than central galaxies of the same stellar mass, the following picture emerges: galaxies become redder and somewhat more concentrated once they fall into a bigger halo (i.e., once they become a satellite galaxy). This is a clear manifestation of environment dependence. However, there is no indication that the magnitude of the transformation (or its timescale) depends on environment; a galaxy undergoes a transition when it becomes a satellite, but it does not matter whether it becomes a satellite of a small (Milky Way sized) halo, or of a massive cluster. We discuss the implication of this `dearth' of environment dependence for the physical processes responsible for transforming satellite galaxies.

  20. Dynamics of the Galaxy's Satellites

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    James Binney

    2000-06-28T23:59:59.000Z

    The Milky Way's satellites provide unique information about the density of the Galactic halo at large radii. The inclusion of even a few rather inaccurate proper motions resolves an ambiguity in older mass estimates in favour of higher values. Many of the satellites are concentrated into streams. The dynamics of the Magellanic Stream provided an early indication that the halo reaches out to beyond 100 kpc. Tidal forces between the Clouds are currently disturbing the Clouds' internal dynamics. One would expect this damage to worsen rapidly as the tidal field of the MW excites the eccentricity of the Clouds' mutual orbit. This process, which has yet to be completely modelled, is important for understanding the degree of self-lensing in searches for gravitational lensing events. The Sagittarius Dwarf galaxy very likely contributes significantly to the Galactic warp. The direction of the warp's line of nodes is incorrectly predicted by the simplest models of the Dwarf's orbit. More sophisticated models, in which a complex distribution of stripped dark matter is predicted, may be more successful.

  1. Four-neutrino analysis of 1.5km-baseline reactor antineutrino oscillations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kang, Sin Kyu; Ko, Young-Ju; Siyeon, Kim

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The masses of sterile neutrinos are not yet known, and depending on the orders of magnitudes, their existence may explain reactor anomalies or the spectral shape of reactor neutrino events at 1.5km-baseline detector. Here, we present four-neutrino analysis of the results announced by RENO and Daya Bay, which performed the definitive measurements of $\\theta_{13}$ based on the disappearance of reactor antineutrinos at km-order baselines. Our results using 3+1 scheme include the exclusion curve of $\\Delta m^2_{41}$ vs. $\\theta_{14}$ and the adjustment of $\\theta_{13}$ due to correlation with $\\theta_{14}$. The value of $\\theta_{13}$ obtained by RENO and Daya Bay with a three-neutrino oscillation analysis is included in the $1\\sigma$ interval of $\\theta_{13}$ allowed by our four-neutrino analysis.

  2. Four-neutrino analysis of 1.5km-baseline reactor antineutrino oscillations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sin Kyu Kang; Yeong-Duk Kim; Young-Ju Ko; Kim Siyeon

    2014-08-19T23:59:59.000Z

    The masses of sterile neutrinos are not yet known, and depending on the orders of magnitudes, their existence may explain reactor anomalies or the spectral shape of reactor neutrino events at 1.5km-baseline detector. Here, we present four-neutrino analysis of the results announced by RENO and Daya Bay, which performed the definitive measurements of $\\theta_{13}$ based on the disappearance of reactor antineutrinos at km-order baselines. Our results using 3+1 scheme include the exclusion curve of $\\Delta m^2_{41}$ vs. $\\theta_{14}$ and the adjustment of $\\theta_{13}$ due to correlation with $\\theta_{14}$. The value of $\\theta_{13}$ obtained by RENO and Daya Bay with a three-neutrino oscillation analysis is included in the $1\\sigma$ interval of $\\theta_{13}$ allowed by our four-neutrino analysis.

  3. Practical free-space quantum key distribution over 10 km in daylight and at night

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Richard J. Hughes; Jane E. Nordholt; Derek Derkacs; Charles G. Peterson

    2002-06-14T23:59:59.000Z

    We have demonstrated quantum key distribution (QKD) over a 10-km, 1-airmass atmospheric range during daylight and at night. Secret random bit sequences of the quality required for the cryptographic keys used to initialize secure communications devices were transferred at practical rates with realistic security. By identifying the physical parameters that determine the system's secrecy efficiency, we infer that free-space QKD will be practical over much longer ranges under these and other atmospheric and instrumental conditions.

  4. Hydrodynamic simulations of a combined hydrogen, helium thermonuclear runaway on a 10-km neutron star

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Starrfield, S.; Kenyon, S.; Truran, J.W.; Sparks, W.M.

    1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We have used a Lagrangian, hydrodynamic stellar-evolution computer code to evolve a thermonuclear runaway in the accreted hydrogen rich envelope of a 1.0M, 10-km neutron star. Our simulation produced an outburst which lasted about 2000 sec and peak effective temperature was 3 keV. The peak luminosity exceeded 2 x 10/sup 5/ L. A shock wave caused a precursor in the light curve which lasted 10/sup -5/ sec.

  5. Satellite Navigation Integrity Assurance: Lessons Learned

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stanford University

    Satellite Navigation Integrity Assurance: Lessons Learned from Hurricane Katrina ION GNSS 2008 by the FAA Satellite Navigation Program Office #12;17 September 2008 Lessons Learned from Hurricane Katrina 2 for probabilistic modeling and analysis #12;17 September 2008 Lessons Learned from Hurricane Katrina 3 Key Sources

  6. Satellite Eye for Galathea 3 -Slutrapport

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Satellite Eye for Galathea 3 - Slutrapport Charlotte Bay Hasager, Peter Brøgger Sørensen, Jacob L Abstract (in English) (max. 2000 char.): The Satellite Eye for Galathea 3 project started on the 10th March August 2006. The expedition lasted in total 256 days (8 months), and the Satelitte Eye project continued

  7. Capture of Irregular Satellites at Jupiter

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nesvorny, D; Deienno, R

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The irregular satellites of outer planets are thought to have been captured from heliocentric orbits. The exact nature of the capture process, however, remains uncertain. We examine the possibility that irregular satellites were captured from the planetesimal disk during the early Solar System instability when encounters between the outer planets occurred (Nesvorny, Vokrouhlicky & Morbidelli 2007, AJ 133; hereafter NVM07). NVM07 already showed that the irregular satellites of Saturn, Uranus and Neptune were plausibly captured during planetary encounters. Here we find that the current instability models present favorable conditions for capture of irregular satellites at Jupiter as well, mainly because Jupiter undergoes a phase of close encounters with an ice giant. We show that the orbital distribution of bodies captured during planetary encounters provides a good match to the observed distribution of irregular satellites at Jupiter. The capture efficiency for each particle in the original transplanetary d...

  8. Findings on rings and inner satellites of Saturn of Pioneer 11

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Van Allen, J.A.

    1982-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The introductory part of this paper gives a short account of the theory of absorption by planetary rings and satellites of energetic charged particles that are trapped in a planet's magnetic field and describes the observable consequences of such absorption processes. The previously published University of Iowa observations of absorption features during Pioneer 11's passage through Saturn's inner radiation belt on 1 September 1979 are critically reanalyzed and related to other evidence on rings and satellites inside 2.9 Saturn radii, especially that from the imaging system on Voyagers 1 and 2. It is found (a) that satellites 1979 S1, 1979 S2, and 1980 S3 are almost certainly identical (b) that the evidence for 1979 S4 is weak to nonexistent (c) that 1979 S5 and two other nearby absorption features and 1979 S6 and one other nearby absorption feature are probably caused by longitudinal and radial structure of Ring F and not by satellites and (d) that absorption feature 1979 S3 at 169,200 + or - 600 km is identified with the optically observed Ring G.

  9. Relationship between satellite-derived vegetation indices and aircraft-based CO2 measurements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cihlar, J.; Caramori, P.H.; Schuepp, P.H.; Desjardins, R.L.; Macpherson, J.I. (Canada Centre for Remote Sensing, Ottawa (Canada) McGill Univ., Montreal (Canada) Agriculture Canada, Centre for Land and Biological Resources Research, Ottawa (Canada) National Research Council of Canada, Inst. for Aerospace Research, Ottawa (Canada))

    1992-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this study was to analyze the relationship between satellite-derived vegetation indices and CO2 uptake, as an initial step in exploring the possibility of using a satellite-derived vegetation index as a measure of net photosynthesis. The study area included the First International Satellite Land Surface Climatology Project (ISLSCP) Field Experiment (FIFE) site located on the Konza prairie and adjacent area as well as a transect between Manhattan and Salina. One third of the transect exhibited vegetation and terrain characteristics similar to those on the FIFE site, whereas cultivated land predominated in the remaining portion of the 75-km-long flight line. In June, July, August, and October 1987, several CO2 data sets were obtained using the National Research Council of Canada's Twin Otter research aircraft. The normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI) and the simple ratio (SR) were computed from NOAA AVHRR data acquired as part of FIFE. Aircraft and satellite data were processed to obtain spatially coincident and locally representative flux values. Results show a linear relationship between NDVI and CO2 uptake during a single day; however, a nonlinear relationship emerged when all data sets were combined. The data from FIFE and the regional transect were consistent for one date but differed for other periods. Overall, about 60 percent of total variability in CO2 flux was accounted for by the NDVI and 74 percent by the SR. 14 refs.

  10. Gas Shepherding by an Infalling Satellite

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    P. Chang

    2008-05-22T23:59:59.000Z

    I calculate the action of a satellite, infalling through dynamical friction, on a coplanar gaseous disk of finite radial extent. The disk tides, raised by the infalling satellite, couple the satellite and disk. Dynamical friction acting on the satellite then shrinks the radius of the coupled satellite-disk system. Thus, the gas is ``shepherded'' to smaller radii. In addition, gas shepherding produces a large surface density enhancement at the disk edge. If the disk edge then becomes gravitationally unstable and fragments, it may give rise to enhanced star formation. On the other hand, if the satellite is sufficiently massive and dense, the gas may be transported from $\\sim 100$ pc to inside of a 10 to 10s of parsecs before completely fragmenting into stars. I argue that gas shepherding may drive the fueling of active galaxies and central starbursts and I compare this scenario to competing scenarios. I argue that sufficiently large and dense super star clusters (acting as the shepherding satellites) can shepherd a gas disk down to ten to tens of parsecs. Inside of ten to tens of parsecs, another mechanism may operate, i.e., cloud-cloud collisions or a marginally (gravitationally) stable disk, that drives the gas $\\lesssim 1$ pc, where it can be viscously accreted, feeding a central engine.

  11. Quantum key distribution over 25 km with an all-fiber continuous-variable system

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jerome Lodewyck; Matthieu Bloch; Raul Garcia-Patron; Simon Fossier; Evgueni Karpov; Eleni Diamanti; Thierry Debuisschert; Nicolas J. Cerf; Rosa Tualle-Brouri; Steven W. McLaughlin; Philippe Grangier

    2007-09-04T23:59:59.000Z

    We report on the implementation of a reverse-reconciliated coherent-state continuous-variable quantum key distribution system, with which we generated secret keys at a rate of more than 2 kb/s over 25 km of optical fiber. Time multiplexing is used to transmit both the signal and phase reference in the same optical fiber. Our system includes all experimental aspects required for a field implementation of a quantum key distribution setup. Real-time reverse reconciliation is achieved by using fast and efficient LDPC error correcting codes.

  12. A 24 km fiber-based discretely signaled continuous variable quantum key distribution system

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Quyen Dinh Xuan; Zheshen Zhang; Paul L. Voss

    2009-10-06T23:59:59.000Z

    We report a continuous variable key distribution system that achieves a final secure key rate of 3.45 kb/sec over a distance of 24.2 km of optical fiber. The protocol uses discrete signaling and post-selection to improve reconciliation speed and quantifies security by means of quantum state tomography. Polarization multiplexing and a frequency translation scheme permit transmission of a continuous wave local oscillator and suppression of noise from guided acoustic wave Brillouin scattering by more than 27 dB.

  13. Quantum key distribution over 25 km with an all-fiber continuous-variable system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lodewyck, Jerome; Fossier, Simon [Thales Research and Technologies, RD 128, 91767 Palaiseau Cedex (France); Laboratoire Charles Fabry de l'Institut d'Optique-CNRS-Universite Paris-Sud, Campus Polytechnique, RD 128, 91127 Palaiseau Cedex (France); Bloch, Matthieu; McLaughlin, Steven W. [GeorgiaTech-CNRS UMI 2958, 2-3 rue Marconi, 57070 Metz (France); Garcia-Patron, Raul; Karpov, Evgueni; Cerf, Nicolas J. [Centre for Quantum Information and Communication, Ecole Polytechnique, CP 165/59, Universite libre de Bruxelles, 50 av. F. D. Roosevelt, B-1050 Brussels (Belgium); Diamanti, Eleni; Tualle-Brouri, Rosa; Grangier, Philippe [Laboratoire Charles Fabry de l'Institut d'Optique-CNRS-Universite Paris-Sud, Campus Polytechnique, RD 128, 91127 Palaiseau Cedex (France); Debuisschert, Thierry [Thales Research and Technologies, RD 128, 91767 Palaiseau Cedex (France)

    2007-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We report on the implementation of a reverse-reconciliated coherent-state continuous-variable quantum key distribution system, with which we generated secret keys at a rate of more than 2 kb/s over 25 km of optical fiber. Time multiplexing is used to transmit both the signal and phase reference in the same optical fiber. Our system includes all experimental aspects required for a field implementation of a quantum key distribution setup. Real-time reverse reconciliation is achieved by using fast and efficient low-density parity check error correcting codes.

  14. Time-resolved particle velocity measurements at impact velocities of 10 km/s

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Furnish, M.D.; Chhabildas, L.C.; Reinhart, W.D.

    1998-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Hypervelocity launch capabilities (9--16 km/s) with macroscopic plates have become available in recent years. It is now feasible to conduct instrumented plane-wave tests using this capability. Successfully conducting such tests requires a planar launch and impact at hypervelocities, appropriate triggering for recording systems, and time-resolved measurements of motion or stress at a particular point or set of points within the target or projectile during impact. The authors have conducted the first time-resolved wave-profile experiments using velocity interferometric techniques at impact velocities of 10 km/s. These measurements show that aluminum continues to exhibit normal release behavior to 161 GPa shock pressure, with complete loss of strength of the shocked state. These experiments have allowed a determination of shock-wave window transparency in conditions produced by a hypervelocity impact. In particular, lithium fluoride appears to lose transparency at a shock stress of 200 GPa; this appears to be the upper limit for conventional wave profile measurements using velocity interferometric techniques.

  15. Daymet: Daily Surface Weather Data on a 1-km Grid for North America, Version 2.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thornton, Peter E [ORNL; Thornton, Michele M [ORNL; Mayer, Benjamin W [ORNL; Wilhelmi, Nate [National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR); Wei, Yaxing [ORNL; Devarakonda, Ranjeet [ORNL; Cook, Robert B [ORNL

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    More information: http://daymet.ornl.gov Presenter: Ranjeet Devarakonda Environmental Sciences Division Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Daymet: Daily Surface Weather Data and Climatological Summaries provides gridded estimates of daily weather parameters for North America, including daily continuous surfaces of minimum and maximum temperature, precipitation occurrence and amount, humidity, shortwave radiation, snow water equivalent, and day length. The current data product (Version 2) covers the period January 1, 1980 to December 31, 2013 [1]. The prior product (Version 1) only covered from 1980-2008. Data are available on a daily time step at a 1-km x 1-km spatial resolution in Lambert Conformal Conic projection with a spatial extent that covers the conterminous United States, Mexico, and Southern Canada as meteorological station density allows. Daymet data can be downloaded from 1) the ORNL Distributed Active Archive Center (DAAC) search and order tools (http://daac.ornl.gov/cgi-bin/cart/add2cart.pl?add=1219) or directly from the DAAC FTP site (http://daac.ornl.gov/cgi-bin/dsviewer.pl?ds_id=1219) and 2) the Single Pixel Tool [2] and THREDDS (Thematic Real-time Environmental Data Services) Data Server [3]. The Single Pixel Data Extraction Tool allows users to enter a single geographic point by latitude and longitude in decimal degrees. A routine is executed that translates the (lon, lat) coordinates into projected Daymet (x,y) coordinates. These coordinates are used to access the Daymet database of daily-interpolated surface weather variables. Daily data from the nearest 1 km x 1 km Daymet grid cell are extracted from the database and formatted as a table with one column for each Daymet variable and one row for each day. All daily data for selected years are returned as a single (long) table, formatted for display in the browser window. At the top of this table is a link to the same data in a simple comma-separated text format, suitable for import into a spreadsheet or other data analysis software. The Single Pixel Data Extraction Tool also provides the option to download multiple coordinates programmatically. A multiple extractor script is freely available to download at http://daymet.ornl.gov/files/daymet.zip. The ORNL DAAC s THREDDS data server (TDS) provides customized visualization and access to Daymet time series of North American mosaics. Users can subset and download Daymet data via a variety of community standards, including OPeNDAP, NetCDF Subset service, and Open Geospatial Consortium (OGC) Web Map/Coverage Service. The ORNL DAAC TDS also exposes Daymet metadata through its ncISO service to facilitate harvesting Daymet metadata records into 3rd party catalogs. References: [1] Thornton, P.E., M.M. Thornton, B.W. Mayer, N. Wilhelmi, Y. Wei, R. Devarakonda, and R.B. Cook. 2014. Daymet: Daily Surface Weather Data on a 1-km Grid for North America, Version 2. Data set. Available on-line [http://daac.ornl.gov] from Oak Ridge National Laboratory Distributed Active Archive Center, Oak Ridge, Tennessee, USA. [2] Devarakonda R., et al. 2012. Daymet: Single Pixel Data Extraction Tool. Available on-line [http://daymet.ornl.go/singlepixel.html]. [3] Wei Y., et al. 2014. Daymet: Thematic Real-time Environmental Data Services. Available on-line [http://daymet.ornl.gov/thredds_tiles.html].

  16. NASA Launches New Earth Observation Satellite

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Christian, Eric

    Goddard View The Weekly ­ 2 NASA Launches New Earth Observation Satellite ­ 3 3-D printing Creates Complex free online access to the information. This revolution has al- lowed scientists to detect changes over

  17. Emerging trends in the satellite industry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Salazar, Vagn Knudsen

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Risk aversion in the satellite industry has fostered long development cycles and low rates of innovation in the past. Emerging trends in propulsion technology development and spacecraft architecture design could lead to ...

  18. Synthetic Aperture Radar Interferometry with 3 satellites

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wong, Wallace D. (Wallace Dazheng)

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Our study investigates interferometric SAR (InSAR) post-processing height retrieval techniques. We explore the possible improvements by adding a third satellite to the two already in orbit, and examine some potential uses ...

  19. Dynamics and control of electromagnetic satellite formations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ahsun, Umair, 1972-

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Satellite formation flying is an enabling technology for many space missions, especially for space-based telescopes. Usually there is a tight formation-keeping requirement that may need constant expenditure of fuel or at ...

  20. MFR PAPER 1230 Finding Fish With Satellites

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    sensors, fishing vessels , spotter pilots, research vessels, and offshore oil platforms were used Investigation? A. It is an attempt to find out if satellites can help fishermen find fish. Our assumption

  1. Deep sea tests of a prototype of the KM3NeT digital optical module

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Adrián-Martínez, S; Aharonian, F; Aiello, S; Albert, A; Ameli, F; Anassontzis, E G; Anghinolfi, M; Anton, G; Anvar, S; Ardid, M; de Asmundis, R; Band, H; Barbarino, G; Barbarito, E; Barbato, F; Baret, B; Baron, S; Belias, A; Berbee, E; Berg, A M van den; Berkien, A; Bertin, V; Beurthey, S; van Beveren, V; Beverini, N; Biagi, S; Bianucci, S; Billault, M; Birbas, A; Rookhuizen, H Boer; Bormuth, R; Bouche, V; Bouhadef, B; Bourlis, G; Bouwhuis, M; Bozza, C; Bruijn, R; Brunner, J; Cacopardo, G; Caillat, L; Calamai, M; Calvo, D; Capone, A; Caramete, L; Caruso, F; Cecchini, S; Ceres, A; Cereseto, R; Champion, C; Chateau, F; Chiarusi, T; Christopoulou, B; Circella, M; Classen, L; Cocimano, R; Colonges, S; Coniglione, R; Cosquer, A; Costa, M; Coyle, P; Creusot, A; Curtil, C; Cuttone, G; D'Amato, C; D'Amico, A; De Bonis, G; De Rosa, G; Deniskina, N; Destelle, J -J; Distefano, C; Donzaud, C; Dornic, D; Dorosti-Hasankiadeh, Q; Drakopoulou7, E; Drouhin, D; Drury, L; Durand, D; Eberl, T; Eleftheriadis, C; Elsaesser, D; Enzenhofer, A; Fermani, P; Fusco, L A; Gajana, D; Gal, T; Galata, S; Gallo, F; Garufi, F; Gebyehu, M; Giordano, V; Gizani, N; Ruiz, R Gracia; Graf, K; Grasso, R; Grella, G; Grmek, A; Habel, R; van Haren, H; Heid, T; Heijboer, A; Heine, E; Henry, S; Hernandez-Rey, J J; Herold, B; Hevinga, M A; van der Hoek, M; Hofestadt, J; Hogenbirk, J; Hugon, C; Hosl, J; Imbesi, M; James, C; Jansweijer, P; Jochum, J; de Jong, M; Kadler, M; Kalekin, O; Kappes, A; Kappos, E; Katz, U; Kavatsyuk, O; Keller, P; Kieft, G; Koffeman, E; Kok, H; Kooijman, P; Koopstra, J; Korporaal, A; Kouchner, A; Koutsoukos, S; Kreykenbohm, I; Kulikovskiy, V; Lahmann, R; Lamare, P; Larosa, G; Lattuada, D; Provost, H Le; Leisos, A; Lenis, D; Leonora, E; Clark, M Lindsey; Liolios, A; Alvarez, C D Llorens; Lohner, H; Presti, D Lo; Louis, F; Maccioni, E; Mannheim, K; Manolopoulos, K; Margiotta, A; Maris, O; Markou, C; Martinez-Mora, J A; Martini, A; Masullo, R; Michael, T; Migliozzi, P; Migneco, E; Miraglia, A; Mollo, C; Mongelli, M; Morganti, M; Mos, S; Moudden, Y; Musico, P; Musumeci, M; Nicolaou, C; Nicolau, C A; Orlando, A; Orzelli, A; Papageorgiou, K; Papaikonomou, A; Papaleo, R; Pavalas, G E; Peek, H; Pellegrino, C; Pellegriti, M G; Perrina, C; Petridou, C; Piattelli, P; Popa, V; Pradier, Th; Priede, M; Puhlhofer, G; Pulvirenti, S; Racca, C; Raffaelli, F; Randazzo, N; Rapidis, P A; Razis, P; Real, D; Resvanis, L; Reubelt, J; Riccobene, G; Rovelli, A; Royon, J; Saldana, M; Samtleben, D F E; Sanguineti, M; Santangelo, A; Sapienza, P; Savvidis, I; Schmelling, J; Schnabel, J; Sedita, M; Seitz, T; Sgura, I; Simeone, F; Siotis, I; Sipala, V; Solazzo, M; Spitaleri, A; Spurio, M; Steijger, J; Stolarczyk, T; Stransky, D; Taiuti, M; Terreni, G; Tezier, D; Theraube, S; Thompson, L F; Timmer, P; Trapierakis, H I; Trasatti, L; Trovato, A; Tselengidou, M; Tsirigotis, A; Tzamarias, S; Tzamariudaki, E; Vallage, B; Van Elewyck, V; Vermeulen, J; Vernin, P; Viola, S; Vivolo, D; Werneke, P; Wiggers, L; Wilms, J; de Wolf, E; van Wooning, R H L; Yatkin, K; Zachariadou, K; Zonca, E; Zornoza, J D; Zúñiga, J; Zwart, A

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The first prototype of a photo-detection unit of the future KM3NeT neutrino telescope has been deployed in the deep waters of the Mediterranean Sea. This digital optical module has a novel design with a very large photocathode area segmented by the use of 31 three inch photomultiplier tubes. It has been integrated in the ANTARES detector for in-situ testing and validation. This paper reports on the first months of data taking and rate measurements. The analysis results highlight the capabilities of the new module design in terms of background suppression and signal recognition. The directionality of the optical module enables the recognition of multiple Cherenkov photons from the same $^{40}$K decay and the localization bioluminescent activity in the neighbourhood. The single unit can cleanly identify atmospheric muons and provide sensitivity to the muon arrival directions.

  2. Determination of wind from Nimbus-6 satellite sounding data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carle, William Everett

    1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    -level and surface wind fields from Nimbus-6 satellite sounding data are developed. These methods are evaluated by comparing satellite-derived and rawinsonde wind fields on gridded constant-pressure charts in four geographical regions. Satellite... interpolated to correspond in time to the satellite pass. Wind direction was interpolated through the smaller angle. t. d ttt' fplt*t' l~h' ht dg t th' ' d Fields of geopotential height were computed from gridded satellite data by integrating...

  3. Interpreting Energy and Tracer Spectra of Upper-Ocean Turbulence in the Submesoscale Range (1–200 km)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ferrari, Raffaele

    Submesoscale (1–200 km) wavenumber spectra of kinetic and potential energy and tracer variance are obtained from in situ observations in the Gulf Stream region and in the eastern subtropical North Pacific. In the Gulf ...

  4. Practical Point-to-Point Free-Space Quantum Key Distribution over 1/2 KM

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Buttler, W.T.; Hughes, R.J.; Kwiat, P.G.; Lamoreaux, S.K.; Morgan, G.L.; Peterson, C.G.

    1999-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We have demonstrated point-to-point single-photon quantum key distribution (QKD) over a free-space optical path of {approximately}475 m under daylight conditions. This represents an increase of >1,000 times farther than any reported point-to-point demonstration, and >6 times farther than the previous folded path daylight demonstration. We expect to extend the daylight range to 2 km or more within the next few months. A brief description of the system is given here. The QKD transmitter, a.k.a. ''Alice'' (Fig. 1), consists of three thermoelectrically cooled diode lasers, a single interference filter (IF), two optical attenuators, two linear polarizers, two non-polarization beam-splitters (BSs), and a 27x beam expander. The two data-lasers' (dim-lasers') wavelengths are temperature controlled and constrained by the IF to {approximately}773 {+-} 0.5 nm, while the transmitted wavelength of the bright-laser (timing-laser) is {approximately}768 nm; the data-lasers are configured to emit a weak pulse of approximately 1 ns duration. The transmitter incorporates no active polarization switching--a first in QKD.

  5. A simple theory of cloud spreading at ranges from 1-2000 km

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gifford, F.A.

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Examples support the conclusion that cloud or plume spreading in the troposphere proceeds rapidly and rather steadily for times on the order of a day or two and to distances of several hundreds of kilometers. Subsequently, possibly after a transition to the asymptotic rate of relative diffusion, the cloud begins to develop a streaky structure under the influence of the large-scale, enstrophy-cascade range of motions. The GASP spectra indicate that the transition between these two modes of spreading begins at several hundred kilometers ad is well developed by about 1000 km, in terms of spectral wavelength. The cloud streaks and patches elongate rapidly, evidently at the exponential rate, but spread laterally more slowly, at a rate that represents the effects of the conservation of cloud area under large-scale deformation and the lateral diffusion at the asymptotic rate. Although this relative diffusion occurs at a comparatively slow rate, it is very effective in reducing cloud concentrations in combination with the rapid, large-scale cloud stretching by the 2-D, enstrophy-cascade range eddies. The LANL heavy-methane cloud data indicate that the net result is very rapid decay of cloud concentration, apparently at an exponential rate.

  6. Soviet satellite communications science and technology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Birch, J.N.; Campanella, S.J.; Gordon, G.D.; McElroy, D.R.; Pritchard, W.L.; Stamminger, R.

    1991-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This is a report by six US scientists and engineers concerning the current state of the art and projections of future Soviet satellite communications technologies. The panel members are experts in satellite stabilization, spacecraft environments, space power generation, launch systems, spacecraft communications sciences and technologies, onboard processing, ground stations, and other technologies that impact communications. The panel assessed the Soviet ability to support high-data-rate space missions at 128 Mbps by evaluating current and projected Soviet satellite communications technologies. A variety of space missions were considered, including Earth-to-Earth communications via satellites in geostationary or highly elliptical orbits, those missions that require space-to-Earth communications via a direct path and those missions that require space-to-Earth communications via a relay satellite. Soviet satellite communications capability, in most cases, is 10 years behind that of the United States and other industrialized nations. However, based upon an analysis of communications links needed to support these missions using current Soviet capabilities, it is well within the current Soviet technology to support certain space missions outlined above at rates of 128 Mbps or higher, although published literature clearly shows that the Soviet Union has not exceeded 60 Mbps in its current space system. These analyses are necessary but not sufficient to determine mission data rates, and other technologies such as onboard processing and storage could limit the mission data rate well below that which could actually be supported via the communications links. Presently, the Soviet Union appears to be content with data rates in the low-Earth-orbit relay via geostationary mode of 12 Mbps. This limit is a direct result of power amplifier limits, spacecraft antenna size, and the utilization of K{sub u}-band frequencies. 91 refs., 16 figs., 15 tabs.

  7. Saturn's inner satellites: Orbits, masses, and the chaotic motion of atlas from new Cassini imaging observations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cooper, N. J.; Murray, C. D. [Astronomy Unit, School of Physics and Astronomy, Queen Mary University of London, Mile End Road, London, E1 4NS (United Kingdom); Renner, S. [Université Lille 1, Laboratoire d'Astronomie de Lille (LAL), 1 impasse de l'Observatoire, F-59000 Lille (France); Evans, M. W. [Department of Astronomy, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853 (United States)

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present numerically derived orbits and mass estimates for the inner Saturnian satellites, Atlas, Prometheus, Pandora, Janus, and Epimetheus from a fit to 2580 new Cassini Imaging Science Subsystem astrometric observations spanning 2004 February to 2013 August. The observations are provided as machine-readable and Virtual Observatory tables. We estimate GM{sub Atlas} = (0.384 ± 0.001) × 10{sup ?3} km{sup 3} s{sup ?2}, a value 13% smaller than the previously published estimate but with an order of magnitude reduction in the uncertainty. We also find GM{sub Prometheus} = (10.677 ± 0.006) × 10{sup ?3} km{sup 3} s{sup ?2}, GM{sub Pandora} = (9.133 ± 0.009) × 10{sup ?3} km{sup 3} s{sup ?2}, GM{sub Janus} = (126.51 ± 0.03) × 10{sup ?3} km{sup 3} s{sup ?2}, and GM{sub Epimetheus} = (35.110 ± 0.009) × 10{sup ?3} km{sup 3} s{sup ?2}, consistent with previously published values, but also with significant reductions in uncertainties. We show that Atlas is currently librating in both the 54:53 co-rotation-eccentricity resonance (CER) and the 54:53 inner Lindblad (ILR) resonance with Prometheus, making it the latest example of a coupled CER-ILR system, in common with the Saturnian satellites Anthe, Aegaeon, and Methone, and possibly Neptune's ring arcs. We further demonstrate that Atlas's orbit is chaotic, with a Lyapunov time of ?10 years, and show that its chaotic behavior is a direct consequence of the coupled resonant interaction with Prometheus, rather than being an indirect effect of the known chaotic interaction between Prometheus and Pandora. We provide an updated analysis of the second-order resonant perturbations involving Prometheus, Pandora, and Epimetheus based on the new observations, showing that these resonant arguments are librating only when Epimetheus is the innermost of the co-orbital pair, Janus and Epimetheus. We also find evidence that the known chaotic changes in the orbits of Prometheus and Pandora are not confined to times of apse anti-alignment.

  8. Regional Navigation System Using Geosynchronous Satellites and Stratospheric Airships

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Won, Chang-Hee

    - 1 - Regional Navigation System Using Geosynchronous Satellites and Stratospheric Airships Chang navigation system using geosynchronous satellites and stratospheric airships. One important factor and stratospheric airships for the urban areas. In the beginning stage, the system would augment the existing GPS

  9. Earthquake Damage Identification using High-Resolution Satellite

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shinozuka, Masanobu

    Earthquake Damage Identification using High-Resolution Satellite Images from the 2003 Northern & evaluation · High-resolution satellite imagery · Images from Boumerdes, Algeria · Semi-automated damage are most damaged? ­ Effects in less populated areas · Earthquake reconnaissance time wasted "looking

  10. Building High-Quality Climate Data Records from Operational Satellites

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kuligowski, Bob

    ;Implications to Construction of Satellite Climate Data Record · Well characterize the errors of satellite-A ATMS NOAA6-14 NOAA15-19 Suomi NPP MetOp-A/B FY

  11. Building technological capability within satellite programs in developing countries

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wood, Danielle Renee

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Global participation in space activity is growing as satellite technology matures and spreads. Countries in Africa, Asia and Latin America are creating or reinvigorating national satellite programs. These countries are ...

  12. Satellite Infrared Soundings From NOAA Spacecraft

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    NOAA Tec / Satellite Infrared Soundings From NOAA Spacecraft #12;U.S. DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE Infrared Soundings From NOAA Spacecraft L. M. McMillin D. Q. Wark J. M. Siomkajlo P. G. Abel A. Werbowetzki. E. Bittner C. M. Hayden #12;UDC 551.507.362.2:551.508.2:551.501.7:535-1 Physics Infrared radiation

  13. Satellite Observations towards the Agriculture applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Satellite Observations towards the Agriculture applications Osamu Ochiai Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency #12;7/30/2006 IGARSS_2006 Integrated Systems for Agriculture 2 Convergence of Evidence, All Gov't Policy Makers Reference Model: USDA Foreign Agricultural Service PECAD:Production Estimates

  14. Satellite Navigation in Vietnam & The NAVIS Centre

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sekercioglu, Y. Ahmet

    Satellite Navigation in Vietnam & The NAVIS Centre TA HAI TUNG (PhD) NAVIS CentreKme predefined incidents occurring; or each 30 s #12;"The mission of Navis is to boost, in South-East Asia." hcp://navis.hust.edu.vn #12;(Source: Mul,-GNSS Asia) #12;Milestones

  15. NASA Launches Next-Generation Communications Satellite

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Christian, Eric

    .nasa.gov Volume 9 Issue 1 February 2013 #12;T he first of NASA's three next-generation Tracking and Data Relay Space Launch Complex-41. After a three-month test phase, NASA will accept the spacecraft for additional rocket blasts off from Space Launch Complex-41 with NASA's Tracking and Data Relay Satellite (TDRS

  16. Satellite Tagging and Cardiac Physiology Reveal Niche

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Luther, Douglas S.

    the movements and habitats of most species are unknown. We used a satellite tag attached to the dorsal fin (SPOT), designed with a small Argos trans- mitter, that permits direct attachment to the shark_s dorsal fin (Fig. 1). This tag enables the tracking of sharks with near­real-time positions for multiple years

  17. Isolated Galaxies and Isolated Satellite Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ann, H B; Choi, Yun-Young

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We search for isolated galaxies using a volume-limited sample of galaxies with 0.02r_{vir,nei} and \\rho <\\bar{\\rho} well segregates the CIG galaxies. We confirm the morphology conformity between the host and their satellites, which suggests importance of hydrodynamic interaction among galaxies within their virial radii in galaxy evolution.

  18. Offshore wind resource assessment through satellite images

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 Slide no. 4 Offshore wind resource assessment through satellite images Charlotte Bay Hasager images for offshore wind ressource assessment in lieu of in-situ mast observations #12;4 Slide no Hasager, Dellwik, Nielsen and Furevik, 2004, Validation of ERS-2 SAR offshore wind-speed maps in the North

  19. SATELLITE SURVEILLANCE OF TROPICAL AND SUBTROPICAL CYCLONES 6.1. Satellites.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    directly from NOAAPORT, from NOAA's Environmental Satellite Processing Center (ESPC), or directly from GOES ESPC, the Internet, and other means such d as local networks. 6.1.1.1. GOES-13. GOES-13, launched May

  20. Characterizing switching problems in low earth orbit satellite constellations with satellite failures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wadsworth, Brandon Scott

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    . . F. Typical Paths G. Ground Cell Pass Off. H. ATM System I. Routing. J. Delay Analysis of the Network . 1. Connection between the Galapagos and Coastal Ecuador 2. Connection between the Galapagos and Interior Ecuador... from 18 inches in diameter to several meters. Solar panels and batteries power all of these satellites. B. GEO Services GEO satellites provide a variety of communication services, including telephone, TV, and data. When providing telephone service...

  1. Global coupling at 660 km is proposed to explain plate tectonics and the generation of the earth's magnetic field

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jozsef Garai

    2007-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

    The presence of low viscosity layers in the mantle is supported by line of geological and geophysical observations. Recent high pressure and temperature investigations indicated that partial carbonate melt should exist at the bottom of the lithosphere and at 660 km. The presence of few percent carbonate melt reduces the viscosity by several order of magnitude. The globally existing 660 km very low viscosity layer allows the development of differential rotation between the upper and lower mantle. This differential rotation between the 660 km outer shell and the rest of the earth offers a plausible explanation for plate tectonics and for the generation of the earth's magnetic field. Simple dynamo model is proposed, which able to reproduce all of the features of the contemporary and, within reasonable uncertainty, the paleomagnetic field. The model is also consistent with geological and geophysical observations.

  2. CIRES/NGDC Research Associate Satellite Sensor Systems Engineer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Colorado at Boulder, University of

    for Research in Environmental Sciences (CIRES) at the University of Colorado at Boulder has an immediate, Boulder, CO. This position is for a Satellite Sensor Systems Engineer within the NGDC Solar on the Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellites (GOES), Polar-orbiting Operational Environmental Satellites

  3. Satellite Eye for Galathea 3 Annual Report 2006

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Satellite Eye for Galathea 3 Annual Report 2006 Charlotte Bay Hasager, Peter Brøgger Sørensen, Leif Title: Satellite Eye for Galathea 3 Annual Report 2006 Department: Wind Energy Department Abstract (max. 2000 char.): ISSN 0106-2840 ISBN 978-87-550-3580-5 The Satellite Eye for Galathea 3 project

  4. Satellite Eye for Galathea 3 Annual Report 2007

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Satellite Eye for Galathea 3 Annual Report 2007 Charlotte Bay Hasager, Peter Brøgger Sørensen, Leif Nielsen, Roberto Saldo og René Møller Title: Satellite Eye for Galathea 3 Annual Report 2007 Department: Wind Energy Department Risø-R-1626(EN) March 2008 Abstract (max. 2000 char.): Satellite Eye

  5. Observing ocean heat content using satellite gravity and altimetry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jayne, Steven

    : ocean heat content, altimetry, satellite gravity, steric height, remote sensing Citation: Jayne, S. RObserving ocean heat content using satellite gravity and altimetry Steven R. Jayne1,2 and John M with satellite measurements of the Earth's time-varying gravity to give improved estimates of the ocean's heat

  6. A robot that walked 65 km on a single charge: energy-effective and reliable locomotion using trajectory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ruina, Andy L.

    PRE-PRINT A robot that walked 65 km on a single charge: energy-effective and reliable locomotion environment, that steps towards that goal. Ranger is essentially planar (rather than 3D); it has only 3 of 0.28). The high reliability and low energy use are achieved by: 1) development of an accurate bench

  7. Brillouin optical time-domain analysis over a 240 km-long fiber loop with no repeater

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thévenaz, Jacques

    Brillouin optical time-domain analysis over a 240 km-long fiber loop with no repeater Xabier Angulo.angulo@io.cfmac.csic.es; phone +34 915618806 ext.:222 ABSTRACT In this paper we combine the use of optical pulse coding and seeded second-order Raman amplification to extend the sensing distance of Brillouin optical time

  8. MASSIVE SATELLITES OF CLOSE-IN GAS GIANT EXOPLANETS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cassidy, Timothy A.; Johnson, Robert E. [Engineering Physics Program, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA 22904-4325 (United States); Mendez, Rolando; Arras, Phil; Skrutskie, Michael F., E-mail: tac2z@virginia.ed, E-mail: rem5d@cms.mail.virginia.ed, E-mail: arras@virginia.ed, E-mail: rej@virginia.ed, E-mail: mfs4n@virginia.ed [Department of Astronomy, University of Virginia, P.O. Box 400325, Charlottesville, VA 22904-4325 (United States)

    2009-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

    We study the orbits, tidal heating and mass loss from satellites around close-in gas giant exoplanets. The focus is on large satellites which are potentially observable by their transit signature. We argue that even Earth-size satellites around hot Jupiters can be immune to destruction by orbital decay; detection of such a massive satellite would strongly constrain theories of tidal dissipation in gas giants, in a manner complementary to orbital circularization. The star's gravity induces significant periodic eccentricity in the satellite's orbit. The resulting tidal heating rates, per unit mass, are far in excess of Io's and dominate radioactive heating out to planet orbital periods of months for reasonable satellite tidal Q. Inside planet orbital periods of about a week, tidal heating can completely melt the satellite. Lastly, we compute an upper limit to the satellite mass loss rate due to thermal evaporation from the surface, valid if the satellite's atmosphere is thin and vapor pressure is negligible. Using this upper limit, we find that although rocky satellites around hot Jupiters with orbital periods less than a few days can be significantly evaporated in their lifetimes, detectable satellites suffer negligible mass loss at longer orbital periods.

