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1

Percent Distribution  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

. . Percent Distribution of Natural Gas Supply and Disposition by State, 1996 Table State Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) Marketed Production Total Consumption Alabama................................................................... 3.02 2.69 1.48 Alaska ...................................................................... 5.58 2.43 2.04 Arizona..................................................................... NA 0 0.55 Arkansas.................................................................. 0.88 1.12 1.23 California.................................................................. 1.25 1.45 8.23 Colorado .................................................................. 4.63 2.90 1.40 Connecticut.............................................................. 0 0 0.58 D.C...........................................................................

2

Percent Distribution  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

. . Percent Distribution of Natural Gas Delivered to Consumers by State, 1996 Table State Residential Commercial Industrial Vehicle Fuel Electric Utilities Alabama..................................... 1.08 0.92 2.27 0.08 0.23 Alaska ........................................ 0.31 0.87 0.85 - 1.16 Arizona....................................... 0.53 0.92 0.30 3.91 0.70 Arkansas.................................... 0.88 0.98 1.59 0.11 1.24 California.................................... 9.03 7.44 7.82 43.11 11.64 Colorado .................................... 2.12 2.18 0.94 0.58 0.20 Connecticut................................ 0.84 1.26 0.37 1.08 0.38 D.C............................................. 0.33 0.52 - 0.21 - Delaware.................................... 0.19 0.21 0.16 0.04 0.86 Florida........................................

3

Table 1. Comparison of Absolute Percent Errors for Present and Current AEO Forecast Evaluations  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

AEO82 to AEO82 to AEO99 AEO82 to AEO2000 AEO82 to AEO2001 AEO82 to AEO2002 AEO82 to AEO2003 AEO82 to AEO2004 Total Energy Consumption 1.9 2.0 2.1 2.1 2.1 2.1 Total Petroleum Consumption 2.9 3.0 3.1 3.1 3.0 2.9 Total Natural Gas Consumption 7.3 7.1 7.1 6.7 6.4 6.5 Total Coal Consumption 3.1 3.3 3.5 3.6 3.7 3.8

4

NNSA Achieves 50 Percent Production for W76-1 Units | National...  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

with NNSA, the team has achieved this important milestone, and I look forward to completion of W76-1 production before the decade is out. The combination of the Ohio-class...

5

EIA","Percent  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1. Estimated rail transportation rates for coal, basin to state, 2008" 1. Estimated rail transportation rates for coal, basin to state, 2008" "comparison of EIA and STB data" ,,"Transportation cost per short ton (nominal)",,,"Percent difference EIA vs. STB ",,"Total delivered cost per short ton (nominal) EIA","Percent transportation cost is of total delivered cost EIA","Shipments (1,000 short tons) EIA","Shipments with transportation rates over total shipments (percent)" "Origin Basin","Destination State"," STB"," EIA",,,,,,,"STB ","EIA " "Northern Appalachian Basin","Delaware"," W"," $28.49",," W",," $131.87"," 21.6%", 59," W"," 100.0%"

6

EIA","Percent  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

9. Estimated rail transportation rates for coal, state to state, 2008" 9. Estimated rail transportation rates for coal, state to state, 2008" "comparison of EIA and STB data" ,,"Transportation cost per short ton (nominal)",,,"Percent difference EIA vs. STB ",,"Total delivered cost per short ton (nominal) EIA","Percent transportation cost is of total delivered cost EIA","Shipments (1,000 short tons) EIA","Shipments with transportation rates over total shipments (percent)" "Origin State","Destination State"," STB"," EIA",,,,,,,"STB ","EIA " "Alabama","Alabama"," W"," $14.43",," W",," $65.38"," 22.1%"," 4,509"," W"," 81.8%"

7

EIA","Percent  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0. Estimated rail transportation rates for coal, state to state, 2009" 0. Estimated rail transportation rates for coal, state to state, 2009" "comparison of EIA and STB data" ,,"Transportation cost per short ton (nominal)",,,"Percent difference EIA vs. STB ",,"Total delivered cost per short ton (nominal) EIA","Percent transportation cost is of total delivered cost EIA","Shipments (1,000 short tons) EIA","Shipments with transportation rates over total shipments (percent)" "Origin State","Destination State"," STB"," EIA",,,,,,,"STB ","EIA " "Alabama","Alabama"," W"," $13.59",," W",," $63.63"," 21.4%"," 3,612"," W"," 100.0%"

8

EIA","Percent  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2. Estimated rail transportation rates for coal, basin to state, 2009" 2. Estimated rail transportation rates for coal, basin to state, 2009" "comparison of EIA and STB data" ,,"Transportation cost per short ton (nominal)",,,"Percent difference EIA vs. STB",,"Total delivered cost per short ton (nominal) EIA","Percent transportation cost is of total delivered cost EIA","Shipments (1,000 short tons) EIA","Shipments with transportation rates over total shipments (percent)" "Origin Basin","Destination State"," STB"," EIA",,,,,,,"STB ","EIA " "Northern Appalachian Basin","Florida"," W"," $38.51",," W",," $140.84"," 27.3%", 134," W"," 100.0%"

9

"Table 1. Aeo Reference Case Projection Results" "Variable","Average Absolute Percent Differences","Percent of Projections Over- Estimated"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Aeo Reference Case Projection Results" Aeo Reference Case Projection Results" "Variable","Average Absolute Percent Differences","Percent of Projections Over- Estimated" "Gross Domestic Product" "Real Gross Domestic Product (Average Cumulative Growth)* (Table 2)",0.9772689079,42.55319149 "Petroleum" "Imported Refiner Acquisition Cost of Crude Oil (Constant $) (Table 3a)",35.19047501,18.61702128 "Imported Refiner Acquisition Cost of Crude Oil (Nominal $) (Table 3b)",34.68652106,19.68085106 "Total Petroleum Consumption (Table 4)",6.150682783,66.4893617 "Crude Oil Production (Table 5)",5.99969572,59.57446809 "Petroleum Net Imports (Table 6)",13.27260615,67.0212766 "Natural Gas"