  9. Satellites in Discs: Regulating the Accretion Luminosity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dave Syer; Cathie Clarke

    1995-05-04T23:59:59.000Z

    We demonstrate, using a simple analytic model, that the presence of a massive satellite can globally modify the structure and emission properties of an accretion disc to which it is tidally coupled. We show, using two levels of numerical approximation, that the analytic model gives reasonable results. The results are applicable to two astrophysical situations. In the case of an active galactic nucleus, we consider the case of a $\\sim 10^3\\Msun$ compact companion to the central black-hole and show that it could modulate the emitted spectrum on a timescale of $\\sim10^5$ years. In the case of a T Tauri accretion disc, a satellite such as a sub-dwarf or giant planet could modify the disc spectral energy distribution over a substantial fraction of the T Tauri star lifetime.

  10. Satellite Threat Warning and Attack Reporting

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hilland, D. [Kirkland AFB, NM (United States). Air Force Research Lab.; Phipps, G. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States). Optics & Technologies Dept.; Jingle, C.; Newton, G. [Schafer Corp., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The Air Force Research Laboratory`s Satellite Threat Warning and Attack Reporting (STW/AR) program will provide technologies for advanced threat warning and reporting of radio frequency (RF) and laser threats. The STW/AR program objectives are: (a) develop cost- effective technologies to detect, identify, locate, characterize, and report attacks or interference against U.S. and Allied satellites. (b) demonstrate innovative, light-weight, low-power, laser and RF sensors. The program focuses on the demonstration of RF and laser sensors. The RF sensor effort includes the investigation of interferometric antenna arrays, multi-arm spiral and butler matrix antennas, wideband receivers, adaptive processors, and improved processing algorithms. The laser sensor effort includes the investigation of alternative detectors, broadband grating and optical designs, active pixel sensing, and improved processing algorithms.

  11. LBNL RUNAROUND RESULTS 3.00 km (1.86 mi) October 10, 2003 TOP GROUP STANDINGS FOR 2003

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    LBNL RUNAROUND RESULTS 3.00 km (1.86 mi) October 10, 2003 page 1 TOP GROUP STANDINGS FOR 2003 , Anton not LBNL 7 11:18.8 Singer, Brett C 30-39 men 3 8 11:20.2 Yegian, Derek 30-39 men 4 9 11:20.4 Nihei 45 13:26.9 card not turned in 46 13:27.4 Elliott, James B 30-39 men 18 #12;LBNL RUNAROUND RESULTS 3

  12. The international status of intelligence-collecting reconnaissance satellites

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gates, Brent Allen

    1972-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    THE INTERNATIONAL STATUS OF INTELLIGENCE- COLLECTING RECONNAISSANCE SATELLITES A Thesis by BRENT ALLEN GATES Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas ASH University in partial fulfillment of the requirement for the degree of i~STER OF ARTS...) (Member) (Member) May 1972 ABSTRACT The International Status of Intelligence-Collecting Reconnaissance Satellites. (Nay 1972) Brent Allen Gates, B. A. , University of Naryland. Directed by: Dr. Paul Van Riper Reconnaissance satellites are examined...

  13. Antarctica: measuring glacier velocity from satellite images

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lucchitta, B.K.; Ferguson, H.M.

    1986-11-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Many Landsat images of Antarctica show distinctive flow and crevasse features in the floating part of ice streams and outlet glaciers immediately below their grounding zones. Some of the features, which move with the glacier or ice stream, remain visible over many years and thus allow time-lapse measurements of ice velocities. Measurements taken from Landsat images of features on Byrd Glacier agree well with detailed ground and aerial observations. The satellite-image technique thus offers a rapid and cost-effective method of obtaining average velocities, to a first order of accuracy, of many ice streams and outlet glaciers near their termini.

  14. Satellite Data Assimilation forSatellite Data Assimilation for Naval Undersea CapabilityNaval Undersea Capability

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chu, Peter C.

    of satellite altimeters necessary to ensure maximum weapon effectiveness · To determine the point at which additional altimeter input no longer increases weapon effectiveness #12;Modular Ocean Data Assimilation for quantifying the effect on weapon presets #12;Environmental Fields · 2 MODAS data fields ­ one with assimilated

  15. atmospheric corrected satellite: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    DENSITY ESTIMATION USING SATELLITE PRECISION ORBIT EPHEMERIDES University of Kansas - KU ScholarWorks Summary: The current atmospheric density models are not capable...

  16. Designing Satellite Communication Networks by Zero-One Quadratic Programming

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Helme, Marcia P.

    In satellite communications networks, distinctive facilities called homing stations perform special transmission functions. Local demand nodes clustered around each homing station communicate with each other via a local ...

  17. artificial satellites: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    been carried out by two different groups of people combining artificial intelligence and artificial life techniques with those of virtual environments Luck, Michael 239 Satellite...

  18. atmosphere research satellite: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    remote sensing device), and airplane and satellite observations. Airplane based sensible heat flux Research. This national observatory accommodates numerous remote sensing and...

  19. Why baryons matter: The kinematics of dwarf spheroidal satellites

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brooks, Alyson M. [Department of Astronomy, University of Wisconsin-Madison, 475 North Charter Street, Madison, WI 53706 (United States); Zolotov, Adi, E-mail: abrooks@physics.rutgers.edu, E-mail: zolotov@physics.huji.ac.il [Racah Institute of Physics, The Hebrew University, Jerusalem 91904 (Israel)

    2014-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

    We use high-resolution cosmological simulations of Milky Way (MW) mass galaxies that include both baryons and dark matter (DM) to show that baryonic physics (energetic feedback from supernovae and subsequent tidal stripping) significantly reduces the DM mass in the central regions of luminous satellite galaxies. The reduced central masses of the simulated satellites reproduce the observed internal dynamics of MW and M31 satellites as a function of luminosity. We use these realistic satellites to update predictions for the observed velocity and luminosity functions of satellites around MW-mass galaxies when baryonic effects are accounted for. We also predict that field dwarf galaxies in the same luminosity range as the MW classical satellites should not exhibit velocities as low as the satellites because the field dwarfs do not experience tidal stripping. Additionally, the early formation times of the satellites compared to field galaxies at the same luminosity may be apparent in the star formation histories of the two populations. Including baryonic physics in cold dark matter (CDM) models naturally explains the observed low DM densities in the MWs dwarf spheroidal population. Our simulations therefore resolve the tension between kinematics predicted in CDM theory and observations of satellites, without invoking alternative forms of DM.

  20. Development of a composite satellite structure for FORTE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Grastataro, C.I.; Butler, T.A.; Smith, B.G.; Thompson, T.C.

    1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) in partnership with Composite Optics Incorporated (COI) has advanced the development of low-cost, lightweight, composite technology for use in small satellite structures, in this case, for the Fast On-Orbit Recording of Transient Events (FORTE) satellite mission. The use of advanced composites in space applications is well developed, but the application of an all-composite satellite structure has not been achieved until now. This paper investigates the application of composite technology in the design of an all-composite spacecraft structure for small satellites. Engineering analysis and test results obtained from the development of the spacecraft engineering model are also presented.

  1. Remote Detection Of Quaternary Borate Deposits With Aster Satellite...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Conference Paper: Remote Detection Of Quaternary Borate Deposits With Aster Satellite Imagery As A Geothermal...

  2. An analysis of the properties of VAS satellite soundings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rhodes, Robert Charles

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    not help to better simulate the satellite profile. The satellite sounding's smoothing seems to be more dependent on the vertical smoothing than it is on the horizontal smoothing, 300 300 . D rv / / I / I I / I I lfJ oI m 700 050 1 l... 26 Synoptic scale constant pressure charts at 700 mb for rawinsonde (top) and satellite (bottom) for 0300 GI'iT 7 Narch 1982. Synoptic scale constant pressure charts at 500 mb for rawinsonde (top) and satellite (bottom) for 0300 GNT 7 March 1982...

  3. Sundman Stability of Natural Planet Satellites

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lukyanov, L G

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The stability of the motion of the planet satellites is considered in the model of the general three-body problem (Sun-planet-satellite). "Sundman surfaces" are constructed, by means of which the concept "Sundman stability" is formulated. The comparison of the Sundman stability with the results of Golubev's c2h method and with the Hill's classical stability in the restricted three-body problem is performed. The constructed Sundman stability regions in the plane of the parameters "energy - moment of momentum" coincide with the analogous regions obtained by Golubev's method, with the value (c2h)cr. The construction of the Sundman surfaces in the three-dimensional space of the specially selected coordinates xyR is carried out by means of the exact Sundman inequality in the general three-body problem. The determination of the singular points of surfaces, the regions of the possible motion and Sundman stability analysis are implemented. It is shown that the singular points of the Sundman surfaces in the coordinate...

  4. Fast object detection for use onboard satellites

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Martin Bange; Stefan Jordan; Michael Biermann; Thomas Kaempke; R alf-Dieter Scholz

    2003-01-30T23:59:59.000Z

    We propose an object detection algorithm which is efficient and fast enough to be used in (almost) real time with the limited computer capacities onboard satellites. For stars below the saturation limit of the CCD detectors it is based on a four neighbourhood local maximum criterion in order to find the centre of a stellar image. For saturated stars it is based on the assumption that the image is increasing monotonically towards the centre in the unsaturated part of the image. The algorithm also calculates approximate stellar magnitudes and efficiently rejects most of the cosmics which would otherwise lead to a large number of false detections. The quality of the algorithm was evaluated with the help of a large set of simulated data for the DIVA satellite mission; different assumptions were made for the noise level, and the presence of cosmics or for a variable sky background. We could show that our algorithm fulfills the requirements for DIVA; only in the case of simulated images which included the bright galaxy M31 some fainter stars could not be detected in the galaxy's vicinity. Since stellar images contain large areas without any stars, we propose an additional block-skipping algorithm which can be coded on special-purpose hardware.

  5. 552 THE WILSON BULLETIN l Vol. 104, No. 3, September1992 On 21 July 1990, I found a second nest of similar construction, approximately 1 km to

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hurd, Peter L.

    of similar construction, approximately 1 km to the NW. It was located on a tree fern (Cyathea sp., ca 8.8 cm

  6. The Nuclear Detonation Detection System on the GPS satellites

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Higbie, P.R. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Blocker, N.K. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1993-07-27T23:59:59.000Z

    This article begins with a historical perspective of satellite usage in monitoring nuclear detonations. Current capabilities of the 24 GPS satellites in detecting the light, gamma rays, x-rays and neutrons from a nuclear explosion are described. In particular, an optical radiometer developed at Sandia National Laboratories is characterized. Operational information and calibration procedures are emphasized.

  7. Observing geomagnetic induction in magnetic satellite measurements and associated

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Constable, Steve

    Observing geomagnetic induction in magnetic satellite measurements and associated implications@ucsd.edu; cconstable@ucsd.edu) [1] Currents induced in Earth by temporal variations in the external magnetic field have by harmonic Dst (``disturbance storm time'') excitation of the magnetospheric ring current in satellite

  8. From the Atlanta Workshop -Use Satellite Data for Model Evaluation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jacob, Daniel J.

    Assimilation ­ dries surface Control - Model too cool due to moisture Plan to revisit August 2006 Texas evaluations 1. Clouds ­ Clouds play a major role in photolysis rates , temperature and wet chemistry. Models temperature #12;model (control) vs. satellite retrieval Satellite retrievals (K) model (sat. assim.) vs

  9. Tropospheric Ozone Satellite Retrievals in the Pacific Northwest

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Collins, Gary S.

    Tropospheric Ozone Satellite Retrievals in the Pacific Northwest Jacqueline Costello1, Farren: Tropospheric ozone is difficult to retrieve from satellites because of the abundance of ozone in the stratosphere. Tropospheric ozone has become a significant environmental issue and can be exacerbated by UT

  10. Compliance of Hazardous Waste Satellite Accumulation Areas (SAAs)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Compliance of Hazardous Waste Satellite Accumulation Areas (SAAs) All Hazardous waste generated to be chemically hazardous and shall be kept in a Satellite Accumulation Area (SAA). The safety coordinator will keep a list of all SAA's in the division and must be notified before an accumulation area

  11. First satellite observations of lower tropospheric ammonia and methanol

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    First satellite observations of lower tropospheric ammonia and methanol Reinhard Beer,1 Mark W) and methanol (CH3OH), well above the normal background levels. This is the first time that these molecules have. Citation: Beer, R., et al. (2008), First satellite observations of lower tropospheric ammonia and methanol

  12. Quantifying Offshore Wind Resources from Satellite Wind Maps

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pryor, Sara C.

    the spatial extent of the wake behind large offshore wind farms. Copyright © 2006 John Wiley & Sons, LtdQuantifying Offshore Wind Resources from Satellite Wind Maps: Study Area the North Sea C. B National Laboratory, Roskilde, Denmark Offshore wind resources are quantified from satellite synthetic

  13. Ris-R-1298(EN) Validation of Satellite SAR Offshore

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    resources, e.g. in future planning of offshore wind farms. The report describes the validation analysisRisø-R-1298(EN) Validation of Satellite SAR Offshore Wind Speed Maps to In-Situ Data, Microscale project goal is to develop a method for utilizing the satellite wind speed maps for offshore wind

  14. Optimal Energy Allocation and Admission Control for Communications Satellites

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Modiano, Eytan

    Initiative. input and output of energy relatively static, such a satellite may not require a sophisticated1 Optimal Energy Allocation and Admission Control for Communications Satellites Alvin Fu, Eytan Modiano, and John Tsitsiklis Abstract--We address the issue of optimal energy alloca- tion and admission

  15. Validation of satellite ozone profile retrievals using Beijing ozonesonde data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pan, Laura

    year time period (September 2002 to July 2005) are used to evaluate the performance of ozone profile, the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) on the NASA Aqua satellite and the Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS) on the NASA Aura satellite. Since the Global Positioning System ozone sensors (GPSO3) used in Beijing

  16. Scalable Proportional Allocation of Bandwidth in IP Satellite Networks12

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jain, Raj

    by the Federal Communications Commission (FCC), comprising a total of 73 satellites. Two Non-Geostationary Orbit increased by the convergence of computing and communications and by new applications such as Web surfing telecommunications industry in the Twenty first century. Satellite communication networks can be an integral part

  17. Ris National Laboratory Satellite SAR applied in offshore wind

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Risø National Laboratory Satellite SAR applied in offshore wind ressource mapping: possibilities is to quantify the regional offshore wind climate for wind energy application based on satellite SAR ·Study of 85SAR(m/s) Hasager, Dellwik, Nielsen and Furevik, 2004, Validation of ERS-2 SAR offshore wind-speed maps

  18. Ris-R-1479(EN) Satellite information for wind energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    wind power potential. Scatterometer wind data are observed ~ twice per day, whereas SAR onlyRisø-R-1479(EN) Satellite information for wind energy applications Morten Nielsen, Poul Astrup Title: Satellite information for wind energy applications Department: Wind Energy Department Risø-R-1479

  19. Asymptotic behavior of an elastic satellite with internal friction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Emanuele Haus; Dario Bambusi

    2012-12-04T23:59:59.000Z

    We study the dynamics of an elastic body whose shape and position evolve due to the gravitational forces exerted by a pointlike planet. The main result is that, if all the deformations of the satellite dissipate some energy, then under a suitable nondegeneracy condition there are only three possible outcomes for the dynamics: (i) the orbit of the satellite is unbounded, (ii) the satellite falls on the planet, (iii) the satellite is captured in synchronous resonance i.e. its orbit is asymptotic to a motion in which the barycenter moves on a circular orbit, and the satellite moves rigidly, always showing the same face to the planet. The result is obtained by making use of LaSalle's invariance principle and by a careful kinematic analysis showing that energy stops dissipating only on synchronous orbits. We also use in quite an extensive way the fact that conservative elastodynamics is a Hamiltonian system invariant under the action of the rotation group.

  20. Symmetric Satellite Swarms and Choreographic Crystals

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Latham Boyle; Jun Yong Khoo; Kendrick Smith

    2014-07-22T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper, we introduce a natural dynamical analogue of crystalline order, which we call choreographic order. In an ordinary (static) crystal, a high degree of symmetry may be achieved through a careful arrangement of the fundamental repeated elements. In the dynamical analogue, a high degree of symmetry may be achieved by having the fundamental elements perform a carefully choreographed dance. For starters, we show how to construct and classify all symmetric satellite constellations. Then we explain how to generalize these ideas to construct and classify choreographic crystals more broadly. We introduce a quantity, called the "choreography" of a given configuration. We discuss the possibility that some (naturally occurring or artificial) many-body or condensed-matter systems may exhibit choreographic order, and suggest natural experimental signatures that could be used to identify and characterize such systems.

  1. Heat Transfer -1 A satellite in space orbits the sun. The satellite can be approximated as a flat plate with

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Virginia Tech

    Heat Transfer - 1 A satellite in space orbits the sun. The satellite can be approximated as a flat plate with dimensions and properties given below. (a) Calculate the solar heat flux (W/m2 is at a distance where the solar heat flux (as defined above) is 500 W/m2 , and the flat plate is oriented

  2. A satellite ocean color observation operator system for eutrophication assessment in coastal waters

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fontana, Clément

    A satellite ocean color observation operator system for eutrophication assessment in coastal waters: Satellite ocean color Observation operator Eutrophication Remote sensing Radiative transfer modeling

  3. Search for Dark Matter Satellites Using the FERMI-LAT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ackermann, M.; /DESY; Albert, A.; /Ohio State U.; Baldini, L.; /INFN, Pisa; Ballet, J.; /DAPNIA, Saclay; Barbiellini, G.; /INFN, Trieste /Trieste U.; Bastieri, D.; /INFN, Padua /Padua U.; Bechtol, K.; /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U., Phys. Dept.; Bellazzini, R.; /INFN, Pisa; Blandford, R.D.; /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U., Phys. Dept.; Bloom, E.D.; /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /SLAC; Bonamente, E.; /INFN, Perugia /Perugia U.; Borgland, A.W.; /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U., Phys. Dept.; Bottacini, E.; /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U., Phys. Dept.; Brandt, T.J.; /IRAP, Toulouse /Toulouse III U.; Bregeon, J.; /INFN, Pisa; Brigida, M.; /Bari U. /INFN, Bari; Bruel, P.; /Ecole Polytechnique; Buehler, R.; /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U., Phys. Dept.; Burnett, T.H.; /Washington U., Seattle; Caliandro, G.A.; /ICE, Bellaterra; Cameron, R.A.; /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /IASF, Milan /IASF, Milan /DAPNIA, Saclay /INFN, Perugia /Perugia U. /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /ASDC, Frascati /Perugia U. /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /Montpellier U. /Stockholm U. /Stockholm U., OKC /ASDC, Frascati /Bari U. /INFN, Bari /Naval Research Lab, Wash., D.C. /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /Montpellier U. /Bari U. /INFN, Bari /Ecole Polytechnique /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /Hiroshima U. /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /Bari U. /INFN, Bari /INFN, Bari /INFN, Perugia /Perugia U. /Bari U. /INFN, Bari /Bari U. /INFN, Bari /Bologna Observ. /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U., Phys. Dept.; /more authors..

    2012-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

    Numerical simulations based on the {Lambda}CDM model of cosmology predict a large number of as yet unobserved Galactic dark matter satellites. We report the results of a Large Area Telescope (LAT) search for these satellites via the {gamma}-ray emission expected from the annihilation of weakly interacting massive particle (WIMP) dark matter. Some dark matter satellites are expected to have hard {gamma}-ray spectra, finite angular extents, and a lack of counterparts at other wavelengths. We sought to identify LAT sources with these characteristics, focusing on {gamma}-ray spectra consistent with WIMP annihilation through the b{bar b} channel. We found no viable dark matter satellite candidates using one year of data, and we present a framework for interpreting this result in the context of numerical simulations to constrain the velocity-averaged annihilation cross section for a conventional 100 GeV WIMP annihilating through the b{bar b} channel.

  4. On the use of Satellite Television in High Energy Physics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lucas Taylor; David O. Williams

    1998-10-24T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper assesses the feasibility of exploiting commercial satellite television technologies to broadcast video signals and data from major High Energy Physics facilities to collaborating institutes throughout the world.

  5. Risk management of student-run small satellite programs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Deems, Elizabeth (Elizabeth Carolina)

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper proposes an approach for failure mode identification in university-affiliated, small satellite programs. These small programs have a unique set of risks due to many factors, including a typically inexperienced ...

  6. Aerospace Power & Electronics Simulation Workshop 2004 Satellite Attitude Control

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Simon, Dan

    Aerospace Power & Electronics Simulation Workshop 2004 · Satellite Attitude Control System Design;3Aerospace Power & Electronics Simulation Workshop 2004 ADCS ·ADCS: Attitude Determination and Control subsystem ·Attitude Determination - Using sensors ·Attitude Control - Using actuators #12;4Aerospace Power

  7. The use of satellite-based technology in developing countries

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wood, Danielle Renee

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Satellite technology in the areas of remote sensing, communication, and navigation can provide valuable information in a number of areas from business to disaster management to agriculture. There is great potential for ...

  8. Sea Oil Field Satellite Monitoring: An Opera3onal View

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kuligowski, Bob

    through oil drilling. It is refined and separated, most easily by boiling In the oil industry, the term "North Sea" o`en includes areasSea Oil Field Satellite Monitoring: An Opera3onal View Maurizio

  9. aster satellite images: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    data, with no false positives. The failure rate is consistent with the inc... Lang, Dustin; Mierle, Keir; Blanton, Michael; Roweis, Sam 2009-01-01 267 The Satellite-substructure...

  10. Satellite measurements of the clear-sky greenhouse effect from

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Waliser, Duane E.

    LETTERS Satellite measurements of the clear-sky greenhouse effect from tropospheric ozone HELEN M of 0.48±0.14 W m-2 between 45 S and 45 N. This estimate of the clear-sky greenhouse effect from

  11. An integrated evolutionary model approach to small satellite engineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Robinson, Joseph B. (Joseph Brian)

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A deficiency exists in the use of detailed integrated modeling in the design, fabrication, and operations of small satellites (<180kg). This need led to the design of the Integrated Evolutionary Model (IEM) approach to ...

  12. A small satellite preliminary thermal control and heat shield analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Melani Barreiro, Diego A

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    As part of a student owned small satellite project, a preliminary thermal control and heat shield analysis was developed to verify acceptable performance requirements for the system. For the thermal control section, the ...

  13. Plasma-satellite interaction driven magnetic field perturbations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Saeed-ur-Rehman, E-mail: surehman@ualberta.ca [Department of Physics, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta T6G 2E1 (Canada); Theoretical Physics Division, PINSTECH, Nilore Islamabad 44000 (Pakistan); Marchand, Richard, E-mail: Richard.Marchand@ualberta.ca [Department of Physics, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta T6G 2E1 (Canada)

    2014-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We report the first fully kinetic quantitative estimate of magnetic field perturbations caused by the interaction of a spacecraft with space environment. Such perturbations could affect measurements of geophysical magnetic fields made with very sensitive magnetometers on-board satellites. Our approach is illustrated with a calculation of perturbed magnetic fields near the recently launched Swarm satellites. In this case, magnetic field perturbations do not exceed 20 pT, and they are below the sensitivity threshold of the on-board magnetometers. Anticipating future missions in which satellites and instruments would be subject to more intense solar UV radiation, however, it appears that magnetic field perturbations associated with satellite interaction with space environment, might approach or exceed instruments' sensitivity thresholds.

  14. Remote sensing of terrestrial tropospheric aerosols from aircraft and satellites

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Remote sensing of terrestrial tropospheric aerosols from aircraft and satellites M I Mishchenko1 instruments suitable for aerosol remote sensing and give examples of aerosol retrievals obtained forcing directly by absorbing and reflecting sunlight, thereby cooling or heating the atmosphere

  15. A mathematical simulation of earth satellite explosion debris orbital elements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mabrey, Wayne Edward

    1970-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    perspective: (1) By simulating the explosion of a satellite we mean that: given the knowledge of' the number of pieces and the force vector of each piece, we will simulate the resulting trajectories. (2) The simulation of a satellite trajectory... classical elements of each debris piece as a function of: (1) the trajectory of the center of mass of *he explosion debris and (2) the explosive forces. Computer program modules are developed to create an explosion and calculate the elements of each...

  16. Determination of wind from Nimbus-6 satellite sounding data 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carle, William Everett

    1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    DETERMINATION OF WIND FROM NIMBUS-6 SATELLITE SOUNDING DATA A Thesis by WILLIAM EVERETT CARLE Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial fulfil!. ment of the requirement for the deg. . ec of MASTER OF SCIENCE... December 1979 Major Subject: Meteorology DETEIQ&INATION OE WIND PROS1 NINEDS-6 SATELLITE SOUNDING DATA A Thesis WILLIA11 EVERETT CARLE Aporoved as to style and content by: (Chairman of Commi tee) Nember) (Head of Department) December 1979...

  17. FPGA Implementation of a Satellite Attitude Control using Variable Structure Control

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aboelaze, Mokhtar

    the weight and power consumption of the satellite. Failure to properly control the satellite can leadFPGA Implementation of a Satellite Attitude Control using Variable Structure Control Mokhtar Dept. of Electrical Engineering Effat University Jeddah Saudi Arabia Abstract-- Satellite control

  18. THE MASSIVE SATELLITE POPULATION OF MILKY-WAY-SIZED GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rodriguez-Puebla, Aldo; Avila-Reese, Vladimir; Drory, Niv, E-mail: apuebla@astro.unam.mx [Instituto de Astronomia, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, A. P. 70-264, 04510 Mexico, DF (Mexico)

    2013-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Several occupational distributions for satellite galaxies more massive than m{sub *} Almost-Equal-To 4 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 7} M{sub Sun} around Milky-Way (MW)-sized hosts are presented and used to predict the internal dynamics of these satellites as a function of m{sub *}. For the analysis, a large galaxy group mock catalog is constructed on the basis of (sub)halo-to-stellar mass relations fully constrained with currently available observations, namely the galaxy stellar mass function decomposed into centrals and satellites, and the two-point correlation functions at different masses. We find that 6.6% of MW-sized galaxies host two satellites in the mass range of the Small and Large Magellanic Clouds (SMC and LMC, respectively). The probabilities of the MW-sized galaxies having one satellite equal to or larger than the LMC, two satellites equal to or larger than the SMC, or three satellites equal to or larger than Sagittarius (Sgr) are Almost-Equal-To 0.26, 0.14, and 0.14, respectively. The cumulative satellite mass function of the MW, N{sub s} ({>=}m{sub *}) , down to the mass of the Fornax dwarf is within the 1{sigma} distribution of all the MW-sized galaxies. We find that MW-sized hosts with three satellites more massive than Sgr (as the MW) are among the most common cases. However, the most and second most massive satellites in these systems are smaller than the LMC and SMC by roughly 0.7 and 0.8 dex, respectively. We conclude that the distribution N{sub s} ({>=}m{sub *}) for MW-sized galaxies is quite broad, the particular case of the MW being of low frequency but not an outlier. The halo mass of MW-sized galaxies correlates only weakly with N{sub s} ({>=}m{sub *}). Then, it is not possible to accurately determine the MW halo mass by means of its N{sub s} ({>=}m{sub *}); from our catalog, we constrain a lower limit of 1.38 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 12} M{sub Sun} at the 1{sigma} level. Our analysis strongly suggests that the abundance of massive subhalos should agree with the abundance of massive satellites in all MW-sized hosts, i.e., there is not a missing (massive) satellite problem for the {Lambda}CDM cosmology. However, we confirm that the maximum circular velocity, v{sub max}, of the subhalos of satellites smaller than m{sub *} {approx} 10{sup 8} M{sub Sun} is systematically larger than the v{sub max} inferred from current observational studies of the MW bright dwarf satellites; different from previous works, this conclusion is based on an analysis of the overall population of MW-sized galaxies. Some pieces of evidence suggest that the issue could refer only to satellite dwarfs but not to central dwarfs, then environmental processes associated with dwarfs inside host halos combined with supernova-driven core expansion should be on the basis of the lowering of v{sub max}.

  19. Assessment of the 60 km rapid update cycle (RUC) with near real-time aircraft reports. Project report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cole, R.E.; Richard, C.; Kim, S.; Bailey, D.

    1998-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) is developing the Center-TRA-CON Advisory System (CTAS), a set of Air Traffic Management (ATM) Decision Support Tools (DST) for en route (Center) and terminal (TRACON) airspace designed to enable controllers to increase capacity and flight efficiency. A crucial component of the CTAS, or any ATM DST, is the computation of the time-of-flight of aircraft along flight path segments. Earlier NASA studies show that accurate knowledge of the wind through which the aircraft are flying is required to estimate time-of-flight accurately. There are current envisioned to be two sources of wind data for CTAS: The Rapid Update Cycle (RUC) for the Center airspace, a numerical model developed by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) Forecast System Laboratory (FSL) and run operationally by the National Weather Service (NWS) National Center for Environmental Prediction (NCEP); and The Integrated Terminal Weather System (ITWS) Terminal Winds (TW) for the TRACON airspace, developed at MIT Lincoln Laboratory under funding from the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA). This study has three goals: (1) determine the errors in the baseline 60 km resolution RUC forecast wind fields relative to the needs of en route DSTs such as CTAS, (2) determine the benefit of using the TW algorithm to refine the RUC forecast wind fields with near real-time Meteorological Data Collection and Reporting System (MDCRS) reports, and (3) identify factors that influence wind errors in order to improve accuracy and estimate errors in real time.

  20. Mulching as a countermeasure for crop contamination within the 30 km zone of Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yera, T.S.; Vallejo, R.; Tent, J.; Rauret, G. [Univ. de Barcelona (Spain); Omelyanenko, N.; Ivanov, Y. [Ukrainian Inst. of Agricultural Radiology, Kiev (Ukraine)

    1999-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The effect of mulch soil cover on crop contamination by {sup 137}Cs was studied within the 30 km zone of Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant. Experiments were performed with oats (Avena sativa) over a three year period. In 1992 soil surface was covered by a plastic net. In 1993 two straw mulch treatments were applied at a dose rate of 200 g m{sup {minus}2} using {sup 137}Cs contaminated and clean straw, respectively. A similar mulch treatment was applied in 1994, and two mulch doses of clean straw were tested. Protection of the soil with a plastic net significantly increased crop yield and reduced crop contamination. When clean straw was used as a mulch layer, a significant decrease of about 30--40% in {sup 137}Cs activity concentration was observed. Mulching with {sup 137}Cs contaminated straw did not reduce crop contamination, probably due to an increase in soil available {sup 137}Cs released from the contaminated mulch. Mulching has been shown to be an effective treatment both for reducing {sup 137}Cs plant contamination and improving crop yield. Therefore, it can be considered as a potential countermeasure in a post-accident situation.

  1. Workshop on Satellites for Solar Energy Resource Information -Washington, DC, April 10-11, 1996 POTENTIALS OF IMAGES FROM GEOSTATIONARY SATELLITE DATA FOR THE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Workshop on Satellites for Solar Energy Resource Information - Washington, DC, April 10-11, 1996 POTENTIALS OF IMAGES FROM GEOSTATIONARY SATELLITE DATA FOR THE ASSESSMENT OF SOLAR ENERGY PARAMETERS Lucien Author manuscript, published in "Workshop `satellites for solar energy resource information', Washington

  2. Carrier-phase Two-Way Satellite Frequency Transfer over a Very Long Baseline

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fujieda, M; Gotoh, T; Becker, J; Aida, M; Bauch, A

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper we report that carrier-phase two-way satellite time and frequency transfer (TWSTFT) was successfully demonstrated over a very long baseline of 9,000 km, established between the National Institute of Information and Communications Technology (NICT) and the Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt (PTB). We verified that the carrier-phase TWSTFT (TWCP) result agreed with those obtained by conventional TWSTFT and GPS carrier-phase (GPSCP) techniques. Moreover, a much improved short-term instability for frequency transfer of $2\\times10^{-13}$ at 1 s was achieved, which is at the same level as previously confirmed over a shorter baseline within Japan. The precision achieved was so high that the effects of ionospheric delay became significant which are ignored in conventional TWSTFT even over a long link. We compensated for these effects using ionospheric delays computed from regional vertical total electron content maps. The agreement between the TWCP and GPSCP results was improved because of this compe...

  3. Development of a micro-satellite TSUBAME for X-ray polarimetry of GRBs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kurita, Shin; Arimoto, Makoto; Yatsu, Yoichi; Kawai, Nobuyuki; Ohta, Kei; Koga, Masaya; Kim, EuGene; Tawara, Kyosuke; Suzuki, Souta; Miyasato, Kazuyoshi; Nagasu, Takashi; Kawajiri, Shouta; Matsushita, Masanori; Matunaga, Saburo; Moriyama, Nagahisa; Kimura, Shin'ichi

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    TSUBAME is a micro-satellite that the students of Tokyo Institute of Technology took the lead to develop for measuring hard X-ray polarization of Gamma-Ray Bursts(GRBs) in order to reveal the nature of the central engine of GRBs. TSUBAME has two instruments: Wide-field Burst Monitor (WBM) and Hard X-ray Compton Polarimeter (HXCP). We aim to start observing with HXCP in 15 seconds by pointing the spacecraft using Control Moment Gyro. In August 2014, we assembled TSUBAME and performed an integration test during ~2 weeks.TSUBAME by communication tests with Cute-1.7+APDII in orbit. On Nov 6 2014, TSUBAME was launched from Russia and it was put into Sun-synchronous orbit at 500 km above the ground. However, serious trouble occurred to the ham radio equipment. Therefore we could not start up the X-ray sensors until Feb 10 2015. In this paper, we report the system of TSUBAME and the progress after the launch.

  4. A Comparative Study of Estimation Models for Satellite Relative Motion 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Desai, Uri

    2013-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The problem of relative spacecraft motion estimation is considered with application to various reference and relative orbits. Mean circular and elliptic orbits are analyzed, with relative orbits ranging in size from 1 km ...

  5. A Baryonic Solution to the Missing Satellites Problem

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brooks, Alyson M.; Kuhlen, Michael; Zolotov, Adi; Hooper, Dan

    2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    It has been demonstrated that the inclusion of baryonic physics can alter the dark matter densities in the centers of low-mass galaxies, making the central dark matter slope more shallow than predicted in pure cold dark matter simulations. This flattening of the dark matter profile can occur in the most luminous subhalos around Milky Way mass galaxies. Zolotov et al. have suggested a correction to be applied to the central masses of dark matter-only satellites in order to mimic the affect of (1) the flattening of the dark matter cusp due to supernova feedback in luminous satellites and (2) enhanced tidal stripping due to the presence of a baryonic disk. In this paper, we apply this correction to the z = 0 subhalo masses from the high resolution, dark matter-only Via Lactea II (VL2) simulation, and find that the number of massive subhalos is dramatically reduced. After adopting a stellar mass to halo mass relationship for the VL2 halos, and identifying subhalos that are (1) likely to be destroyed by stripping and (2) likely to have star formation suppressed by photo-heating, we find that the number of massive, luminous satellites around a Milky Way mass galaxy is in agreement with the number of observed satellites around the Milky Way or M31. We conclude that baryonic processes have the potential to solve the missing satellites problem

  6. Geospatial Visualization of Global Satellite Images with Vis-EROS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Standart, G. D.; Stulken, K. R.; Zhang, Xuesong; Zong, Ziliang

    2011-04-13T23:59:59.000Z

    The Earth Resources Observation and Science (EROS) Center of U.S. Geological Survey is currently managing and maintaining the world largest satellite images distribution system, which provides 24/7 free download service for researchers all over the globe in many areas such as Geology, Hydrology, Climate Modeling, and Earth Sciences. A large amount of geospatial data contained in satellite images maintained by EROS is generated every day. However, this data is not well utilized due to the lack of efficient data visualization tools. This software implements a method for visualizing various characteristics of the global satellite image download requests. More specifically, Keyhole Markup Language (KML) files are generated which can be loaded into an earth browser such as Google Earth. Colored rectangles associated with stored satellite scenes are painted onto the earth browser; and the color and opacity of each rectangle is varied as a function of the popularity of the corresponding satellite image. An analysis of the geospatial information obtained relative to specified time constraints provides an ability to relate image download requests to environmental, political, and social events.

  7. DARK SATELLITES AND THE MORPHOLOGY OF DWARF GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Helmi, Amina; Starkenburg, E.; Starkenburg, T. K.; Vera-Ciro, C. A. [Kapteyn Astronomical Institute, University of Groningen, P.O. Box 800, 9700 AV Groningen (Netherlands); Sales, L. V. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Astrophysik, Karl-Schwarzschild-Str. 1, D-85748 Garching (Germany); De Lucia, G. [INAF-Astronomical Observatory of Trieste, via G.B. Tiepolo 11, I-34143 Trieste (Italy); Li, Y.-S., E-mail: ahelmi@astro.rug.nl [Kavli Institute for Astronomy and Astrophysics, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China)

    2012-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

    One of the strongest predictions of the {Lambda}CDM cosmological model is the presence of dark satellites orbiting all types of galaxies. We focus here on the dynamical effects of such satellites on disky dwarf galaxies, and demonstrate that these encounters can be dramatic. Although mergers with M{sub sat} > M{sub d} are not very common, because of the lower baryonic content they occur much more frequently on the dwarf scale than for L{sub *} galaxies. As an example, we present a numerical simulation of a 20% (virial) mass ratio merger between a dark satellite and a disky dwarf (akin to the Fornax dwarf galaxy in luminosity) that shows that the merger remnant has a spheroidal morphology. Perturbations by dark satellites thus provide a plausible path for the formation of dSph systems. The transition from disky to the often amorphous, irregular, or spheroidal morphologies of dwarfs could be a natural consequence of the dynamical heating of hitherto unobservable dark satellites.

  8. Tracking target objects orbiting earth using satellite-based telescopes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    De Vries, Willem H; Olivier, Scot S; Pertica, Alexander J

    2014-10-14T23:59:59.000Z

    A system for tracking objects that are in earth orbit via a constellation or network of satellites having imaging devices is provided. An object tracking system includes a ground controller and, for each satellite in the constellation, an onboard controller. The ground controller receives ephemeris information for a target object and directs that ephemeris information be transmitted to the satellites. Each onboard controller receives ephemeris information for a target object, collects images of the target object based on the expected location of the target object at an expected time, identifies actual locations of the target object from the collected images, and identifies a next expected location at a next expected time based on the identified actual locations of the target object. The onboard controller processes the collected image to identify the actual location of the target object and transmits the actual location information to the ground controller.

  9. Scaling of solid state lasers for satellite power beaming applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Friedman, H.W.; Albrecht, G.F.; Beach, R.J.

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The power requirements for a satellite power beaming laser system depend upon the diameter of the beam director, the performance of the adaptive optics system, and the mission requirements. For an 8 meter beam director and overall Strehl ratio of 50%, a 30 kW laser at 850 nm can deliver an equivalent solar flux to a satellite at geostationary orbit. Advances in Diode Pumped Solid State Lasers (DPSSL) have brought these small, efficient and reliable devices to high average power and they should be considered for satellite power beaming applications. Two solid state systems are described: a diode pumped Alexandrite and diode pumped Thulium doped YAG. Both can deliver high average power at 850 nm in a single aperture.

  10. Dust en-route to Jupiter and the Galilean satellites

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Krüger, H; Krueger, Harald; Gruen, Eberhard

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Spacecraft investigations during the last ten years have vastly improved our knowledge about dust in the Jovian system. All Galilean satellites, and probably all smaller satellites as well, are sources of dust in the Jovian system. In-situ measurements with the dust detectors on board the Ulysses and Galileo spacecraft have for the first time demonstrated the electromagnetic interaction of charged dust grains with the interplanetary magnetic field and with a planetary magnetosphere. Jupiter's magnetosphere acts as a giant mass-velocity spectrometer for charged 10-nanometer dust grains. These dust grains are released from Jupiter's moon Io with typical rate of 1 kg s^1. The dust streams probe the plasma conditions in the Io plasma torus and can be used as a potential monitor of Io's volcanic plume activity. The other Galilean satellites are surrounded by tenuous impact-generated clouds of mostly sub-micrometer ejecta grains. Galileo measurements have demonstrated that impact-ejecta derived from hypervelocity i...

  11. Modeling the Jovian subnebula: II - Composition of regular satellites ices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Olivier Mousis; Yann Alibert

    2005-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

    We use the evolutionary turbulent model of Jupiter's subnebula described by Alibert et al. (2005a) to constrain the composition of ices incorporated in its regular icy satellites. We consider CO2, CO, CH4, N2, NH3, H2S, Ar, Kr, and Xe as the major volatile species existing in the gas-phase of the solar nebula. All these volatile species, except CO2 which crystallized as a pure condensate, are assumed to be trapped by H2O to form hydrates or clathrate hydrates in the solar nebula. Once condensed, these ices were incorporated into the growing planetesimals produced in the feeding zone of proto-Jupiter. Some of these solids then flowed from the solar nebula to the subnebula, and may have been accreted by the forming Jovian regular satellites. We show that ices embedded in solids entering at early epochs into the Jovian subdisk were all vaporized. This leads us to consider two different scenarios of regular icy satellites formation in order to estimate the composition of the ices they contain. In the first scenario, icy satellites were accreted from planetesimals that have been produced in Jupiter's feeding zone without further vaporization, whereas, in the second scenario, icy satellites were accreted from planetesimals produced in the Jovian subnebula. In this latter case, we study the evolution of carbon and nitrogen gas-phase chemistries in the Jovian subnebula and we show that the conversions of N2 to NH3, of CO to CO2, and of CO to CH4 were all inhibited in the major part of the subdisk. Finally, we assess the mass abundances of the major volatile species with respect to H2O in the interiors of the Jovian regular icy satellites. Our results are then compatible with the detection of CO2 on the surfaces of Callisto and Ganymede and with the presence of NH3 envisaged in subsurface oceans within Ganymede and Callisto.

  12. North and northeast Greenland ice discharge from satellite radar interferometry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rignot, E.J. [California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA (United States)] [California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA (United States); Gogineni, S.P. [Univ. of Kansas, Lawrence, KS (United States)] [Univ. of Kansas, Lawrence, KS (United States); Krabill, W.B. [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Wallops Island, VA (United States)] [and others] [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Wallops Island, VA (United States); and others

    1997-05-09T23:59:59.000Z

    Ice discharge from north and northeast Greenland calculated from satellite radar interferometry data of 14 outlet glaciers is 3.5 times that estimated from iceberg production. The satellite estimates, obtained at the grounding line of the outlet glaciers, differ from those obtained at the glacier front, because basal melting is extensive at the underside of the floating glacier sections. The results suggest that the north and northeast parts of the Greenland ice sheet may be thinning and contributing positively to sea-level rise. 24 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  13. Synchronization of system-of-systems interfaces in military satellite communications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Davis, Mark J. (Mark Jeffrey)

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Military systems continue to become more complex and nearly all are now part of one or more system of systems (SoS). Military satellite communications programs have expanded over the last decade from three distinct satellite ...

  14. Bouquet: a Satellite Constellation Visualization Program for Walkers and Lattice Flower Constellations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Enkh, Mandakh

    2011-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

    of visualizing numerous user defined satellites in both 3D and 2D, and plot trajectories corresponding to arbitrary coordinate frames. The ultimate goal of Bouquet is to provide a viable open source alternative to commercial satellite orbit analysis programs...

  15. Short term forecasting of solar radiation based on satellite data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Heinemann, Detlev

    Short term forecasting of solar radiation based on satellite data Elke Lorenz, Annette Hammer University, D-26111 Oldenburg Forecasting of solar irradiance will become a major issue in the future integration of solar energy resources into existing energy supply structures. Fluctuations of solar irradiance

  16. applications technology satellite: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    applications technology satellite First Page Previous Page 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 Next Page Last Page Topic Index 1 Use of the high...

  17. Wind energy calculated from SAR and scatterometer satellite data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Slide no. The WAsP icon #12;1 8 Slide no. Wind observations #12;1 9 Slide no. European Wind Atlas #121 Slide no. 4 Wind energy calculated from SAR and scatterometer satellite data Charlotte Bay, Italy, 23-24 June 2003 #12;2 Slide no. 4 Presentation · Risø National Laboratory/ Wind Energy Dept

  18. Molecular biology study of satellite panicum mosaic virus capsid protein

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Qi, Dong

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Satellite panicum mosaic virus (SPMV) depends on its helper Panicum mosaic virus (PMV) for replication and movement in host plants. The positive-sense single-stranded genomic RNA of SPMV encodes a 17-kDa capsid protein (CP) to form 16-nm virions...

  19. Using satellite data for mapping offshore wind resources and wakes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    (no wind) Horns Rev Offshore Wind Farm Blaavandshuk Met. mast N #12;Wind Horns Rev Wind speed map from · Wake near large offshore wind farms is quantified in space and time · Software for usersUsing satellite data for mapping offshore wind resources and wakes Charlotte Bay Hasager, Merete

  20. Micro-Electromagnetic Formation Flight of Satellite Systems Aya Sakaguchi

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    to maintain a satellite's relative position in a formation. Thus far, high temperature superconducting (HTS) wire has been considered the enabling technology and the concept has been sized for aggressive as well as HTS EMFF and shown to be advantageous in close proximity formations. Because the forces

  1. AVIATION UTILIZATION OF GEOSTATIONARY SATELLITES FOR THE AUGMENTATION TO

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stanford University

    currently under development by the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA). WAAS will provide correctionsAVIATION UTILIZATION OF GEOSTATIONARY SATELLITES FOR THE AUGMENTATION TO GPS: RANGING AND DATA LINK to aviation users for the GPS clock, its ephemeris, and for the delay in its signal as it passes through

  2. NO2 lidar profile measurements for satellite interpretation and validation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dirksen, Ruud

    NO2 lidar profile measurements for satellite interpretation and validation H. Volten,1 E. J matter. We describe a novel instrument, the RIVM NO2 mobile lidar, to measure tropospheric NO2 profiles collection of lidar NO2 profiles, coinciding with OMI and SCIAMACHY overpasses. On clear days and early

  3. Greenland snow accumulation estimates from satellite radar scatterometer data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Long, David G.

    Greenland snow accumulation estimates from satellite radar scatterometer data Mark R. Drinkwater accumulation on the Greenland ice sheet. Microwave radar backscatter images of Greenland are derived using (or decrease) in net snow accumulation on the polar ice caps. The net mass balance of the Greenland

  4. Update on the Solar Power Satellite transmitter design

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brown, W.C.

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A number of remaining problems in the conceptual design of the transmitting antenna for the Solar Power Satellite have been solved as a result of additional technology development. Much of the technology was derived from the conceptual design of a ground-based transmitting antenna for beaming power to a high altitude airship or airplane.

  5. Deriving Atmospheric Density Estimates Using Satellite Precision Orbit Ephemerides

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hiatt, Andrew Timothy

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    due to atmospheric drag m/s2 ap geomagnetic 3-hourly planetary equivalent amplitude index gamma, Telsa, or kg s m-1 A satellite cross-sectional area m2 Ap geomagnetic daily planetary amplitude index gamma, Telsa, or kg s m-1 B B? estimated...

  6. Ionization satellites of the ArHe dimer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miteva, Tsveta; Klaiman, Shachar; Gokhberg, Kirill [Theoretische Chemie, Physikalisch-Chemisches Institut, Universität Heidelberg, Im Neuenheimer Feld 229, D-69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Gromov, Evgeniy V., E-mail: Evgeniy.Gromov@pci.uni-heidelberg.de [Theoretische Chemie, Physikalisch-Chemisches Institut, Universität Heidelberg, Im Neuenheimer Feld 229, D-69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Laboratory of Quantum Chemistry, Computer Center, Irkutsk State University, K. Marks 1, 664003 Irkutsk (Russian Federation)

    2014-05-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Ionization satellites are key ingredients in the control of post ionization processes such as molecular dissociation and interatomic Coulombic decay. Here, using the high-level ab initio method of multi-reference configuration interaction up to triple excitations, we study the potential energy curves (PECs) of the ionization satellites of the ArHe dimer. With this model system, we demonstrate that the simple model used in alkaline earth metal and rare gas complexes to describe the satellites as a Rydberg electron moving on top of a dicationic core does not fully hold for the rare gas clusters. The more complex valence structure in the rare gas atom leads to the mixing of different electronic configurations of the dimer. This prevents one from assigning a single dicationic parent state to some of the ionization satellites. We further analyze the structure of the different PECs, demonstrating how the density of the Rydberg electron is reflected in the structure of the PEC wherever the simple model is applicable.

  7. Fisheries Applications of Satellite Data in the Eastern North Pacific

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    is particularly useful. However, satellite measurements are usually limited to the surface or near- surface layers radiance from the earth's surface in visible, thermal infrared (IR), and microwave wavelength bands (Table by reflection from the sea surface and clouds, and by absorption, emission, and scatter by atmospheric

  8. artificial earth satellites: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    earth satellites First Page Previous Page 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 Next Page Last Page Topic Index 1 On the possibility of testing the Weak...

  9. artificial earth satellite: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    earth satellite First Page Previous Page 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 Next Page Last Page Topic Index 1 On the possibility of testing the Weak...

  10. Dust en-route to Jupiter and the Galilean satellites

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harald Krueger; Eberhard Gruen

    2002-05-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Spacecraft investigations during the last ten years have vastly improved our knowledge about dust in the Jovian system. All Galilean satellites, and probably all smaller satellites as well, are sources of dust in the Jovian system. In-situ measurements with the dust detectors on board the Ulysses and Galileo spacecraft have for the first time demonstrated the electromagnetic interaction of charged dust grains with the interplanetary magnetic field and with a planetary magnetosphere. Jupiter's magnetosphere acts as a giant mass-velocity spectrometer for charged 10-nanometer dust grains. These dust grains are released from Jupiter's moon Io with typical rate of 1 kg s^1. The dust streams probe the plasma conditions in the Io plasma torus and can be used as a potential monitor of Io's volcanic plume activity. The other Galilean satellites are surrounded by tenuous impact-generated clouds of mostly sub-micrometer ejecta grains. Galileo measurements have demonstrated that impact-ejecta derived from hypervelocity impacts onto satellites are the major -- if not the only -- constituent of dusty planetary rings. We review the in-situ dust measurements at Jupiter and give an update of most recent results.

  11. Tropospheric carbon monoxide: satellite observations and their applications 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    MacCallum, Stuart Neil

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of greenhouse gases such as CH4 and O3. Consequently, CO has an atmospheric lifetime of 1-3 months, making it a good tracer for studying the long range transport of pollution. Satellite observations present a valuable tool to investigate tropospheric CO...

  12. SOLAR COOKER UTILIZING SATELLITE DISH TECHNOLOGY Mechanical Engineering Department , Philadelphia University, Amman Jordan, e-mail

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    SOLAR COOKER UTILIZING SATELLITE DISH TECHNOLOGY A. Saleh1 A. Badran2 1 Mechanical Engineering dish­type solar cooker was built and tested utilizing satellite dish technology. A common satellite-TV dish was utilized as a solar cooker after covering it with a highly­reflective aluminum foil, which

  13. 1Hinode Satellite Power The Hinode satellite weighs approximately 700 kg (dry) and carries 170 kg of gas for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    for up to two years. The satellite has two solar panels (blue) that produce all of the spacecraft's power. The panels are 4 meters long and 1 meter wide, and are covered on both sides by solar cells. Problem 1 - What is the total area of the solar panels covered by solar cells in square centimeters? Problem 2 - If a solar cell

  14. Practical quantum key distribution over 60 hours at an optical fiber distance of 20km using weak and vacuum decoy pulses for enhanced security

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. F. Dynes; Z. L. Yuan; A. W. Sharpe; A. J. Shields

    2011-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Experimental one-way decoy pulse quantum key distribution running continuously for 60 hours is demonstrated over a fiber distance of 20km. We employ a decoy protocol which involves one weak decoy pulse and a vacuum pulse. The obtained secret key rate is on average over 10kbps. This is the highest rate reported using this decoy protocol over this fiber distance and duration.

  15. Effect of Sun and Planet-Bound Dark Matter on Planet and Satellite Dynamics in the Solar System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lorenzo Iorio

    2010-05-11T23:59:59.000Z

    We apply our recent results on orbital dynamics around a mass-varying central body to the phenomenon of accretion of Dark Matter-assumed not self-annihilating-on the Sun and the major bodies of the solar system due to its motion throughout the Milky Way halo. We inspect its consequences on the orbits of the planets and their satellites over timescales of the order of the age of the solar system. It turns out that a solar Dark Matter accretion rate of \\approx 10^-12 yr^-1, inferred from the upper limit \\Delta M/M= 0.02-0.05 on the Sun's Dark Matter content, assumed somehow accumulated during last 4.5 Gyr, would have displaced the planets faraway by about 10^-2-10^1 au 4.5 Gyr ago. Another consequence is that the semimajor axis of the Earth's orbit, approximately equal to the Astronomical Unit, would undergo a secular increase of 0.02-0.05 m yr^-1, in agreement with the latest observational determinations of the Astronomical Unit secular increase of 0.07 +/- 0.02 m yr^-1 and 0.05 m yr^-1. By assuming that the Sun will continue to accrete Dark Matter in the next billions year at the same rate as in the past, the orbits of its planets will shrink by about 10^-1-10^1 au (\\approx 0.2-0.5 au for the Earth), with consequences for their fate, especially of the inner planets. On the other hand, lunar and planetary ephemerides set upper bounds on the secular variation of the Sun's gravitational parameter GM which are one one order of magnitude smaller than 10^-12 yr^-1. Dark Matter accretion on planets has, instead, less relevant consequences for their satellites. Indeed, 4.5 Gyr ago their orbits would have been just 10^-2-10^1 km wider than now. (Abridged)

  16. EVIDENCE THAT GAMMA-RAY BURST 130702A EXPLODED IN A DWARF SATELLITE OF A MASSIVE GALAXY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kelly, Patrick L.; Filippenko, Alexei V.; Fox, Ori D.; Zheng Weikang; Clubb, Kelsey I., E-mail: pkelly@astro.berkeley.edu [Department of Astronomy, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720-3411 (United States)

    2013-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

    GRB 130702A is a nearby long-duration gamma-ray burst (LGRB) discovered by the Fermi satellite whose associated afterglow was detected by the Palomar Transient Factory. Subsequent photometric and spectroscopic monitoring has identified a coincident broad-lined Type Ic supernova (SN), and nebular emission detected near the explosion site is consistent with a redshift of z = 0.145. The SN-GRB exploded at an offset of {approx}7.''6 from the center of an inclined r = 18.1 mag red disk-dominated galaxy, and {approx}0.''6 from the center of a much fainter r = 23 mag object. We obtained Keck-II DEIMOS spectra of the two objects and find a 2{sigma} upper limit on their line-of-sight velocity offset of {approx}<60 km s{sup -1}. If we calculate the inclination angle of the massive red galaxy from its axis ratio and assume that its light is dominated by a very thin disk, the explosion would have a {approx}60 kpc central offset, or {approx}9 times the galaxy's half-light radius. A significant bulge or a thicker disk would imply a higher inclination angle and greater central offset. The substantial offset suggests that the faint source is a separate dwarf galaxy. The star-formation rate of the dwarf galaxy is {approx}0.05 M{sub Sun} yr{sup -1}, and we place an upper limit on its oxygen abundance of 12 + log(O/H) < 8.16 dex. The identification of an LGRB in a dwarf satellite of a massive, metal-rich primary galaxy suggests that recent detections of LGRBs spatially coincident with metal-rich galaxies may be, in some cases, superpositions.

  17. Irregular Satellites of the Planets: Products of Capture in the Early Solar System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    David Jewitt; Nader Haghighipour

    2007-03-03T23:59:59.000Z

    All four giant planets in the Solar system possess irregular satellites, characterized by large, highly eccentric and/or inclined orbits that are distinct from the nearly circular, uninclined orbits of the regular satellites. This difference can be traced directly to different modes of formation. Whereas the regular satellites grew by accretion within circumplanetary disks the irregular satellites were captured from initially heliocentric orbits at an early epoch. Recently, powerful survey observations have greatly increased the number of known irregular satellites, permitting a fresh look at the group properties of these objects and motivating a re-examination of the mechanisms of capture. None of the suggested mechanisms, including gas-drag, pull-down, and three-body capture, convincingly fit the group characteristics of the irregular satellites. The sources of the satellites also remain unidentified.

  18. Configuration studies for a cubic-kilometre deep-sea neutrino telescope - KM3NeT - with NESSY, a fast and flexible approach

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. Carr; D. Dornic; F. Jouvenot; G. Maurin; for the KM3NeT consortium

    2007-11-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Theoretical predictions for neutrino fluxes indicate that km$^{3}$ scale detectors are needed to detect certain astrophysical sources. The three Mediterranean experiments, ANTARES, NEMO and NESTOR are working together on a design study, KM3NeT, for a large deep-sea neutrino telescope. A detector placed in the Mediterranean Sea will survey a large part of the Galactic disc, including the Galactic Centre. It will complement the IceCube telescope currently under construction at the South Pole. Furthermore, the improved optical properties of sea water, compared to Antarctic ice, will allow a better angular resolution and hence better background rejection. The main work presented in this paper is to evaluate different km$^{3}$ scale detector geometries in order to optimize the muon neutrino sensitivity between 1 and 100 TeV. For this purpose, we have developed a detailed simulation based on the {\\it Mathematica} software - for the muon track production, the light transmission in water, the environmental background and the detector response. To compare different geometries, we have mainly used the effective neutrino area obtained after the full standard reconstruction chain.}

  19. Satellite remote sensing for hydrology and water management

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barrett, E.C.; Power, C.H. (Univ. of Bristol (GB)); Micallef, A. (Univ. of Malta, Valletta (IT)); Voute, C. (International Inst. for Aerospace Survey and Earth Sciences, Enschede (NL))

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Interest in satellite remote sensing is fast moving away from pure science and individual case studies towards truly operational applications. At the same time the micro-computer revolution is ensuring that data reception and processing facilities need no longer be the preserve of a small number of global centers, but can be common-place installations in smaller countries and even local regional agency offices or laboratories. As remote sensing matures, and its applications proliferate, a new type of treatment is required to ensure both that decision makers, managers and engineers with problems to solve are informed of today's opportunities and that scientists are provided with integrated overviews of the ever-growing need for their services. This book addresses these needs uniquely focusing on the area bounded by satellite remote sensing, pure and applied hydrological sciences, and a specific world region, namely the Mediterranean basin.

  20. Toshiba recommends Windows 7 Satellite L750-12T

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Saskatchewan, University of

    Toshiba recommends Windows 7 Model: i Satellite L750-12T 2nd Generation Intel® CoreTM i3-2350M processor­ 2.3 GHz, Genuine Windows® 7 Home Premium, 15.6" HD LCD, 4GB DDR3, 640GB HDD S-ATA, DVD Super and Enhanced Intel® SpeedStep® Technology Operating System Genuine Windows® 7 Home Premium Key Features Toshiba

  1. Dynamic characterization of satellite components through non-invasive methods

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mullins, Joshua G [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Wiest, Heather K [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Mascarenas, David D. L. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Macknelly, David [INST-OFF/AWE; Park, Gyuhae [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2010-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

    The rapid deployment of satellites is hindered by the need to flight-qualify their components and the resulting mechanical assembly. Conventional methods for qualification testing of satellite components are costly and time consuming. Furthermore, full-scale vehicles must be subjected to launch loads during testing. This harsh testing environment increases the risk of component damage during qualification. The focus of this research effort was to assess the performance of Structural Health Monitoring (SHM) techniques as a replacement for traditional vibration testing. SHM techniques were applied on a small-scale structure representative of a responsive satellite. The test structure consisted of an extruded aluminum space-frame covered with aluminum shear plates, which was assembled using bolted joints. Multiple piezoelectric patches were bonded to the test structure and acted as combined actuators and sensors. Various methods of SHM were explored including impedance-based health monitoring, wave propagation, and conventional frequency response functions. Using these methods in conjunction with finite element modelling, the dynamic properties of the test structure were established and areas of potential damage were identified and localized. The adequacy of the results from each SHM method was validated by comparison to results from conventional vibration testing.

  2. POLITECNICO DI MILANO Progetto e sviluppo di sistemi di elaborazione nel campo del telerilevamento da satellite e della

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    telerilevamento da satellite e della prospezione geofisica; Progetto e sviluppo di soluzioni hardware e software

  3. The NASA Aura satellite houses four instruments to study atmospheric ozone. The Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI) onboard the satellite provides global total column ozone (TCO) and in combination

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thompson, Anne

    iii ABSTRACT The NASA Aura satellite houses four instruments to study atmospheric ozone. The Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI) onboard the satellite provides global total column ozone (TCO) and in combination with other instruments tropospheric ozone residual (TOR) can be derived. In this study, the trajectory

  4. 217 km long distance photon-counting optical time-domain reflectometry based on ultra-low noise up-conversion single photon detector

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Guo-Liang Shentu; Qi-Chao Sun; Xiao Jiang; Xiao-Dong Wang; Jason S. Pelc; M. M. Fejer; Qiang Zhang; Jian-Wei Pan

    2013-08-05T23:59:59.000Z

    We demonstrate a photon-counting optical time-domain reflectometry with 42.19 dB dynamic range using an ultra-low noise up-conversion single photon detector. By employing the long wave pump technique and a volume Bragg grating, we reduce the noise of our up-conversion single photon detector, and achieve a noise equivalent power of -139.7 dBm/sqrt(Hz). We perform the OTDR experiments using a fiber of length 216.95 km, and show that our system can identify defects along the entire fiber length with a distance resolution better than 10 cm in a measurement time of 13 minutes.

  5. Assessing net ecosystem carbon exchange of U S terrestrial ecosystems by integrating eddy covariance flux measurements and satellite observations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhuang, Qianlai [Purdue University; Law, Beverly E. [Oregon State University; Baldocchi, Dennis [University of California, Berkeley; Ma, Siyan [University of California, Berkeley; Chen, Jiquan [University of Toledo, Toledo, OH; Richardson, Andrew [Harvard University; Melillo, Jerry [Marine Biological Laboratory; Davis, Ken J. [Pennsylvania State University; Hollinger, D. [USDA Forest Service; Wharton, Sonia [University of California, Davis; Falk, Matthias [University of California, Davis; Paw, U. Kyaw Tha [University of California, Davis; Oren, Ram [Duke University; Katulk, Gabriel G. [Duke University; Noormets, Asko [North Carolina State University; Fischer, Marc [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL); Verma, Shashi [University of Nebraska; Suyker, A. E. [University of Nebraska, Lincoln; Cook, David R. [Argonne National Laboratory (ANL); Sun, G. [USDA Forest Service; McNulty, Steven G. [USDA Forest Service; Wofsy, Steve [Harvard University; Bolstad, Paul V [University of Minnesota; Burns, Sean [University of Colorado, Boulder; Monson, Russell K. [University of Colorado, Boulder; Curtis, Peter [Ohio State University, The, Columbus; Drake, Bert G. [Smithsonian Environmental Research Center, Edgewater, MD; Foster, David R. [Harvard University; Gu, Lianhong [ORNL; Hadley, Julian L. [Harvard University; Litvak, Marcy [University of New Mexico, Albuquerque; Martin, Timothy A. [University of Florida, Gainesville; Matamala, Roser [Argonne National Laboratory (ANL); Meyers, Tilden [NOAA, Oak Ridge, TN; Oechel, Walter C. [San Diego State University; Schmid, H. P. [Indiana University; Scott, Russell L. [USDA ARS; Torn, Margaret S. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL)

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    More accurate projections of future carbon dioxide concentrations in the atmosphere and associated climate change depend on improved scientific understanding of the terrestrial carbon cycle. Despite the consensus that U.S. terrestrial ecosystems provide a carbon sink, the size, distribution, and interannual variability of this sink remain uncertain. Here we report a terrestrial carbon sink in the conterminous U.S. at 0.63 pg C yr 1 with the majority of the sink in regions dominated by evergreen and deciduous forests and savannas. This estimate is based on our continuous estimates of net ecosystem carbon exchange (NEE) with high spatial (1 km) and temporal (8-day) resolutions derived from NEE measurements from eddy covariance flux towers and wall-to-wall satellite observations from Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS). We find that the U.S. terrestrial ecosystems could offset a maximum of 40% of the fossil-fuel carbon emissions. Our results show that the U.S. terrestrial carbon sink varied between 0.51 and 0.70 pg C yr 1 over the period 2001 2006. The dominant sources of interannual variation of the carbon sink included extreme climate events and disturbances. Droughts in 2002 and 2006 reduced the U.S. carbon sink by 20% relative to a normal year. Disturbances including wildfires and hurricanes reduced carbon uptake or resulted in carbon release at regional scales. Our results provide an alternative, independent, and novel constraint to the U.S. terrestrial carbon sink.

  6. Ship and satellite observations of chlorophyl stocks in interacting cyclone-anticyclone eddy pairs in the western Gulf of Mexico

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Biggs, D.C. [Texas A& M Univ., College Station, TX (United States)] [Texas A& M Univ., College Station, TX (United States); Mueller-Karger, F.E. [Univ. of South Florida, St. Petersburg, FL (United States)] [Univ. of South Florida, St. Petersburg, FL (United States)

    1994-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    When anticyclonic eddies shed by the Loop Current of the Gulf of Mexico reach the western margin of the gulf, they influence the surface circulation over the continental slope and rise. Of particular interest is the generation of cyclone (cold-core)- anticyclone (warm-core) pairs when aging Loop Current eddies interact with the continental margin. In this paper the authors describe the physical and biological characteristics of these cyclone-anticyclone pairs. Their objective was to determine how eddy pairs affect the distribution of phytoplankton in the region and how satellite ocean color measurements are applicable to tracing of the eddies. They present shipboard data collected between 1980 and 1982 on the hydrography, chlorophyll stocks, and nutrient concentrations of eddy pairs in the western Gulf of Mexico and compare these data with coastal zone color scanner (CZCS) images collected during the time frame of the cruises. Surface pigment concentrations followed a seasonal cycle, with low concentrations (0.05-0.1 mg m{sup {minus}3}) found within cyclones and anticyclones from April through early November and higher concentrations (>0.1 mg m{sup {minus}3}) found in the winter. CZCS pigment concentrations were locally high in the flow confluence of cyclone-anticyclone pairs. The CZCS imagery shows that some cyclone-anticyclone geometries transport high-chlorophyll shelf water seaward at least 100-200 km off-shelf. 46 figs., 9 figs., 3 tabs.

  7. Monte Carlo Simulations of Macho Parallaxes From a Satellite

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas Boutreux; Andrew Gould

    1995-07-25T23:59:59.000Z

    Three ongoing microlensing experiments have found more candidate events than expected from the known stars. These experiments measure only one parameter of the massive compact halo objects (machos), the magnification time scale of the events. More information is required to understand the nature of the machos. A satellite experiment has been proposed to measure their projected transverse speed $\\tilde{v} = v/(1-z)$, where $v$ is the macho transverse speed and $z$ its distance divided by the distance of the source. Measurement of $\\tilde{v}$ would determine whether the machos were in the Galactic disk, Galactic halo, or in the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC). We simulate events observed toward the LMC by the Earth and by a satellite in an Earth like heliocentric orbit. To leading order, such an experiment determines $\\tilde{v}$ up to a two fold degeneracy. More precise measurements break the degeneracy. We show that with photometric precisions of 3\\% to 4\\% and approximately 1 observation per day, $\\tilde{v}$ can be measured with a maximum error of 20\\% for 70\\% to 90\\% of events similar to the ones reported by the EROS and MACHO collaborations. The projected transverse velocity is known with the same maximum error for 60\\% to 75\\% of these events. This 20\\% maximum error is not a 1 $\\sigma$ error but is mostly due to degeneracy between two possible solutions, each one being localized to much better than 20\\%. These results are obtained with an Earth-satellite separation of 1 AU, and are improved by a larger separation.

  8. Water Ice on the Satellite of Kuiper Belt Object 2003 EL61

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    K. M Barkume; M. E. Brown; E. L. Schaller

    2006-01-24T23:59:59.000Z

    We have obtained a near infrared spectrum of the brightest satellite of the large Kuiper Belt Object, 2003 EL61. The spectrum has absorption features at 1.5 and 2.0 microns, indicating that water ice is present on the surface. We find that the satellite's absorption lines are much deeper than water ice features typically found on Kuiper Belt Objects. We argue that the unusual spectrum indicates that the satellite was likely formed by impact and not by capture.

  9. SpaceWire model development technology for satellite architecture.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eldridge, John M.; Leemaster, Jacob Edward; Van Leeuwen, Brian P.

    2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Packet switched data communications networks that use distributed processing architectures have the potential to simplify the design and development of new, increasingly more sophisticated satellite payloads. In addition, the use of reconfigurable logic may reduce the amount of redundant hardware required in space-based applications without sacrificing reliability. These concepts were studied using software modeling and simulation, and the results are presented in this report. Models of the commercially available, packet switched data interconnect SpaceWire protocol were developed and used to create network simulations of data networks containing reconfigurable logic with traffic flows for timing system distribution.

  10. Production process for advanced space satellite system cables/interconnects.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mendoza, Luis A.

    2007-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This production process was generated for the satellite system program cables/interconnects group, which in essences had no well defined production process. The driver for the development of a formalized process was based on the set backs, problem areas, challenges, and need improvements faced from within the program at Sandia National Laboratories. In addition, the formal production process was developed from the Master's program of Engineering Management for New Mexico Institute of Mining and Technology in Socorro New Mexico and submitted as a thesis to meet the institute's graduating requirements.

  11. Satellite image analysis for surveillance, vegetation and climate change

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cai, D Michael [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2011-01-18T23:59:59.000Z

    Recently, many studies have provided abundant evidence to show the trend of tree mortality is increasing in many regions, and the cause of tree mortality is associated with drought, insect outbreak, or fire. Unfortunately, there is no current capability available to monitor vegetation changes, and correlate and predict tree mortality with CO{sub 2} change, and climate change on the global scale. Different survey platforms (methods) have been used for forest management. Typical ground-based forest surveys measure tree stem diameter, species, and alive or dead. The measurements are low-tech and time consuming, but the sample sizes are large, running into millions of trees, covering large areas, and spanning many years. These field surveys provide powerful ground validation for other survey methods such as photo survey, helicopter GPS survey, and aerial overview survey. The satellite imagery has much larger coverage. It is easier to tile the different images together, and more important, the spatial resolution has been improved such that close to or even higher than aerial survey platforms. Today, the remote sensing satellite data have reached sub-meter spatial resolution for panchromatic channels (IKONOS 2: 1 m; Quickbird-2: 0.61 m; Worldview-2: 0.5 m) and meter spatial resolution for multi-spectral channels (IKONOS 2: 4 meter; Quickbird-2: 2.44 m; Worldview-2: 2 m). Therefore, high resolution satellite imagery can allow foresters to discern individual trees. This vital information should allow us to quantify physiological states of trees, e.g. healthy or dead, shape and size of tree crowns, as well as species and functional compositions of trees. This is a powerful data resource, however, due to the vast amount of the data collected daily, it is impossible for human analysts to review the imagery in detail to identify the vital biodiversity information. Thus, in this talk, we will discuss the opportunities and challenges to use high resolution satellite imagery and machine learning theory to monitor tree mortality at the level of individual trees.

  12. Assessment of a satellite power system and six alternative technologies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wolsko, T.; Whitfield, R.; Samsa, M.; Habegger, L.S.; Levine, E.; Tanzman, E.

    1981-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The satellite power system is assessed in comparison to six alternative technologies. The alternatives are: central-station terrestrial photovoltaic systems, conventional coal-fired power plants, coal-gasification/combined-cycle power plants, light water reactor power plants, liquid-metal fast-breeder reactors, and fusion. The comparison is made regarding issues of cost and performance, health and safety, environmental effects, resources, socio-economic factors, and insitutional issues. The criteria for selecting the issues and the alternative technologies are given, and the methodology of the comparison is discussed. Brief descriptions of each of the technologies considered are included. (LEW)

  13. When can the Planck satellite measure spectral index running?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cédric Pahud; Andrew R. Liddle; Pia Mukherjee; David Parkinson

    2007-09-04T23:59:59.000Z

    We use model selection forecasting to assess the ability of the Planck satellite to make a positive detection of spectral index running. We simulate Planck data for a range of assumed cosmological parameter values, and carry out a three-way Bayesian model comparison of a Harrison-Zel'dovich model, a power-law model, and a model including running. We find that Planck will be able to strongly support running only if its true value satisfies |dn/d ln k| > 0.02.

  14. Laser beaming demonstrations to high-orbit satellites

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lipinski, R.J.; Meister, D.C.; Tucker, S. [and others

    1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Laser power beaming to satellites and orbital transfer vehicles requires the accurate pointing of a low-divergence laser beam to its target, whether the target is in the sunlight or the earth`s shadow. The Air Force Phillips Laboratory (AFPL) has demonstrated reduction in the image size of stars by a factor of 10 or more by using laser beacons and adaptive optics for atmospheric compensation. This same technology is applicable to reducing the divergence of laser beams propagated from earth to space. A team of Phillips Laboratory, COMSAT Laboratories, and Sandia National Laboratories plans to demonstrate the state of the art in this area with laser-beaming demonstrations to high-orbit satellites. The demonstrations will utilize the 1.5-m diameter telescope with adaptive optics at the AFPL Starfire Optical Range (SOR) and a ruby laser provided by the Air Force and Sandia (1--50 kill and 6 ms at 694.3 nm). The first targets will be corner-cube retro-reflectors left on the moon by the Apollo 11, 14, and 15 landings. We will attempt to use adaptive optics for atmospheric compensation to demonstrate accurate and reliable beam projection with a series of shots over a span of time and shot angle. We will utilize the return signal from the retro-reflectors to help determine the beam diameter on the moon and the variations in pointing accuracy caused by atmospheric tilt. This will be especially challenging because the retro-reflectors will need to be in the lunar shadow to allow detection over background light. If the results from this experiment are encouraging, we will at a later date direct the beam at a COMSAT satellite in geosynchronous orbit as it goes into the shadow of the earth. We will utilize an onboard monitor to measure the current generated in the solar panels on the satellite while the beam is present. A threshold irradiance of about 4 W/m{sup 2} on orbit is needed for this demonstration.

  15. The `Skyline' Distance 46km

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    VOTEDINTOP10OF WORLDTRAILS2004 Croeso i Afan, lleoliad beicio mynydd heb ei ail. Mae gan y lle yma bopeth - o swooping singletrack threading through beautiful forest to exposed rocky doubletrack on wide open hills

  16. xu-km-99.PDF

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What'sis Taking Over OurThe Iron4 Self-Scrubbing:,, ,Development1U CO1) 1 Winter FuelsYOURxinyufuUpdraft

  17. ERS 14.1 Satellite Accumulation Ares (RCRA Compliance), 4/30/13

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The objective of this surveillance is to evaluate the effectiveness of the contractor's management of hazardous and mixed wastes in satellite accumulation areas.  The Facility Representative...

  18. assessing satellite-based fire: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Radiation Budget (SRB) project updated its Perez, Richard R. 2 SATELLITE-BASED SOLAR RESOURCE ASSESSMENT: SOCIAL, ECONOMIC AND CULTURAL CHALLENGES AND BARRIERS, Renewable...

  19. A multiobjective, multidisciplinary design optimization methodology for the conceptual design of distributed satellite systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jilla, Cyrus D., 1974-

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A multiobjective, multidisciplinary design optimization methodology for mathematically modeling the distributed satellite system (DSS) conceptual design problem as an optimization problem has been developed to advance the ...

  20. Uncertainty for Satellite and Station Solar Data in the Updated NSRDB

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Myers, D. R.

    2008-10-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Solar Resource Assessment Workshop, Denver CO, Oct 29, 2008 presentation: Uncertainty for Satellite and Station Solar Data in the Updated NSRDB,

  1. Gravitational quantization of satellite orbits in the giant planets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Geroyannis, Vassilis S

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A fundamental assumption in the so-called "global polytropic model" is global hydrostatic equilibrium for a system of planets or statellites. In the framework of the polytropic models and the induced (by hydrostatic equilibrium) Lane-Emden differential equation, a polytropic sphere of polytropic index $n$ and radius $R_1$ represents the central component $S_1$(star or planet) of a polytropic configuration, of which further components are the polytropic spherical shells $S_2$, $S_3$, ..., defined by the pairs of radii $(R_1,\\,R_2)$, $(R_2,\\,R_3)$, ..., where $R_1,\\,R_2,\\,R_3$, ..., are the roots of the real part $\\mathrm{Re}(\\theta)$ of the complex Lane-Emden function $\\theta$. Such shells are appropriate places for accomodating planets or satellites. The Lane-Emden equation is solved by the Fortran code DCRKF54, which can integrate complex initial value problems along complex paths. In the present study, we treat numerically the systems of satellites of the giant planets: Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus, and Neptune.

  2. Dielectronic satellite spectra of hydrogen-like titanium (Ti XXII)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bitter, M.; von Goeler, S.; Cohen, S.; Hill, K.W.; Sesnic, S.; Tenney, F.; Timberlake, J.; Safronova, U.I.; Vainshtein, L.A.; Dubau, J.

    1983-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    High resolution spectra of the Ly ..cap alpha../sub 1/ and Ly ..cap alpha../sub 2/ lines of hydrogenlike titanium, TiXXII, and the associated dielectronic satellites which are due to transitions 1snl-2pnl with n greater than or equal to 2, have been observed from tokamak discharges with auxiliary ion cyclotron heating (ICRH) with central electron temperatures of 2 keV and central electron densities of 8 x 10/sup 13/ cm/sup -3/ on the Princeton Large Torus (PLT). The data have been used for a detailed comparison with theoretical predictions based on the Z - expansion method and Hartree - Fock calculations. The results obtained with the Z - expansion method are in excellent agreement with the observed spectral data except for minor discrepancies between the theoretical and experimental wavelengths of 0.0003 A for the n = 2 satellites and of 0.0001 A for the separation of the Ly ..cap alpha../sub 1/ and Ly ..cap alpha../sub 2/ lines. Very good agreement with the experimental data is also obtained for the results from the Hartree - Fock calculations though somewhat larger discrepancies (approx. = 0.0009 A) exist between experimental and theoretical wavelengths which are systematically too small. The observed spectra are used for diagnosis of the central ion and electron temperatures of the PLT discharges and for a measurement of the dielectronic recombination rate coefficient of TiXXII.

  3. Autonomous, agile micro-satellites and supporting technologies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Breitfeller, E; Dittman, M D; Gaughan, R J; Jones, M S; Kordas, J F; Ledebuhr, A G; Ng, L C; Whitehead, J C; Wilson, B

    1999-07-19T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper updates the on-going effort at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory to develop autonomous, agile micro-satellites (MicroSats). The objective of this development effort is to develop MicroSats weighing only a few tens of kilograms, that are able to autonomously perform precision maneuvers and can be used telerobotically in a variety of mission modes. The required capabilities include satellite rendezvous, inspection, proximity-operations, docking, and servicing. The MicroSat carries an integrated proximity-operations sensor-suite incorporating advanced avionics. A new self-pressurizing propulsion system utilizing a miniaturized pump and non-toxic mono-propellant hydrogen peroxide was successfully tested. This system can provide a nominal 25 kg MicroSat with 200-300 m/s delta-v including a warm-gas attitude control system. The avionics is based on the latest PowerPC processor using a CompactPCI bus architecture, which is modular, high-performance and processor-independent. This leverages commercial-off-the-shelf (COTS) technologies and minimizes the effects of future changes in processors. The MicroSat software development environment uses the Vx-Works real-time operating system (RTOS) that provides a rapid development environment for integration of new software modules, allowing early integration and test. We will summarize results of recent integrated ground flight testing of our latest non-toxic pumped propulsion MicroSat testbed vehicle operated on our unique dynamic air-rail.