10

Percent Yield and Mass of Water  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Percent Yield and Mass of Water Percent Yield and Mass of Water Name: Lisa Status: educator Grade: 9-12 Location: CA Country: USA Date: Winter 2011-2012 Question: When doing a percent yield activity in lab, we use MgCl hexahydrate and CaSO4. How do we factor the mass of the water that is released during the reaction? Replies: Lisa, Based on your question, I am not quite sure what the experiment is. Are you heating the hydrates and looking at the percent-yield of water removed during the heating? If so, then you would calculate the theoretical yield (using stoichiometry and the balanced chemical equation: MgCl2.6H2O --> MgCl2 + 6H2O) of water released, and compare it to the actual yield of water released in the experiment to get percent yield. Greg (Roberto Gregorius) Canisius College

11

Variable Average Absolute Percent Differences  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Variable Variable Average Absolute Percent Differences Percent of Projections Over- Estimated Gross Domestic Product Real Gross Domestic Product (Average Cumulative Growth)* (Table 2) 1.0 42.6 Petroleum Imported Refiner Acquisition Cost of Crude Oil (Constant $) (Table 3a) 35.2 18.6 Imported Refiner Acquisition Cost of Crude Oil (Nominal $) (Table 3b) 34.7 19.7 Total Petroleum Consumption (Table 4) 6.2 66.5 Crude Oil Production (Table 5) 6.0 59.6 Petroleum Net Imports (Table 6) 13.3 67.0 Natural Gas Natural Gas Wellhead Prices (Constant $) (Table 7a) 30.7 26.1 Natural Gas Wellhead Prices (Nominal $) (Table 7b) 30.0 27.1 Total Natural Gas Consumption (Table 8) 7.8 70.2 Natural Gas Production (Table 9) 7.1 66.0 Natural Gas Net Imports (Table 10) 29.3 69.7 Coal Coal Prices to Electric Generating Plants (Constant $)** (Table 11a)

12

27. 5-percent silicon concentrator solar cells  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Recent advances in silicon solar cells using the backside point-contact configuration have been extended resulting in 27.5-percent efficiencies at 10 W/sq cm (100 suns, 24 C), making these the most efficient solar cells reported to date. The one-sun efficiencies under an AM1.5 spectrum normalized to 100 mW/sq cm are 22 percent at 24 C based on the design area of the concentrator cell. The improvements reported here are largely due to the incorportation of optical light trapping to enhance the absorption of weakly absorbed near bandgap light. These results approach the projected efficiencies for a mature technology which are 23-24 percent at one sun and 29 percent in the 100-350-sun (10-35 W/sq cm) range. 10 references.

Sinton, R.A.; Kwark, Y.; Gan, J.Y.; Swanson, R.M.

1986-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

13

Colorado Natural Gas % of Total Residential Deliveries (Percent...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

% of Total Residential Deliveries (Percent) Colorado Natural Gas % of Total Residential Deliveries (Percent) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8...

14

Connecticut Natural Gas % of Total Residential Deliveries (Percent...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

% of Total Residential Deliveries (Percent) Connecticut Natural Gas % of Total Residential Deliveries (Percent) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7...

15

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4 4 Oregon - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S39. Summary statistics for natural gas - Oregon, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 18 21 24 26 24 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 409 778 821 1,407 1,344 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0

16

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

6 6 Oregon - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S39. Summary statistics for natural gas - Oregon, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 21 24 26 24 27 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 778 821 1,407 1,344 770 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0

17

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4 4 Nebraska - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S29. Summary statistics for natural gas - Nebraska, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 186 322 285 276 322 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 1,331 2,862 2,734 2,092 1,854 From Oil Wells 228 221 182 163 126 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0

18

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6 6 California - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S5. Summary statistics for natural gas - California, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 1,540 1,645 1,643 1,580 1,308 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 93,249 91,460 82,288 73,017 63,902 From Oil Wells R 116,652 R 122,345 R 121,949 R 151,369 120,880

19

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2 2 Oklahoma - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S38. Summary statistics for natural gas - Oklahoma, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 38,364 41,921 43,600 44,000 41,238 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells R 1,583,356 R 1,452,148 R 1,413,759 R 1,140,111 1,281,794 From Oil Wells 35,186 153,227 92,467 210,492 104,703

20

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

80 80 Wyoming - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S52. Summary statistics for natural gas - Wyoming, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 27,350 28,969 25,710 26,124 26,180 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells R 1,649,284 R 1,764,084 R 1,806,807 R 1,787,599 1,709,218 From Oil Wells 159,039 156,133 135,269 151,871 152,589

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "1 percent compared" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 2 Wyoming - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S52. Summary statistics for natural gas - Wyoming, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 28,969 25,710 26,124 26,180 22,171 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 1,764,084 1,806,807 1,787,599 1,709,218 1,762,095 From Oil Wells 156,133 135,269 151,871 152,589 24,544

22

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

8 8 California - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S5. Summary statistics for natural gas - California, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 1,645 1,643 1,580 1,308 1,423 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 91,460 82,288 73,017 63,902 120,579 From Oil Wells 122,345 121,949 151,369 120,880 70,900

23

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4 4 Oklahoma - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S38. Summary statistics for natural gas - Oklahoma, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 41,921 43,600 44,000 41,238 40,000 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 1,452,148 1,413,759 1,140,111 1,281,794 1,394,859 From Oil Wells 153,227 92,467 210,492 104,703 53,720

24

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6 6 Illinois - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S15. Summary statistics for natural gas - Illinois, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 43 45 51 50 40 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells RE 1,389 RE 1,188 RE 1,438 RE 1,697 2,114 From Oil Wells E 5 E 5 E 5 E 5 7 From Coalbed Wells RE 0 RE

25

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4 4 Kentucky - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S19. Summary statistics for natural gas - Kentucky, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 16,563 16,290 17,152 17,670 14,632 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 95,437 R 112,587 R 111,782 133,521 122,578 From Oil Wells 0 1,529 1,518 1,809 1,665 From Coalbed Wells 0

26

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

6 6 Kentucky - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S19. Summary statistics for natural gas - Kentucky, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 16,290 17,152 17,670 14,632 17,936 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 112,587 111,782 133,521 122,578 106,122 From Oil Wells 1,529 1,518 1,809 1,665 0 From Coalbed Wells 0

27

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

8 8 Illinois - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S15. Summary statistics for natural gas - Illinois, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 45 51 50 40 40 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells E 1,188 E 1,438 E 1,697 2,114 2,125 From Oil Wells E 5 E 5 E 5 7 0 From Coalbed Wells E 0 E 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0

28

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2 2 South Dakota - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S43. Summary statistics for natural gas - South Dakota, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 71 71 89 102 100 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 422 R 1,098 R 1,561 1,300 933 From Oil Wells 11,458 10,909 11,366 11,240 11,516 From Coalbed Wells 0 0

29

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6 6 Louisiana - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S20. Summary statistics for natural gas - Louisiana, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 18,145 19,213 18,860 19,137 21,235 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells R 1,261,539 R 1,288,559 R 1,100,007 R 911,967 883,712 From Oil Wells 106,303 61,663 58,037 63,638 68,505

30

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4 4 South Dakota - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S43. Summary statistics for natural gas - South Dakota, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 71 89 102 100 95 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 1,098 1,561 1,300 933 14,396 From Oil Wells 10,909 11,366 11,240 11,516 689 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0

31

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0 0 Mississippi - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S26. Summary statistics for natural gas - Mississippi, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 2,343 2,320 1,979 5,732 1,669 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 331,673 337,168 387,026 429,829 404,457 From Oil Wells 7,542 8,934 8,714 8,159 43,421 From Coalbed Wells 7,250

32

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

8 8 Louisiana - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S20. Summary statistics for natural gas - Louisiana, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 19,213 18,860 19,137 21,235 19,792 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 1,288,559 1,100,007 911,967 883,712 775,506 From Oil Wells 61,663 58,037 63,638 68,505 49,380

33

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

8 8 Mississippi - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S26. Summary statistics for natural gas - Mississippi, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 2,315 2,343 2,320 1,979 5,732 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells R 259,001 R 331,673 R 337,168 R 387,026 429,829 From Oil Wells 6,203 7,542 8,934 8,714 8,159 From Coalbed Wells

34

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6 6 Texas - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S45. Summary statistics for natural gas - Texas, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 76,436 87,556 93,507 95,014 100,966 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells R 4,992,042 R 5,285,458 R 4,860,377 R 4,441,188 3,794,952 From Oil Wells 704,092 745,587 774,821 849,560 1,073,301

35

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0 0 Colorado - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S6. Summary statistics for natural gas - Colorado, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 25,716 27,021 28,813 30,101 32,000 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 496,374 459,509 526,077 563,750 1,036,572 From Oil Wells 199,725 327,619 338,565

36

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

8 8 West Virginia - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S50. Summary statistics for natural gas - West Virginia, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 49,364 50,602 52,498 56,813 50,700 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 191,444 192,896 151,401 167,113 397,313 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 1,477 From Coalbed Wells 0

37

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

8 8 Texas - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S45. Summary statistics for natural gas - Texas, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 87,556 93,507 95,014 100,966 96,617 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 5,285,458 4,860,377 4,441,188 3,794,952 3,619,901 From Oil Wells 745,587 774,821 849,560 1,073,301 860,675

38

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0 0 Alabama - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S1. Summary statistics for natural gas - Alabama, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 6,860 6,913 7,026 7,063 6,327 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 158,964 142,509 131,448 116,872 114,407 From Oil Wells 6,368 5,758 6,195 5,975 10,978

39

fig5_VqP_polar_co2_50Hz_relation_15-1_10percent_sat_color.eps  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1.0. 2.0. 3.0. 4.0. 30. 60. 90. 0. qP Waves. Vex (m/s). Vez (m/s). 1. Brine saturated medium with fractures. 2. Patchy saturated medium without fractures. 3. Patchy...

40

COMPARING ALASKA'S OIL PRODUCTION TAXES: INCENTIVES AND ASSUMPTIONS1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 COMPARING ALASKA'S OIL PRODUCTION TAXES: INCENTIVES AND ASSUMPTIONS1 Matthew Berman In a recent analysis comparing the current oil production tax, More Alaska Production Act (MAPA, also known as SB 21 oil prices, production rates, and costs. He noted that comparative revenues are highly sensitive

Pantaleone, Jim

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "1 percent compared" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

6 6 Tennessee - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S44. Summary statistics for natural gas - Tennessee, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 285 310 230 210 212 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 4,700 5,478 5,144 4,851 5,825 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0

42

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

38 38 Nevada - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S30. Summary statistics for natural gas - Nevada, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 4 4 4 3 4 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 Total 4 4 4 3 4

43

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 2 Connecticut - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S7. Summary statistics for natural gas - Connecticut, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0

44

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4 4 Idaho - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S14. Summary statistics for natural gas - Idaho, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 Total 0

45

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4 4 Washington - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S49. Summary statistics for natural gas - Washington, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 Total 0

46

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0 0 Maine - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S21. Summary statistics for natural gas - Maine, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 Total 0 0

47

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

8 8 Minnesota - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S25. Summary statistics for natural gas - Minnesota, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 Total 0 0 0

48

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 2 South Carolina - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S42. Summary statistics for natural gas - South Carolina, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 Total 0

49

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

6 6 District of Columbia - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S9. Summary statistics for natural gas - District of Columbia, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0

50

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6 6 North Carolina - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S35. Summary statistics for natural gas - North Carolina, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 Total 0

51

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0 0 Iowa - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S17. Summary statistics for natural gas - Iowa, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 Total 0 0

52

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4 4 Massachusetts - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S23. Summary statistics for natural gas - Massachusetts, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 Total 0

53

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

8 8 Georgia - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S11. Summary statistics for natural gas - Georgia, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0

54

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6 6 Minnesota - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S25. Summary statistics for natural gas - Minnesota, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 Total 0 0 0

55

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2 2 Delaware - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S8. Summary statistics for natural gas - Delaware, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0

56

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4 4 District of Columbia - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S9. Summary statistics for natural gas - District of Columbia, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0

57

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0 0 New Jersey - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S32. Summary statistics for natural gas - New Jersey, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 Total 0

58

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4 4 Tennessee - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S44. Summary statistics for natural gas - Tennessee, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 305 285 310 230 210 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells NA 4,700 5,478 5,144 4,851 From Oil Wells 3,942 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0

59

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0 0 Vermont - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S47. Summary statistics for natural gas - Vermont, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 Total 0 0 0

60

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

8 8 Wisconsin - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S51. Summary statistics for natural gas - Wisconsin, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 Total 0 0 0

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "1 percent compared" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

8 8 North Carolina - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S35. Summary statistics for natural gas - North Carolina, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 Total 0