  4. SUPPORTING GROUP APPLICATIONS VIA SATELLITE CONSTELLATIONS WITH MULTICAST L. Wood, H. Cruickshank, Z. Sun

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wood, Lloyd

    SUPPORTING GROUP APPLICATIONS VIA SATELLITE CONSTELLATIONS WITH MULTICAST L. Wood, H. Cruickshank) to low-altitude low earth orbit (LEO). However, support for low-latency group applications Teledesic satellite has eight intersatellite links, in the 60GHz band, to its two nearest neighbours in each

  5. ACM-enabled satellite triple play over DVB-S2: A techno-economic study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 ACM-enabled satellite triple play over DVB-S2: A techno-economic study N. Anastasiadou1 , G looks at the techno-economic perspectives of the use of DVB-S2 and its unique feature, Adaptive Coding and Modulation (ACM) in the provision of satellite triple play. For this study, current market economic data were

  6. Simulating aerosols using a chemical transport model with assimilation of satellite aerosol retrievals

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zender, Charles

    Simulating aerosols using a chemical transport model with assimilation of satellite aerosol for simulating aerosols has been developed using a chemical transport model together with an assimilation of satellite aerosol retrievals. The methodology and model components are described in this paper

  7. Satellite observations of the seasonal cycles of absorbing aerosols in Africa

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Graaf, Martin de

    Satellite observations of the seasonal cycles of absorbing aerosols in Africa related to monsoon system and aerosol loading is studied using multi-year satellite observations of UV-absorbing aerosols and rain gauge measurements. The seasonal variation of the aerosol distribution is clearly linked

  8. Satellite characterization of urban aerosols: Importance of including hygroscopicity and mixing state in the retrieval algorithms

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Satellite characterization of urban aerosols: Importance of including hygroscopicity and mixing the sensitivity of the calculated optical properties of urban aerosols to (1) hygroscopicity and (2) internal of satellite retrievals of aerosol optical thickness (t) and aerosol effective radius (reff). State

  9. Coastal Wind Mapping from Satellite SAR: Possibilities and Limitations Charlotte Bay Hasager and Merete Bruun Christiansen

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    - 21 - Coastal Wind Mapping from Satellite SAR: Possibilities and Limitations Charlotte Bay Hasager and Merete Bruun Christiansen Risø National Laboratory, Wind Energy Department, Meteorology Program, VEA-118 Abstract Satellite remote sensing of ocean wind fields from Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) observations

  10. Diurnal cycle of land surface temperature in a desert encroachment zone as observed from satellites

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sun, Donglian

    Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR) that are limited in their ability to capture the full diurnal) project and the Department of Energy's Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) program, the ARM Mobile of the surface from satellites are possible. Infrared radiometers on polar orbiting satellites have been used

  11. A Satellite Study of Tropical Moist Convection and Environmental Variability: A Moisture and Thermal Budget Analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Masunaga, Hirohiko

    radiometer and scatterometer aboard different platforms. Satellite measurements of atmospheric parameters of moisture and dry static energy and their vertical flux at cloud base from satellite observations alone convergence for highly organized systems; 2) FT diabatic heating is largely offset on an instantaneous basis

  12. P5.60B DERIVATION OF DAYLIGHT AND SOLAR IRRADIANCE DATA FROM SATELLITE OBSERVATIONS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Heinemann, Detlev

    P5.60B DERIVATION OF DAYLIGHT AND SOLAR IRRADIANCE DATA FROM SATELLITE OBSERVATIONS A. Hammer, D project SATELLIGHT an attempt is made to use satellite methods to derive daylight and solar irradiance). In daylighting applications, knowledge of the lumi- nance distribution of the sky is of primary concern. Thus

  13. Comparisons of optical properties of the coastal ocean derived from satellite ocean color and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chang, Grace C.

    Comparisons of optical properties of the coastal ocean derived from satellite ocean color Laboratory, Ocean Optics Section, Code 7333, Stennis Space Center, MS 39529 gould@nrlssc.navy.mil Abstract: Satellite-derived optical properties are compared to in situ mooring and ship-based measurements

  14. 2007 Urban Remote Sensing Joint Event Application of satellite Remote Sensing for Urban

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    2007 Urban Remote Sensing Joint Event Application of satellite Remote Sensing for Urban Risk Analysis: a case study of the 2003 extreme heat wave in Paris Bénédicte Dousset Hawaii Institute@ogs.trieste.it Abstract ­ Satellite observations are used to monitor the August 2003 heat wave in Paris

  15. Sea surface exchanges of momentum, heat, and freshwater determined by satellite remote sensing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yu, Lisan

    1 Sea surface exchanges of momentum, heat, and freshwater determined by satellite remote sensing Freshwater flux Latent heat flux Longwave radiation Satellite remote sensing Sea surface flux estimation Sensible heat flux Shortwave radiation Surface wind fields 2 #12;Sea surface exchanges of momentum, heat

  16. Evaluation of satellite and reanalysis products of downward surface solar radiation over East Asia: Spatial and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dai, Aiguo

    Evaluation of satellite and reanalysis products of downward surface solar radiation over East Asia Received 29 July 2012; revised 27 February 2013; accepted 18 March 2013. [1] Surface solar radiation plays hydrological models. In this study, the downward surface solar radiation (DSSR) from two satellite products

  17. Data-Driven Model for Solar Irradiation Based on Satellite Observations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anitescu, Mihai

    available at any solar energy production plant. Mathematically, these techniques fall into the categoryData-Driven Model for Solar Irradiation Based on Satellite Observations Ilias Bilionisa , Emil M a data-driven model for solar irradiation based on satellite ob- servations. The model yields

  18. Feasibility study of extracting runoff data from satellite altimetry over continental surface waters

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stuttgart, Universität

    the feasibility of extracting runoff data using satellite altimetry over all possible continental surface waters- ered algorithm for extracting runoff from the satellite altimetry is based on making water level. not feasible be- cause of bad quality of extracted water level time series class 4. impossible. Computed runoff

  19. Recent glacier changes in the Alps observed by satellite: Consequences for future monitoring strategies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kääb, Andreas

    Recent glacier changes in the Alps observed by satellite: Consequences for future monitoring satellite-derived Swiss glacier inventory revealed that mean glacier area loss per decade from 1985 to 1998 display much evidence that down- wasting (i.e. stationary thinning) has become a major source of glacier

  20. Diurnal variability of upper ocean temperatures from microwave satellite measurements and Argo profiles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gille, Sarah T.

    measurements. [3] Satellites measure SST at the surface of the ocean. Infrared satellite sensors measure. Data pairs with time separations of up to Æ3 h are used to evaluate systematic differences between a net impact on the climate sys- tem. The objective of this study is to evaluate the character

  1. 2013 ISES Solar World Congress Review of satellite-based surface solar irradiation databases for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Recanati, Catherine

    the operating of the solar plant, the same actors along with operators and maintenance companies may need2013 ISES Solar World Congress Review of satellite-based surface solar irradiation databases explores the possibilities provided by satellite-based surface solar irradiation databases

  2. 1SCTP Multistreaming over satellite M.Atiquzzaman, Univ. of Oklahoma, Oct 22, 2003.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Atiquzzaman, Mohammed

    Page 1 1SCTP Multistreaming over satellite M.Atiquzzaman, Univ. of Oklahoma, Oct 22, 2003. Effect)) School of Computer Science University of Oklahoma. Email: atiq@ieee.org Web: www.cs.ou.edu/~atiq 12th over satellite M.Atiquzzaman, Univ. of Oklahoma, Oct 22, 2003. Introduction TCP is the main transport

  3. Estimating Sea Surface Temperature From Infrared Satellite and In Situ Temperature Data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    the exchanges of heat, momentum and gases between the ocean and the atmosphere. As the most widely observed variable in oceanography, SST is used in many different studies of the ocean and its coupling to adjust the satellite SSTs to match a selection of buoy SSTs. This forces the satellite skin SSTs

  4. DEM GENERATION FROM ASTER SATELLITE DATA FOR GEOMORPHOMETRIC ANALYSIS OF CERRO SILLAJHUAY, CHILE/BOLIVIA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bolch, Tobias

    DEM GENERATION FROM ASTER SATELLITE DATA FOR GEOMORPHOMETRIC ANALYSIS OF CERRO SILLAJHUAY, CHILE/BOLIVIA, a volcano in the Andes of Chile/Bolivia, was developed from ASTER (Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission ASTER satellite data of the Cerro Sillajhuay in the Andes of Chile/Bolivia. Fieldwork at the Cerro

  5. An Image-Based Sensor System for Autonomous Rendez-Vous with Uncooperative Satellites

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Miravet, Carlos; Krouch, Eloise; del Cura, Juan Manuel

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper are described the image processing algorithms developed by SENER, Ingenieria y Sistemas to cope with the problem of image-based, autonomous rendez-vous (RV) with an orbiting satellite. The methods developed have a direct application in the OLEV (Orbital Life Extension Extension Vehicle) mission. OLEV is a commercial mission under development by a consortium formed by Swedish Space Corporation, Kayser-Threde and SENER, aimed to extend the operational life of geostationary telecommunication satellites by supplying them control, navigation and guidance services. OLEV is planned to use a set of cameras to determine the angular position and distance to the client satellite during the complete phases of rendez-vous and docking, thus enabling the operation with satellites not equipped with any specific navigational aid to provide support during the approach. The ability to operate with un-equipped client satellites significantly expands the range of applicability of the system under development, compar...

  6. Analysis of Errors in a Special Perturbations Satellite Orbit Propagator

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Beckerman, M.; Jones, J.P.

    1999-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We performed an analysis of error densities for the Special Perturbations orbit propagator using data for 29 satellites in orbits of interest to Space Shuttle and International Space Station collision avoidance. We find that the along-track errors predominate. These errors increase monotonically over each 36-hour prediction interval. The predicted positions in the along-track direction progressively either leap ahead of or lag behind the actual positions. Unlike the along-track errors the radial and cross-track errors oscillate about their nearly zero mean values. As the number of observations per fit interval decline the along-track prediction errors, and amplitudes of the radial and cross-track errors, increase.

  7. Extracting cosmic microwave background polarisation from satellite astrophysical maps

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baccigalupi, C; De Zotti, G; Smoot, G F; Burigana, C; Maino, D; Bedini, L; Salerno, E

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present the application of the Fast Independent Component Analysis technique for blind component separation to polarised astrophysical emission. We study how the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) polarised signal, consisting of $E$ and $B$ modes, can be extracted from maps affected by substantial contamination from diffuse Galactic foregrounds and instrumental noise. We perform the analysis of all sky maps simulated accordingly to the nominal performances of the Low Frequency Instrument (LFI) aboard the Planck satellite; the sky signal is modeled as a superposition of CMB, generated by a Gaussian, nearly scale invariant cosmological perturbation spectrum, and the existing simulated polarisation templates of Galactic synchrotron. Our results indicate that the angular power spectrum of CMB $E$ modes can be recovered on all scales up to $\\ell\\simeq 1000$, corresponding to the fourth acoustic oscillation, while $B$ modes can be detected, up to their turnover at $\\ell\\simeq 100$ if cosmological tensor amplitude...

  8. Assessing the technical, economic and policy-centered feasibility of a proposed satellite communication system for the developing world

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Samuels, Ayanna Terehas

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Satellite communication systems remain one of the most under utilized development mediums in less industrialized countries. This research proposes to establish a low cost satellite communications system tailored specifically ...

  9. Extracting cosmic microwave background polarisation from satellite astrophysical maps

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    C. Baccigalupi; F. Perrotta; G. De Zotti; G. F. Smoot; C. Burigana; D. Maino; L. Bedini; E. Salerno

    2004-07-12T23:59:59.000Z

    We present the application of the Fast Independent Component Analysis ({\\ica}) technique for blind component separation to polarized astrophysical emission. We study how the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) polarized signal, consisting of $E$ and $B$ modes, can be extracted from maps affected by substantial contamination from diffuse Galactic foreground emission and instrumental noise. {We implement Monte Carlo chains varying the CMB and noise realizations in order to asses the average capabilities of the algorithm and their variance.} We perform the analysis of all sky maps simulated according to the {\\sc Planck} satellite capabilities, modelling the sky signal as a superposition of the CMB and of the existing simulated polarization templates of Galactic synchrotron. Our results indicate that the angular power spectrum of CMB $E$-mode can be recovered on all scales up to $\\ell\\simeq 1000$, corresponding to the fourth acoustic oscillation, while the $B$-mode power spectrum can be detected, up to its turnover at $\\ell\\simeq 100$, if the ratio of tensor to scalar contributions to the temperature quadrupole exceeds 30%. The power spectrum of the cross correlation between total intensity and polarization, $TE$, can be recovered up to $\\ell\\simeq 1200$, corresponding to the seventh $TE$ acoustic oscillation.

  10. Hardware demonstration of high-speed networks for satellite applications.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Donaldson, Jonathon W.; Lee, David S.

    2008-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report documents the implementation results of a hardware demonstration utilizing the Serial RapidIO{trademark} and SpaceWire protocols that was funded by Sandia National Laboratories (SNL's) Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) office. This demonstration was one of the activities in the Modeling and Design of High-Speed Networks for Satellite Applications LDRD. This effort has demonstrated the transport of application layer packets across both RapidIO and SpaceWire networks to a common downlink destination using small topologies comprised of commercial-off-the-shelf and custom devices. The RapidFET and NEX-SRIO debug and verification tools were instrumental in the successful implementation of the RapidIO hardware demonstration. The SpaceWire hardware demonstration successfully demonstrated the transfer and routing of application data packets between multiple nodes and also was able reprogram remote nodes using configuration bitfiles transmitted over the network, a key feature proposed in node-based architectures (NBAs). Although a much larger network (at least 18 to 27 nodes) would be required to fully verify the design for use in a real-world application, this demonstration has shown that both RapidIO and SpaceWire are capable of routing application packets across a network to a common downlink node, illustrating their potential use in real-world NBAs.

  11. Preliminary materials assessment for the Satellite Power System (SPS)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Teeter, R.R.; Jamieson, W.M.

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Presently, there are two SPS reference design concepts (one using silicon solar cells; the other using gallium arsenide solar cells). A materials assessment of both systems was performed based on the materials lists set forth in the DOE/NASA SPS Reference System Report: Concept Development and Evaluation Program. This listing identified 22 materials (plus miscellaneous and organics) used in the SPS. Tracing the production processes for these 22 materials, a total demand for over 20 different bulk materials (copper, silicon, sulfuric acid, etc.) and nealy 30 raw materials (copper ore, sand, sulfur ore, etc.) was revealed. Assessment of these SPS material requirements produced a number of potential material supply problems. The more serious problems are those associated with the solar cell materials (gallium, gallium arsenide, sapphire, and solar grade silicon), and the graphite fiber required for the satellite structure and space construction facilities. In general, the gallium arsenide SPS option exhibits more serious problems than the silicon option, possibly because gallium arsenide technology is not as well developed as that for silicon. Results are presented and discussed in detail. (WHK)

  12. Intelligent scraping experience using ultrasonics in two 60in./56in. dual diameter 100 km seawater transmission pipelines in Saudi Arabia

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bird, A.F.; Chu, K.S.

    1995-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Saudi ARAMCO`s two 60in./56in. (1524/1422 mm) diameter Seawater Injection Pipelines used for secondary oil recovery stretch from the Seawater Treatment Plant across the Arabian Desert for a distance of approximately 100 kilometers. Both lines were put into operation in mid 1978 using over the ditch Plicoflex tape wrap as a means of protection against external corrosion. A significant portion of both pipelines (32 km of each line) runs through Subkha (salty moist) areas. A series of test hole evaluations in 1989 indicated moderate to sever external corrosion particularly in Subkha which necessitated sleeving and external coating application. In 1991 a series of leaks, four (4) in total over a period of two (2) months occurred in Pipeline {number_sign}2 due to external corrosion. This suggested that the line(s) were in urgent need of at least partial replacement or major rehabilitation. Prior to making a final decision on partial replacement it was decided to run an Intelligent Scraper in both pipelines to ascertain both internal and external pipeline conditions. An Ultrasonic Scraper the largest of it`s kind in the world, similar to what was used in the Alyeska Pipeline was developed and successfully run in both pipelines in February 1993. This paper discusses the pipeline history, test hole evaluations, Intelligent Scraping experiences, field evaluation for anomaly verification, and repair of approximately 120 locations as identified by the Intelligent Scraping run. The Intelligent Scraping evaluation played a major role in the cancellation of partial pipeline replacement with cost savings estimated $30 MM.

  13. Development and analysis of a small satellite attitude determination and control system testbed

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Crowell, Corey Whitcomb

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Attitude Determination and Control Systems (ADCS) are critical to the operation of satellites that require attitude knowledge and/or attitude control to achieve mission success. Furthermore, ADCS systems only operate as ...

  14. Aerosol loading in the Southeastern United States: reconciling surface and satellite observations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ford, B.

    We investigate the seasonality in aerosols over the Southeastern United States using observations from several satellite instruments (MODIS, MISR, CALIOP) and surface network sites (IMPROVE, SEARCH, AERONET). We find that ...

  15. Modeling Space-Time Dynamics of Aerosols Using Satellite Data and Atmospheric Transport Model Output

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shi, Tao

    Modeling Space-Time Dynamics of Aerosols Using Satellite Data and Atmospheric Transport Model of aerosol optical depth across mainland Southeast Asia. We include a cross validation study to assess

  16. First Observations of SO2 from the Satellite Suomi NPP OMPS: Widespread Air Pollution Events over

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dickerson, Russell R.

    First Observations of SO2 from the Satellite Suomi NPP OMPS: Widespread Air Pollution Events over. The largest sources of air pollutants in China are coal combustion and motor vehicle exhausts [He et al., 2002

  17. Emissions of crustal material in air quality forecast systems: Use of satellite observations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Menut, Laurent

    Emissions of crustal material in air quality forecast systems: Use of satellite observations) Natural (dust, fires, volcanos) Meteorology: Transport, turbulence Clouds and radiation, precipitations Chemistry-transport model Gas and particles concentrations Use of model outputs: Analysis Direct: model vs

  18. Causal relationships between solar proton events and single event upsets for communication satellites

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lohmeyer, Whitney Quinne

    In this work, we analyze a historical archive of single event upsets (SEUs) maintained by Inmarsat, one of the world's leading providers of global mobile satellite communications services. Inmarsat has operated its ...

  19. Data management of geostationary communication satellite telemetry and correlation to space weather observations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lohmeyer, Whitney Quinne

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    To understand and mitigate the effects of space weather on the performance of geostationary communications satellites, we analyze sixteen years of archived telemetry data from Inmarsat, the UK-based telecommunications ...

  20. Height change detection in Antarcita using satellite altimetry data and Kriging / Kalman filtering techniques

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nguyen, An Thanh-Thuy

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Studies of the response of ice sheets to climate change require data sets with high accuracy and uniform ice-sheet coverage. The most common technique used in analyzing satellite altimetry data to study height change in ...

  1. Experimental study of linear magnetic dichroism in photoionization satellite transitions of atomic rubidium

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jaenkaelae, K. [Department of Physics, P.O. Box 3000, 90014 University of Oulu, Oulu (Finland); Alagia, M. [CNR-IOM, Laboratorio TASC, IT-34149 Trieste (Italy); Feyer, V.; Richter, R. [Sincrotrone Trieste, Area Science Park, IT-34149 Trieste (Italy); Prince, K. C. [Sincrotrone Trieste, Area Science Park, IT-34149 Trieste (Italy); CNR-IOM, Laboratorio TASC, IT-34149 Trieste (Italy)

    2011-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Laser orientation in the initial state has been used to study the properties of satellite transitions in inner-shell photoionization of rubidium atoms. The linear magnetic dichroism in the angular distribution (LMDAD) has been utilized to probe the continuum waves of orbital angular momentum conserving monopole, and angular momentum changing conjugate satellites, accompanying the 4p ionization of atomic Rb. We show experimentally that LMDAD of both types of satellite transitions is nonzero and that LMDAD of monopole satellites, measured as a function of photon energy, mimics the LMDAD of direct photoionization, whereas the LMDAD of conjugate transitions deviates drastically from that trend. The results indicate that conjugate transitions cannot be described theoretically without explicit inclusion of electron-electron interaction. The present data can thus be used as a very precise test of current models for photoionization.

  2. SHORT-TERM FORECASTING OF SOLAR RADIATION BASED ON SATELLITE DATA WITH STATISTICAL METHODS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Heinemann, Detlev

    SHORT-TERM FORECASTING OF SOLAR RADIATION BASED ON SATELLITE DATA WITH STATISTICAL METHODS Annette governing the insolation, forecasting of solar radiation makes the description of development of the cloud

  3. SEA SURFACE CURRENT FIELDS IN THE BALTIC SEA DERIVED FROM MULTI-SENSOR SATELLITE DATA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hamburg,.Universität

    -sensor, algae blooms, surface currents, optical flow ABSTRACT: Mesoscale dynamic sea surface features demonstrate the use of multi- sensor / multi-channel satellite images for the computation of mesoscale surface

  4. Using satellite remote sensing to quantify woody cover and biomass across Africa 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mitchard, Edward Thomas Alexander

    2012-06-25T23:59:59.000Z

    The goal of quantifying the woody cover and biomass of tropical savannas, woodlands and forests using satellite data is becoming increasingly important, but limitations in current scientific understanding reduce the ...

  5. Retrieval of Non-Spherical Dust Aerosol Properties from Satellite Observations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huang, Xin

    2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An accurate and generalized global retrieval algorithm from satellite observations is a prerequisite to understand the radiative effect of atmospheric aerosols on the climate system. Current operational aerosol retrieval algorithms are limited...

  6. The European Satellite Navigation Program : policy analysis and recommendations for the future

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Escudero San José, Laura

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The European Satellite Navigation Program is a case study that combines Technical / Public / Private aspects in an integrative way. Therefore, it is a sound case for a TPP thesis candidate. This thesis analyzes the European ...

  7. MIMO active vibration control of magnetically suspended flywheels for satellite IPAC service

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Park, Junyoung

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Theory and simulation results have demonstrated that four, variable speed flywheels could potentially provide the energy storage and attitude control functions of existing batteries and control moment gyros (CMGs) on a satellite. Past modeling...

  8. Capabilities of satellite precipitation datasets to estimate heavy precipitation rates at different temporal accumulations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    AghaKouchak, Amir

    Artificial Neural Networks and CPC MORPHing (CMORPH) is compared against radar-based gauge-adjusted Stage IV on a more in-depth understanding of satellite errors and biases across different spatial and temporal scales

  9. Spin Dynamics of the LAGEOS Satellite in Support of a Measurement of the Earth's Gravitomagnetism

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Salman Habib; Daniel E. Holz; Arkady Kheyfets; Richard A. Matzner; Warner A. Miller; Brian W. Tolman

    1994-06-20T23:59:59.000Z

    LAGEOS is an accurately-tracked, dense spherical satellite covered with 426 retroreflectors. The tracking accuracy is such as to yield a medium term (years to decades) inertial reference frame determined via relatively inexpensive observations. This frame is used as an adjunct to the more difficult and data intensive VLBI absolute frame measurements. There is a substantial secular precession of the satellite's line of nodes consistent with the classical, Newtonian precession due to the non-sphericity of the earth. Ciufolini has suggested the launch of an identical satellite (LAGEOS-3) into an orbit supplementary to that of LAGEOS-1: LAGEOS-3 would then experience an equal and opposite classical precession to that of LAGEOS-1. Besides providing a more accurate real-time measurement of the earth's length of day and polar wobble, this paired-satellite experiment would provide the first direct measurement of the general relativistic frame-dragging effect. Of the five dominant error sources in this experiment, the largest one involves surface forces on the satellite, and their consequent impact on the orbital nodal precession. The surface forces are a function of the spin dynamics of the satellite. Consequently, we undertake here a theoretical effort to model the spin ndynamics of LAGEOS. In this paper we present our preliminary results.

  10. The Impact of Inhomogeneous Reionization on the Satellite Galaxy Population of the Milky Way

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Busha, Michael T.; Alvarez, Marcelo A.; Wechsler, Risa H.; Abel, Tom; Strigari, Louis E.; /KIPAC, Menlo Park; ,

    2009-08-03T23:59:59.000Z

    We use the publicly available subhalo catalogs from the via Lactea simulation along with a Gpc-scale N-body simulation to understand the impact of inhomogeneous reionization on the satellite galaxy population of the Milky Way. The large-volume simulation is combined with a model for reionization that allows us to predict the distribution of reionization times for Milky Way mass halos. Motivated by this distribution, we identify candidate satellite galaxies in the simulation by requiring that any subhalo must grow above a specified mass threshold before it is reionized; after this time the photoionizing background will suppress both the formation of stars and the accretion of gas. We show that varying the reionization time over the range expected for Milky Way mass halos can change the number of satellite galaxies by roughly two orders of magnitude. This conclusion is in contradiction with a number of studies in the literature, and we conclude that this is a result of inconsistent application of the results of Gnedin (2000); subtle changes in the assumptions about how reionization affects star formation in small galaxies can lead to large changes in the effect of changing the reionization time on the number of satellites. We compare our satellite galaxies to observations using both abundance matching and stellar population synthesis methods to assign luminosities to our subhalos and account for observational completeness effects. Additionally, if we assume that the mass threshold is set by the virial temperature T{sub vir} = 8 x 10{sup 3} K we find that our model accurately matches the vmax distribution, radial distribution, and luminosity function of observed Milky Way satellites for a reionization time z{sub reion} = 9.6{sub -2.1}{sup 1.0}, assuming that the via Lactea subhalo distribution is representative of the Milky Way. This results in the presence of 119{sub -50}{sup +202} satellite galaxies.

  11. Aerosol indirect effects -- general circulation model intercomparison and evaluation with satellite data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Quaas, Johannes; Ming, Yi; Menon, Surabi; Takemura, Toshihiko; Wang, Minghuai; Penner, Joyce E.; Gettelman, Andrew; Lohmann, Ulrike; Bellouin, Nicolas; Boucher, Olivier; Sayer, Andrew M.; Thomas, Gareth E.; McComiskey, Allison; Feingold, Graham; Hoose, Corinna; Kristjansson, Jon Egill; Liu, Xiaohong; Balkanski, Yves; Donner, Leo J.; Ginoux, Paul A.; Stier, Philip; Feichter, Johann; Sednev, Igor; Bauer, Susanne E.; Koch, Dorothy; Grainger, Roy G.; Kirkevag, Alf; Iversen, Trond; Seland, Oyvind; Easter, Richard; Ghan, Steven J.; Rasch, Philip J.; Morrison, Hugh; Lamarque, Jean-Francois; Iacono, Michael J.; Kinne, Stefan; Schulz, Michael

    2009-04-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Aerosol indirect effects continue to constitute one of the most important uncertainties for anthropogenic climate perturbations. Within the international AEROCOM initiative, the representation of aerosol-cloud-radiation interactions in ten different general circulation models (GCMs) is evaluated using three satellite datasets. The focus is on stratiform liquid water clouds since most GCMs do not include ice nucleation effects, and none of the model explicitly parameterizes aerosol effects on convective clouds. We compute statistical relationships between aerosol optical depth (Ta) and various cloud and radiation quantities in a manner that is consistent between the models and the satellite data. It is found that the model-simulated influence of aerosols on cloud droplet number concentration (Nd) compares relatively well to the satellite data at least over the ocean. The relationship between Ta and liquid water path is simulated much too strongly by the models. It is shown that this is partly related to the representation of the second aerosol indirect effect in terms of autoconversion. A positive relationship between total cloud fraction (fcld) and Ta as found in the satellite data is simulated by the majority of the models, albeit less strongly than that in the satellite data in most of them. In a discussion of the hypotheses proposed in the literature to explain the satellite-derived strong fcld - Ta relationship, our results indicate that none can be identified as unique explanation. Relationships similar to the ones found in satellite data between Ta and cloud top temperature or outgoing long-wave radiation (OLR) are simulated by only a few GCMs. The GCMs that simulate a negative OLR - Ta relationship show a strong positive correlation between Ta and fcld The short-wave total aerosol radiative forcing as simulated by the GCMs is strongly influenced by the simulated anthropogenic fraction of Ta, and parameterisation assumptions such as a lower bound on Nd. Nevertheless, the strengths of the statistical relationships are good predictors for the aerosol forcings in the models. An estimate of the total short-wave aerosol forcing inferred from the combination of these predictors for the modelled forcings with the satellite-derived statistical relationships yields a global annual mean value of -1.5+-0.5 Wm-2. An alternative estimate obtained by scaling the simulated clear- and cloudy-sky forcings with estimates of anthropogenic Ta and satellite-retrieved Nd - Ta regression slopes, respectively, yields a global annual mean clear-sky (aerosol direct effect) estimate of -0.4+-0.2 Wm-2 and a cloudy-sky (aerosol indirect effect) estimate of -0.7+-0.5 Wm-2, with a total estimate of -1.2+-0.4 Wm-2.

  12. An overview of the Nuclear Electric Propulsion Space Test Program (NEPSTP) satellite

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Voss, S.S. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Reynolds, E.L. [Applied Physics Laboratory, Laurel, MD (United States)

    1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Early in 1992 the idea of purchasing a Russian designed and fabricated space reactor power system and integrating it with a US designed satellite went from fiction to reality with the purchase of the first two Topaz II reactors by the Strategic Defense Initiative Organization (now the Ballistic Missile Defense Organization (BMDO). The New Mexico Alliance was formed to establish a ground test facility in which to perform nonnuclear systems testing of the Topaz II, and to evaluate the Topaz 11 system for flight testing with respect to safety, performance, and operability. In conjunction, SDIO requested that the Applied Physics Laboratory in Laurel, MD propose a mission and design a satellite in which the Topaz II could be used as the power source. The outcome of these two activities was the design of the Nuclear Electric Propulsion Space Test Program (NEPSTP) satellite which combines a modified Russian Topaz II power system with a US designed satellite to achieve a specified mission. Due to funding reduction within the SDIO, the Topaz II flight program was postponed indefinitely at the end of Fiscal Year 1993. The purpose of this paper is to present an overview of the NEPSTP mission and the satellite design at the time the flight program ended.

  13. Development of an all-composite spacecraft bus for small satellite programs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thompson, T.C.; Grastataro, C.; Smith, B.G. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Krumweide, G.; Tremblay, G. [Composite Optics Inc., San Diego, CA (United States)

    1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) in partnership with Composite Optics Incorporated (COI) is advancing the development of low-cost, lightweight, composite technology for use in small satellites. The use of advanced composites in space applications is well developed but the application of an all-composite satellite bus has never been achieved. This paper investigates the application of composite technology to the design and fabrication of an all-composite spacecraft bus for small satellites. The satellite program Fast On-Orbit Recording of Transient Events (FORTE) is the second in a series of satellites to be launched into orbit for the US Department of Energy (DOE). The FORTE program objective is to record atmospheric bursts of electromagnetic radiation. This paper will discuss the issues of design, analysis, testing, and fabrication required to deliver the spacecraft and its associated components within a two-year period. The spacecraft will be launched into low earth orbit in late 1995 from a Pegasus-XL launch vehicle. Due to the extremely tight time constraints, a novel low-cost solution using graphite fiber reinforced plastics composites was required to achieve the performance goals of the mission. The details of material selection, characterization of design allowables, and the approach used in determining the structural geometry that will provide the optimum performance for this mission are presented.

  14. The Invisibles: A Detection Algorithm to Trace the Faintest Milky Way Satellites

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Walsh, Shane; Jerjen, Helmut

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    [Abridged] A specialized data mining algorithm has been developed using wide-field photometry catalogues, enabling systematic and efficient searches for resolved, extremely low surface brightness satellite galaxies in the halo of the Milky Way (MW). Tested and calibrated with the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Data Release 6 (SDSS-DR6) we recover all fifteen MW satellites recently detected in SDSS, six known MW/Local Group dSphs in the SDSS footprint, and 19 previously known globular and open clusters. In addition, 30 point source overdensities have been found that correspond to no cataloged objects. The detection efficiencies of the algorithm have been carefully quantified by simulating more than three million model satellites embedded in star fields typical of those observed in SDSS, covering a wide range of parameters including galaxy distance, scale-length, luminosity, and Galactic latitude.

  15. The Invisibles: A Detection Algorithm to Trace the Faintest Milky Way Satellites

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shane Walsh; Beth Willman; Helmut Jerjen

    2008-07-25T23:59:59.000Z

    [Abridged] A specialized data mining algorithm has been developed using wide-field photometry catalogues, enabling systematic and efficient searches for resolved, extremely low surface brightness satellite galaxies in the halo of the Milky Way (MW). Tested and calibrated with the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Data Release 6 (SDSS-DR6) we recover all fifteen MW satellites recently detected in SDSS, six known MW/Local Group dSphs in the SDSS footprint, and 19 previously known globular and open clusters. In addition, 30 point source overdensities have been found that correspond to no cataloged objects. The detection efficiencies of the algorithm have been carefully quantified by simulating more than three million model satellites embedded in star fields typical of those observed in SDSS, covering a wide range of parameters including galaxy distance, scale-length, luminosity, and Galactic latitude.

  16. Quantum Cryptography for Secure Communications to Low-Earth Orbit Satellites

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hughes, R.J.; Buttler, W.T.; Kwiat, P.G.; Lamoreaux, S.K.; Morgan, G.L.; Peterson, C.G.; Twyeffort, E.; Simmons, C.M.; Nordholt, J.E.

    1999-06-03T23:59:59.000Z

    This is the final report of a three-year, Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). Quantum cryptography is an emerging technology in which two parties may simultaneously generate shared, secret cryptographic key material using the transmission of quantum states of light. The security of these transmissions is based on the inviolability of the laws of quantum mechanics. An adversary can neither successfully tap the quantum transmissions, nor evade detection. Key material is built up using the transmission of a single-photon per bit. We have developed an experimental quantum cryptography system based on the transmission of non-orthogonal single-photon polarization states to generate shared key material over line-of-sight optical links. Our results provide strong evidence that cryptographic key material could be generated on demand between a ground station and a satellite (or between two satellites), allowing a satellite to be securely re-keyed on in orbit.

  17. Evaluation of Clear Sky Models for Satellite-Based Irradiance Estimates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sengupta, M.; Gotseff, P.

    2013-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes an intercomparison of three popular broadband clear sky solar irradiance model results with measured data, as well as satellite-based model clear sky results compared to measured clear sky data. The authors conclude that one of the popular clear sky models (the Bird clear sky model developed by Richard Bird and Roland Hulstrom) could serve as a more accurate replacement for current satellite-model clear sky estimations. Additionally, the analysis of the model results with respect to model input parameters indicates that rather than climatological, annual, or monthly mean input data, higher-time-resolution input parameters improve the general clear sky model performance.

  18. Neutrino Solar Flare detection for a saving alert system of satellites and astronauts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fargion, Daniele

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Largest Solar Neutrino Flare may be soon detectable by Deep Core neutrino detector immediately and comunicate to satellites or astronauts. Its detection is the fastest manifestation of a later (tens minutes,hours) dangerous cosmic shower. The precursor trigger maybe saving satellites and even long flight astronauts lives. We shall suggest how. Moreover their detection may probe the inner solar flare acceleration place as well as the neutrino flavor mixing in a new different parameter windows. We show the updated expected rate and signature of neutrinos and antineutrinos in largest solar flare for present tens Megaton Deep Core telescope at tens Gev range. Speculation for additional Icecube gigaton array signals are also considered.

  19. Neutrino Solar Flare detection for a saving alert system of satellites and astronauts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Daniele Fargion

    2011-06-19T23:59:59.000Z

    Largest Solar Neutrino Flare may be soon detectable by Deep Core neutrino detector immediately and comunicate to satellites or astronauts. Its detection is the fastest manifestation of a later (tens minutes,hours) dangerous cosmic shower. The precursor trigger maybe saving satellites and even long flight astronauts lives. We shall suggest how. Moreover their detection may probe the inner solar flare acceleration place as well as the neutrino flavor mixing in a new different parameter windows. We show the updated expected rate and signature of neutrinos and antineutrinos in largest solar flare for present tens Megaton Deep Core telescope at tens Gev range. Speculation for additional Icecube gigaton array signals are also considered.

  20. A comparison of model-generated and satellite-observed radiances

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Smith, Donna Ellen Woolley

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    periods in January: Every 12 hours between 21 January at 12 GMT and 29 January at 00 GMT. 2. Ten time periods in May: Every 12 hours between 12 May at 12 GMT and 17 May at 00 GMT, B. TIROS-N HIRS/MSU Radiances Channel radiances used as ground truth... are discussed in Chapter IV. Detailed information is described by Smith et al. (1979). Satellite radiances are not observed synoptically at 00 GMT and 12 GMT. Therefore, measurements made during satellite passes within three hours of Sponsored...

  1. Comparison of Precision Orbit Derived Density Estimates for CHAMP and GRACE Satellites

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fattig, Eric

    2011-04-21T23:59:59.000Z

    NOMENCLATURE Symbol Definition Units draga acceleration vector due to atmospheric drag m/s 2 ap geomagnetic 3-hourly planetary equivalent amplitude index gamma, Telsa, or kg s m-1 A satellite cross-sectional area m2 Ap geomagnetic daily planetary... amplitude index gamma, Telsa, or kg s m-1 BB estimated ballistic coefficient correction ~ BC ballistic coefficient m2/kg Dc satellite drag coefficient ~ d cross correlation delay F10.7 daily solar radio flux measured at 10.7 cm wavelength SFU 10.7F...

  2. On-orbit calibration of soft X-ray detector on Chang'E-2 satellite

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hong Xiao; Wenxi Penga; Huanyu Wang; Xingzhu Cui; Dongya Guo

    2015-02-02T23:59:59.000Z

    X-ray spectrometer is one of the satellite payloads on Chang'E-2 satellite. The soft X-ray detector is one of the device on X-ray spectrometer which is designed to detect the major rock-forming elements within 0.5-10keV range on lunar surface. In this paper, energy linearity and energy resolution calibration is done using a weak Fe55 source, while temperature and time effect is considered not take big error. The total uncertainty is estimated to be within 5% after correction.

  3. On-orbit calibration of soft X-ray detector on Chang'E-2 satellite

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xiao, Hong; Wang, Huanyu; Cui, Xingzhu; Guo, Dongya

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    X-ray spectrometer is one of the satellite payloads on Chang'E-2 satellite. The soft X-ray detector is one of the device on X-ray spectrometer which is designed to detect the major rock-forming elements within 0.5-10keV range on lunar surface. In this paper, energy linearity and energy resolution calibration is done using a weak Fe55 source, while temperature and time effect is considered not take big error. The total uncertainty is estimated to be within 5% after correction.

  4. Ozone air quality measurement requirements for a geostationary satellite mission Peter Zoogman a,*, Daniel J. Jacob a,b

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chance, Kelly

    Ozone air quality measurement requirements for a geostationary satellite mission Peter Zoogman a Accepted 23 May 2011 Keywords: Air quality Ozone Kalman filter Assimilation Remote sensing a b s t r a c satellite measurements of ozone in different spectral regions to constrain surface ozone concentrations

  5. Wind Fields over the Great Lakes Measured by the SeaWinds Scatterometer on the QuikSCAT Satellite

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wind Fields over the Great Lakes Measured by the SeaWinds Scatterometer on the QuikSCAT Satellite for wind retrieval over the Great Lakes on a daily basis. We use data acquired by the SeaWinds Scatterometer on the QuikSCAT (QSCAT) satellite launched in June 1999 to derive wind speeds and directions over

  6. Rapid disintegration of Alpine glaciers observed with satellite data Frank Paul, Andreas Kaab, Max Maisch, Tobias Kellenberger, and Wilfried Haeberli

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kääb, Andreas

    Rapid disintegration of Alpine glaciers observed with satellite data Frank Paul, Andreas Ka 12 November 2004. [1] Analyses of multispectral satellite data indicate accelerated glacier decline around the globe since the 1980s. By using digitized glacier outlines inferred from the 1973 inventory

  7. Radiometric Correctionradiometric correction Radiometric correction is important to ensure that terrestrial variables retrieved from optical satellite sensor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Coburn, Craig

    that terrestrial variables retrieved from optical satellite sensor systems are calibrated to a common physical interactions. Radiometric corrections of optical sensor data consider sensor radiometric calibration, surface reflectance propagated through the atmosphere to the satellite sensor. Given that the optical properties

  8. A Field-Wise Wind Retrieval Algorithm for Satellite Scatterometers Charles G. Brown and David G . Long

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Long, David G.

    A Field-Wise Wind Retrieval Algorithm for Satellite Scatterometers Charles G. Brown and David G-378-6586 browncg@salt.ee.byii.edu Abstract-Traditional satellite scatterometer wind retrieval algorithms consist of point-wise wind estimation and point- wise ambiguity removal. Point-wise estimation yields mul- tiple

  9. Satellite data for high resolution offshore wind resource mapping: A data fusion approach M.B. Ben Ticha a,*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Satellite data for high resolution offshore wind resource mapping: A data fusion approach M.B. Ben accurate high spatial and temporal resolutions wind measurements. Offshore, satellite data are an accurate radar, scatterometer, data fusion, offshore wind energy resource assessment. 1. INTRODUCTION Since

  10. A study of the direct and indirect effects of aerosols using global satellite data sets of aerosol and cloud parameters

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Daniel, Rosenfeld

    regions consistent with the global mean statistics. However, the effective cloud particle radius showedA study of the direct and indirect effects of aerosols using global satellite data sets of aerosol between aerosol and cloud parameters derived from satellite remote sensing for evaluating the radiative

  11. PicPot: a small satellite with educational goals L. Reyneri, C. Sanso, D. Del Corso, C. Passerone, S. Speretta, M. Tranchero

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , showing two solar panels and some internal wiring #12;18th EAEEIE conference, Praha, 2007 2 2. A Small of this activity for a next generation of small, limited cost satellites is outlined. Fig 1 ­ Picpot satellite

  12. The ion experiment onboard the Interball-Aurora satellite; initial results on velocity-dispersed structures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    The ion experiment onboard the Interball-Aurora satellite; initial results on velocity / Accepted: 10 March 1998 Abstract. The Toulouse ION experiment ¯own on the Russian Interball-Aurora mission perform measurements in the energy range $10 eV±20 000 eV. The Interball- Aurora spacecraft was launched

  13. Simultaneous ground-satellite optical observations of postnoon shock aurora in the Southern Hemisphere

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Berkeley, University of

    Simultaneous ground-satellite optical observations of postnoon shock aurora in the Southern, a transient postnoon shock aurora, induced by an interplanetary (IP) shock, was observed simultaneously.3° magnetic latitude (MLAT), $15 magnetic local time). The global evolution of the shock aurora was identified

  14. Incorporating WAAS Data Into an Ionospheric Model for Correcting Satellite Radar

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Toews, Carl

    at the Millstone Hill Satellite Tracking Radar. She currently holds a joint appointment with the Atmospheric corrections to radar measurements, incorporating data from a single receiver to generate TEC estimates that the GRIMS ionospheric model degenerates during times of sharp spatial TEC gradients, e.g. during geomagnetic

  15. Power line harmonic radiation observed by satellite: Properties and propagation through the ionosphere

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Santolik, Ondrej

    Power line harmonic radiation observed by satellite: Properties and propagation through of power line harmonic radiation events observed by the low-altitude DEMETER spacecraft. Altogether, 88 with the largest intensities often occur off exact multiples of base power system frequency. This can be explained

  16. Using Satellite Data with on Site Measurements to Create Estimates of Biomass as a Baseline for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alabama in Huntsville, University of

    The sequestration of carbon has become a key interest in Central and South American countries due to the vast amount of forested land in these regions. In order to place monetary value on carbon stocks there must be viable. of using radar satellite imagery to measure carbon levels in tropical forests. This technique is important

  17. Global analysis of satellite tracking data shows that adult green turtles are

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    for Ecology and Conservation, Tremough Campus, University of Exeter, Penryn, Cornwall TR10 9EZ, UK. E-mail: b.j.godley , L. Pet-Soede11 , Kellie Pendoley12 , Peter B. Richardson1,13 , Alan F. Rees1,14 & Brendan J. Godley1 megavertebrate, Marine Protected Area, satellite tracking, sea turtle. *Correspondence: Brendan J. Godley, Centre

  18. Satellite constraints of nitrogen oxide (NOx) emissions from India based on OMI observations and WRFChem simulations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haak, Hein

    , and economic growth in India and attracted the attention of researchers and policy makers [Garg et al., 2001Satellite constraints of nitrogen oxide (NOx) emissions from India based on OMI observations emission inventory for India for 2005 using an inverse technique and iterative procedure. We used OMI

  19. Aerosol-cloud radiative effects from passive satellite instruments Mar%n de Graaf

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Graaf, Martin de

    Graaf Global annual mean Earth's energy budget for March 2000 ­ May 2004 (Wm2) [Trenberth et al. 2009 Satellite measurements of absorbing aerosols Reflectance Difference Method Cloud modelling Results Outlook] Global energy budget #12;Absorbing Aerosol Workshop, 15 October2013, Leipzig Aerosol effects over clouds

  20. Reply to Quaas et al.: Can satellites be used to estimate indirect climate forcing by aerosols?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Penner, J. E.; Zhou, Cheng; Xu, Li; Wang, Minghuai

    2011-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We welcome the comments by Quaas et al. (1). In our paper (2), we used a model to show that the methods used to estimate indirect aerosol forcing using satellite data, especially those based on relating the slope of present-day (PD) drop number (Nc) to aerosol optical depth (AOD), underestimate the forcing calculated when both PD and preindustrial (PI) data are available.

  1. Providing Integrity for Satellite Navigation: Lessons Learned (Thus Far) from the Financial

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stanford University

    Providing Integrity for Satellite Navigation: Lessons Learned (Thus Far) from the Financial], the goal is to learn lessons from this experience that can improve the way that risk is assessed directly to the worldwide financial crisis of 2008 - 2009 and identifies lessons that are applicable

  2. The ozone response to ENSO in Aura satellite measurements and a chemistry-climate simulation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Waugh, Darryn W.

    The ozone response to ENSO in Aura satellite measurements and a chemistry-climate simulation Luke D impact on tropospheric circulation causes significant changes to the distribution of ozone. Here we derive the lower tropospheric to lower stratospheric ozone response to ENSO from observations

  3. GRAPH-BASED METHOD FOR MULTITEMPORAL SEGMENTATION OF SEA ICE FLOES FROM SATELLITE DATA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    the Arc- tic sea ice pack in December 2007, continuously moved with the Arctic ocean currents and meltedGRAPH-BASED METHOD FOR MULTITEMPORAL SEGMENTATION OF SEA ICE FLOES FROM SATELLITE DATA Claudio, MODIS, Sea Ice Floes. ABSTRACT: Automated segmentation of the sea ice evolution would allow scientists

  4. PROGRESSIVE CLASSIFICATION IN THE COMPRESSED DOMAIN FOR LARGE EOS SATELLITE DATABASES1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kontoyiannis, Ioannis

    PROGRESSIVE CLASSIFICATION IN THE COMPRESSED DOMAIN FOR LARGE EOS SATELLITE DATABASES1 Vittorio and Signal Processing, Atlanta, GA, May 1996. ABSTRACT We introduce a new framework for classifying large-by-pixel approach. This approach, called progressive classi cation, is well suited for analyzing large images

  5. PROGRESSIVE CLASSIFICATION IN THE COMPRESSED DOMAIN FOR LARGE EOS SATELLITE DATABASES 1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kontoyiannis, Ioannis

    PROGRESSIVE CLASSIFICATION IN THE COMPRESSED DOMAIN FOR LARGE EOS SATELLITE DATABASES 1 Vittorio for classifying large images that is more accurate and less computationally expensive than the classical pixel­by­pixel approach. This approach, called progressive classification, is well suited for analyzing large images

  6. Space Communications 21 (2007/2008) 6982 69 Satellite system performance assessment for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mailhes, Corinne

    for In-Flight Entertainment and Air Traffic Control José Radzik a,, Alain Pirovano b , Na Tao b. At the same time, an increasing interest in the use of satellite communications for ATC (Air Traffic Control-term perspective. The objective of the presented system design is to provide both passenger application traffic

  7. Deployable Tensegrity Reflectors for Small Satellites1 A.G. Tibert2 and S. Pellegrino3

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pellegrino, Sergio

    of Cambridge, Trumpington Street, Cambridge, CB2 1PZ, U.K. Abstract Future small satellite missions require low-cost, precision reflector structures with large aperture that can be packaged in a small envelope. Existing that deploys two identical cable nets (front and rear nets) interconnected by tension ties; the reflecting mesh

  8. THE SURFACE ALBEDO OF THE VATNAJ OKULL ICE CAP, ICELAND: A COMPARISON BETWEEN SATELLITE-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haak, Hein

    is composed for the summer of 1996 using satellite radiance measurements from the Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR). This time series is compared with ground measurements carried out during is usually to a large extent determined by the summer energy balance (see e.g. Ambach(1963) for the central

  9. Aerosol radiative forcing and the accuracy of satellite aerosol optical depth retrieval

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ) of the AVHRR (Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer) is typically between 0.06 and 0.15, while the RMSE between t = 0.1 and t = 0.8. The Department of Energy research satellite instrument, the Multispectral aerosol radiative forcing are known, the predictions of future global warming may remain unacceptably high

  10. VISUAL EXPLORATION OF SATELLITE IMAGES Jurgen Symanzik , Louise Gri ths, Robert R. Gillies, Utah State University.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Symanzik, Jürgen

    by the Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR) sensor aboard a NOAA{14 polar orbit- ing satellite from to urban structures on the local and re- gional climate, surface energy uxes, and air quality center for the southeast- ern United States. The land{atmosphere energy bal- ance of the area has changed

  11. Interpolation of surface radiative temperature measured from polar orbiting satellites to a diurnal cycle

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jin, Menglin

    . Instruments on polar orbiting satellites, such as advanced very high resolution radiometer (AVHRR) or Moderate. This approach is based on the surface energy balance with the soil heat flux being treated by a conventional in temperate and tropical regions, observed empirical relationships between solar radiative energy and skin

  12. RESEARCH ARTICLE Time series analysis of infrared satellite data for detecting

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wright, Robert

    successfully detected ther- mal anomalies in TIR data from the Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR algorithm that analyzes thermal infrared satellite time series data to detect and quantify the excess energy. These instruments provide data over potentially dangerous, high-temperature phenomena, such as volcanic eruptions

  13. VALIDATION OF PV PERFORMANCE MODELS USING SATELLITE-BASED IRRADIANCE MEASUREMENTS: A CASE STUDY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Perez, Richard R.

    VALIDATION OF PV PERFORMANCE MODELS USING SATELLITE-BASED IRRADIANCE MEASUREMENTS: A CASE STUDY Clean Power Research Kirkland, WA e-mail: aparkins@cleanpower.com ABSTRACT Photovoltaic (PV) system and existing PV systems under a wide variety of environmental conditions. Ground based meteorological

  14. WATER AND ENERGY BALANCE ESTIMATION IN PUERTO RICO USING SATELLITE REMOTE SENSING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gilbes, Fernando

    WATER AND ENERGY BALANCE ESTIMATION IN PUERTO RICO USING SATELLITE REMOTE SENSING Eric. W Management of water resources relies on estimates of the hydrologic water balance within defined and/or similar land use. Components of the water balance include precipitation, actual

  15. From Measurements to Models: What Satellite and Sub-Orbital Instruments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    uncertainty upper bounds for ~1 W/m2 TOA DARF accuracy: ~ 0.02 CCSP - SAP 2.3, 2009 #12;Aerosol-location time series Regional Context R. Kahn #12;The NASA Earth Observing System's Terra Satellite ASTER First Light: February 24, 2000 MODIS CERES MISR MOPITT Terra Project Office / NASA Goddard Space Flight Center

  16. Satellite observations of Mexico City pollution outflow from the Tropospheric Emissions Spectrometer (TES)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Satellite observations of Mexico City pollution outflow from the Tropospheric Emissions 12 November 2008 Keyword: Mega-city pollution TES O3­CO correlation INTEX-B Mexico city a b s t r a c regions were used to examine Mexico City pollution outflow on a regional scale. The pollution outflow from

  17. CROSS VALIDATION OF SATELLITE RADIATION TRANSFER MODELS DURING SWERA PROJECT IN BRAZIL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Heinemann, Detlev

    CROSS VALIDATION OF SATELLITE RADIATION TRANSFER MODELS DURING SWERA PROJECT IN BRAZIL Enio B-970, SP, Brazil. Phone + 55 12 39456741, Fax + 55 12 39456810, fernando@dge.inpe.br. Samuel L. Abreu, Hans, Federal University of Santa Catarina -UFSC, Florianópolis, 88040-900, (SC), Brazil. Richard Perez

  18. Vision Based Navigation with an Experimental Satellite Konrad Makowka, Alvar Saenz-Otero, David W. Miller

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    -Otero, David W. Miller January 2012 SSL # 2-12 #12;#12;Page I Vision Based Navigation with an Experimental Satellite Testbed Konrad Makowka, Alvar Saenz-Otero, David W. Miller January 2012 SSL # 2-12 This work at Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) Space Systems Laboratory (SSL). First, an application programming

  19. A satellite-based biosphere parameterization for net ecosystem CO2 exchange: Vegetation Photosynthesis and Respiration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lin, John Chun-Han

    Photosynthesis and Respiration Model (VPRM) Pathmathevan Mahadevan,1 Steven C. Wofsy,1 Daniel M. Matross,1 12 April 2008. [1] We present the Vegetation Photosynthesis and Respiration Model (VPRM), a satellite of ecosystem photosynthesis, and annual sum of NEE at all eddy flux sites for which it is optimized

  20. Toshiba recommends Windows 7 Satellite P755-0M6

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Saskatchewan, University of

    .7 million colours Graphics Controller NVIDIA GeForce GT 520M 1GB (DDR3)-Dedicated Graphics - up to 3793MB (64bit OS) dynamically allocated shared graphics memory with 6GB of system memory. Sound System-Operating: 1G Environmental Credentials Energy Star 5.0 RoHS Warranty This Satellite notebook comes with a one

  1. Time series modeling and large scale global solar radiation forecasting from geostationary satellites data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    1 Time series modeling and large scale global solar radiation forecasting from geostationary global solar radiation. In this paper, we use geostationary satellites data to generate 2-D time series of solar radiation for the next hour. The results presented in this paper relate to a particular territory

  2. Satellite-Based Techniques for the Retrieval of Solar Radiation Data A Review of Current European

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Heinemann, Detlev

    Satellite-Based Techniques for the Retrieval of Solar Radiation Data ­ A Review of Current European of solar radiation (clouds, water vapor, aerosols, ozone) through the use of twelve spectral radiometer of application- specific solar radiation data. Especially the integration into energy structures makes

  3. National Aeronautics and Space Administration The Hinode satellite was launched on September 22, 2006 and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    on September 22, 2006 and began taking images of the sun through x-ray light. The goal was to study the intense 10 Hot Gas and Cold Gas 9 - 11 11 Using the Doppler Shift to Study Gas Motions 9 - 11 12 Spectroscopy to be authentic glimpses of modern science and engineering issues that come up in designing satellites to work

  4. ASES Proc. Solar 2010, Phoenix, AZ HIGH PERFORMANCE MSG SATELLITE MODEL FOR OPERATIONAL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Perez, Richard R.

    ENERGY APPLICATIONS Tomás Cebecauer GeoModel, s.r.o. Pionierska 15 841 07 Bratislava, Slovakia tomas terrain affects exploitation of solar energy. In this article we present innovative features of MSG© ASES ­ Proc. Solar 2010, Phoenix, AZ HIGH PERFORMANCE MSG SATELLITE MODEL FOR OPERATIONAL SOLAR

  5. Q-Winds satellite hurricane wind retrievals and H*Wind comparisons

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hennon, Christopher C.

    of the hurricane surface winds from NOAA and U.S. Air Force Weather Squadron aircraft flights. Further, results1 Q-Winds satellite hurricane wind retrievals and H*Wind comparisons Pet Laupattarakasem and W This paper presents a new hurricane ocean vector wind (OVW) product known as Q-Winds produced from the SeaWinds

  6. Wind resources and wind farm wake effects offshore observed from satellite

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wind resources and wind farm wake effects offshore observed from satellite Charlotte Bay Hasager to quantify the wake effect at two large offshore wind farms in Denmark. It is found that the wake velocity further. There is fast progress on planning and installation of offshore wind farms in the European waters

  7. Tuesday, March 13, 2007 POSTER SESSION I: GALILEAN SATELLITES: GEOLOGY AND MAPPING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rathbun, Julie A.

    Tuesday, March 13, 2007 POSTER SESSION I: GALILEAN SATELLITES: GEOLOGY AND MAPPING 6:30 p. Geissler P. Jaeger W. Becker T. Crown D. A. Schenk P. Geologic Mapping of the Polar Regions of Io [#1124] This abstract discusses our results from geologic mapping of the polar regions of Jupiter's moon Io using

  8. Annual satellite imaging of the world's glaciers Assessment of glacier extent and change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    GLIMS HIGH ICE Annual satellite imaging of the world's glaciers Assessment of glacier extent and change Development and population of a digital glacier data inventory #12;Glaciers of High Asia: Where was a debris-covered glacier near Mt. Everest J.S. Kargel, April 2001 #12;Gangotri Glacier, India #12;A. Kääb

  9. Annual satellite imaging of the world's glaciers Assessment of glacier extent and change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    GLIMS HIGH ICE Annual satellite imaging of the world's glaciers Assessment of glacier extent and change Development and population of a digital glacier data inventory #12;Skeletal remains of what was a debris-covered glacier near Mt. Everest J.S. Kargel, April 2001 #12;#12;#12;Global Land Ice Measurements

  10. Surface motion of mountain glaciers derived from satellite optical imagery E. Berthiera,*, H. Vadonb

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Berthier, Etienne

    Surface motion of mountain glaciers derived from satellite optical imagery E. Berthiera,*, H Abstract A complete and detailed map of the ice-velocity field on mountain glaciers is obtained by cross the displacements of glaciers. The methodology presented in this study does not require ground control points (GCPs

  11. Contribution of Alaskan glaciers to sea-level rise derived from satellite imagery

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    1 Contribution of Alaskan glaciers to sea-level rise derived from satellite imagery BERTHIER E.1: Berthier E., Schiefer E., Clarke G.K.C., Menounos B. & Remy, F. Contribution of Alaskan glaciers to sea.1038/ngeo737 #12;2 Over the past 50 years, retreating glaciers and ice caps contributed 0.5mm yr-1 to sea

  12. Satellite Image Atlas of Glaciers of the World State of the Earth's Cryosphere

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fleskes, Joe

    Satellite Image Atlas of Glaciers of the World State of the Earth's Cryosphere at the Beginning of the 21st Century: Glaciers, Global Snow Cover, Floating Ice, and Permafrost and Periglacial Environments CENTURY: GLACIERS, GLOBAL SNOW COVER, FLOATING ICE, AND PERMAFROST AND PERIGLACIAL ENVIRONMENTS A-1

  13. Changes in Area of Stubai Glaciers analysed by means of Satellite Data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Changes in Area of Stubai Glaciers analysed by means of Satellite Data for the GLIMS Project-Franzens-Universität Innsbruck eingereicht von Irene Schicker Innsbruck, März 2006 #12;#12;Abstract The extent of glaciers) image of 30 September 1985. Algorithms recommended by the GLIMS group were used for analysing glaciers

  14. Towards a deployable satellite gripper based on multisegment dielectric elastomer minimum energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Floreano, Dario

    Towards a deployable satellite gripper based on multisegment dielectric elastomer minimum energy dielectric elastomer minimum energy structures O. A. Araromi*a , I. Gavrilovichb , J. Shintakea , S. Rosseta , H. R. Sheaa a Microsystems For Space Technologies Laboratory, �cole Polytechnique Fédérale de

  15. Submitted for Publication to SOLAR ENERGY PRODUCING SATELLITE-DERIVED IRRADIANCES IN COMPLEX ARID TERRAIN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Perez, Richard R.

    Submitted for Publication to SOLAR ENERGY PRODUCING SATELLITE-DERIVED IRRADIANCES IN COMPLEX ARID spectrum. #12;Submitted for Publication to SOLAR ENERGY In its simplest description the model amounts wavelengths in the visible spectral range (0.55-0.75 µm) corresponding to the peak of the solar radiation

  16. Satellite SAR Remote Sensing of Great Lakes Ice Cover, Part 2. Ice Classification and Mapping

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Satellite SAR Remote Sensing of Great Lakes Ice Cover, Part 2. Ice Classification and Mapping° to 60° for all polarizations, was processed to radar cross-section to establish a library of signatures (look-up table) for different ice types. The library is used in the computer classifica- tion

  17. Spatio-temporal segmentation of mesoscale ocean surface dynamics using satellite data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Spatio-temporal segmentation of mesoscale ocean surface dynamics using satellite data Pierre Tandeo Temperature (SST) provide a wealth of information about ocean circulation, espe- cially mesoscale ocean an observation-driven framework, we investigate the extent to which mesoscale ocean dynamics may be decomposed

  18. GREENLAND INLAND ICE MELT-OFF: ANALYSIS OF GLOBAL GRAVITY DATA FROM THE GRACE SATELLITES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    GREENLAND INLAND ICE MELT-OFF: ANALYSIS OF GLOBAL GRAVITY DATA FROM THE GRACE SATELLITES Allan A) in meters starting at 29 July 2002 and ending at 25 August 2010. Results focussing on Greenland show indications of a transition taking place in the mass loss in Greenland from mid-2004 to early 2006. Index

  19. Cloud optical and microphysical properties derived from ground-based and satellite sensors over

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Zhanqing

    Cloud optical and microphysical properties derived from ground-based and satellite sensors over of cloud optical and microphysical properties were made at Taihu, a highly polluted site in the central Yangtze Delta region, during a research campaign from May 2008 to December 2009. Cloud optical depth (COD

  20. WATER AND ENERGY BALANCE ESTIMATION IN PUERTO RICO USING SATELLITE REMOTE SENSING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gilbes, Fernando

    countries (i.e., Haiti and the Dominican Republic). #12;Technical Approach #12;Algorithm Flow Chart ObtainWATER AND ENERGY BALANCE ESTIMATION IN PUERTO RICO USING SATELLITE REMOTE SENSING Eric.W. Harmsen Solar Radiation, wind speed, rainfall, etc,. for yesterday Expand the components of the Surface Energy

  1. Southeastern Paci c Stratocumulus: On the Validation of Satellite Retrievals David Painemal and Paquita Zuidema

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zuidema, Paquita

    ,lifting condensation level (black line),ceilometer cloud base (red dots),inversion base (white points) and MODIS cloud and Paquita Zuidema RSMAS/University of Miami dpainemal@rsmas.miami.edu 1. Introduction Since satellite cloud observations have become available,better understanding of the role of clouds in climate has been achieved

  2. 1 DECEMBER 1995 Validation of Satellite Retrievals of Cloud Microphysics and Liquid Water Path

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Han, Quingyuan

    1 DECEMBER 1995 Validation of Satellite Retrievals of Cloud Microphysics and Liquid Water Path Using Observations from FIRE 1, Introduction Q. HAN, * W. Rossow, t R. WELCH, * A. WHITE, * * AND J Cloud effective radii (r) and cloud liquid water path (LWP) are derived from ISCCP spatially sampled

  3. LAGEOS-type Satellites in Critical Supplementary Orbit Configuration and the Lense-Thirring Effect Detection

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lorenzo Iorio; David M. Lucchesi

    2003-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper we analyze quantitatively the concept of LAGEOS--type satellites in critical supplementary orbit configuration (CSOC) which has proven capable of yielding various observables for many tests of General Relativity in the terrestrial gravitational field, with particular emphasis on the measurement of the Lense--Thirring effect.

  4. LAGEOS--type Satellites in Critical Supplementary Orbit Configuration and the Lense--Thirring Effect Detection

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Iorio, L; Iorio, Lorenzo; Lucchesi, David M.

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper we analyze quantitatively the concept of LAGEOS--type satellites in critical supplementary orbit configuration (CSOC) which has proven capable of yielding various observables for many tests of General Relativity in the terrestrial gravitational field, with particular emphasis on the measurement of the Lense--Thirring effect.

  5. The Earth Observing System (EOS)Aura satellite mission is scheduled to launch in June 2004.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ://cloudsat.atmos.colostate.edu/),which is to be launched in mid-2005 [Stephens et al.,2002]. This group of satellites,including the Centre National d? Total Ozone Mapping Spectrometer (TOMS) observations from 1978 show a strong secular decrease in column the TOMS/SBUV global column and profile ozone trend measurements. What are the sources and processes

  6. SATELLITE-BASED SOLAR RESOURCE ASSESSMENT: SOCIAL, ECONOMIC AND CULTURAL CHALLENGES AND BARRIERS,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Perez, Richard R.

    SATELLITE-BASED SOLAR RESOURCE ASSESSMENT: --- SOCIAL, ECONOMIC AND CULTURAL CHALLENGES solar resource information opens door to a solid analysis capability which often opens door to new solutions, better planning, better targeted R&D, and faster, more intelligent, development of solar energy

  7. On the information content of the thermal infrared cooling rate profile from satellite instrument measurements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liou, K. N.

    On the information content of the thermal infrared cooling rate profile from satellite instrument 2008; accepted 25 February 2008; published 13 June 2008. [1] This work investigates how remote sensing of the quantities required to calculate clear-sky cooling rate profiles propagates into cooling rate profile

  8. Design and modelling of an airship station holding controller for low cost satellite operations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnson, Eric N.

    been directed in the use of autonomous airships as less expensive alternatives to satellites. A key Expressed in wind axes I. Introduction The airship is one of the oldest vehicles for aerial operations loads over long periods of time with very low fuel consumption has renewed the interest

  9. VALIDATION OF THE SUNY SATELLITE MODEL IN A METEOSAT ENVIRONMENT Richard Perez

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Perez, Richard R.

    ]. In this paper we evaluate the model's performance with another set of satellites: the European Meteosat 5 and 7 NREL, 1617 Cole Blvd. Golden, CO 80847 David_renne@nrel.gov Shannon Cowlin NREL Shannon_cowlin@nrel.gov Ray George NREL Ray_george@nrel.gov Bibek Bandyopadhyay Solar Energy Centre New Delhi, India bbibek

  10. 38Name ________________________________ Solar Proton Events can cause satellite damage and produce harmful radiation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    the solar panels 10% larger to they produce 4900 watts at launch. By the end of 2004, the power will have38Name ________________________________ Solar Proton Events can cause satellite damage and produce the SPEs between 1997 and 2004 with intensities greater than 300 pico-Flux Units (pFU). Study this table

  11. Turbo Equalization of Non-Linear Satellite Channels using Soft Interference Cancellation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rontogiannis, Athanasios A.

    Turbo Equalization of Non-Linear Satellite Channels using Soft Interference Cancellation D by such channels is considered, by employing a soft interference canceller operating in a turbo equalization framework. I. INTRODUCTION Inspired by the advent of turbo codes [1], turbo equal- ization (TE) [2] has

  12. Mesoscale eddies northeast of the Hawaiian archipelago from satellite altimeter observations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Qiu, Bo

    Mesoscale eddies northeast of the Hawaiian archipelago from satellite altimeter observations; published 16 March 2010. [1] Enhanced mesoscale eddy activity northeast of the Hawaiian archipelago by 5° longitude subregions revealed the dominant mesoscale periods ranging from 90 days near 18°N

  13. Satellite observations of mesoscale ocean features and copropagating atmospheric surface fields in the tropical belt

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xie, Shang-Ping

    Satellite observations of mesoscale ocean features and copropagating atmospheric surface fields speed and sea surface temperature (SST) over mesoscale ocean features in certain frontal regions. The aim of this study is to determine to what extent mesoscale ocean dynamics modifies the surface wind

  14. Deriving Mesoscale Surface Current Fields from Multi-Sensor Satellite Data , B. Seppke b

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hamburg,.Universität

    Deriving Mesoscale Surface Current Fields from Multi-Sensor Satellite Data M. Gade a , B. Seppke b of mesoscale surface currents in the southestern Baltic Sea (Southern Baltic Proper). Marine surface films of the two-dimensional data sets may therefore allow for the calculation of mesoscale ocean current fields

  15. Segmentation of mesoscale ocean surface dynamics using satellite SST and SSH observations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    1 Segmentation of mesoscale ocean surface dynamics using satellite SST and SSH observations Pierre about ocean circulation, espe- cially mesoscale ocean dynamics which may involve strong spatio- temporal to which mesoscale ocean dynamics may be decomposed into a mixture of dynamical modes, characterized

  16. Polar Cloud Detection using Satellite Data with Analysis and Application of Kernel Learning Algorithms

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shi, Tao

    Abstract Polar Cloud Detection using Satellite Data with Analysis and Application of Kernel Professor Bin Yu, Chair Clouds play a major role in Earth's climate and cloud detection is a crucial step climate model studies. Cloud detection is particularly difficult in the snow- and ice-covered polar

  17. Estimated solar contribution to the global surface warming using the ACRIM TSI satellite composite

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Scafetta, Nicola

    Estimated solar contribution to the global surface warming using the ACRIM TSI satellite composite minimally contributed $10­30% of the global surface temperature warming over the period 1980­2002. Citation: Scafetta, N., and B. J. West (2005), Estimated solar contribution to the global surface warming using

  18. Rotation estimation for a satellite from Sun sensors Lionel Magnis Nicolas Petit

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of the angle of incidence of solar radiation, the output signal of a Sun sensor is, roughly speaking, a cosine attitude deter- mination [2], the data produced with these techniques have to be consolidated using another , photocells 3 and 4 lie in the shadow of the satellite. The output currents of photocells 1 and 2 are roughly

  19. Preliminary environmental assessment for the Satellite Power System (SPS). Revision 1. Volume 2. Detailed assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Department of Energy (DOE) is considering several options for generating electrical power to meet future energy needs. The satellite power system (SPS), one of these options, would collect solar energy through a system of satellites in space and transfer this energy to earth. A reference system has been described that would convert the energy to microwaves and transmit the microwave energy via directive antennas to large receiving/rectifying antennas (rectennas) located on the earth. At the rectennas, the microwave energy would be converted into electricity. The potential environmental impacts of constructing and operating the satellite power system are being assessed as a part of the Department of Energy's SPS Concept Development and Evaluation Program. This report is Revision I of the Preliminary Environmental Assessment for the Satellite Power System published in October 1978. It refines and extends the 1978 assessment and provides a basis for a 1980 revision that will guide and support DOE recommendations regarding future SPS development. This is Volume 2 of two volumes. It contains the technical detail suitable for peer review and integrates information appearing in documents referenced herein. The key environmental issues associated with the SPS concern human health and safety, ecosystems, climate, and electromagnetic systems interactions. In order to address these issues in an organized manner, five tasks are reported: (I) microwave-radiation health and ecological effects; (II) nonmicrowave health and ecological effectss; (III) atmospheric effects; (IV) effects on communication systems due to ionospheric disturbance; and (V) electromagnetic compatibility. (WHK)

  20. Quantifying Errors Associated with Satellite Sampling of Offshore Wind S.C. Pryor1,2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 Quantifying Errors Associated with Satellite Sampling of Offshore Wind Speeds S.C. Pryor1,2 , R, Bloomington, IN47405, USA. Tel: 1-812-855-5155. Fax: 1-812-855-1661 Email: spryor@indiana.edu 2 Dept. of Wind an attractive proposition for measuring wind speeds over the oceans because in principle they also offer

  1. GLOBAL FLOOD AND LANDSLIDE NOWCASTS AND FORECASTS USING SATELLITE PRECIPITATION OBSERVATIONS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kuligowski, Bob

    with passive microwave (gaps filled with Geo- IR) calibrated by TRMM Research product uses TRMM radar information and monthly gauges; real-time product produced ~ 6 hrs after obs. time by TRMM/GPM data system Depth from Hydrological Model 35mm 75mm >125mm 8 Dec 2010 12 GMT #12;Adjusting NWP using satellite

  2. Estimate of Solar Radiative Forcing by Polluted Clouds Using OMI and SCIAMACHY Satellite Data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Graaf, Martin de

    scenes. We first determine the global occurrence of events in 2006 with high effective cloud fractionEstimate of Solar Radiative Forcing by Polluted Clouds Using OMI and SCIAMACHY Satellite Data P potentially have a large heating effect if they are situated above bright clouds. However, the detection

  3. Study of Multi-Scale Cloud Processes Over the Tropical Western Pacific Using Cloud-Resolving Models Constrained by Satellite Data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dudhia, Jimy

    2013-03-12T23:59:59.000Z

    Clouds in the tropical western Pacific are an integral part of the large scale environment. An improved understanding of the multi-scale structure of clouds and their interactions with the environment is critical to the ARM (Atmospheric Radiation Measurement) program for developing and evaluating cloud parameterizations, understanding the consequences of model biases, and providing a context for interpreting the observational data collected over the ARM Tropical Western Pacific (TWP) sites. Three-dimensional cloud resolving models (CRMs) are powerful tools for developing and evaluating cloud parameterizations. However, a significant challenge in using CRMs in the TWP is that the region lacks conventional data, so large uncertainty exists in defining the large-scale environment for clouds. This project links several aspects of the ARM program, from measurements to providing improved analyses, and from cloud-resolving modeling to climate-scale modeling and parameterization development, with the overall objective to improve the representations of clouds in climate models and to simulate and quantify resolved cloud effects on the large-scale environment. Our objectives will be achieved through a series of tasks focusing on the use of the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model and ARM data. Our approach includes: -- Perform assimilation of COSMIC GPS radio occultation and other satellites products using the WRF Ensemble Kalman Filter assimilation system to represent the tropical large-scale environment at 36 km grid resolution. This high-resolution analysis can be used by the community to derive forcing products for single-column models or cloud-resolving models. -- Perform cloud-resolving simulations using WRF and its nesting capabilities, driven by the improved regional analysis and evaluate the simulations against ARM datasets such as from TWP-ICE to optimize the microphysics parameters for this region. A cirrus study (Mace and co-authors) already exists for TWP-ICE using satellite and ground-based observations. -- Perform numerical experiments using WRF to investigate how convection over tropical islands in the Maritime Continent interacts with large-scale circulation and affects convection in nearby regions. -- Evaluate and apply WRF as a testbed for GCM cloud parameterizations, utilizing the ability of WRF to run on multiple scales (from cloud resolving to global) to isolate resolution and physics issues from dynamical and model framework issues. Key products will be disseminated to the ARM and larger community through distribution of data archives, including model outputs from the data assimilation products and cloud resolving simulations, and publications.

  4. The Potential Uses of Commercial Satellite Imagery in the Middle East

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vannoni, M.G.

    1999-06-08T23:59:59.000Z

    It became clear during the workshop that the applicability of commercial satellite imagery to the verification of future regional arms control agreements is limited at this time. Non-traditional security topics such as environmental protection, natural resource management, and the development of infrastructure offer the more promising applications for commercial satellite imagery in the short-term. Many problems and opportunities in these topics are regional, or at least multilateral, in nature. A further advantage is that, unlike arms control and nonproliferation applications, cooperative use of imagery in these topics can be done independently of the formal Middle East Peace Process. The value of commercial satellite imagery to regional arms control and nonproliferation, however, will increase during the next three years as new, more capable satellite systems are launched. Aerial imagery, such as that used in the Open Skies Treaty, can also make significant contributions to both traditional and non-traditional security applications but has the disadvantage of requiring access to national airspace and potentially higher cost. There was general consensus that commercial satellite imagery is under-utilized in the Middle East and resources for remote sensing, both human and institutional, are limited. This relative scarcity, however, provides a natural motivation for collaboration in non-traditional security topics. Collaborations between scientists, businesses, universities, and non-governmental organizations can work at the grass-roots level and yield contributions to confidence building as well as scientific and economic results. Joint analysis projects would benefit the region as well as establish precedents for cooperation.

  5. Systematic evaluation of satellite remote sensing for identifying uranium mines and mills.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Blair, Dianna Sue; Stork, Christopher Lyle; Smartt, Heidi Anne; Smith, Jody Lynn

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this report, we systematically evaluate the ability of current-generation, satellite-based spectroscopic sensors to distinguish uranium mines and mills from other mineral mining and milling operations. We perform this systematic evaluation by (1) outlining the remote, spectroscopic signal generation process, (2) documenting the capabilities of current commercial satellite systems, (3) systematically comparing the uranium mining and milling process to other mineral mining and milling operations, and (4) identifying the most promising observables associated with uranium mining and milling that can be identified using satellite remote sensing. The Ranger uranium mine and mill in Australia serves as a case study where we apply and test the techniques developed in this systematic analysis. Based on literature research of mineral mining and milling practices, we develop a decision tree which utilizes the information contained in one or more observables to determine whether uranium is possibly being mined and/or milled at a given site. Promising observables associated with uranium mining and milling at the Ranger site included in the decision tree are uranium ore, sulfur, the uranium pregnant leach liquor, ammonia, and uranyl compounds and sulfate ion disposed of in the tailings pond. Based on the size, concentration, and spectral characteristics of these promising observables, we then determine whether these observables can be identified using current commercial satellite systems, namely Hyperion, ASTER, and Quickbird. We conclude that the only promising observables at Ranger that can be uniquely identified using a current commercial satellite system (notably Hyperion) are magnesium chlorite in the open pit mine and the sulfur stockpile. Based on the identified magnesium chlorite and sulfur observables, the decision tree narrows the possible mineral candidates at Ranger to uranium, copper, zinc, manganese, vanadium, the rare earths, and phosphorus, all of which are milled using sulfuric acid leaching.

  6. Architecture of a Small Low-Cost Satellite D. Del Corso, C. Passerone, L. M. Reyneri, C. Sanso`e, M. Borri, S. Speretta, M. Tranchero

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ones, such as solar panels and antennas. The tem- perature range inside the satellite is [+30,+70] CArchitecture of a Small Low-Cost Satellite D. Del Corso, C. Passerone, L. M. Reyneri, C. Sanso`e, M satellite that we have developed. The main design cri- teria were low cost and fault tolerance, which have

  7. Rapid volume loss from two East Greenland outlet glaciers quantified using repeat stereo satellite imagery

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stearns, Leigh; Hamilton, Gordon S.

    2007-03-14T23:59:59.000Z

    [1] The coastal portions of Kangerdlugssuaq and Helheim glaciers in southeast Greenland lost at least 51 ± 8 km3 yr?1 of ice between 2001–2006 due to thinning and retreat, according to an analysis of sequential digital elevation models (DEMs...

  8. Altitude Distribution of the Auroral Acceleration Potential Determined from Cluster Satellite Data at Different Heights

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marklund, Goeran T.; Sadeghi, Soheil; Karlsson, Tomas; Lindqvist, Per-Arne [Space and Plasma Physics, School of Electrical Engineering, KTH, SE 10044 Stockholm (Sweden); Nilsson, Hans [Swedish Institute of Space Physics, Box 812, SE 981 28 Kiruna (Sweden); Forsyth, Colin; Fazakerley, Andrew [Mullard Space Science Laboratory, University College, Holmbury St Mary, Dorking, Surrey RH5 6NT (United Kingdom); Lucek, Elizabeth A. [Space and Atmospheric Physics Group, Blacket Laboratory, Imperial College, London (United Kingdom); Pickett, Jolene [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Iowa, Iowa City, Iowa 52242-1479 (United States)

    2011-02-04T23:59:59.000Z

    Aurora, commonly seen in the polar sky, is a ubiquitous phenomenon occurring on Earth and other solar system planets. The colorful emissions are caused by electron beams hitting the upper atmosphere, after being accelerated by quasistatic electric fields at 1-2 R{sub E} altitudes, or by wave electric fields. Although aurora was studied by many past satellite missions, Cluster is the first to explore the auroral acceleration region with multiprobes. Here, Cluster data are used to determine the acceleration potential above the aurora and to address its stability in space and time. The derived potential comprises two upper, broad U-shaped potentials and a narrower S-shaped potential below, and is stable on a 5 min time scale. The scale size of the electric field relative to that of the current is shown to depend strongly on altitude within the acceleration region. To reveal these features was possible only by combining data from the two satellites.