62

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 2 New Jersey - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S32. Summary statistics for natural gas - New Jersey, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 Total 0

63

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0 0 Georgia - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S11. Summary statistics for natural gas - Georgia, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0

64

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0 0 Connecticut - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S7. Summary statistics for natural gas - Connecticut, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0

65

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0 0 Maryland - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S22. Summary statistics for natural gas - Maryland, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 7 7 7 7 8 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 35 28 43 43 34 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 Total 35

66

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6 6 Florida - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S10. Summary statistics for natural gas - Florida, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 2,000 2,742 290 13,938 17,129 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0

67

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0 0 New Hampshire - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S31. Summary statistics for natural gas - New Hampshire, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 Total 0

68

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 2 Maryland - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S22. Summary statistics for natural gas - Maryland, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 7 7 7 8 9 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 28 43 43 34 44 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 Total 28

69

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 2 Missouri - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S27. Summary statistics for natural gas - Missouri, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 53 100 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 Total 0

70

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4 4 Delaware - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S8. Summary statistics for natural gas - Delaware, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0

71

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2 2 Massachusetts - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S23. Summary statistics for natural gas - Massachusetts, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 Total 0

72

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0 0 South Carolina - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S42. Summary statistics for natural gas - South Carolina, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 Total 0

73

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0 0 Rhode Island - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S41. Summary statistics for natural gas - Rhode Island, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 Total 0

74

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0 0 Indiana - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S16. Summary statistics for natural gas - Indiana, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 525 563 620 914 819 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 4,701 4,927 6,802 9,075 8,814 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0

75

Table B29. Percent of Floorspace Cooled, Number of Buildings and Floorspace, 199  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

9. Percent of Floorspace Cooled, Number of Buildings and Floorspace, 1999" 9. Percent of Floorspace Cooled, Number of Buildings and Floorspace, 1999" ,"Number of Buildings (thousand)",,,,,"Total Floorspace (million square feet)" ,"All Buildings","Not Cooled","1 to 50 Percent Cooled","51 to 99 Percent Cooled","100 Percent Cooled","All Buildings","Not Cooled","1 to 50 Percent Cooled","51 to 99 Percent Cooled","100 Percent Cooled" "All Buildings ................",4657,1097,1012,751,1796,67338,8864,16846,16966,24662 "Building Floorspace" "(Square Feet)" "1,001 to 5,000 ...............",2348,668,352,294,1034,6774,1895,1084,838,2957 "5,001 to 10,000 ..............",1110,282,292,188,348,8238,2026,2233,1435,2544

76

Table B30. Percent of Floorspace Lit When Open, Number of Buildings and Floorspa  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0. Percent of Floorspace Lit When Open, Number of Buildings and Floorspace, 1999" 0. Percent of Floorspace Lit When Open, Number of Buildings and Floorspace, 1999" ,"Number of Buildings (thousand)",,,,,"Total Floorspace (million square feet)" ,"All Buildings","Not Lita","1 to 50 Percent Lit","51 to 99 Percent Lit","100 Percent Lit","All Buildings","Not Lita","1 to 50 Percent Lit","51 to 99 Percent Lit","100 Percent Lit" "All Buildings ................",4657,498,835,1228,2096,67338,3253,9187,20665,34233 "Building Floorspace" "(Square Feet)" "1,001 to 5,000 ...............",2348,323,351,517,1156,6774,915,1061,1499,3299 "5,001 to 10,000 ..............",1110,114,279,351,367,8238,818,2014,2614,2793

77

Table B28. Percent of Floorspace Heated, Number of Buildings and Floorspace, 199  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

8. Percent of Floorspace Heated, Number of Buildings and Floorspace, 1999" 8. Percent of Floorspace Heated, Number of Buildings and Floorspace, 1999" ,"Number of Buildings (thousand)",,,,,"Total Floorspace (million square feet)" ,"All Buildings","Not Heated","1 to 50 Percent Heated","51 to 99 Percent Heated","100 Percent Heated","All Buildings","Not Heated","1 to 50 Percent Heated","51 to 99 Percent Heated","100 Percent Heated" "All Buildings ................",4657,641,576,627,2813,67338,5736,7593,10745,43264 "Building Floorspace" "(Square Feet)" "1,001 to 5,000 ...............",2348,366,230,272,1479,6774,1091,707,750,4227 "5,001 to 10,000 ..............",1110,164,194,149,603,8238,1148,1504,1177,4409

78

Comparing Predictors of Disordered Protein Xiaohong Li1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Comparing Predictors of Disordered Protein Xiaohong Li1 Zoran Obradovic1 xiahong@livegrip.com zoran by their conditional probabilities for indicating ordered or disordered protein structure. The top 10 each from several compared to our previously published predictor. Keywords: disordered proteins, sequence attributes

Obradovic, Zoran

79

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

50 50 North Dakota - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S36. Summary statistics for natural gas - North Dakota, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 194 196 188 239 211 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 13,738 11,263 10,501 14,287 22,261 From Oil Wells 54,896 45,776 38,306 27,739 17,434 From Coalbed Wells 0

80

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2 2 Virginia - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S48. Summary statistics for natural gas - Virginia, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 5,735 6,426 7,303 7,470 7,903 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells R 6,681 R 7,419 R 16,046 R 23,086 20,375 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells R 86,275 R 101,567

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "1 percent compared" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4 4 Michigan - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S24. Summary statistics for natural gas - Michigan, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 9,712 9,995 10,600 10,100 11,100 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells R 80,090 R 16,959 R 20,867 R 7,345 18,470 From Oil Wells 54,114 10,716 12,919 9,453 11,620 From Coalbed Wells 0

82

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2 2 Montana - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S28. Summary statistics for natural gas - Montana, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 6,925 7,095 7,031 6,059 6,477 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells R 69,741 R 67,399 R 57,396 R 51,117 37,937 From Oil Wells 23,092 22,995 21,522 19,292 21,777 From Coalbed Wells

83

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

8 8 Indiana - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S16. Summary statistics for natural gas - Indiana, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 2,350 525 563 620 914 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 3,606 4,701 4,927 6,802 9,075 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0

84

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4 4 New York - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S34. Summary statistics for natural gas - New York, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 6,680 6,675 6,628 6,736 6,157 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 54,232 49,607 44,273 35,163 30,495 From Oil Wells 710 714 576 650 629 From Coalbed Wells 0

85

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 2 Ohio - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S37. Summary statistics for natural gas - Ohio, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 34,416 34,963 34,931 46,717 35,104 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 79,769 83,511 73,459 30,655 65,025 From Oil Wells 5,072 5,301 4,651 45,663 6,684 From Coalbed Wells 0

86

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

8 8 Colorado - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S6. Summary statistics for natural gas - Colorado, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 22,949 25,716 27,021 28,813 30,101 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells R 436,330 R 496,374 R 459,509 R 526,077 563,750 From Oil Wells 160,833 199,725 327,619

87

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0 0 Alaska - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S2. Summary statistics for natural gas - Alaska, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 239 261 261 269 277 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 165,624 150,483 137,639 127,417 112,268 From Oil Wells 3,313,666 3,265,401 3,174,747 3,069,683 3,050,654

88

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0 0 Ohio - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S37. Summary statistics for natural gas - Ohio, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 34,416 34,416 34,963 34,931 46,717 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells R 82,812 R 79,769 R 83,511 R 73,459 30,655 From Oil Wells 5,268 5,072 5,301 4,651 45,663 From Coalbed Wells

89

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

8 8 Utah - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S46. Summary statistics for natural gas - Utah, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 5,197 5,578 5,774 6,075 6,469 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells R 271,890 R 331,143 R 340,224 R 328,135 351,168 From Oil Wells 35,104 36,056 36,795 42,526 49,947 From Coalbed Wells

90

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0 0 Utah - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S46. Summary statistics for natural gas - Utah, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 5,578 5,774 6,075 6,469 6,900 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 331,143 340,224 328,135 351,168 402,899 From Oil Wells 36,056 36,795 42,526 49,947 31,440 From Coalbed Wells 74,399

91

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2 2 New Mexico - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S33. Summary statistics for natural gas - New Mexico, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 42,644 44,241 44,784 44,748 32,302 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells R 657,593 R 732,483 R 682,334 R 616,134 556,024 From Oil Wells 227,352 211,496 223,493 238,580 252,326

92

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6 6 West Virginia - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S50. Summary statistics for natural gas - West Virginia, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 48,215 49,364 50,602 52,498 56,813 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells R 189,968 R 191,444 R 192,896 R 151,401 167,113 From Oil Wells 701 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells

93

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

6 6 Michigan - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S24. Summary statistics for natural gas - Michigan, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 9,995 10,600 10,100 11,100 10,900 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 16,959 20,867 7,345 18,470 17,041 From Oil Wells 10,716 12,919 9,453 11,620 4,470 From Coalbed Wells 0

94

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

6 6 New York - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S34. Summary statistics for natural gas - New York, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 6,675 6,628 6,736 6,157 7,176 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 49,607 44,273 35,163 30,495 25,985 From Oil Wells 714 576 650 629 439 From Coalbed Wells 0

95

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4 4 Virginia - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S48. Summary statistics for natural gas - Virginia, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 6,426 7,303 7,470 7,903 7,843 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 7,419 16,046 23,086 20,375 21,802 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 9 From Coalbed Wells 101,567 106,408

96

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6 6 Pennsylvania - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S40. Summary statistics for natural gas - Pennsylvania, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 52,700 55,631 57,356 44,500 54,347 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 182,277 R 188,538 R 184,795 R 173,450 242,305 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0

97

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4 4 Kansas - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S18. Summary statistics for natural gas - Kansas, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 17,862 21,243 22,145 25,758 24,697 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 286,210 269,086 247,651 236,834 264,610 From Oil Wells 45,038 42,647 39,071 37,194 0 From Coalbed Wells 44,066

98

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

6 6 Arkansas - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S4. Summary statistics for natural gas - Arkansas, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 5,592 6,314 7,397 8,388 8,538 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 173,975 164,316 152,108 132,230 121,684 From Oil Wells 7,378 5,743 5,691 9,291 3,000

99

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 2 Alaska - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S2. Summary statistics for natural gas - Alaska, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 261 261 269 277 185 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 150,483 137,639 127,417 112,268 107,873 From Oil Wells 3,265,401 3,174,747 3,069,683 3,050,654 3,056,918

100

Gamma-ray spectrometric determination of UF/sub 6/ assay with 1 percent precision for international safeguards. Part 1: product and feed in 1S and 2S sample cylinders  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The method is based on counting the 186-keV gamma rays emitted by /sup 235/U using a Pb-collimated Ge(Li) detector. Measurements of fifty UF/sub 6/ product and feed cylinders reveal the following precisions and counting times: Product - 2S, 0.98% (600 s); Feed - 2S, 0.48% (2500 s); Product - 1S, 0.62% (1000 s); Feed - 1S, 0.73% (3000 s). A 1% precision is desired for variables - attributes verification measurements of /sup 235/U assay in UF/sub 6/ sample cylinders for safeguards inspections by the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA). Statistically, these measurements stand between fine, high-precision (or variables) measurements and gross, low-precision (or attributes) ones. Because of their intermediate precisions, the variables-attributes measurements may not require analysis of all samples, and this could result in significant savings of IAEA inspector time. Although the precision of the above results is satisfactory, the average relative differences between gamma-ray and mass-spectrometric determinations for the last two sets of measurements (1S cylinders) have positive biases.

Ricci, E.

1981-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "1 percent compared" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

INFORMED AUDIO SOURCE SEPARATION: A COMPARATIVE STUDY Antoine Liutkus1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

INFORMED AUDIO SOURCE SEPARATION: A COMPARATIVE STUDY Antoine Liutkus1 Stanislaw Gorlow2 Nicolas separation algorithms is to recover the con- stituent sources, or audio objects, from their mixture. How. Informed Source Separation (ISS) is a solution to make separation robust when the audio objects are known

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

102

Skills, education, and the rise of earnings inequality among the other 99 percent  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...disaster assistance, food assistance) that buffer...executives and financial professionals...evidence of rents in top 1 percent...macro-micro-minnesota/2012/02...attractive financial proposition on average...research assistance. Supported...