  9. Core-level satellites and outer core-level multiplet splitting in Mn model compounds

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nelson, A. J. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, University of California, Livermore, California 94550 (United States)] [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, University of California, Livermore, California 94550 (United States); Reynolds, John G. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, University of California, Livermore, California 94550 (United States)] [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, University of California, Livermore, California 94550 (United States); Roos, Joseph W. [Ethyl Corporation, Richmond, Virginia 23217 (United States)] [Ethyl Corporation, Richmond, Virginia 23217 (United States)

    2000-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We report a systematic study of the Mn 2p, 3s, and 3p core-level photoemission and satellite structures for Mn model compounds. Charge transfer from the ligand state to the 3d metal state is observed and is distinguished by prominent shake-up satellites. We also observe that the Mn 3s multiplet splitting becomes smaller as the Mn oxidation state increases, and that 3s-3d electron correlation reduces the branching ratio of the {sup 7}S:{sup 5}S states in the Mn 3s spectra. In addition, as the ligand electronegativity decreases, the spin-state purity is lost in the 3s spectra, as evidenced by peak broadening. Our results are best understood in terms of the configuration-interaction model including intrashell electron correlation, charge transfer, and final-state screening. (c) 2000 American Vacuum Society.

  10. Portable Microwave Frequency Dissemination in Free Space and Implications on Ground-Satellite Synchronization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Bo; Bai, Yu; Yuan, Yibo; Gao, Chao; Wang, Lijun

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Frequency dissemination and synchronization in free space plays an important role in global navigation satellite system (GNSS), radio astronomy and synthetic aperture radar (SAR). In this paper, we demonstrate a portable radio frequency (RF) dissemination scheme via free space using microwave antennas. The setup has a good environment adaptability and high dissemination stability. The frequency signal is disseminated at different distances ranging from 10 to 640 m with a fixed 10 Hz locking bandwidth, and the scaling law of dissemination stability on distance and averaging time is discussed. The preliminary extrapolation shows that the dissemination stability may reach $1\\times10^{-12}/s$ in ground-to-satellite synchronization, which far exceeds all present methods, and is worthy for further study.

  11. Autonomous Sub-Pixel Satellite Track Endpoint Determination for Space Based Images

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Simms, L M

    2011-03-07T23:59:59.000Z

    An algorithm for determining satellite track endpoints with sub-pixel resolution in spaced-based images is presented. The algorithm allows for significant curvature in the imaged track due to rotation of the spacecraft capturing the image. The motivation behind the subpixel endpoint determination is first presented, followed by a description of the methodology used. Results from running the algorithm on real ground-based and simulated spaced-based images are shown to highlight its effectiveness.

  12. Short communication Satellite-derived surface water pCO2 and airsea CO2 fluxes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Short communication Satellite-derived surface water pCO2 and air­sea CO2 fluxes in the northern for the estimation of the partial pressure of carbon dioxide (pCO2) and air­sea CO2 fluxes in the northern South), respectively, the monthly pCO2 fields were computed. The derived pCO2 was compared with the shipboard pCO2

  13. Field distribution and genetic variability of Panicum mosaic virus satellite RNAs in St. Augustine decline

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cabrera Perez, Over

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    . . . . . . . . . . . 20 Introduction . . Materials and Methods. . . Results. . . . . . . . . . Discussion. . . . 20 . 21 . 24 . 29 111 GENETIC DIVERSITY OF PANICUM MOSAIC VIRUS SATELLITE RNAs IN ST. AUGUSTINEGRASS. . 32 Introduction . . Materials and Methods...RNA is found associated with Australian isolates of BYDV-RPV. This non- coding satRNA is undetectable in the field and becomes perceptible only following greenhouse propagation. This satRNA attenuates the symptoms induced by the helper virus (BYDV-RPV) alone...

  14. Satellite observations and estimates of surface flow in the northwestern Gulf of Mexico

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barron, Charlie Nelms

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    methods of observation do not provide sufficient spatial and temporal coverage and resolution to reliably depict surface flow on the required scales. In earlier studies, researchers extracted information on the nature of Gulf circulation from historical... 1992) Charlie Nelms Barron Jr. , B. S. , Texas A&M University Co-Chairs of Advisory Committee: Dr. Andrew C. Vastano Dr. Robert O. Reid Data from two satellite-based instrument systems are used to provide a description of the surface circulation...

  15. Satellite-derived estimates of forest leaf area index in southwest Western Australia are not tightly coupled to

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Montana, University of

    Satellite-derived estimates of forest leaf area index in southwest Western Australia Engineering, University of Western Australia, Nedlands, WA 6009, Australia, Department of Forest Ecosystems and Environment, University of Western Australia, Nedlands, WA 6009, Australia, §Numerical Terradynamics

  16. Investigation of Thin Cirrus Cloud Optical and Microphysical Properties on the Basis of Satellite Observations and Fast Radiative Transfer Models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Chenxi

    2013-07-25T23:59:59.000Z

    This dissertation focuses on the global investigation of optically thin cirrus cloud optical thickness (tau) and microphysical properties, such as, effective particle size (D_(eff)) and ice crystal habits (shapes), based on the global satellite...

  17. Development of a guidance, navigation and control architecture and validation process enabling autonomous docking to a tumbling satellite

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nolet, Simon, 1975-

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The capability to routinely perform autonomous docking is a key enabling technology for future space exploration, as well as assembly and servicing missions for spacecraft and commercial satellites. Particularly, in more ...

  18. Investigation of the Dynamical, Macrophysical and Radiative Properties of High Clouds Combining Satellite Observations and Climate Model Simulations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Yue

    2012-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

    This dissertation investigates three topics concerning high clouds: 1) convectively coupled equatorial wave (CCEW) signals derived from cloud top temperature (CTT) and cirrus optical thickness retrieved from satellite observations; 2) investigation...

  19. Optimal estimation of ionosphere-induced group delays of global positioning satellite signals during launch, orbit and re-entry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnson, Andrea Marie, S.M. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    There are many sources of range error in a Global Positioning Satellite (GPS) signal that has traveled to a receiver near the earth's surface. Among these is the ionospheric group delay. In the past, a single-state, ...

  20. Investigation of Thin Cirrus Cloud Optical and Microphysical Properties on the Basis of Satellite Observations and Fast Radiative Transfer Models 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Chenxi

    2013-07-25T23:59:59.000Z

    observations and fast radiative transfer models (RTMs). In the first part, we develop two computationally efficient RTMs simulating satellite observations under cloudy-sky conditions in the visible/shortwave infrared (VIS/SWIR) and thermal inferred (IR...

  1. High-altitude, long-endurance UAVs vs. satellites : potential benefits for U.S. Army applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Symolon, William Everette, Major

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Satellites have become a critical component of nearly every aspect of modern life. In addition to well-known civilian applications, military applications of space-based platforms include supporting mission operations through ...

  2. Space-based solar power generation using a distributed network of satellites and methods for efficient space power transmission

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McLinko, Ryan M.

    Space-based solar power (SSP) generation is being touted as a solution to our ever-increasing energy consumption and dependence on fossil fuels. Satellites in Earth's orbit can capture solar energy through photovoltaic ...

  3. Development of a new class of satellites: a composite lightweight affordable spacecraft structure

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thompson, T.C.; Parietti, L.

    1996-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) in partnership with Composite Optics Incorporated (COI) has successfully designed and tested a Composite Lightweight Affordable Structure (CLASS). The use of advanced composites in space applications is well developed, but the application of an all-composite satellite structure has not been achieved until now. The development of this low-cost, lightweight, composite technology for use in small satellite structures, in this case, for the Fast On-Orbit Recording of Transient Events (FORT{acute E}) satellite mission will make a considerable contribution to the advanced spacecraft community. A common practice for constructing small spacecraft structures is to use an all-aluminum spacecraft bus. Compared to a composite structure, this reduces the payload capacity significantly; however, the cost of the aluminum structure has historically been lower than one of that uses lightweight components. LANL mission requirements dictate the need for a long term solution that substantially increased the ratio of payload to structural mass while maintaining a low-risk low-cost approach. LANL intends to use the concept developed for FORT{acute E} on future missions requiring similar enhanced payload capacities. 1 fig.

  4. Simultaneous hierarchical segmentation and vectorization of satellite images through combined data sampling and anisotropic triangulation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Grazzini, Jacopo [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Prasad, Lakshman [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Dillard, Scott [PNNL

    2010-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

    The automatic detection, recognition , and segmentation of object classes in remote sensed images is of crucial importance for scene interpretation and understanding. However, it is a difficult task because of the high variability of satellite data. Indeed, the observed scenes usually exhibit a high degree of complexity, where complexity refers to the large variety of pictorial representations of objects with the same semantic meaning and also to the extensive amount of available det.ails. Therefore, there is still a strong demand for robust techniques for automatic information extraction and interpretation of satellite images. In parallel, there is a growing interest in techniques that can extract vector features directly from such imagery. In this paper, we investigate the problem of automatic hierarchical segmentation and vectorization of multispectral satellite images. We propose a new algorithm composed of the following steps: (i) a non-uniform sampling scheme extracting most salient pixels in the image, (ii) an anisotropic triangulation constrained by the sampled pixels taking into account both strength and directionality of local structures present in the image, (iii) a polygonal grouping scheme merging, through techniques based on perceptual information , the obtained segments to a smaller quantity of superior vectorial objects. Besides its computational efficiency, this approach provides a meaningful polygonal representation for subsequent image analysis and/or interpretation.

  5. Temperature (oC)! Height(km)!

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and forecasting ! ·Temperature decreases in altitude + water vapor > instabilities can develop ·Well mixed + O2 + M = O3 + M to proceed. It is M here that transfers the excess energy to the surrounding created and transported to high latitudes PSCs form in cold, dark, polar lower stratosphere PSCs process

  6. Brazil's Legal Amazon 5 million km2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Frank, Thomas D.

    effect on atmosphere · Effect cloud formation · Increase cloud cover: aerosols that do not absorb much sunlight · act as seeds for clouds · Decrease cloud cover: aerosols that absorb sunlight · create layer photometer · Direct solar radiation · Calculate columnar aerosol optical depth (AOD) · Level 2 data · AOT 500

  7. KM_C364e-20170629133124

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville PowerCherries 82981-1cnHigh SchoolIn12electron beamJoin2015Just Plain Cool,relocatesm

  8. KM_C654e-20150324133840

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville PowerCherries 82981-1cnHigh SchoolIn12electron beamJoin2015Just Plain Cool,relocatesm

  9. Patterns of satellite-viewed, subtropical, jet-stream clouds in relation to the observed wind field

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vogt, Richard Joel

    1972-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    PATTERNS OF SATELLITE-VIEWED, SUBTROPICAL, JET- STREAM CLOUDS IN RELATION TO THE OBSERVED WIND FIELD A Thesis by RICHARD JOEL VOGT Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirement... for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE December 1972 Major Subject: Meteorology PATTERNS OP SATELLITE-VIEWED, SUBTROPICAL, JET-STREAM CLOUDS IN RELATION TO THE OBSERVED WIND FIELD A Thesis by RICHARD JOEL VOGT Approved as to style and content by: (Chairman...

  10. Satellite Magnetic Resonances of a Bound Pair of Half-Quantum Vortices in Rotating Superfluid He-3-a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hu, Chia-Ren; MAKI, K.

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    PHYSICAL REVIE%' B VOLUME 36, NUMBER 13 1 NOVEMBER 1987 Satellite magnetic resonances of a bound pair of half-quantum vortices in rotating superfluid He- A Chia-Ren Hu Center for Theoretical Physics, Department of Physics, Texas A&M University..., College Station, Texas 77843-4242 Kazumi Maki Department of Physics, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, California 90089-0484 (Received 29 December 1986) The transverse magnetic resonance satellite frequency and intensity associated with a...

  11. Evaluating Clouds, Aerosols, and their Interactions in Three Global Climate Models using COSP and Satellite Observations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ban-Weiss, George; Jin, Ling; Bauer, S.; Bennartz, Ralph; Liu, Xiaohong; Zhang, Kai; Ming, Yi; Guo, Huan; Jiang, Jonathan

    2014-09-23T23:59:59.000Z

    Accurately representing aerosol-cloud interactions in global climate models is challenging. As parameterizations evolve, it is important to evaluate their performance with appropriate use of observations. In this work we compare aerosols, clouds, and their interactions in three climate models (AM3, CAM5, ModelE) to MODIS satellite observations. Modeled cloud properties were diagnosed using the CFMIP Observations Simulator Package (COSP). Cloud droplet number concentrations (N) were derived using the same algorithm for both satellite-simulated model values and observations. We find that aerosol optical depth tau simulated by models is similar to observations. For N, AM3 and CAM5 capture the observed spatial pattern of higher values in near-coast versus remote ocean regions, though modeled values in general are higher than observed. In contrast, ModelE simulates lower N in most near-coast versus remote regions. Aerosol- cloud interactions were computed as the sensitivity of N to tau for marine liquid clouds off the coasts of South Africa and Eastern Asia where aerosol pollution varies in time. AM3 and CAM5 are in most cases more sensitive than observations, while the sensitivity for ModelE is statistically insignificant. This widely used sensitivity could be subject to misinterpretation due to the confounding influence of meteorology on both aerosols and clouds. A simple framework for assessing the N – tau sensitivity at constant meteorology illustrates that observed sensitivity can change from positive to statistically insignificant when including the confounding influence of relative humidity. Satellite simulated values of N were compared to standard model output and found to be higher with a bias of 83 cm-3.

  12. Social acceptability of Satellite Power Systems (SPS): the near-term outlook

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Klineberg, S L

    1980-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    It is important, at this early stage in the concept development and evaluation of Satellite Power Systems, to explore aspects of contemporary social change that may be expected to complicate the process of achieving the necessary support of the American public for this new technological venture. Current public attitudes make it appear unlikely that a consensus will evolve during the 1980s favoring costly efforts to develop vast new supplies of conventional energy. Opinion polls reveal a pervasive worry over inflation, a broadening of aspirations to encompass quality-of-life concerns, a growing distrust of central governments, large corporations, big science and technology, and a continuing commitment to environmental protection - all of which suggests a social environment that is likely to resist the development of a major new high-technology energy system such as the SPS. Opposition to satellite power will focus on the high front-end development costs, on environmental and technical uncertainties, and on a generalized distrust of large bureaucracies and esoteric technologies. The SPS concept is also likely to be viewed with skepticism by those with vested interests in the long-run uses of coal, shale, fission, fusion, or on-site solar technologies. The growing commitment to energy conservation and the spreading deployment of dispersed renewable-energy systems strongly suggest that the unmet US demand for centrally generated electricity is unlikely to grow sufficiently over the next twenty years to convince a reluctant public of the need for so large an investment of scarce resources in the SPS program. Satellite Power Systems will have a problem in the area of public acceptability.

  13. Nocturnal effects in the retrieval of land surface temperatures from satellite measurements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Platt, C.M.R.; Prata, A.J. (CSIRO, Mordialloc, Victoria (Australia). Div. of Atmospheric Research)

    1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The determination of accurate land surface temperatures from infrared satellite measurements is difficult because of variations in atmospheric water vapor and in land surface emissivity. Here the authors show that under certain conditions (viz. when the atmosphere near the surface is warmer than the surface), there is a cancellation between absorbed and emitted radiation. This often occurs during clear nights when intense nocturnal cooling of the surface causes inversions in the temperature and water vapor profiles. They demonstrate that a reasonable estimate of the land surface temperature can be made from a single channel infrared measurement in these conditions.

  14. Program assessment report, statement of findings. Satellite power systems concept development and evaluation program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    1980-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    What is known, uncertain, and unknown about the Solar Power Satellite (SPS) concept is stated. The important technical, environmental, and cost goal questions that must be answered prior to making a commitment to the SPS concept are discussed. Although significant technological, environmental and economic questions remain to be answered, the preliminary investigations undertaken in the CDEP do provide a basis for a policy decision on further commitment. Also, areas of research and experimentation required to acquire the knowledge by which a series of informed, time-phased decisions may be made concerning the possibility of the SPS concept playing a major role in the United States' energy future are suggested.

  15. Frequency sweep for a beam system with local unilateral contact modeling satellite solar arrays

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hazim, Hamad

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In order to save mass of satellite solar arrays, the flexibility of the panels becomes not negligible and they may strike each other; this may damage the structure. To prevent this, rubber snubbers are mounted at well chosen points of the structure and they act as one sided linear spring; as a negative consequence, the dynamic of these panels becomes nonlinear. The finite element approximation is used to solve partial differential equations governing the structural dynamic. Frequency sweep has been performed numerically to study the dynamic behavior. Non linear normal modes are under study

  16. Measurement of the gravitational redshift effect with RadioAstron satellite

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Birukov, A V; Litvinov, D A; Porayko, N K; Rudenko, V N

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    RadioAstron satellite admits in principle a testing the gravitational redshift effect with an accuracy of better than $10^{-5}$. It would surpass the result of Gravity Probe A mission at least an order of magnitude. However, RadioAstron's communications and frequency transfer systems are not adapted for a direct application of the non relativistic Doppler and troposphere compensation scheme used in the Gravity Probe A experiment. This leads to degradation of the redshift test accuracy approximately to the level 0.01. We discuss the way to overcome this difficulty and present preliminary results based on data obtained during special observing sessions scheduled for testing the new techniques.

  17. Measurement of the gravitational redshift effect with RadioAstron satellite

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. V. Birukov; V. L. Kauts; D. A. Litvinov; N. K. Porayko; V. N. Rudenko

    2015-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

    RadioAstron satellite admits in principle a testing the gravitational redshift effect with an accuracy of better than $10^{-5}$. It would surpass the result of Gravity Probe A mission at least an order of magnitude. However, RadioAstron's communications and frequency transfer systems are not adapted for a direct application of the non relativistic Doppler and troposphere compensation scheme used in the Gravity Probe A experiment. This leads to degradation of the redshift test accuracy approximately to the level 0.01. We discuss the way to overcome this difficulty and present preliminary results based on data obtained during special observing sessions scheduled for testing the new techniques.

  18. Analysis of forest-fire smoke using satellite imagery. Master's thesis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    De Vries, P.J.

    1989-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    NOAA-9 AVHRR data from 17 and 18 September 1987 were used to perform forest-fire smoke analysis and tracking. The analysis included alignment, subtraction and division of image digital values to produce an Aerosol Particle Size Index (S12) after Frost (1988). S12 provides information about the slope of the aerosol particle size distribution curve and can be used to infer particle-size distribution changes over time. The results provide evidence that the smoke aging process may be successfully studied using satellite imagery, provided careful analysis and removal of background effects are performed.

  19. Cirrus cloud-temperature interactions over a tropical station, Gadanki from lidar and satellite observations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    S, Motty G, E-mail: mottygs@gmail.com; Satyanarayana, M., E-mail: mottygs@gmail.com; Krishnakumar, V., E-mail: mottygs@gmail.com; Dhaman, Reji k., E-mail: mottygs@gmail.com [Department of Optoelectronics, University of Kerala, Kariavattom, Trivandrum-695 581, Kerala (India)

    2014-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The cirrus clouds play an important role in the radiation budget of the earth's atmospheric system and are important to characterize their vertical structure and optical properties. LIDAR measurements are obtained from the tropical station Gadanki (13.5{sup 0} N, 79.2{sup 0} E), India, and meteorological indicators derived from Radiosonde data. Most of the cirrus clouds are observed near to the tropopause, which substantiates the strength of the tropical convective processes. The height and temperature dependencies of cloud height, optical depth, and depolarization ratio were investigated. Cirrus observations made using CALIPSO satellite are compared with lidar data for systematic statistical study of cirrus climatology.

  20. Photo of the Week: Satellite View of Sandy at Night | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directed offOCHCO Overview OCHCO Overview OCHCO OCHCOControlGuide to aEnergy Living Large --Satellite

  1. Stimulated Radiative Molecular Association in the Early Solar System: Orbital Radii of Satellites of Uranus, Jupiter, Neptune, and Saturn

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lombardi, James C

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The present investigation relates the orbital radii of regular satellites of Uranus, Jupiter, Neptune, and Saturn to photon energies in the spectra of atomic and molecular hydrogen. To explain these observations a model is developed involving stimulated radiative molecular association (SRMA) reactions among the photons and atoms in the protosatellite disks of the planets. In this model thermal energy is extracted from each disk due to a resonance at radii where there is a match between the temperature in the disk and a photon energy. Matter accumulates at these radii, and satellites and rings are ultimately formed. Orbital radii of satellites of Uranus, Jupiter, and Neptune are related to photon energies ($E_{PM}$ values) in the spectrum of molecular hydrogen. Orbital radii of satellites of Saturn are related to photon energies ($E_{PA}$ values) in the spectrum of atomic hydrogen. The first hint that such relationships exist is found in the linearity of the graphs of orbital radii of uranian satellites vs. or...

  2. DEVELOPMENT OF IMPROVED TECHNIQUES FOR SATELLITE REMOTE SENSING OF CLOUDS AND RADIATION USING ARM DATA, FINAL REPORT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Minnis, Patrick [NASA Langley Research Center, Hampton, VA

    2013-06-28T23:59:59.000Z

    During the period, March 1997 – February 2006, the Principal Investigator and his research team co-authored 47 peer-reviewed papers and presented, at least, 138 papers at conferences, meetings, and workshops that were supported either in whole or in part by this agreement. We developed a state-of-the-art satellite cloud processing system that generates cloud properties over the Atmospheric Radiation (ARM) surface sites and surrounding domains in near-real time and outputs the results on the world wide web in image and digital formats. When the products are quality controlled, they are sent to the ARM archive for further dissemination. These products and raw satellite images can be accessed at http://cloudsgate2.larc.nasa.gov/cgi-bin/site/showdoc?docid=4&cmd=field-experiment-homepage&exp=ARM and are used by many in the ARM science community. The algorithms used in this system to generate cloud properties were validated and improved by the research conducted under this agreement. The team supported, at least, 11 ARM-related or supported field experiments by providing near-real time satellite imagery, cloud products, model results, and interactive analyses for mission planning, execution, and post-experiment scientific analyses. Comparisons of cloud properties derived from satellite, aircraft, and surface measurements were used to evaluate uncertainties in the cloud properties. Multiple-angle satellite retrievals were used to determine the influence of cloud structural and microphysical properties on the exiting radiation field.

  3. gLISA: geosynchronous Laser Interferometer Space Antenna concepts with off-the-shelf satellites

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massimo Tinto; Daniel DeBra; Sasha Buchman; Scott Tilley

    2014-10-07T23:59:59.000Z

    We discuss two geosynchronous gravitational wave mission concepts, which we generically name gLISA. One relies on the science instrument hosting program onboard geostationary commercial satellites, while the other takes advantage of recent developments in the aerospace industry that result in dramatic satellite and launching vehicle cost reductions for a dedicated geosynchronous mission. To achieve the required level of disturbance free-fall onboard these large and heavy platforms we propose a "two-stage" drag-free system, which incorporates the Modular Gravitational Reference Sensor (MGRS) (developed at Stanford University) and does not rely on the use of micro-Newton thrusters. Although both mission concepts are characterized by different technical and programmatic challenges, individually they could be flown and operated at a cost significantly lower than those of previously envisioned gravitational wave missions. We estimate both mission concepts to cost less than 500M US$ each, and in the year 2015 we will perform at JPL a detailed selecting mission cost analysis.

  4. Time series modeling and large scale global solar radiation forecasting from geostationary satellites data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Voyant, Cyril; Muselli, Marc; Paoli, Christophe; Nivet, Marie Laure

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    When a territory is poorly instrumented, geostationary satellites data can be useful to predict global solar radiation. In this paper, we use geostationary satellites data to generate 2-D time series of solar radiation for the next hour. The results presented in this paper relate to a particular territory, the Corsica Island, but as data used are available for the entire surface of the globe, our method can be easily exploited to another place. Indeed 2-D hourly time series are extracted from the HelioClim-3 surface solar irradiation database treated by the Heliosat-2 model. Each point of the map have been used as training data and inputs of artificial neural networks (ANN) and as inputs for two persistence models (scaled or not). Comparisons between these models and clear sky estimations were proceeded to evaluate the performances. We found a normalized root mean square error (nRMSE) close to 16.5% for the two best predictors (scaled persistence and ANN) equivalent to 35-45% related to ground measurements. F...

  5. Telescope Spectrophotometric and Absolute Flux Calibration, and National Security Applications, Using a Tunable Laser on a Satellite

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Justin Albert; William Burgett; Jason Rhodes

    2006-05-19T23:59:59.000Z

    We propose a tunable laser-based satellite-mounted spectrophotometric and absolute flux calibration system, to be utilized by ground- and space-based telescopes. As spectrophotometric calibration may play a significant role in the accuracy of photometric redshift measurement, and photometric redshift accuracy is important for measuring dark energy using SNIa, weak gravitational lensing, and baryon oscillations, a method for reducing such uncertainties is needed. We propose to improve spectrophotometric calibration, currently obtained using standard stars, by placing a tunable laser and a wide-angle light source on a satellite by early next decade (perhaps included in the upgrade to the GPS satellite network) to improve absolute flux calibration and relative spectrophotometric calibration across the visible and near-infrared spectrum. As well as fundamental astrophysical applications, the system proposed here potentially has broad utility for defense and national security applications such as ground target illumination and space communication.

  6. The Effect of Lunar-like Satellites on the Orbital Infrared Light Curves of Earth-analog Planets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nicholas A. Moskovitz; Eric Gaidos; Darren Williams

    2008-10-17T23:59:59.000Z

    We investigate the influence of lunar-like satellites on the infrared orbital light curves of Earth-analog extra-solar planets. Such light curves will be obtained by NASA's Terrestrial Planet Finder (TPF) and ESA's Darwin missions as a consequence of repeat observations to confirm the companion status of a putative planet. We use an energy balance model to calculate disk-averaged infrared (bolometric) fluxes from planet-satellite systems over a full orbital period (one year). The satellites are assumed to lack an atmosphere, have a low thermal inertia like that of the Moon and span a range of plausible radii. The planets are assumed to have thermal and orbital properties that mimic those of the Earth while their obliquities and orbital longitudes of inferior conjunction remain free parameters. Even if the gross thermal properties of the planet can be independently constrained (e.g. via spectroscopy or visible-wavelength detection of specular glint from a surface ocean) only the largest (approximately Mars-size) lunar-like satellites can be detected by light curve data from a TPF-like instrument (i.e. one that achieves a photometric signal-to-noise of 10-20 at infrared wavelengths). Non-detection of a lunar-like satellite can obfuscate the interpretation of a given system's infrared light curve so that it may resemble a single planet with high obliquity, different orbital longitude of vernal equinox relative to inferior conjunction and in some cases drastically different thermal characteristics. If the thermal properties of the planet are not independently established then the presence of a lunar-like satellite cannot be inferred from infrared data, thus demonstrating that photometric light curves alone can only be used for preliminary study of extra-solar Earth-like planets.

  7. All-optical remote monitoring of propane gas using a 5-km-long, low-loss optical fiber link and an InGaP light-emitting diode in the 1. 68-. mu. m region

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chan, K.; Ito, H.; Inaba, H.

    1984-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We report the fully optical remote detection of low-level propane (C/sub 3/H/sub 8/) gas realized by the scheme based on a long distance, very low-loss silica optical fiber link connected to a compact absorption cell in conjunction with a high radiant InGaP light-emitting diode at 1.68 ..mu..m. For this application, the near-infrared absorption spectrum of propane was measured and studied to find very complicated bands around 1.69, 1.53, and 1.38 ..mu..m. This simple system, employing a 5-km-long silica optical fiber link, was demonstrated to be capable of achieving reproducibly the detection sensitivity less than 2.4 Torr for propane gas in air, i.e., about 14% of the lower explosion limit of propane density. This result verifies a large capability for major applications to various strategic points within the environment, such as industrial complexes as well as urban and residential areas, with considerably increased reliability and safety over the existing techniques.

  8. > REPLACE THIS LINE WITH YOUR PAPER IDENTIFICATION NUMBER (DOUBLE-CLICK HERE TO EDIT) < 1 The Utilization of Satellite Images to Identify

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The Utilization of Satellite Images to Identify Trees Endangering Transmission Lines Y. Kobayashi, G. G. Karady, G to determine tree interference with overhead transmission lines. Index Terms-- satellite images, tree trimming a transmission lines may inter- fere with circuit operation and may produce short cir- cuits. As a typical

  9. GEOPHYSICAL RESEARCH LETTERS, VOL. 40, 16, doi:10.1002/grl.50952, 2013 First observations of SO2 from the satellite Suomi NPP OMPS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Jun

    from the satellite Suomi NPP OMPS: Widespread air pollution events over China Kai Yang,1,2 Russell R, and J. Wang (2013), First observations of SO2 from the satellite Suomi NPP OMPS: Widespread air] in the 1940s to 1970s. The largest sources of air pollutants in China are coal combustion and motor vehicle

  10. Using Satellite Ocean Color Data to Derive an Empirical Model for the Penetration Depth of Solar Radiation (Hp) in the Tropical Pacific Ocean

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, .Dake

    Radiation (Hp) in the Tropical Pacific Ocean RONG-HUA ZHANG State Key Laboratory of Satellite OceanUsing Satellite Ocean Color Data to Derive an Empirical Model for the Penetration Depth of Solar Environment Dynamics, Second Institute of Oceanography, State Oceanic Administration, Hangzhou, Zhejiang

  11. Using infrared satellite data to drive a thermo-rheological/stochastic lava flow emplacement model: A method for near-real-time volcanic

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wright, Robert

    Using infrared satellite data to drive a thermo-rheological/stochastic lava flow emplacement model the downhill paths that a lava flow could possibly follow and a thermo­rheological model to terminate, and A. J. L. Harris (2008), Using infrared satellite data to drive a thermo-rheological/stochastic lava

  12. Total Ozone Mapping Spectrometer (TOMS) Derived Data, Global Earth Coverage (GEC) from NASA's Earth Probe Satellite

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    This is data from an external datastream processed through the ARM External Data Center (XDC) at Brookhaven National Laboratory. The XDC identifies sources and acquires data, called "external data", to augment the data being generated within the ARM program. The external data acquired are usually converted from native format to either netCDF or HDF formats. The GEC collection contains global data derived from the Total Ozone Mapping Spectrometer (TOMS) instrument on the Earth Probe satellite, consisting of daily values of aerosol index, ozone and reflectivity remapped into a regular 1x1.25 deg grid. Data are available from July 25, 1996 - December 31, 2005, but have been updated or replaced as of September 2007. See the explanation on the ARM web site at http://www.arm.gov/xds/static/toms.stm and the information at the NASA/TOMS web site: http://toms.gsfc.nasa.gov/ (Registration required)

  13. Magnetic Field Generation in Planets and Satellites by Natural Nuclear Fission Reactors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. Marvin Herndon

    2007-09-27T23:59:59.000Z

    One of the most fundamental problems in physics has been to understand the nature of the mechanism that generates the geomagnetic field and the magnetic fields of other planets and satellites. For decades, the dynamo mechanism, thought to be responsible for generating the geomagnetic field and other planetary magnetic fields, has been ascribed to convection in each planet's iron-alloy core. Recently, I described the problems inherent in Earth-core convection and proposed instead that the geomagnetic field is produced by a dynamo mechanism involving convection, not in the fluid core, but in the electrically conductive, fluid, fission-product sub-shell of a natural nuclear fission reactor at the center of the Earth, called the georeactor. Here I set forth in detail the commonality in the Solar System of the matter like that of the inside of the Earth, which is my basis for generalizing the concept of planetary magnetic field generation by natural planetocentric nuclear fission reactors.

  14. Search for Very High Energy Emission from Satellite-triggered GRBs with the Milagro Observatory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Parkinson, P M S; Atkins, R; Benbow, W; Berley, D; Blaufuss, E; Coyne, D G; De Young, T R; Dingus, B L; Dorfan, D E; Ellsworth, R W; Fleysher, L; Gisler, G; González, M M; Goodman, J A; Haines, T J; Hays, E; Hoffman, C M; Kelley, L A; Lansdell, C P; Linnemann, J T; McEnery, J E; Miller, R S; Mincer, A I; Morales, M F; Némethy, P; Noyes, D; Ryan, J M; Samuelson, F W; Saz-Parkinson, P M; Shoup, A; Sinnis, G; Smith, A J; Sullivan, G W; Williams, D A; Wilson, M E; Xu, X W; Yodh, G B

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Milagro gamma-ray observatory employs a water Cherenkov detector to observe extensive air showers produced by high energy particles interacting in the Earth's atmosphere. Milagro has a wide field of view (2 sr) and high duty cycle (> 90%) making it an ideal all-sky monitor of the northern hemisphere in the 100 GeV to 100 TeV energy range. More than 45 satellite-triggered gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) have occurred in the field of view of Milagro since January 2000, with the rate of bursts increasing significantly with the launch of Swift. We discuss the most recent results of a search for very high energy (VHE) emission from these GRBs.

  15. Assimilation of satellite images into a sediment transport model of Lake Michigan.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stroud, J.; Lesht, B.; Beletsky, D.; Stein, M.; Univ. of Pennsylvania; NOAA; Univ. of Michigan; Univ. of Chicago

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper we develop and examine several schemes for combining daily images obtained from the Sea-viewing Wide Field Spectrometer (SeaWiFS) with a two-dimensional sediment transport model of Lake Michigan. We consider two data assimilation methods, direct insertion and a kriging-based approach, and perform a forecasting study focused on a 2-month period in spring 1998 when a large storm caused substantial amounts of sediment resuspension and horizontal sediment transport in the lake. By beginning with the simplest possible forecast method and sequentially adding complexity we are able to assess the improvements offered by combining the satellite data with the numerical model. In our application, we find that data assimilation schemes that include both the data and the lake dynamics improve forecast root mean square error by 40% over purely model-based approaches and by 20% over purely data-based approaches.

  16. A MEGACAM SURVEY OF OUTER HALO SATELLITES. II. BLUE STRAGGLERS IN THE LOWEST STELLAR DENSITY SYSTEMS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Santana, Felipe A.; Munoz, Ricardo R. [Departamento de Astronomia, Universidad de Chile, Camino El Observatorio 1515, Las Condes, Santiago (Chile); Geha, Marla [Astronomy Department, Yale University, New Haven, CT 06520 (United States); Cote, Patrick; Stetson, Peter [Herzberg Institute of Astrophysics, National Research Council of Canada, Victoria, BC, V9E 2E7 (Canada); Simon, Joshua D. [Observatories of the Carnegie Institution of Washington, 813 Santa Barbara Street, Pasadena, CA 91101 (United States); Djorgovski, S. G., E-mail: fsantana@das.uchile.cl, E-mail: rmunoz@das.uchile.cl [Astronomy Department, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA, 91125 (United States)

    2013-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a homogeneous study of blue straggler stars across 10 outer halo globular clusters, 3 classical dwarf spheroidal galaxies, and 9 ultra-faint galaxies based on deep and wide-field photometric data taken with MegaCam on the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope. We find blue straggler stars to be ubiquitous among these Milky Way satellites. Based on these data, we can test the importance of primordial binaries or multiple systems on blue straggler star formation in low-density environments. For the outer halo globular clusters, we find an anti-correlation between the specific frequency of blue stragglers and absolute magnitude, similar to that previously observed for inner halo clusters. When plotted against density and encounter rate, the frequency of blue stragglers is well fit by a single trend with a smooth transition between dwarf galaxies and globular clusters; this result points to a common origin for these satellites' blue stragglers. The fraction of blue stragglers stays constant and high in the low encounter rate regime spanned by our dwarf galaxies, and decreases with density and encounter rate in the range spanned by our globular clusters. We find that young stars can mimic blue stragglers in dwarf galaxies only if their ages are 2.5 {+-} 0.5 Gyr and they represent {approx}1%-7% of the total number of stars, which we deem highly unlikely. These results point to mass-transfer or mergers of primordial binaries or multiple systems as the dominant blue straggler formation mechanism in low-density systems.

  17. Direct comparison of pulsating aurora observed simultaneously by the FAST satellite and from the ground at Syowa

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Berkeley, University of

    Direct comparison of pulsating aurora observed simultaneously by the FAST satellite and from September 2002; published 15 November 2002. [1] We have made a direct comparison of a pulsating aurora: a poleward moving pulsation and a standing mode pulsation, each with a period of $5 sec. The aurora occurs

  18. Generation region of pulsating aurora obtained simultaneously by the FAST satellite and a Syowa-Iceland conjugate pair of observatories

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Berkeley, University of

    Generation region of pulsating aurora obtained simultaneously by the FAST satellite and a Syowa 2004; published 7 October 2004. [1] We have carried out a direct comparison of pulsating auroras), with reference to simultaneous data obtained by a Syowa-Iceland conjugate pair of observatories. The aurora

  19. Probabilistic Non-Repudiation for Source Authentication with TESLA Certificates in Hybrid Satellite/Wireless Networks and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baras, John S.

    Probabilistic Non-Repudiation for Source Authentication with TESLA Certificates in Hybrid Satellite describe a novel non-repudiation mechanism for an authentication protocol based on the extended TESLA to this problem, we have proposed a new class of lightweight, symmetric key certificates called extended TESLA

  20. Coordinated observation of the dayside magnetospheric entry and exit of the THEMIS satellites with ground-based

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Berkeley, University of

    Coordinated observation of the dayside magnetospheric entry and exit of the THEMIS satellites. Weatherwax (2009), Coordinated observation of the dayside magnetospheric entry and exit of the THEMIS). The THEMIS constellation entered and exited the magnetosphere near magnetic midday on 10 and 12 August 2007

  1. Abstract--The INTEGRAL satellite was launched on October 17, 2002. All on-board instruments are operating successfully. In

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    in space. I. INTRODUCTION HE INTEGRAL (INTErnational Gamma-Ray Astrophysics Laboratory) satellite is an ESA (European Space Agency) gamma-ray observatory successfully launched from Baïkonour on October 17, 2002 extreme phenomena (black hole, accretion in X-ray binaries, gamma-ray bursts, supernovae...). Two

  2. 1 2/13/2012 Ground Referencing GRACE Satellite Estimates of Groundwater Storage Changes in the1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    1 2/13/2012 Ground Referencing GRACE Satellite Estimates of Groundwater Storage Changes in the1 storage variations; however, comparisons with15 ground-based well data are limited but necessary droughts. Here we18 compare updated estimates of groundwater storage changes in the California Central

  3. Tropical precipitation simulated by the NCAR Community Climate Model (CCM3): an evaluation based on TRMM satellite measurements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Collier, Jonathan Craig

    2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    rates from an ensemble of CCM3 simulations are compared to those computed from observations of the TRMM satellite over a 44-month period. On regional and sub-regional scales, the comparison fares well over much of the Eastern Hemisphere south of 10...

  4. Observations of ice thickness and frazil ice in the St. Lawrence Island polynya from satellite imagery, upward looking sonar, and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Washington at Seattle, University of

    . The combination of the SAR imagery and ULS observations also allow measurement of the pack ice advection velocityObservations of ice thickness and frazil ice in the St. Lawrence Island polynya from satellite define a thermal ice thickness from the AVHRR retrieval of ice surface temperature combined

  5. RGPS/Model Ice Deformation July 3, 2003 1 Sea Ice Deformation Rates From Satellite Measurements and in a Model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lindsay, Ron

    of the Arctic geophysical environment. The deformation rate of pack ice, determined from the spatial gradientsRGPS/Model Ice Deformation July 3, 2003 1 Sea Ice Deformation Rates From Satellite Measurements The deformation of sea ice is an important element of the Arctic climate system because of its influence

  6. 30TH INTERNATIONAL COSMIC RAY CONFERENCE A Search for Prompt Very High Energy Emission from Satellite-detected Gamma-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Santa Cruz, University of

    Satellite-detected Gamma- ray Bursts using Milagro P. M. SAZ PARKINSON & B. L. DINGUS ¡ FOR THE MILAGRO@scipp.ucsc.edu; dingus@lanl.gov Abstract: Gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) have been detected up to GeV energies and are predicted of the Swift bursts. Introduction Almost 40 years after the detection of the first gamma-ray burst (GRB), many

  7. Discontinuous Non-Rigid Motion Analysis of Sea Ice using C-Band Synthetic Aperture Radar Satellite Imagery

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Delaware, University of

    Discontinuous Non-Rigid Motion Analysis of Sea Ice using C-Band Synthetic Aperture Radar Satellite@cis.udel.edu Cathleen Geiger Snow and Ice Branch USACRREL 72 Lyme Rd, Hanover, NH 03755 cathleen@cis.udel.edu Abstract Sea-ice motion consists of complex non-rigid motions in- volving continuous, piece-wise continuous

  8. Evaluation of DART 3D model in the thermal domain using satellite/airborne imagery and ground-based measurements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    1 Evaluation of DART 3D model in the thermal domain using satellite/airborne imagery and ground ISSN0143-1161print/ISSN1366-5901, DOI:10.1080/01431161.2010.524672 jean to energy fluxes at the earth's surface. Its physical magnitude is defined as the effective kinetic

  9. Smoke over haze: Comparative analysis of satellite, surface radiometer, and airborne in situ measurements of aerosol optical

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Zhanqing

    measurements of aerosol optical properties and radiative forcing over the eastern United States Brian Vant their consistency for application to satellite retrievals of optical depth and radiative forcing. These optical properties were combined with MODIS reflectance observations to calculate optical depth. The use of AERONET

  10. T-649: Red Hat Network Satellite Server Request Validation Flaw Permits Cross-Site Request Forgery Attacks

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Red Hat Network (RHN) Satellite and Spacewalk services do not properly validate user-supplied. A remote user can create specially crafted HTML that, when loaded by a target authenticated user, will take actions on the target site acting as the target user.

  11. HAZARDOUS WASTE SATELLITE ACCUMULATION AREA REQUIREMENTS 1. Mark all waste containers conspicuously with the words "Hazardous Waste."

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Slatton, Clint

    HAZARDOUS WASTE SATELLITE ACCUMULATION AREA REQUIREMENTS 1. Mark all waste containers conspicuously. Decontaminate 5. Dispose of cleanup debris as Hazardous Waste Chemical Spill ­ major 1. Evacuate area, isolate with the words "Hazardous Waste." 2. Label all containers accurately, indicating the constituents and approximate

  12. Absorption of solar radiation by the atmosphere as determined using satellite, aircraft, and surface data during the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dong, Xiquan

    Absorption of solar radiation by the atmosphere as determined using satellite, aircraft of 0.33 0.04 for the total atmosphere (surface to top). The absorptance of solar radiation estimated more solar radiation than is predicted by theory [e.g., Stephens and Tsay 1990]. Recently, and nearly

  13. Manuscript Submitted to Solar Energy 4/2002 A NEW OPERATIONAL SATELLITE-TO-IRRADIANCE MODEL DESCRIPTION AND VALIDATION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Perez, Richard R.

    Manuscript Submitted to Solar Energy 4/2002 A NEW OPERATIONAL SATELLITE-TO-IRRADIANCE MODEL, OR, USA #12;Manuscript Submitted to Solar Energy 4/2002 ABSTRACT We present a new simple model zenith angle to account for first order solar #12;Manuscript Submitted to Solar Energy 4/2002 geometry

  14. Use of land surface remotely sensed satellite and airborne data for environmental exposure assessment in cancer research

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    cancer and environmental contaminants, focusing primarily on agricultural chemical exposure assessmentUse of land surface remotely sensed satellite and airborne data for environmental exposure assessment in cancer research SUSAN K. MAXWELLa , JAYMIE R. MELIKERb AND PIERRE GOOVAERTSc a U.S. Geological

  15. Re-evaluation of SO2 release of the 15 June 1991 Pinatubo eruption using ultraviolet and infrared satellite sensors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rose, William I.

    Re-evaluation of SO2 release of the 15 June 1991 Pinatubo eruption using ultraviolet and infrared Infrared Radiation Sounder/2) sensor, whose data sets have a higher temporal resolution, are also analyzed ultraviolet and infrared satellite sensors, Geochem. Geophys. Geosyst., 5, Q04001, doi:10.1029/ 2003GC000654

  16. THE USE OF SPATIAL CONSTRAINTS IN THE DERIVATION OF MESOSCALE SEA SURFACE CURRENT FIELDS FROM MULTI-SENSOR SATELLITE DATA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hamburg,.Universität

    THE USE OF SPATIAL CONSTRAINTS IN THE DERIVATION OF MESOSCALE SEA SURFACE CURRENT FIELDS FROM MULTI images are used for the computation of mesoscale surface currents in the Northern and Southern Baltic for the derivation of mesoscale sea surface currents using multi-sensor / multi-channel satellite images by means

  17. EVALUATION OF AIRBORNE AND SATELLITE ELECTRO-OPTICAL SENSORS PERFORMANCES BY USE OF HIGH-ALTITUDE CLOUDS OCCURRENCE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    EVALUATION OF AIRBORNE AND SATELLITE ELECTRO-OPTICAL SENSORS PERFORMANCES BY USE OF HIGH The impact of high-altitude clouds along an electro- optical sensor line of sight has been studied, F-91761 Palaiseau, France, email : karine.caillault@onera.fr KEYWORDS: sensor performance

  18. Movements and behaviors of swordfish in the Atlantic and Pacific Oceans examined using pop-up satellite archival tags

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hawai'i at Manoa, University of

    Movements and behaviors of swordfish in the Atlantic and Pacific Oceans examined using pop depths were signifi- cantly correlated with light penetration as measured by the diffuse attenuation words: Atlantic Ocean, deep sound scattering layer, diel migration, Pacific Ocean, satellite tags

  19. Continental Scale Comparisons of Terrestrial Carbon Sinks Estimated from Satellite Data and Ecosystem Modeling 1982-1998

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kumar, Vipin

    ecosystem (tundra and boreal) sinks for atmospheric CO2. Key Words: carbon dioxide, ecosystems, remote "missing sink" for carbon dioxide emissions. Measured atmospheric CO2, 13 C, and O2/N2 distributionsContinental Scale Comparisons of Terrestrial Carbon Sinks Estimated from Satellite Data

  20. Deep-Sea Research I 55 (2008) 405434 Satellite-driven modeling of the upper ocean mixed layer and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Antoine, David

    'Energia e l'Ambiente Frascati, Italy Received 27 September 2006; received in revised form 30 November 2007 is to massively assimilate satellite information, on one hand to derive accurate surface heat fluxes, and CO2 is regulated by the ocean, primarily through the ``solubility pump'' (physical entrainment of CO2

  1. How to implement decoy-state quantum key distribution for a satellite uplink with 50-dB channel loss

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Meyer-Scott, Evan; Yan, Zhizhong; MacDonald, Allison; Bourgoin, Jean-Philippe; Huebel, Hannes; Jennewein, Thomas [Institute for Quantum Computing, University of Waterloo, 200 University Avenue W, Waterloo ON, Canada N2L 3G1 (Canada)

    2011-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Quantum key distribution (QKD) takes advantage of fundamental properties of quantum physics to allow two distant parties to share a secret key; however, QKD is hampered by a distance limitation of a few hundred kilometers on Earth. The most immediate solution for global coverage is to use a satellite, which can receive separate QKD transmissions from two or more ground stations and act as a trusted node to link these ground stations. In this article we report on a system capable of performing QKD in the high loss regime expected in an uplink to a satellite using weak coherent pulses and decoy states. Such a scenario profits from the simplicity of its receiver payload, but has so far been considered to be infeasible due to very high transmission losses (40-50 dB). The high loss is overcome by implementing an innovative photon source and advanced timing analysis. Our system handles up to 57 dB photon loss in the infinite key limit, confirming the viability of the satellite uplink scenario. We emphasize that while this system was designed with a satellite uplink in mind, it could just as easily overcome high losses on any free space QKD link.

  2. A study of mesoscale gravity waves over the North Atlantic with satellite observations and a mesoscale model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A study of mesoscale gravity waves over the North Atlantic with satellite observations and a mesoscale model Dong L. Wu Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena and compare AMSU-A observations to simulations from a mesoscale model (MM5). The simulated gravity waves

  3. Mesoscale variability in time series data: Satellite-based estimates for the U.S. JGOFS Bermuda Atlantic

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mesoscale variability in time series data: Satellite-based estimates for the U.S. JGOFS Bermuda TOPEX/Poseidon­ERS-1/2) are used to characterize, statistically, the mesoscale variability about the U to better understand the contribution of mesoscale eddies to the time series record and the model- data

  4. Abstract--With the rapid expansion of satellite communication, an increasing number of unattended ground terminals are

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huang, Changcheng

    ground terminals are spreading out to serve local customers. And there is a great demand to equip the terminals with fault identification functionality so that the remote satellite operators can be notified signal behaviors of signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) measured at the ground terminal with different type

  5. EMAG2: A 2arc min resolution Earth Magnetic Anomaly Grid compiled from satellite, airborne, and marine magnetic

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Müller, Dietmar

    grid for the World Digital Magnetic Anomaly Map. The resolution has been improved from 3 arc min to 2EMAG2: A 2­arc min resolution Earth Magnetic Anomaly Grid compiled from satellite, airborne, I-19020 Fezzano, Italy [1] A global Earth Magnetic Anomaly Grid (EMAG2) has been compiled from

  6. DIRECT IMAGING OF QUASI-PERIODIC FAST PROPAGATING WAVES OF {approx}2000 km s{sup -1} IN THE LOW SOLAR CORONA BY THE SOLAR DYNAMICS OBSERVATORY ATMOSPHERIC IMAGING ASSEMBLY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu Wei; Title, Alan M.; Schrijver, Carolus J.; Aschwanden, Markus J.; De Pontieu, Bart; Tarbell, Theodore D. [Lockheed Martin Solar and Astrophysics Laboratory, Building 252, 3251 Hanover Street, Palo Alto, CA 94304 (United States); Zhao Junwei [W. W. Hansen Experimental Physics Laboratory, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305 (United States); Ofman, Leon [Catholic University of America and NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Code 671, 8800 Greenbelt Road, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States)

    2011-07-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Quasi-periodic propagating fast mode magnetosonic waves in the solar corona were difficult to observe in the past due to relatively low instrument cadences. We report here evidence of such waves directly imaged in EUV by the new Atmospheric Imaging Assembly instrument on board the Solar Dynamics Observatory. In the 2010 August 1 C3.2 flare/coronal mass ejection event, we find arc-shaped wave trains of 1%-5% intensity variations (lifetime {approx}200 s) that emanate near the flare kernel and propagate outward up to {approx}400 Mm along a funnel of coronal loops. Sinusoidal fits to a typical wave train indicate a phase velocity of 2200 {+-} 130 km s{sup -1}. Similar waves propagating in opposite directions are observed in closed loops between two flare ribbons. In the k-{omega} diagram of the Fourier wave power, we find a bright ridge that represents the dispersion relation and can be well fitted with a straight line passing through the origin. This k-{omega} ridge shows a broad frequency distribution with power peaks at 5.5, 14.5, and 25.1 mHz. The strongest signal at 5.5 mHz (period 181 s) temporally coincides with quasi-periodic pulsations of the flare, suggesting a common origin. The instantaneous wave energy flux of (0.1-2.6) x 10{sup 7} erg cm{sup -2} s{sup -1} estimated at the coronal base is comparable to the steady-state heating requirement of active region loops.

  7. Satellite detection of severe convective storms by their retrieved vertical profiles of cloud particle effective radius and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Daniel, Rosenfeld

    and intense gust fronts. Wind shear provides additional energy for sustaining the dynamics of tornadic. The respective roles of convective potential available energy (CAPE) and the 0­6 km vertical wind shear have been Kelman,1 and Daniel T. Lindsey3 Received 1 March 2007; revised 7 October 2007; accepted 16 November 2007

  8. Monitoring large enrichment plants using thermal imagery from commercial satellites: A case study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Adam Bernstein

    2000-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Thermal imagery from commercial satellites is an interesting candidate technology for use as a verification tool for the purpose of monitoring certain types of fissile material production sites. Examples of its potential treaty applications include the Fissile Material Cutoff Treaty (FMCT) or a Fissile Material Production Moratorium. To help determine the capabilities and limitations of such imagery as a monitoring tool, the author has examined archived LANDSAT-5 images of the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant, a large US uranium-enrichment facility in Ohio. This analysis indicates that large-scale gaseous diffusion plants can very likely be recognized as operational with thermal imagery throughout most of the year in clear weather conditions. It may also be possible to identify certain other large-scale qualitative changes in operations, such as the shut-down of a single process building in a plant, by a comparison of its temperature with the temperatures of neighboring operational process buildings. However, uncertainties in the current data set prevent a definitive conclusion regarding the latter capability. This study identifies intrinsic weaknesses, including vulnerability to countermeasures, that prevent thermal imagery from satellites from being a robust standalone verification tool, even for very large enrichment plants. Nonetheless, the imagery may be useful as a trigger for an on-site inspection, to alert and train inspectors prior to an inspection, and possibly to reduce the frequency of on-site inspections required at a given site. It could have some immediate utility for monitoring the two large gaseous diffusion plants the US and the French plant at Tricastin, and possibly for determining the operational status of two gaseous diffusion plants in China as well--a total of five plants worldwide. The ease of acquisition and modest cost of thermal commercial imagery further increase its attractiveness as a verification tool. In addition to these basic results, the author considers the influence on performance of improvements in spatial resolution in the thermal band expected from new and future platforms. He also discusses the effects of external factors such as convective cooling of the roofs, solar heating, the atmosphere, emissivity changes, and deliberate countermeasures--all of which can adversely affect measurements.

  9. Satellite Remote Sensing of Air Pollution in Mega CitiesSatellite Remote Sensing of Air Pollution in Mega Cities Sundar A. Christopher 1; J.Wang1; P. Gupta 1; M.A. Box2; and G.P. Box2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Jun

    Satellite Remote Sensing of Air Pollution in Mega CitiesSatellite Remote Sensing of Air Pollution, consistent, and cost-effective way for monitoring air pollution. Using Terra/Aqua data, we demonstrate (PM2.5) is an important tool for evaluating air quality. However, PM2.5 has larger spatiotemporal

  10. New Technique for Retrieving Liquid Water Path over Land using Satellite Microwave Observations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Deeter, M.N.; Vivekanandan, J.

    2005-03-18T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a new methodology for retrieving liquid water path over land using satellite microwave observations. As input, the technique exploits the Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer for earth observing plan (EOS) (AMSR-E) polarization-difference signals at 37 and 89 GHz. Regression analysis performed on model simulations indicates that over variable atmospheric and surface conditions the polarization-difference signals can be simply parameterized in terms of the surface emissivity polarization difference ({Delta}{var_epsilon}), surface temperature, liquid water path (LWP), and precipitable water vapor (PWV). The resulting polarization-difference parameterization (PDP) enables fast and direct (noniterative) retrievals of LWP with minimal requirements for ancillary data. Single- and dual-channel retrieval methods are described and demonstrated. Data gridding is used to reduce the effects of instrumental noise. The methodology is demonstrated using AMSR-E observations over the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Southern Great Plains (SGP) site during a six day period in November and December, 2003. Single- and dual-channel retrieval results mostly agree with ground-based microwave retrievals of LWP to within approximately 0.04 mm.

  11. Variable stars and stellar populations in Andromeda XXI: II. Another merged galaxy satellite of M31?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cusano, F; Clementini, G; Cignoni, M; Federici, L; Marconi, M; Musella, I; Ripepi, V; Speziali, R; Sani, E; Merighi, R

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    B and V time-series photometry of the M31 dwarf spheroidal satellite Andromeda XXI (And XXI) was obtained with the Large Binocular Cameras at the Large Binocular Telescope. We have identified 50 variables in And XXI, of which 41 are RR Lyrae stars (37 fundamental-mode RRab, and 4 first-overtone RRc, pulsators) and 9 are Anomalous Cepheids (ACs). The average period of the RRab stars ( = 0.64 days) and the period-amplitude diagram place And~XXI in the class of Oosterhoff II - Oosterhoff-Intermediate objects. From the average luminosity of the RR Lyrae stars we derived the galaxy distance modulus of (m-M)$_0$=$24.40\\pm0.17$ mag, which is smaller than previous literature estimates, although still consistent with them within 1 $\\sigma$. The galaxy color-magnitude diagram shows evidence for the presence of three different stellar generations in And~XXI: 1) an old ($\\sim$ 12 Gyr) and metal poor ([Fe/H]=$-$1.7 dex) component traced by the RR Lyrae stars; 2) a slightly younger (10-6 Gyr) and more metal rich ([Fe/H]=$-...

  12. Particle-induced bit errors in high performance fiber optic data links for satellite data management

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marshall, P.W.; Carts, M.A. (Naval Research Lab., Washington, DC (United States) SFA, Inc., Landover, MD (United States)); Dale, C.J. (Naval Research Lab., Washington, DC (United States)); LaBel, K.A. (NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD (United States))

    1994-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Experimental test methods and analysis tools are demonstrated to assess particle-induced bit errors on fiber optic link receivers for satellites. Susceptibility to direct ionization from low LET particles is quantified by analyzing proton and helium ion data as a function of particle LET. Existing single event analysis approaches are shown to apply, with appropriate modifications, to the regime of temporally (rather than spatially) distributed bits, even though the sensitivity to single events exceeds conventional memory technologies by orders of magnitude. The cross-section LET dependence follows a Weibull distribution at data rates from 200 to 1,000 Mbps and at various incident optical power levels. The LET threshold for errors is shown, through both experiment and modeling, to be 0 in all cases. The error cross-section exhibits a strong inverse dependence on received optical power in the LET range where most orbital single events would occur, thus indicating that errors can be minimized by operating links with higher incident optical power. Also, an analytic model is described which incorporates the appropriate physical characteristics of the link as well as the optical and receiver electrical characteristics. Results indicate appropriate steps to assure suitable link performance even in severe particle orbits.

  13. Detection of GRB 090618 with RT-2 Experiment Onboard the Coronas-Photon Satellite

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rao, A R; Hingar, M K; Agrawal, V K; Chakrabarti, S K; Nandi, A; Debnath, D; Kotoch, T B; Sarkar, R; Chidambaram, T R; Vinod, P; Sreekumar, S; Kotov, Y D; Buslov, A S; Yurov, V N; Tyshkevich, V G; Arkhangelskij, A I; Zyatkov, R A; Naik, Sachindra

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present the results of an analysis of the prompt gamma-ray emission from GRB 090618 using the RT-2 Experiment onboard the Coronas-Photon satellite. GRB 090618 shows multiple peaks and a detailed study of the temporal structure as a function of energy is carried out. As the GRB was incident at an angle of 77 degree to the detector axis, we have generated appropriate response functions of the detectors to derive the spectrum of this GRB. We have augmented these results using the publicly available data from the Swift BAT detector and show that a combined spectral analysis can measure the spectral parameters quite accurately. We also attempt a spectral and timing analysis of individual peaks and find evidence for a systematic change in the pulse emission characteristics for the successive pulses. In particular, we find that the peak energy of the spectrum, E_p, is found to monotonically decrease with time, for the successive pulses of this GRB.

  14. Seasonally-managed wetland footprint delineation using Landsat ETM+ satellite imagery

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Quinn, N.W.T.; Epshtein, O.

    2013-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    One major challenge in water resource management is the estimation of evapotranspiration losses from seasonally managed wetlands. Quantifying these losses is complicated by the dynamic nature of the wetlands’ areal footprint during the periods of flood-up and drawdown. In this study we present a data-lean solution to this problem using an example application in the San Joaquin River Basin of California, USA. Through analysis of high-resolution (30 meter) Landsat Enhanced Thematic Mapper Plus (ETM+) satellite imagery, we develop a metric for more fully capturing the extent of total flooded wetland area. The procedure is validated using year-long, continuously-logged field datasets at two separate wetlands within the study area. Based on this record, the proposed classification using a Landsat ETM+ Band 5 (mid-IR wavelength) to Band 2 (visible green wavelength) ratio improves estimates by 30-50% relative to previous attempts at wetland delineation. Requiring modest ancillary data, the results of our study provide a practical and efficient option for wetland management in data-sparse regions or un-gauged watersheds.

  15. Survey and documentation of emerging technologies for the satellite power system (SPS)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Glaser, P.; Chapman, P.

    1981-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this study is to survey emerging technologies and new concepts which may offer advantages over those selected for the SPS Reference System. A brief historical overview of the genesis of the Solar Power Satellite (SPS) concept is presented leading to a discussion of the assumptions and guidelines which were originally established and which led to development of the SPS Reference System design concept. Some of these guidelines are applicable to almost any SPS design, but others could be changed, leading to new and perhaps preferable systems. Moreover, while some of the guidelines are based on solid data, some are little more than arbitrary assumptions which were adopted only to proceed with a concrete point design which then could be assessed in the DOE/NASA Concept Development and Evaluation Program. In order to stimulate new SPS concepts and to facilitate comparative assessment of emerging SPS technologies, one useful approach is to break the overall system into functional parts. The system functions which must be performed by any SPS concept and the interrelations between them are discussed and a systematic framework is presented for assessment of the wide variety of system concepts and subsystem technologies which have been proposed. About 80 alternative SPS technologies are reviewed.

  16. Detection of facilities in satellite imagery using semi-supervised image classification and auxiliary contextual observables

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harvey, Neal R [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Ruggiero, Christy E [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Pawley, Norma H [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Brumby, Steven P [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Macdonald, Brian [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Balick, Lee [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Oyer, Alden [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Detecting complex targets, such as facilities, in commercially available satellite imagery is a difficult problem that human analysts try to solve by applying world knowledge. Often there are known observables that can be extracted by pixel-level feature detectors that can assist in the facility detection process. Individually, each of these observables is not sufficient for an accurate and reliable detection, but in combination, these auxiliary observables may provide sufficient context for detection by a machine learning algorithm. We describe an approach for automatic detection of facilities that uses an automated feature extraction algorithm to extract auxiliary observables, and a semi-supervised assisted target recognition algorithm to then identify facilities of interest. We illustrate the approach using an example of finding schools in Quickbird image data of Albuquerque, New Mexico. We use Los Alamos National Laboratory's Genie Pro automated feature extraction algorithm to find a set of auxiliary features that should be useful in the search for schools, such as parking lots, large buildings, sports fields and residential areas and then combine these features using Genie Pro's assisted target recognition algorithm to learn a classifier that finds schools in the image data.

  17. 150K - 200K miniature pulse tube cooler for micro satellites

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chassaing, Clément; Butterworth, James; Aigouy, Gérald [Air Liquide Advanced Technologies (AL-AT) - 38360 Sassenage (France); Daniel, Christophe [Centre National D'Etudes Spatiales (CNES) - 31401 Toulouse (France); Crespin, Maurice; Duvivier, Eric [STEEL électronique - 31220 Martres Tolosane (France)

    2014-01-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Air Liquide is working with the CNES and Steel électronique in 2013 to design, manufacture and test a Miniature Pulse Tube Cooler (MPTC) to cool infrared detectors for micro-satellite missions. The cooler will be particularly adapted to the needs of the CNES MICROCARB mission to study atmospheric Carbon Dioxide which presents absorption lines in the thermal near infrared, at 1.6 ?m and 2.0 ?m. The required cooler temperature is from 150 to 200K with cooling power between 1 and 3 watts. The overall electrical power budget including electronics is less than 20W with a 288-300K rejection temperature. Particular attention is therefore paid to optimizing overall system efficiency. The active micro vibration reduction system and thermal control systems already developed for the Air Liquide Large Pulse Tube Cooler (LPTC) are currently being implemented into a new high efficiency electronic architecture. The presented work concerns the new cold finger and electronic design. The cooler uses the compressor already developed for the 80K Miniature Pulse Tube Cryocooler. This Pulse Tube Cooler addresses the requirements of space missions where extended continuous operating life time (>5 years), low mass and low micro vibration levels are critical.

  18. Comparison of Historical Satellite-Based Estimates of Solar Radiation Resources with Recent Rotating Shadowband Radiometer Measurements: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Myers, D. R.

    2009-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The availability of rotating shadow band radiometer measurement data at several new stations provides an opportunity to compare historical satellite-based estimates of solar resources with measurements. We compare mean monthly daily total (MMDT) solar radiation data from eight years of NSRDB and 22 years of NASA hourly global horizontal and direct beam solar estimates with measured data from three stations, collected after the end of the available resource estimates.

  19. Improvement of weather analysis in isolated areas of the southern hemisphere by meteorological satellite information: a case study.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alvarez, Jose? Angel

    1963-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    pressure Temperature Wind Upper-air circulation Fronts Cloudiness Cyclonic and anticyclonic activity. Weather patterns Summary of the status of available information Status of the Use of Information from Meteorological Satellites as Applied... del Fuego and South Patagonia, unpredictable most of the time except for the orographic effects, is due to the changes in the atmospheric circulation in the vicinity of the Drake Passage . Aircraft of Argentine and Chilean airlines operate...

  20. Environmental assessment for the satellite power system-concept development and evaluation program-microwave health and ecological effects

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1980-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report is concerned with the potential health and ecological effects of the microwave beam from the microwave power transmission system (MPTS) of the satellite power system (SPS). The report is written in the form of a detailed critical review of selected scientific articles from the published literature on the biological effects of nonionizing electromagnetic radiation, followed by an assessment of the possible effects of the SPS, based on exposure values for the reference system (US DOE and NASA, 1978).

  1. Simultaneous laser ranging and communication from an Earth-based satellite laser ranging station to the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter in lunar orbit

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sun, Xiaoli

    We report a free space laser communication experiment from the satellite laser ranging (SLR) station at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) to the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter (LRO) in lunar orbit through the on board ...

  2. Airborne protected military satellite communications : analysis of open-loop pointing and closed-loop tracking with noisy platform attitude information

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Deike, William D

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    U.S. military assets' increasing need for secure global communications has led to the design and fabrication of airborne satellite communication terminals that operate under protected security protocol. Protected transmission ...

  3. Sesso Temtica: Uso de satlites, modelos de ecossistemas e inventrios florestais para apoio s polticas de REDD+ (Informing REDD+ services with satellite, ecosystem models, and forest inventory)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    políticas de REDD+ (Informing REDD+ services with satellite, ecosystem models, and forest inventory a calibrated carbon cycle model, ORCHIDEE, using optical and radar remote sensing and forest inventory data

  4. The Effect of Lunar-like Satellites on the Orbital Infrared Light Curves of Earth-analog Planets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moskovitz, Nicholas A; Williams, Darren

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We investigate the influence of lunar-like satellites on the infrared orbital light curves of Earth-analog extra-solar planets. Such light curves will be obtained by NASA's Terrestrial Planet Finder (TPF) and ESA's Darwin missions as a consequence of repeat observations to confirm the companion status of a putative planet. We use an energy balance model to calculate disk-averaged infrared (bolometric) fluxes from planet-satellite systems over a full orbital period (one year). The satellites are assumed to lack an atmosphere, have a low thermal inertia like that of the Moon and span a range of plausible radii. The planets are assumed to have thermal and orbital properties that mimic those of the Earth while their obliquities and orbital longitudes of inferior conjunction remain free parameters. Even if the gross thermal properties of the planet can be independently constrained (e.g. via spectroscopy or visible-wavelength detection of specular glint from a surface ocean) only the largest (approximately Mars-siz...

  5. A BAYESIAN APPROACH TO LOCATING THE RED GIANT BRANCH TIP MAGNITUDE. II. DISTANCES TO THE SATELLITES OF M31

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Conn, A. R.; Parker, Q. A.; Zucker, D. B. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Macquarie University, NSW 2109 (Australia); Ibata, R. A.; Martin, N. F. [Observatoire Astronomique, Universite de Strasbourg, CNRS, F-67000 Strasbourg (France); Lewis, G. F. [Sydney Institute for Astronomy, School of Physics, A28, University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW 2006 (Australia); McConnachie, A. W. [NRC Herzberg Institute of Astrophysics, 5071 West Saanich Road, Victoria, British Columbia V9E 2E7 (Canada); Irwin, M. J.; Chapman, S. C. [Institute of Astronomy, University of Cambridge, Madingley Road, Cambridge CB3 0HA (United Kingdom); Tanvir, N. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Leicester, Leicester LE1 7RH (United Kingdom); Fardal, M. A. [University of Massachusetts, Department of Astronomy, LGRT 619-E, 710 N. Pleasant Street, Amherst, MA 01003-9305 (United States); Ferguson, A. M. N. [Institute for Astronomy, University of Edinburgh, Royal Observatory, Blackford Hill, Edinburgh EH9 3HJ (United Kingdom); Valls-Gabaud, D. [Observatoire de Paris, LERMA, 61 Avenue de l'Observatoire, F-75014 Paris (France)

    2012-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

    In 'A Bayesian Approach to Locating the Red Giant Branch Tip Magnitude (Part I)', a new technique was introduced for obtaining distances using the tip of the red giant branch (TRGB) standard candle. Here we describe a useful complement to the technique with the potential to further reduce the uncertainty in our distance measurements by incorporating a matched-filter weighting scheme into the model likelihood calculations. In this scheme, stars are weighted according to their probability of being true object members. We then re-test our modified algorithm using random-realization artificial data to verify the validity of the generated posterior probability distributions (PPDs) and proceed to apply the algorithm to the satellite system of M31, culminating in a three-dimensional view of the system. Further to the distributions thus obtained, we apply a satellite-specific prior on the satellite distances to weight the resulting distance posterior distributions, based on the halo density profile. Thus in a single publication, using a single method, a comprehensive coverage of the distances to the companion galaxies of M31 is presented, encompassing the dwarf spheroidals Andromedas I-III, V, IX-XXVII, and XXX along with NGC 147, NGC 185, M33, and M31 itself. Of these, the distances to Andromedas XXIV-XXVII and Andromeda XXX have never before been derived using the TRGB. Object distances are determined from high-resolution tip magnitude posterior distributions generated using the Markov Chain Monte Carlo technique and associated sampling of these distributions to take into account uncertainties in foreground extinction and the absolute magnitude of the TRGB as well as photometric errors. The distance PPDs obtained for each object both with and without the aforementioned prior are made available to the reader in tabular form. The large object coverage takes advantage of the unprecedented size and photometric depth of the Pan-Andromeda Archaeological Survey. Finally, a preliminary investigation into the satellite density distribution within the halo is made using the obtained distance distributions. For simplicity, this investigation assumes a single power law for the density as a function of radius, with the slope of this power law examined for several subsets of the entire satellite sample.

  6. Estimating the Radiative Forcing of Carbonaceous Aerosols over California based on Satellite and Ground Observations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xu, Yangyang; Bahadur, R.; Zhao, Chun; Leung, Lai-Yung R.

    2013-10-04T23:59:59.000Z

    Carbonaceous aerosols have the potential to impact climate both through directly absorbing incoming solar radiation, and by indirectly affecting the cloud layer. To quantify this impact recent modeling studies have made great efforts to simulate both the spatial and temporal distribution of carbonaceous aerosols and their associated radiative forcing. This study makes the first observationally constrained assessment of the direct radiative forcing of carbonaceous aerosols at a regional scale over California. By exploiting multiple observations (including ground sites and satellites), we constructed the distribution of aerosol optical depths and aerosol absorption optical depths over California for a ten-year period (2000-2010). The total solar absorption was then partitioned into contributions from elemental carbon (EC), organic carbon (OC) and dust aerosols using a newly developed scheme. Aerosol absorption optical depth due to carbonaceous aerosols (EC and OC) at 440 nm is 50%-200% larger than natural dust, with EC contributing the bulk (70%-90%). Observationally constrained EC absorption agrees reasonably well with estimates from regional transport models, but the model underestimates the OC AAOD by at least 50%. We estimate that the TOA warming from carbonaceous aerosols is 0.7 W/m2 and the TOA forcing due to OC is close to zero. The atmospheric heating of carbonaceous aerosols is 2.2-2.9 W/m2, of which EC contributed about 80-90%. The atmospheric heating due to OC is estimated to be 0.1 to 0.4 W/m2, larger than model simulations. The surface brightening due to EC reduction over the last two decades is estimated to be 1.5-3.5 W/m2.

  7. The development of potassium tantalate niobate thin films for satellite-based pyroelectric detectors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cherry, H B.B. [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States). Dept. of Materials Science and Mineral Engineering

    1997-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Potassium tantalate niobate (KTN) pyroelectric detectors are expected to provide detectivities, of 3.7 x 10{sup 11} cmHz {sup {1/2}}W{sup {minus}1} for satellite-based infrared detection at 90 K. The background limited detectivity for a room-temperature thermal detector is 1.8 x 10{sup 10} cmHz{sup {1/2}}W{sup {minus}1}. KTN is a unique ferroelectric for this application because of the ability to tailor the temperature of its pyroelectric response by adjusting its ratio of tantalum to niobium. The ability to fabricate high quality KTN thin films on Si-based substrates is crucial to the development of KTN pyroelectric detectors. Si{sub x}N{sub y} membranes created on the Si substrate will provide the weak thermal link necessary to reach background limited detectivities. The device dimensions obtainable by thin film processing are expected to increase the ferroelectric response by 20 times over bulk fabricated KTN detectors. In addition, microfabrication techniques allow for easier array development. This is the first reported attempt at growth of KTN films on Si-based substrates. Pure phase perovskite films were grown by pulsed laser deposition on SrRuO{sub 3}/Pt/Ti/Si{sub x}N{sub y}/Si and SrRuO{sub 3}/Si{sub x}N{sub y}/Si structures; room temperature dielectric permittivities for the KTN films were 290 and 2.5, respectively. The dielectric permittivity for bulk grown, single crystal KTN is {approximately}380. In addition to depressed dielectric permittivities, no ferroelectric hysteresis was found between 80 and 300 K for either structure. RBS, AES, TEM and multi-frequency dielectric measurements were used to investigate the origin of this apparent lack of ferroelectricity. Other issues addressed by this dissertation include: the role of oxygen and target density during pulsed laser deposition of KTN thin films; the use of YBCO, LSC and Pt as direct contact bottom electrodes to the KTN films, and the adhesion of the bottom electrode layers to Si{sub x}N{sub y}/Si.

  8. Elliptical model of cutoff boundaries for the solar energetic particles measured by POES satellites in December 2006

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dmitriev, A V; Tsai, L -C

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Experimental data from a constellation of five NOAA POES satellites were used for studying the penetration of solar energetic particles (SEP) to high latitudes during long-lasting SEP events on December 5 to 15, 2006. We determined cutoff latitudes for electrons with energies >100 keV and > 300 keV, and protons with energies from 240 keV to >140 MeV. The large number of satellites allowed us to derive snap shots of the cutoff boundaries with 1-hour time resolution. The boundaries were fitted well by ellipses. Based on the elliptical approach, we developed a model of cutoff latitudes for protons and electrons in the northern and southern hemispheres. The cutoff latitude is represented as a function of rigidity, R, of particles, MLT, geomagnetic indices: Dst, Kp, AE, and dipole tilt angle PS. The model predicts tailward and duskward shifting of the cutoff boundaries in relation to intensification of the cross-tail current, field-aligned currents, and symmetrical and asymmetrical parts of the ring current. The m...

  9. Constraining Dark Matter Models from a Combined Analysis of Milky Way Satellites with the Fermi Large Area Telescope

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ackermann, M.; Ajello, M.; /Stanford U., HEPL /Taiwan, Natl. Taiwan U. /SLAC; Albert, A.; /Taiwan, Natl. Taiwan U. /Ohio State U.; Atwood, W.B.; /UC, Santa Cruz; Baldini, L.; /INFN, Pisa; Ballet, J.; /DAPNIA, Saclay; Barbiellini, G.; /INFN, Trieste /Trieste U.; Bastieri, D.; /INFN, Padua /Padua U.; Bechtol, K.; /Stanford U., HEPL /Taiwan, Natl. Taiwan U. /SLAC; Bellazzini, R.; /INFN, Pisa; Berenji, B.; Blandford, R.D.; Bloom, E.D.; /Stanford U., HEPL /Taiwan, Natl. Taiwan U. /SLAC; Bonamente, E.; /INFN, Perugia /Perugia U.; Borgland, A.W.; /Stanford U., HEPL /Taiwan, Natl. Taiwan U. /SLAC; Bregeon, J.; /INFN, Pisa; Brigida, M.; /Bari Polytechnic /INFN, Bari; Bruel, P.; /Ecole Polytechnique; Buehler, R.; /Stanford U., HEPL /Taiwan, Natl. Taiwan U. /SLAC; Burnett, T.H.; /Washington U., Seattle; Buson, S.; /INFN, Padua /Padua U. /ICE, Bellaterra /Stanford U., HEPL /Taiwan, Natl. Taiwan U. /SLAC /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /IASF, Milan /IASF, Milan /DAPNIA, Saclay /INFN, Perugia /Perugia U. /Stanford U., HEPL /Taiwan, Natl. Taiwan U. /SLAC /Artep Inc. /Stanford U., HEPL /Taiwan, Natl. Taiwan U. /SLAC /ASDC, Frascati /Perugia U. /Stanford U., HEPL /Taiwan, Natl. Taiwan U. /SLAC /Montpellier U. /Stockholm U. /Stockholm U., OKC /ASDC, Frascati /ASDC, Frascati /Udine U. /INFN, Trieste /Bari Polytechnic /INFN, Bari /Naval Research Lab, Wash., D.C. /Stanford U., HEPL /Taiwan, Natl. Taiwan U. /SLAC /Montpellier U. /Bari Polytechnic /INFN, Bari /Ecole Polytechnique /NASA, Goddard /Hiroshima U. /Stanford U., HEPL /Taiwan, Natl. Taiwan U. /SLAC /Bari Polytechnic /INFN, Bari /INFN, Bari /ASDC, Frascati /NASA, Goddard /INFN, Perugia /Perugia U. /Bari Polytechnic /INFN, Bari /Bologna Observ. /Stanford U., HEPL /Taiwan, Natl. Taiwan U. /SLAC /DAPNIA, Saclay /Alabama U., Huntsville; /more authors..

    2012-09-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Satellite galaxies of the Milky Way are among the most promising targets for dark matter searches in gamma rays. We present a search for dark matter consisting of weakly interacting massive particles, applying a joint likelihood analysis to 10 satellite galaxies with 24 months of data of the Fermi Large Area Telescope. No dark matter signal is detected. Including the uncertainty in the dark matter distribution, robust upper limits are placed on dark matter annihilation cross sections. The 95% confidence level upper limits range from about 10{sup -26} cm{sup 3} s{sup -1} at 5 GeV to about 5 x 10{sup -23} cm{sup 3} s{sup -1} at 1 TeV, depending on the dark matter annihilation final state. For the first time, using gamma rays, we are able to rule out models with the most generic cross section ({approx}3 x 10{sup -26} cm{sup 3} s{sup -1} for a purely s-wave cross section), without assuming additional boost factors.

  10. Improvements in Near-Terminator and Nocturnal Cloud Masks using Satellite Imager Data over the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Sites

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Trepte, Q.Z.; Minnis, P.; Heck, P.W.; Palikonda, R.

    2005-03-18T23:59:59.000Z

    Cloud detection using satellite measurements presents a big challenge near the terminator where the visible (VIS; 0.65 {micro}m) channel becomes less reliable and the reflected solar component of the solar infrared 3.9-{micro}m channel reaches very low signal-to-noise ratio levels. As a result, clouds are underestimated near the terminator and at night over land and ocean in previous Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program cloud retrievals using Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite (GOES) imager data. Cloud detection near the terminator has always been a challenge. For example, comparisons between the CLAVR-x (Clouds from Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer [AVHRR]) cloud coverage and Geoscience Laser Altimeter System (GLAS) measurements north of 60{sup o}N indicate significant amounts of missing clouds from AVHRR because this part of the world was near the day/night terminator viewed by AVHRR. Comparisons between MODIS cloud products and GLAS at the same regions also shows the same difficulty in the MODIS cloud retrieval (Pavolonis and Heidinger 2005). Consistent detection of clouds at all times of day is needed to provide reliable cloud and radiation products for ARM and other research efforts involving the modeling of clouds and their interaction with the radiation budget. To minimize inconsistencies between daytime and nighttime retrievals, this paper develops an improved twilight and nighttime cloud mask using GOES-9, 10, and 12 imager data over the ARM sites and the continental United States (CONUS).

  11. The orbits of the uranian satellites and rings, the gravity field of the uranian system, and the orientation of the pole of Uranus

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jacobson, R. A., E-mail: robert.jacobson@jpl.nasa.gov [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, 4800 Oak Grove Drive, Pasadena, CA 91109-8099 (United States)

    2014-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    French et al. determined the orbits of the Uranian rings, the orientation of the pole of Uranus, and the gravity harmonics of Uranus from Earth-based and Voyager ring occultations. Jacobson et al. determined the orbits of the Uranian satellites and the masses of Uranus and its satellites from Earth-based astrometry and observations acquired with the Voyager 2 spacecraft; they used the gravity harmonics and pole from French et al. Jacobson and Rush reconstructed the Voyager 2 trajectory and redetermined the Uranian system gravity parameters, satellite orbits, and ring orbits in a combined analysis of the data used previously augmented with additional Earth-based astrometry. Here we report on an extension of that work that incorporates additional astrometry and ring occultations together with improved data processing techniques.