David H. Autor

2014-05-23T23:59:59.000Z

103

Effects of time constraint and percent defective on visual inspection performance  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

EFFECTS OF TIME CONSTRAINT AND PERCENT DEFECTIVE ON VISUAL INSPECTION PERFORMANCE A Thesis by WALTER EDGAR GILMORE II Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas ABM University in partial fulfillment of the requirement for the degree MASTER... OF SCIENCE August 1982 Major Subject: Industrial Engineering EFFECTS OF TIME CONSTRAINT AND PERCENT DEFECTIVE ON VISUAL INSPECTION PERFORMANCE A Thesis by WALTER EDGAR GILMORE II Approved as to sty1e and content by: Chairman of Committ e) (Memb r...

Gilmore, Walter Edgar

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

104

Seletos 1 COMPARING NATIVE AND CROSS-PLATFORM DEVELOPMENT TABLET  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

like animations, touch sensors, button interaction and sound output all help to hold the attention..............................................................................................4 2 Background.1.1 Multi-Platform Development Environment.................................6 2.2 Autism Background

Miles, Will

105

Federal Government Increases Renewable Energy Use Over 1000 Percent since  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Federal Government Increases Renewable Energy Use Over 1000 Percent Federal Government Increases Renewable Energy Use Over 1000 Percent since 1999; Exceeds Goal Federal Government Increases Renewable Energy Use Over 1000 Percent since 1999; Exceeds Goal November 3, 2005 - 12:35pm Addthis WASHINGTON, DC - The Department of Energy (DOE) announced today that the federal government has exceeded its goal of obtaining 2.5 percent of its electricity needs from renewable energy sources by September 30, 2005. The largest energy consumer in the nation, the federal government now uses 2375 Gigawatt hours (GWh) of renewable energy -- enough to power 225,000 homes or a city the size of El Paso, Texas, for a year. "Particularly in light of tight oil and gas supplies caused by Hurricanes Katrina and Rita, it is important that all Americans - including the

106

Federal Government Increases Renewable Energy Use Over 1000 Percent since  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Federal Government Increases Renewable Energy Use Over 1000 Percent Federal Government Increases Renewable Energy Use Over 1000 Percent since 1999; Exceeds Goal Federal Government Increases Renewable Energy Use Over 1000 Percent since 1999; Exceeds Goal November 3, 2005 - 12:35pm Addthis WASHINGTON, DC - The Department of Energy (DOE) announced today that the federal government has exceeded its goal of obtaining 2.5 percent of its electricity needs from renewable energy sources by September 30, 2005. The largest energy consumer in the nation, the federal government now uses 2375 Gigawatt hours (GWh) of renewable energy -- enough to power 225,000 homes or a city the size of El Paso, Texas, for a year. "Particularly in light of tight oil and gas supplies caused by Hurricanes Katrina and Rita, it is important that all Americans - including the

107

Ninety - Two Percent Minimum Heater Efficiency By 1980  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Technology is now available to increase heater efficiencies to 92 percent and more. By 1980, this technology will be field proven and corrosion and reliability problems identified and resolved. Recent studies have shown that a minimum efficiency...

Mieth, H. C.; Hardie, J. E.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

108

BOSS Measures the Universe to One-Percent Accuracy  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

This and future measures at this precision are the key to determining the nature of dark energy. "One-percent accuracy in the scale of the universe is the most precise such...

109

LAB 1: POPULATION Discussion:. This project compares three ...  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Your first goal will be to graph the data in the table corresponding ... Data in MATLAB is stored in matrices. ... Graph the population predicted by formulas (1).

1910-00-12T23:59:59.000Z

110

NETL: News Release - President's Initiative to Seek 90 Percent Mercury  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

April 21, 2004 April 21, 2004 President's Initiative to Seek 90 Percent Mercury Removal We Energies to Test TOXECON(tm) Process in Michigan Coal-fired Power Plant WASHINGTON, DC - The Department of Energy (DOE) and We Energies today initiated a joint venture to demonstrate technology that will remove an unprecedented 90 percent of mercury emissions from coal-based power plants. Presque Isle Power Plant - We Energies' Presque Isle Power Plant located on the shores of Lake Superior in the Upper Peninsula of Michigan. As part of the President's Clean Coal Power Initiative of technology development and demonstration, the new project supports current proposals to reduce mercury emissions in the range of 70 percent through a proposed regulation pending before the Environmental Protection Agency or, in the

111

26-percent efficient point-junction concentrator solar cells with a front metal grid  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper reports on silicon concentrator cells with point diffusions and metal contacts on both the front and back sides. The design minimizes reflection losses by forming an inverted pyramid topography on the front surface and by shaping the metal grid lines in the form of a triangular ridge. A short-circuit current density of 39.6 mA/cm{sup 2} has been achieved even though the front grid covers 16 percent of the cell's active area of 1.56 cm{sup 2}. This, together with an open-circuit voltage of 700 mV, has led to an efficiency of 22 percent at one sun, AM1.5 global spectrum. Under direct-spectrum, 8.8-W/cm{sup 2}, concentrated light, the efficiency is 26 percent. This is the highest ever reported for a silicon cell having a front metal grid.

Cuevas, A.; Sinton, R.A.; Midkiff, N.E.; Swanson, R.M. (Stanford Univ., CA (USA). Dept. of Electrical Engineering)

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

112

THE COMPARATIVE VALUE OF BIOLOGICAL CARBON SEQUESTRATION  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

THE COMPARATIVE VALUE OF BIOLOGICAL CARBON SEQUESTRATION 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 sequestration and between 1 and 49 percent for forest based carbon sequestration. Value adjustments 18 19 20 21 22 BRUCE A. MCCARL, BRIAN C. MURRAY, AND UWE A. SCHNEIDER Abstract Carbon sequestered via

McCarl, Bruce A.

113

Novel Sorbent Achieves 90 Percent Carbon Capture in DOE-Sponsored Test |  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Sorbent Achieves 90 Percent Carbon Capture in DOE-Sponsored Sorbent Achieves 90 Percent Carbon Capture in DOE-Sponsored Test Novel Sorbent Achieves 90 Percent Carbon Capture in DOE-Sponsored Test August 21, 2012 - 1:00pm Addthis Washington, DC - The successful bench-scale test of a novel carbon dioxide (CO2) capturing sorbent promises to further advance the process as a possible technological option for reducing CO2 emissions from coal-fired power plants. The new sorbent, BrightBlack™, was originally developed for a different application by Advanced Technology Materials Inc. (ATMI) , a subcontractor to SRI for the Department of Energy (DOE)-sponsored test at the University of Toledo. Through partnering with the Office of Fossil Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) and others, SRI developed a method to

114

Novel Sorbent Achieves 90 Percent Carbon Capture in DOE-Sponsored Test |  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Novel Sorbent Achieves 90 Percent Carbon Capture in DOE-Sponsored Novel Sorbent Achieves 90 Percent Carbon Capture in DOE-Sponsored Test Novel Sorbent Achieves 90 Percent Carbon Capture in DOE-Sponsored Test August 21, 2012 - 1:00pm Addthis Washington, DC - The successful bench-scale test of a novel carbon dioxide (CO2) capturing sorbent promises to further advance the process as a possible technological option for reducing CO2 emissions from coal-fired power plants. The new sorbent, BrightBlack™, was originally developed for a different application by Advanced Technology Materials Inc. (ATMI) , a subcontractor to SRI for the Department of Energy (DOE)-sponsored test at the University of Toledo. Through partnering with the Office of Fossil Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) and others, SRI developed a method to

115

Table 2. Percent of Households with Vehicles, Selected Survey Years  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Percent of Households with Vehicles, Selected Survey Years " Percent of Households with Vehicles, Selected Survey Years " ,"Survey Years" ,1983,1985,1988,1991,1994,2001 "Total",85.5450237,89.00343643,88.75545852,89.42917548,87.25590956,92.08566108 "Household Characteristics" "Census Region and Division" " Northeast",77.22222222,"NA",79.16666667,82.9015544,75.38461538,85.09615385 " New England",88.37209302,"NA",81.81818182,82.9787234,82,88.52459016 " Middle Atlantic ",73.72262774,"NA",78.37837838,82.31292517,74.30555556,83.67346939 " Midwest ",85.51401869,"NA",90.66666667,90.17094017,92.30769231,91.47286822 " East North Central",82,"NA",88.81987578,89.88095238,91.51515152,90.55555556

116

Page 1 of 6 Institute for Biodiversity, Animal Health & Comparative Medicine  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Page 1 of 6 Institute for Biodiversity, Animal Health & Comparative Medicine Initial Meeting in Tanzania Dr David M Bailey Lecturer Ecology and physiology of marine animals, in particular the effects

Glasgow, University of

117

Page 1 of 16 Institute of Biodiversity, Animal Health & Comparative Medicine  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Page 1 of 16 Institute of Biodiversity, Animal Health & Comparative Medicine BAH-Science, 8 Aherne, CW Bean, J Dodd, D Fairlamb, PS ... Aquatic Conservation: Marine and Freshwater Ecosystems

Guo, Zaoyang

118

COMPARATIVE STUDY OF CdTe AND GaAs PHOTOREFRACTIVE PERFORMANCES FROM 1m TO 1.55m  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 COMPARATIVE STUDY OF CdTe AND GaAs PHOTOREFRACTIVE PERFORMANCES FROM 1µm TO 1.55µm L.A. de CdTe at different wavelengths from 1.06µm to 1.55µm. The sensitivity and performances of different for the extension of the photorefractive effect towards the wavelength region of 1.3-1.5µm. CdTe appears

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

119

A combined cycle designed to achieve greater than 60 percent efficiency  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In cooperation with the US Department of Energy`s Morgantown Energy Technology Center, Westinghouse is working on Phase 2 of an 8-year Advanced Turbine Systems Program to develop the technologies required to provide a significant increase in natural gas-fired combined cycle power generation plant efficiency. In this paper, the technologies required to yield an energy conversion efficiency greater than the Advanced Turbine Systems Program target value of 60 percent are discussed. The goal of 60 percent efficiency is achievable through an improvement in operating process parameters for both the combustion turbine and steam turbine, raising the rotor inlet temperature to 2,600 F (1,427 C), incorporation of advanced cooling techniques in the combustion turbine expander, and utilization of other cycle enhancements obtainable through greater integration between the combustion turbine and steam turbine.

Briesch, M.S.; Bannister, R.L.; Diakunchak, I.S.; Huber, D.J. [Westinghouse Electric Corp., Orlando, FL (United States)

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

120

One decade of biomedical problems using ICA: a full comparative L. Albera1, A. Kachenoura1, A. Karfoul1, P. Comon2 and L. Senhadji1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

One decade of biomedical problems using ICA: a full comparative study L. Albera1, A. Kachenoura1, A insights into the use of Independent Component Anal- ysis (ICA) for solving biomedical problems. First encountered biomedical problems solved using ICA is detailed. Finally a comparative performance study

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "1 percent compared" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Ultrasonic methods for measuring liquid viscosity and volume percent of solids  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes two ultrasonic techniques under development at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) in support of the tank-waste transport effort undertaken by the U.S. Department of Energy in treating low-level nuclear waste. The techniques are intended to provide continuous on-line measurements of waste viscosity and volume percent of solids in a waste transport line. The ultrasonic technique being developed for waste-viscosity measurement is based on the patented ANL viscometer. Focus of the viscometer development in this project is on improving measurement accuracy, stability, and range, particularly in the low-viscosity range (<30 cP). A prototype instrument has been designed and tested in the laboratory. Better than 1% accuracy in liquid density measurement can be obtained by using either a polyetherimide or polystyrene wedge. To measure low viscosities, a thin-wedge design has been developed and shows good sensitivity down to 5 cP. The technique for measuring volume percent of solids is based on ultrasonic wave scattering and phase velocity variation. This report covers a survey of multiple scattering theories and other phenomenological approaches. A theoretical model leading to development of an ultrasonic instrument for measuring volume percent of solids is proposed, and preliminary measurement data are presented.

Sheen, S.H.; Chien, H.T.; Raptis, A.C.

1997-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

122

U.S. Utility-Scale Solar 60 Percent Towards Cost-Competition...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

U.S. Utility-Scale Solar 60 Percent Towards Cost-Competition Goal U.S. Utility-Scale Solar 60 Percent Towards Cost-Competition Goal February 12, 2014 - 11:05am Addthis News Media...