  12. The use of data from the NIMBUS II satellite to determine the mean relative humidity in the layer below 500 mb 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Morrissette, John Francis

    1967-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE May 1967 Major Subject: METEOROLOGY THE USE OF DATA FROM THE NIMBUS II SATELLITE TO DETERMINE THE MEAN RELATIVE HUMIDITY IN THE LAYER BELON 5OO MB A Thesis By JOHN FRANCIS MORRISSFTTE Approved... as to style and content by: (Ch rrman of Committee) (Head of Departme & (Member) (Member) (Member) May 1967 ABSTRACT The Use of Data From the NIMBUS II Satellite to Determine the Mean Relative Humidity in the Layer Below 500 mb. (May 1967) John Francis...

  13. Rigollier C., Wald L., 1999. The HelioClim Project: from satellite images to solar radiation maps. In Proceedings of the ISES Solar World Congress 1999, Jerusalem, Israel, July 4-9, 1999, volume I, pp 427-431.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Rigollier C., Wald L., 1999. The HelioClim Project: from satellite images to solar radiation maps-431. THE HELIOCLIM PROJECT: FROM SATELLITE IMAGES TO SOLAR RADIATION MAPS C. Rigollier, L. Wald Ecole des Mines de such a climatological database of solar radiation, images of the visible channel of the series of Meteosat

  14. WALD, Lucien, BASLY, Ludovic, and BALEYNAUD, JeanMichel. Satellite data for the air pollution mapping. In: Proceedings of the 18th EARSeL Symposium on Operational Remote Sensing for Sustainable Development, Enschede, Netherlands, 1114 May

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    WALD, Lucien, BASLY, Ludovic, and BALEYNAUD, JeanMichel. Satellite data for the air pollution, Rotterdam, ISBN 9058090299, p. 133139 Satellite data for the air pollution mapping L. Wald, L. Basly Groupe of air pollution are reached. Medical studies tend to demonstrate that breathing diseases may be linked

  15. Effect of Terrestrial and Marine Organic Aerosol on Regional and Global Climate: Model Development, Application, and Verification with Satellite Data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Meskhidze, Nicholas; Zhang, Yang; Kamykowski, Daniel

    2012-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

    In this DOE project the improvements to parameterization of marine primary organic matter (POM) emissions, hygroscopic properties of marine POM, marine isoprene derived secondary organic aerosol (SOA) emissions, surfactant effects, new cloud droplet activation parameterization have been implemented into Community Atmosphere Model (CAM 5.0), with a seven mode aerosol module from the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL)���¢��������s Modal Aerosol Model (MAM7). The effects of marine aerosols derived from sea spray and ocean emitted biogenic volatile organic compounds (BVOCs) on microphysical properties of clouds were explored by conducting 10 year CAM5.0-MAM7 model simulations at a grid resolution 1.9�������°��������2.5�������° with 30 vertical layers. Model-predicted relationship between ocean physical and biological systems and the abundance of CCN in remote marine atmosphere was compared to data from the A-Train satellites (MODIS, CALIPSO, AMSR-E). Model simulations show that on average, primary and secondary organic aerosol emissions from the ocean can yield up to 20% increase in Cloud Condensation Nuclei (CCN) at 0.2% Supersaturation, and up to 5% increases in droplet number concentration of global maritime shallow clouds. Marine organics were treated as internally or externally mixed with sea salt. Changes associated with cloud properties reduced (absolute value) the model-predicted short wave cloud forcing from -1.35 Wm-2 to -0.25 Wm-2. By using different emission scenarios, and droplet activation parameterizations, this study suggests that addition of marine primary aerosols and biologically generated reactive gases makes an important difference in radiative forcing assessments. All baseline and sensitivity simulations for 2001 and 2050 using global-through-urban WRF/Chem (GU-WRF) were completed. The main objective of these simulations was to evaluate the capability of GU-WRF for an accurate representation of the global atmosphere by exploring the most accurate configuration of physics options in GWRF for global scale modeling in 2001 at a horizontal grid resolution of 1�������° x 1�������°. GU-WRF model output was evaluated using observational datasets from a variety of sources including surface based observations (NCDC and BSRN), model reanalysis (NCEP/ NCAR Reanalysis and CMAP), and remotely-sensed data (TRMM) to evaluate the ability of GU-WRF to simulate atmospheric variables at the surface as well as aloft. Explicit treatment of nanoparticles produced from new particle formation in GU-WRF/Chem-MADRID was achieved by expanding particle size sections from 8 to 12 to cover particles with the size range of 1.16 nm to 11.6 �������µm. Simulations with two different nucleation parameterizations were conducted for August 2002 over a global domain at a 4�������º by 5�������º horizontal resolution. The results are evaluated against field measurement data from the 2002 Aerosol Nucleation and Real Time Characterization Experiment (ANARChE) in Atlanta, Georgia, as well as satellite and reanalysis data. We have also explored the relationship between ���¢��������clean marine���¢������� aerosol optical properties and ocean surface wind speed using remotely sensed data from the Cloud-Aerosol Lidar with Orthogonal Polarization (CALIOP) on board the CALIPSO satellite and the Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer (AMSR-E) on board the AQUA satellite. Detailed data analyses

  16. 0.5-4 Å X-RAY BRIGHTENINGS IN THE MAGNETOSPHERE OBSERVED BY THE GEOSTATIONARY OPERATIONAL ENVIRONMENTAL SATELLITES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yamamoto, Tetsuya T.; Miyoshi, Y., E-mail: tyamamot@stelab.nagoya-u.ac.jp [Solar-Terrestrial Environment Laboratory, Nagoya University, Aichi (Japan)

    2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We found 217 X-ray brightening events in Earth's magnetosphere. These events occur in the high-energy band (0.5-4 Å) of the Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite (GOES) X-ray light curves, although GOES X-ray light curves are frequently used as indices of solar flare magnitudes. We found that (1) brightening events are absent in the low-energy band (1-8 Å), unlike those associated with solar flares; and (2) the peak fluxes, durations, and onset times of these events depend on the magnetic local time (MLT). The events were detected in 2006, 2010, and 2011 at around 19-10 MLT, that is, from night to morning. They typically lasted for 2-3 hr. Their peak fluxes are less than 3 × 10{sup –8} W m{sup –2} in the 0.5-4 Å band and are maximized around 0-5 MLT. From these MLT dependencies, we constructed an MLT time profile of X-ray brightening events. Because 0.5-4 and 1-8 Å fluxes were observed and had the same order of magnitude when GOES 14 passed through Earth's shadow, we expected that X-ray brightening events in the 1-8 Å band are obscured by high-background X-ray fluxes coming from the Sun. We also found coincidence between X-ray brightening events and aurora substorms. In the majority of our events, the minimum geomagnetic field values (AL index) are below –400 nT. From these results and consideration of the GOES satellite orbit, we expect that these X-ray brightening events occur in the magnetosphere. We cannot, however, clarify the radiative process of the observed X-ray brightening events.

  17. Vermessung & Geoinformation 2/2011, P. 171 179, 7 Figs. 171171 Precise Point Positioning (PPP) denotes a GNSS (Global Navigation Satellite System) based positioning technique,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schuh, Harald

    (PPP) denotes a GNSS (Global Navigation Satellite System) based positioning technique, where dual parameters along with the site coordinates. Introduced for the first time about 14 years ago the PPP technique was mainly used in post-processing applications. Barriers for a more intense use of PPP were

  18. Vermessung & Geoinformation 2/2011, P. 114 121, 5 Figs.114 Within the last decade, Precise Point Positioning (PPP) has been discussed by GNSS (Global Navigation Satellite

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schuh, Harald

    , Precise Point Positioning (PPP) has been discussed by GNSS (Global Navigation Satellite System) experts and research groups all over the world. PPP uses code or phase observations on zero-difference level in combination with precise orbits and clock corrections to achieve highly accurate point coordinates. PPP

  19. Oumbe A., Blanc Ph., Schroedter-Homscheidt M., Wald L., 2010. Solar surface irradiance from new meteorological satellite data. In Proceedings of the 29th

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Tech, Center for Energy and Processes, BP 207, 06904 Sophia Antipolis, France b German Aerospace CenterOumbe A., Blanc Ph., Schroedter-Homscheidt M., Wald L., 2010. Solar surface irradiance from new, 320-328, doi:10.3233/978-1-60750-494-8-320 Solar surface irradiance from new meteorological satellite

  20. Design and Implementation of Small Satellite Inspection 2LT Michael C. O'Connor, Alvar Saenz-Otero, David W. Miller

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Saenz-Otero, David W. Miller June 2012 SSL # 4-12 #12;#12;Design and Implementation of Small Satellite Inspection Missions 2LT Michael C. O'Connor, Alvar Saenz-Otero, David W. Miller June 2012 SSL # 4

  1. Presented as SPIE Optics+Photonics 2007 Coastal Ocean Remote Sensing Conf. paper 6680-33 Aug. 27, San Diego, CA 1 Submerged turbulence detection with optical satellites

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Deli

    Presented as SPIE Optics+Photonics 2007 Coastal Ocean Remote Sensing Conf. paper 6680-33 Aug. 27. These were part of the RASP Remote Anthropogenic Sensing Program. Ikonos and Quickbird optical satellite) turbulence in outfall fossil turbulence patches that transmit heat, mass, chemical species, momentum

  2. Maintain all SAA weekly inspection forms in your laboratory. Forms must be readily available for review. Satellite Accumulation Area -Weekly Inspection Form

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    to the corresponding date of the SAA inspection. A. Good Condition - Containers in good condition, properly labeled containment. No Corrective Action Required. B. Missing Labels - Containers not labeled in compliance with SAA storage requirements. Satellite Accumulation Area ­ Waste Storage Requirements Label Requirements: · Waste

  3. On the importance of satellite lines to the He-like K ALPHA complex and the G ratio for calcium, iron, and nickel

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. Oelgoetz; C. J. Fontes; H. L. Zhang; S. N. Nahar; A. K. Pradhan

    2008-11-13T23:59:59.000Z

    New, more detailed calculations of the emission spectra of the He-like K ALPHA complex of calcium, iron and nickel have been carried out using data from both distorted-wave and R-matrix calculations. The value of the GD ratio (an extended definition of the G ratio that accounts for the effect of resolved and unresolved satellite lines) is significantly enhanced at temperatures below the temperature of He-like maximum abundance. Furthermore it is shown that satellite lines are important contributors to the GD ratio such that GD/G>1 at temperatures well above the temperature of maximum abundance. These new calculations demonstrate, with an improved treatment of the KLn (n>=3) satellite lines, that K ALPHA satellite lines need to be included in models of He like spectra even at relatively high temperatures. The excellent agreement between spectra and line ratios calculated from R-matrix and distorted-wave data also confirms the validity of models based on distorted-wave data for highly charged systems, provided the effect of resonances are taken into account as independent processes.

  4. A synergetic use of satellite imagery from SAR and optical sensors to improve coastal flood mapping in the Gulf of Mexico

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Central Florida, University of

    A synergetic use of satellite imagery from SAR and optical sensors to improve coastal flood mapping for inundation mapping and have a great potential for evaluating wetting/drying algorithms of inland and coastal and near infrared domains. Images acquired in these wavelengths (i.e. visible and near infrared

  5. Satellite Observations of Mesoscale Eddy-Induced Ekman Pumping1 Peter Gaube ,Dudley B. Chelton, Roger M. Samelson, Michael G. Schlax, Larry W. O'Neill2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Satellite Observations of Mesoscale Eddy-Induced Ekman Pumping1 Peter Gaube ,Dudley B. Chelton;Three mechanisms for self-induced Ekman pumping in the interiors of mesoscale ocean eddies temperature (SST) field, which generates a stress curl and therefore Ekman pumping in regions of crosswind SST

  6. Satellite Observations of Mesoscale Eddy-Induced Ekman Pumping1 Peter Gaube ,Dudley B. Chelton, Roger M. Samelson, Michael G. Schlax, Larry W. O'Neill2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Samelson, Roger

    Satellite Observations of Mesoscale Eddy-Induced Ekman Pumping1 Peter Gaube ,Dudley B. Chelton;Three mechanisms for self-induced Ekman pumping in the interiors of mesoscale ocean eddies generates a curl of the stress and therefore Ekman pumping in regions of crosswind SST gradients

  7. The ESA's Climate Change Initiative is reprocessing and reassessing over 40 years of multi-sensor satellite records to generate consistent, traceable, long-term datasets of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    The ESA's Climate Change Initiative is reprocessing and reassessing over 40 years of multi" for the climate modeling and research communities. THE ESA CLIMATE CHANGE INITIATIVE Satellite Data Records to our understanding of Earth's climate and how it is changing--one of the major challenges of the twenty

  8. Mesoscale model cloud scheme assessment using satellite observations Jean-Pierre Chaboureau, Jean-Pierre Cammas, Patrick J. Mascart, and Jean-Pierre Pinty

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chaboureau, Jean-Pierre

    Mesoscale model cloud scheme assessment using satellite observations Jean-Pierre Chaboureau, Jean of the mesoscale nonhydrostatic (Meso-NH) model has been conducted by comparing synthetic METEOSAT brightness combines the output from a bulk explicit cloud scheme routinely used in mesoscale simulations

  9. 20LRO Sees Apollo 11 on the Moon! The LRO satellite recently imaged the Apollo 11 landing area on the surface of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    20LRO Sees Apollo 11 on the Moon! The LRO satellite recently imaged the Apollo 11 landing area meters long (1/4 the Apollo 11 module) and there are no such shadows in the image, other than the Apollo, which is why it was selected by Apollo-11 astronauts for a landing site. Space Math http

  10. Rating curves and estimation of average water depth at the upper Negro River based on satellite altimeter data and modeled discharges

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    1 Rating curves and estimation of average water depth at the upper Negro River based on satellite for 21 ``virtual gauge stations'' located at the upper Negro River (Amazon Basin, Brazil). A virtual station can be defined as any crossing of water body surface (i.e., large rivers) by radar altimeter

  11. Contribution to the development of DOE ARM Climate Modeling Best Estimate Data (CMBE) products: Satellite data over the ARM permanent and AMF sites: Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xie, B; Dong, X; Xie, S

    2012-05-18T23:59:59.000Z

    To support the LLNL ARM infrastructure team Climate Modeling Best Estimate (CMBE) data development, the University of North Dakota (UND)'s group will provide the LLNL team the NASA CERES and ISCCP satellite retrieved cloud and radiative properties for the periods when they are available over the ARM permanent research sites. The current available datasets, to date, are as follows: the CERES/TERRA during 200003-200812; the CERES/AQUA during 200207-200712; and the ISCCP during 199601-200806. The detailed parameters list below: (1) CERES Shortwave radiative fluxes (net and downwelling); (2) CERES Longwave radiative fluxes (upwelling) - (items 1 & 2 include both all-sky and clear-sky fluxes); (3) CERES Layered clouds (total, high, middle, and low); (4) CERES Cloud thickness; (5) CERES Effective cloud height; (6) CERES cloud microphysical/optical properties; (7) ISCCP optical depth cloud top pressure matrix; (8) ISCCP derived cloud types (r.g., cirrus, stratus, etc.); and (9) ISCCP infrared derived cloud top pressures. (10) The UND group shall apply necessary quality checks to the original CERES and ISCCP data to remove suspicious data points. The temporal resolution for CERES data should be all available satellite overpasses over the ARM sites; for ISCCP data, it should be 3-hourly. The spatial resolution is the closest satellite field of view observations to the ARM surface sites. All the provided satellite data should be in a format that is consistent with the current ARM CMBE dataset so that the satellite data can be easily merged into the CMBE dataset.

  12. ELECTROMAGNETIC CONSTRUCTION OF A 1 KM-RADIUS RADIATION SHIELD

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    in the light of recent studies on bootstrapped lunar solar-electric power plants, mass drivers, and autonomous-drivers, (g) teleoperation of lunar and orbital facilities, (h) orbital assembly of lunar-derived solar power presence beyond Earth is limited to a very few government employees and robots who are sent up, entirely

  13. The European Optical Module for Paris, KM-3 electronics meeting

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wiebusch, Christopher

    of subsequent hits (> 20ns) (Multiple muon detection) Low afterpulse rate EOM Philips XP-2600 (14") hybrid (+XP;CPUModem Comunication Power & DATA(optical) Q-T DC/DC DMQT Pulse LED XP2600 PhilipsPMT Remote

  14. Microsoft Word - China_10km_solar_documentation.doc

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I Geothermal Pwer Plant JumpMarysville, Ohio:Menomonee| OpenMickey HotVII, Cologne, Germany, 29 June - 5

  15. Microsoft Word - Ethiopia_10km_solar_country_report.doc

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I Geothermal Pwer Plant JumpMarysville, Ohio:Menomonee| OpenMickey HotVII, Cologne, Germany, 29 June -

  16. Microsoft Word - Ghana_10km_solar_country_report.doc

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I Geothermal Pwer Plant JumpMarysville, Ohio:Menomonee| OpenMickey HotVII, Cologne, Germany, 29 June -of

  17. Microsoft Word - Kenya_10km_solar_country_report.doc

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I Geothermal Pwer Plant JumpMarysville, Ohio:Menomonee| OpenMickey HotVII, Cologne, Germany, 29 June -ofKenya

  18. Microsoft Word - Nepal_10km_solar_country_report.doc

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I Geothermal Pwer Plant JumpMarysville, Ohio:Menomonee| OpenMickey HotVII, Cologne, Germany, 29 JuneNepal

  19. The satellite gravimetry measurements from GRACE enable analysis of mass changes on Earth, including recent mass loss from ice sheets and glaciers. However, GRACE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Utrecht, Universiteit

    , including recent mass loss from ice sheets and glaciers. However, GRACE resolution is coarse (~300 km), where glaciers have lost ~600 Gt of ice since 2003. CAA consists of a northern part (NCAA), where several large ice caps exist, and a southern part (SCAA), with two large ice caps, many smaller glaciers

  20. Matching the dark matter profiles of dSph galaxies with those of simulated satellites: a two parameter comparison

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Breddels, Maarten A; Helmi, Amina

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We compare the dark matter halos' structural parameters derived for four Milky Way dwarf spheroidal galaxies to those of subhalos found in cosmological $N$-body simulations. We confirm that estimates of the mass at a single fixed radius are fully consistent with the observations. However, when a second structural parameter such as the logarithmic slope of the dark halo density profile measured close to the half-light radius is included in the comparison, we find little to no overlap between the satellites and the subhalos. Typically the right mass subhalos have steeper profiles at these radii than measurements of the dSph suggest. Using energy arguments we explore if it is possible to solve this discrepancy by invoking baryonic effects. Assuming that feedback from supernovae can lead to a reshaping of the halos, we compute the required efficiency and find entirely plausible values for a significant fraction of the subhalos and even as low as 0.1%. This implies that care must be taken not to exaggerate the eff...

  1. A Search for Prompt Very High Energy Emission from Satellite-detected Gamma-ray Bursts using Milagro

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Milagro Collaboration; P. M. Saz Parkinson; B. L. Dingus

    2007-10-11T23:59:59.000Z

    Gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) have been detected up to GeV energies and are predicted by many models to emit in the very high energy (VHE, > 100 GeV) regime too. Detection of such emission would allow us to constrain GRB models. Since its launch, in late 2004, the Swift satellite has been locating GRBs at a rate of approximately 100 per year. The rapid localization and follow-up in many wavelengths has revealed new and unexpected phenomena, such as delayed emission in the form of bright X-ray flares. The Milagro gamma-ray observatory is a wide field of view (2 sr) instrument employing a water Cherenkov detector to continuously ($>$ 90% duty cycle) observe the overhead sky in the 100 GeV to 100 TeV energy range. Over 100 GRBs are known to have been in the field of view of Milagro since January 2000, including 57 since the launch of Swift (through May 2007). We discuss the results of the searches for prompt emission from these bursts, as well as for delayed emission from the X-ray flares observed in some of the Swift bursts.

  2. Use of high resolution satellite images for tracking of changes in the lineament structure, caused by earthquakes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arellano-Baeza, A A; Trejo-Soto, M

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Over the last decades strong efforts have been made to apply new spaceborn technologies to the study and possible forecast of strong earthquakes. In this study we use ASTER/TERRA multispectral satellite images for detection and analysis of changes in the system of lineaments previous to a strong earthquake. A lineament is a straight or a somewhat curved feature in an image, which it is possible to detect by a special processing of images based on directional filtering and or Hough transform. "The Lineament Extraction and Stripes Statistic Analysis" (LESSA) software package, developed by Zlatopolsy (1992, 1997). We assume that the lineaments allow to detect, at least partially, the presence ruptures in the Earths crust, and therefore enable one to follow the changes in the system of faults and fractures associated with strong earthquakes. We analysed 6 earthquakes occurred in the Pacific coast of the South America and XXX with the Richter scale magnitude >4.5. They were located in the regions with small season...

  3. A Search for Prompt Very High Energy Emission from Satellite-detected Gamma-ray Bursts using Milagro

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Parkinson, P M Saz

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) have been detected up to GeV energies and are predicted by many models to emit in the very high energy (VHE, > 100 GeV) regime too. Detection of such emission would allow us to constrain GRB models. Since its launch, in late 2004, the Swift satellite has been locating GRBs at a rate of approximately 100 per year. The rapid localization and follow-up in many wavelengths has revealed new and unexpected phenomena, such as delayed emission in the form of bright X-ray flares. The Milagro gamma-ray observatory is a wide field of view (2 sr) instrument employing a water Cherenkov detector to continuously ($>$ 90% duty cycle) observe the overhead sky in the 100 GeV to 100 TeV energy range. Over 100 GRBs are known to have been in the field of view of Milagro since January 2000, including 57 since the launch of Swift (through May 2007). We discuss the results of the searches for prompt emission from these bursts, as well as for delayed emission from the X-ray flares observed in some of the Swift...

  4. US satellites find cause of winter pollution in north India .:. NewKerala -... http://www.newkerala.com/news2.php?action=fullnews&id=22703 2 of 3 3/10/2006 7:46 AM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Singh, Ramesh P.

    Test Word Scramble Word Find Quotable Quotes Support Web newkerala.com Search US satellites find cause still richest man alive Center of '60s British scandal dies Ports deal a victim of wide opposition

  5. Satellite-based remote sensing of cirrus clouds: hyperspectral radiative transfer modeling, analysis of uncertainties in in-situ cloud extinction measurements and intercomparison of cirrus retrievals from a-train instruments 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Zhibo

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    This dissertation consists of three parts, each devoted to a particular issue of significant importance for satellite-based remote sensing of cirrus clouds. In the first part, we develop and present a fast infrared radiative transfer model...

  6. Determination of Large-Scale Cloud Ice Water Concentration by Combining Surface Radar and Satellite Data in Support of ARM SCM Activities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, Guosheng

    2013-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Single-column modeling (SCM) is one of the key elements of Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) research initiatives for the development and testing of various physical parameterizations to be used in general circulation models (GCMs). The data required for use with an SCM include observed vertical profiles of temperature, water vapor, and condensed water, as well as the large-scale vertical motion and tendencies of temperature, water vapor, and condensed water due to horizontal advection. Surface-based measurements operated at ARM sites and upper-air sounding networks supply most of the required variables for model inputs, but do not provide the horizontal advection term of condensed water. Since surface cloud radar and microwave radiometer observations at ARM sites are single-point measurements, they can provide the amount of condensed water at the location of observation sites, but not a horizontal distribution of condensed water contents. Consequently, observational data for the large-scale advection tendencies of condensed water have not been available to the ARM cloud modeling community based on surface observations alone. This lack of advection data of water condensate could cause large uncertainties in SCM simulations. Additionally, to evaluate GCMsâ�� cloud physical parameterization, we need to compare GCM results with observed cloud water amounts over a scale that is large enough to be comparable to what a GCM grid represents. To this end, the point-measurements at ARM surface sites are again not adequate. Therefore, cloud water observations over a large area are needed. The main goal of this project is to retrieve ice water contents over an area of 10 x 10 deg. surrounding the ARM sites by combining surface and satellite observations. Built on the progress made during previous ARM research, we have conducted the retrievals of 3-dimensional ice water content by combining surface radar/radiometer and satellite measurements, and have produced 3-D cloud ice water contents in support of cloud modeling activities. The approach of the study is to expand a (surface) point measurement to an (satellite) area measurement. That is, the study takes the advantage of the high quality cloud measurements (particularly cloud radar and microwave radiometer measurements) at the point of the ARM sites. We use the cloud ice water characteristics derived from the point measurement to guide/constrain a satellite retrieval algorithm, then use the satellite algorithm to derive the 3-D cloud ice water distributions within an 10�° (latitude) x 10�° (longitude) area. During the research period, we have developed, validated and improved our cloud ice water retrievals, and have produced and archived at ARM website as a PI-product of the 3-D cloud ice water contents using combined satellite high-frequency microwave and surface radar observations for SGP March 2000 IOP and TWP-ICE 2006 IOP over 10 deg. x 10 deg. area centered at ARM SGP central facility and Darwin sites. We have also worked on validation of the 3-D ice water product by CloudSat data, synergy with visible/infrared cloud ice water retrievals for better results at low ice water conditions, and created a long-term (several years) of ice water climatology in 10 x 10 deg. area of ARM SGP and TWP sites and then compared it with GCMs.

  7. 60Optimization Satellites are

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    panels to generate electricity using solar cells. Instead, the solar cells have to be mounted the surface area and hence the available power that can be generated by the solar cells? Problem 2 - If only 1/2 of the solar cells receive light at any one time, and the power they can deliver is 100 watts per square meter

  8. SATELLITE METEOROLOGY Guosheng Liu

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Yuqing

    , USA Key Words: absorption, brightness temperature, radiometer, radiative transfer equation, remote Remote Sensing 2.1 Radiative Transfer in the Atmosphere 2.2 Thermal Radiation under Clear-Sky 2 Variation 3.2.4 Latent Heating 3.3 Clouds and Surface Energy Fluxes 3.3.1 Cloud Properties 3.3.2 Surface

  9. Science satellites seek Santa

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del Sol HomeFacebook Twitter Principalfuel cells"03, 2008 »Science ofandScience

  10. The use of data from the NIMBUS II satellite to determine the mean relative humidity in the layer below 500 mb

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Morrissette, John Francis

    1967-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    for different kinds of cloud cover. 18 2. The relationship between the mean relative humidity below the 500-mb level and the temperatures sensed by the Channel 4 radiometer 21 LIST OF TABLES Table Page 1. The simple correlation between the mean relative... of radiation in the 5. 8 to 6. 8 micron band (the "water vapor" channel) measured by the early TIROS satellites is in effect a measure of the mean relative humidity of the troposphere, provided that the temperature profile is known. Following this work...

  11. A new generic method for the semi-automatic extraction of river and road networks in low and mid-resolution satellite images

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Grazzini, Jacopo [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Dillard, Scott [PNNL; Soille, Pierre [EC JRC

    2010-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper addresses the problem of semi-automatic extraction of road or hydrographic networks in satellite images. For that purpose, we propose an approach combining concepts arising from mathematical morphology and hydrology. The method exploits both geometrical and topological characteristics of rivers/roads and their tributaries in order to reconstruct the complete networks. It assumes that the images satisfy the following two general assumptions, which are the minimum conditions for a road/river network to be identifiable and are usually verified in low- to mid-resolution satellite images: (i) visual constraint: most pixels composing the network have similar spectral signature that is distinguishable from most of the surrounding areas; (ii) geometric constraint: a line is a region that is relatively long and narrow, compared with other objects in the image. While this approach fully exploits local (roads/rivers are modeled as elongated regions with a smooth spectral signature in the image and a maximum width) and global (they are structured like a tree) characteristics of the networks, further directional information about the image structures is incorporated. Namely, an appropriate anisotropic metric is designed by using both the characteristic features of the target network and the eigen-decomposition of the gradient structure tensor of the image. Following, the geodesic propagation from a given network seed with this metric is combined with hydrological operators for overland flow simulation to extract the paths which contain most line evidence and identify them with the target network.

  12. High Resolution Imaging of the Anomalous Flux-Ratio Gravitational Lens System CLASS B2045+265: Dark Or Luminous Satellites?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McKean, J.P.; Koopmans, L.V.E.; Flack, C.E.; Fassnacht, C.D.; Thompson, D.; Matthews, K.; Blandford, R.D.; Readhead, A.C.S.; Soifer, B.T.; /UC, Davis /Bonn, Max Planck

    2006-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

    The existence of flux-ratio anomalies between fold and cusp images in galaxy-scale strong-lens systems has led to an interpretation based on the presence of a high mass-fraction of cold-dark-matter (CDM) substructures around galaxies, as predicted by numerical N-body simulations. These substructures can cause large perturbations of the image magnifications, leading to changes in the image flux ratios. The flux-ratio anomaly is particularly evident in the radio-loud quadruple gravitational lens system CLASS B2045+265. In this paper, new high-resolution radio, optical, and infrared imaging of B2045+265 is presented which sheds more light on this anomaly and its possible causes. First, deep Very Long Baseline Array observations show very compact images, possibly with a hint of a jet, but with no evidence for differential scattering or scatter broadening. Hence, the flux-ratio anomaly is unlikely to be caused by refractive scattering in either the Milky Way or the lens galaxy. Second, optical and infrared observations with the Hubble Space Telescope and through Adaptive-Optics imaging with the W. M. Keck Telescope, show a previously undiscovered object--interpreted as a (tidally disrupted) dwarf satellite based on its colors and slight extension--between the main lens galaxy and the three anomalous flux-ratio images. Third, color variations in the early-type lens galaxy indicate recent star-formation, possibly the result of secondary infall of gas-rich satellites. A population of young galaxies around the lens system could explain the previously discovered strong [O II] emission. However, spiral structure and/or normal star formation in the lens galaxy cannot be excluded. In light of these new data, we propose a lens model for the system, including the observed dwarf satellite, which reproduces all positional and flux-ratio constraints, without the need for additional CDM substructure. Although the model is peculiar in that the dwarf galaxy must be highly flattened, the model is very similar to recently proposed mass models based on high-order multipole expansions.

  13. Implications of heavy-ion-induced satellite x-ray emission. III. Chemical effects in high resolution sulfur K/sub. cap alpha. / x-ray spectra

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vane, C.R.; Hulett, L.D. Jr.; Kahane, S.; McDaniel, F.D.; Milner, W.T.; Raman, S.; Rosseel, T.M.; Slaughter, G.G.; Varghese, S.L.; Young, J.P.

    1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    High resolution (approx. 7 eV at 2.3 keV) sulfur K/sub ..cap alpha../ x-ray spectra have been obtained for a series of sulfur compound targets under heavy ion impact at the Holified Heavy Ion Facility. The spectra observed are dominated by a series of satellite peaks arising from varying degrees of L-shell ionization at the time of x-ray emission. Each spectral profile has been parameterized by a single variable p/sub L/, the apparent average L-shell ionization probability. Correlations are evident between p/sub L/ and the corresponding sulfur atom chemical environment. Much stronger correlations are however found for variations of some individual peak intensities with specific chemical parameters. Comparison of results for Ar/sup q+/ and Kr/sup q+/ projectiles shows that while L-shell ionization probability has increased, chemical sensitivity has apparently saturated.

  14. Comparing cropland net primary production estimates from inventory, a satellite-based model, and a process-based model in the Midwest of the United States

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, Zhengpeng; Liu, Shuguang; Tan, Zhengxi; Bliss, N.; Young, Claudia J.; West, Tristram O.; Ogle, Stephen

    2014-05-06T23:59:59.000Z

    Accurately quantifying the spatial and temporal variability of net primary production (NPP) for croplands is essential to understand regional cropland carbon dynamics. We compared three NPP estimates for croplands in the Midwestern United States: inventory-based estimates using crop yield data from the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) National Agricultural Statistics Service (NASS); estimates from the satellite-based Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) NPP product; and estimates from the General Ensemble biogeochemical Modeling System (GEMS) process-based model. The three methods estimated mean NPP in the range of 469–687 g C m?2 yr?1 and total NPP in the range of 318–490 Tg C yr?1 for croplands in the Midwest in 2007 and 2008. The NPP estimates from crop yield data and the GEMS model showed the mean NPP for croplands was over 650 g C m?2 yr?1 while the MODIS NPP product estimated the mean NPP was less than 500 g C m?2 yr?1. MODIS NPP also showed very different spatial variability of the cropland NPP from the other two methods. We found these differences were mainly caused by the difference in the land cover data and the crop specific information used in the methods. Our study demonstrated that the detailed mapping of the temporal and spatial change of crop species is critical for estimating the spatial and temporal variability of cropland NPP. We suggest that high resolution land cover data with species–specific crop information should be used in satellite-based and process-based models to improve carbon estimates for croplands.

  15. Rigollier C., Lefvre M., Cros S., Wald L., 2003, Heliosat 2: an improved method for the mapping of the solar radiation from Meteosat imagery. In Proceedings of the 2002 EUMETSAT Meteorological Satellite

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    of the solar radiation from Meteosat imagery. In Proceedings of the 2002 EUMETSAT Meteorological Satellite. HELIOSAT 2: AN IMPROVED METHOD FOR THE MAPPING OF THE SOLAR RADIATION FROM METEOSAT IMAGERY C. Rigollier, M INTRODUCTION Mapping solar radiation at the ground level is an important issue for several applications

  16. Dust Aerosol Impact on North Africa Climate: A GCM Investigation of Aerosol-Cloud-Radiation Interactions Using A-Train Satellite Data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gu, Y.; Liou, K. N.; Jiang, Jonathan; Su, Hui; Liu, Xiaohong

    2012-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The climatic effects of dust aerosols in North Africa have been investigated using the atmospheric general circulation model (AGCM) developed at the University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA). The model includes an efficient and physically based radiation parameterization scheme developed specifically for application to clouds and aerosols. Parameterization of the effective ice particle size in association with the aerosol indirect effect based on cloud and aerosol data retrieved from A-Train satellite observations have been employed in the climate model simulations. Offline simulations reveal that the direct solar, IR, and net forcings by dust aerosols generally increase with increasing aerosol optical depth (AOD). When the dust semi-direct effect is included with the presence of ice clouds, positive IR radiative forcing is enhanced, since ice clouds trap substantial IR radiation, while the positive solar forcing with dust aerosols alone has been changed to negative values due to the strong reflection of solar radiation by clouds, indicating that cloud forcing could exceed aerosol forcing. With the aerosol indirect effect, the net cloud forcing is generally reduced for ice water path (IWP) larger than 20 g m-2. The magnitude of the reduction increases with IWP. AGCM simulations show that the reduced ice crystal mean effective size due to the aerosol first indirect effect result in less OLR and net solar flux at the top of the atmosphere over the cloudy area of the North Africa region because ice clouds with smaller size trap more IR radiation and reflect more solar radiation. The precipitation in the same area, however, increases due to the aerosol indirect effect on ice clouds, corresponding to the enhanced convection as indicated by reduced OLR. The increased precipitation seems to be associated with enhanced ice water contents in this region. The 200 mb radiative heating rate shows more cooling with the aerosol indirect effect since greater cooling is produced at the cloud top with smaller ice crystal size. The 500 mb omega indicates strong upward motion, which, together with the increased cooling effect, results in the increased ice water contents. Adding the aerosol direct effect into the model simulation reduces the precipitation in the normal rainfall band over North Africa, where precipitation is shifted to the south and the northeast produced by the absorption of sunlight and the subsequent heating of the air column by dust particles. As a result, rainfall is drawn further inland to the northeast. This study represents the first attempt to quantify the climate impact of aerosol indirect effect using a GCM in connection with A-train satellite data. The parameterization for the aerosol first indirect effect developed in this study can be readily incorporated for application to any other GCMs.

  17. The evolution of dwarf galaxy satellites with different dark matter density profiles in the ErisMod simulations. I. The early infalls

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tomozeiu, Mihai; Quinn, Thomas

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present the first simulations of tidal stirring of dwarf galaxies in the Local Group carried out in a cosmological context. We use the ErisDARK simulation of a MW-sized galaxy to identify some of the most massive subhalos ($M_{vir} > 10^8 M_{\\odot}$) that fall into the main host before $z=2$. Subhalos are replaced before infall with high-resolution models of dwarf galaxies comprising a faint stellar disk embedded in a dark matter halo. The set of models contains cuspy halos as well as halos with "cored" profiles (with asymptotic inner slope $\\gamma = 0.6$). The simulations are then run to $z=0$ with as many as 54 million particles and resolution as small as $\\sim 4$ pc using the N-Body code ChaNGa. The stellar components of all satellites are significantly affected by tidal stirring, losing stellar mass and undergoing a morphological transformation towards a pressure supported spheroidal system. However, while some remnants with cuspy halos maintain significant rotational flattening and disk-like features,...

  18. 1 [2.7 km/s] 3 [2.4; 2.7;2.9 km/s] 8 along the strike 3 along the strike

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cerveny, Vlastislav

    Fisiche - Universita' degli Studi "Federico II" - Napoli - Italy; Istituto Nazionale di Geofisica e with Istituto Nazionale di Geofisica e Vulcanologia). One of the goals is to perform a sensitivity analysis

  19. Final Report: Detection and Characterization of Underground Facilities by Stochastic Inversion and Modeling of Data from the New Generation of Synthetic Aperture Satellites

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Foxall, W; Cunningham, C; Mellors, R; Templeton, D; Dyer, K; White, J

    2012-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

    Many clandestine development and production activities can be conducted underground to evade surveillance. The purpose of the study reported here was to develop a technique to detect underground facilities by broad-area search and then to characterize the facilities by inversion of the collected data. This would enable constraints to be placed on the types of activities that would be feasible at each underground site, providing a basis the design of targeted surveillance and analysis for more complete characterization. Excavation of underground cavities causes deformation in the host material and overburden that produces displacements at the ground surface. Such displacements are often measurable by a variety of surveying or geodetic techniques. One measurement technique, Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar (InSAR), uses data from satellite-borne (or airborne) synthetic aperture radars (SARs) and so is ideal for detecting and measuring surface displacements in denied access regions. Depending on the radar frequency and the acquisition mode and the surface conditions, displacement maps derived from SAR interferograms can provide millimeter- to centimeter-level measurement accuracy on regional and local scales at spatial resolution of {approx}1-10 m. Relatively low-resolution ({approx}20 m, say) maps covering large regions can be used for broad-area detection, while finer resolutions ({approx}1 m) can be used to image details of displacement fields over targeted small areas. Surface displacements are generally expected to be largest during or a relatively short time after active excavation, but, depending on the material properties, measurable displacement may continue at a decreasing rate for a considerable time after completion. For a given excavated volume in a given geological setting, the amplitude of the surface displacements decreases as the depth of excavation increases, while the area of the discernable displacement pattern increases. Therefore, the ability to detect evidence for an underground facility using InSAR depends on the displacement sensitivity and spatial resolution of the interferogram, as well as on the size and depth of the facility and the time since its completion. The methodology development described in this report focuses on the exploitation of synthetic aperture radar data that are available commercially from a number of satellite missions. Development of the method involves three components: (1) Evaluation of the capability of InSAR to detect and characterize underground facilities ; (2) inversion of InSAR data to infer the location, depth, shape and volume of a subsurface facility; and (3) evaluation and selection of suitable geomechanical forward models to use in the inversion. We adapted LLNL's general-purpose Bayesian Markov Chain-Monte Carlo procedure, the 'Stochastic Engine' (SE), to carry out inversions to characterize subsurface void geometries. The SE performs forward simulations for a large number of trial source models to identify the set of models that are consistent with the observations and prior constraints. The inverse solution produced by this kind of stochastic method is a posterior probability density function (pdf) over alternative models, which forms an appropriate input to risk-based decision analyses to evaluate subsequent response strategies. One major advantage of a stochastic inversion approach is its ability to deal with complex, non-linear forward models employing empirical, analytical or numerical methods. However, while a geomechanical model must incorporate adequate physics to enable sufficiently accurate prediction of surface displacements, it must also be computationally fast enough to render the large number of forward realizations needed in stochastic inversion feasible. This latter requirement prompted us first to investigate computationally efficient empirical relations and closed-form analytical solutions. However, our evaluation revealed severe limitations in the ability of existing empirical and analytical forms to predict deformations from undergro

  20. SNAP Satellite Focal Plane Development

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    from 42 High-Redshift Supernovae,” ApJ 517, p.565, 1999. A.Observational Evidence from Supernovae for an AcceleratingCorrections for Type Ia Supernovae,” PASP, 114, 803N (2002).