123

2 Comparing E field changes aloft to lightning mapping 4 Richard G. Sonnenfeld,1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-to-ground (CG) lightning flash can be quantified. As 12 the flash progresses, the locations of the charge2 Comparing E field changes aloft to lightning mapping 3 data 4 Richard G. Sonnenfeld,1 John electric and magnetic sensors 7 for determining how lightning alters electric field vectors relative

Hager, William

124

Percent of Industrial Natural Gas Deliveries in Connecticut Represente...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2001 66.1 48.5 50.9 50.2 58.7 44.3 34.1 58.5 55.7 73.8 58.9 51.8 2002 45.0 47.4 53.0 41.3 52.5 50.1 38.1 49.3 53.9 52.2 49.1...

125

Michigan Natural Gas % of Total Residential - Sales (Percent)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2002 97.9 97.7 97.9 97.7 95.5 94.0 95.6 94.1 91.2 91.7 92.6 92.9 2003 93.8 93.4 92.3 96.3 95.8 95.0 95.8 95.5 94.0 93.6 95.9 94.7 2004 95.1 95.6 95.3 95.7 90.9 95.6 95.7 95.6 95.1 95.0 95.3 95.7 2005 95.9 96.1 96.0 95.9 95.9 95.6 95.1 95.1 94.4 93.3 94.2 95.1 2006 94.6 94.4 94.6 95.4 94.6 95.0 94.2 93.8 92.6 92.1 93.4 93.6 2007 94.6 95.1 95.5 95.3 95.5 95.5 94.8 94.5 93.8 92.7 92.1 93.5 2008 93.6 93.5 94.1 95.5 94.2 95.6 95.1 94.3 94.2 91.9 93.1 94.0 2009 93.9 94.6 94.4 94.5 94.3 94.5 93.2 93.8 92.3 91.6 92.7 92.2 2010 93.6 93.5 93.8 80.9 93.6 93.1 93.1 92.7 91.5 90.4 91.6 92.1 2011 92.3 92.7 92.1 93.0 93.1 92.7 91.9 91.5 90.2 89.8 91.0 91.7

126

Indiana Natural Gas % of Total Residential - Sales (Percent)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2002 98.9 98.5 98.7 99.1 92.8 99.4 98.8 98.8 99.1 99.0 98.8 97.8 2003 97.0 97.0 97.0 96.3 96.6 97.7 96.1 100.0 97.2 96.4 97.1 96.9 2004 97.0 96.7 96.7 96.3 97.3 96.3 97.8 96.5 96.0 96.1 96.7 96.7 2005 96.8 96.7 96.2 95.7 96.4 96.0 96.3 96.3 96.2 96.1 96.4 96.5 2006 96.2 96.3 96.2 96.3 95.8 96.4 95.5 96.1 96.5 97.0 96.2 96.3 2007 96.4 97.0 95.9 96.6 96.1 95.2 95.0 95.6 95.0 94.8 95.9 95.9 2008 95.9 95.8 95.8 94.2 94.1 94.1 93.9 93.9 93.4 93.1 94.4 94.3 2009 94.0 94.9 93.2 92.8 91.7 93.2 92.8 92.1 91.7 93.1 93.3 93.7 2010 94.1 94.5 94.2 93.1 94.1 92.8 93.0 92.9 92.6 93.1 94.0 94.8 2011 95.2 94.7 94.6 94.4 94.4 94.5 93.9 94.7 93.8 94.2 94.2 94.6

127

Nebraska Natural Gas % of Total Residential - Sales (Percent)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2002 71.4 90.5 87.4 84.8 95.4 86.8 82.7 90.4 81.3 75.5 79.7 78.6 2003 80.3 93.4 87.6 91.1 95.3 94.9 87.9 80.0 95.4 69.4 78.6 80.7 2004 81.5 91.9 86.8 94.5 88.7 84.8 89.1 89.1 88.2 83.7 83.7 88.7 2005 86.1 87.2 86.3 83.0 84.5 86.5 85.0 84.4 85.5 83.9 84.3 84.1 2006 87.1 85.9 86.7 85.8 85.0 86.2 87.0 86.2 85.9 83.3 84.2 85.1 2007 84.9 87.4 89.4 86.1 87.5 86.9 88.7 85.5 83.3 77.5 76.6 83.9 2008 86.6 89.0 90.3 89.6 90.1 89.0 87.7 87.3 85.6 75.2 77.2 85.0 2009 90.2 89.1 89.1 86.8 85.8 88.1 86.7 88.8 86.4 83.6 84.6 85.4 2010 87.0 88.8 89.5 86.2 82.5 87.3 86.5 87.8 87.6 87.1 84.0 86.8 2011 87.2 88.9 89.2 86.3 86.1 86.1 87.8 89.1 86.7 86.3 83.3 86.1

128

Percent of Commercial Natural Gas Deliveries in Connecticut Represente...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1990's 96.0 93.0 96.5 98.1 80.9 82.0 87.0 81.9 68.7 62.8 2000's 78.3 77.6 72.4 68.1 69.0 70.3 71.0 71.5...

129

Percent of Commercial Natural Gas Deliveries in Wisconsin Represented by  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1989 94.1 94.2 94.5 94.0 92.6 87.7 86.1 84.2 84.2 84.3 91.1 95.0 1990 91.6 91.5 91.9 91.9 90.3 86.5 83.1 82.4 82.6 87.5 90.1 93.3 1991 93.8 92.3 92.9 91.2 88.8 83.8 80.7 84.7 83.6 86.7 91.5 92.1 1992 92.7 92.1 91.6 90.0 85.8 82.3 83.3 84.1 85.2 90.7 93.4 95.1 1993 95.2 96.0 95.3 93.5 92.1 90.8 89.2 88.5 90.0 92.6 95.2 96.0 1994 97.1 97.6 97.4 96.6 91.8 89.9 83.5 87.1 87.8 90.8 94.4 84.4 1995 93.5 94.0 93.2 92.4 90.0 81.8 82.3 84.8 87.3 88.9 93.4 93.6 1996 93.9 94.8 94.0 92.0 89.9 86.1 82.1 83.8 82.4 87.1 90.9 91.8 1997 89.7 88.2 88.5 83.3 77.4 60.6 67.8 55.4 62.9 69.3 85.9 83.2 1998 87.0 81.6 79.8 75.5 55.6 55.5 47.6 48.5 45.5 71.1 74.9 79.2

130

District of Columbia Natural Gas % of Total Residential - Sales (Percent)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2002 76.0 76.2 75.3 73.4 81.1 82.2 72.9 80.3 74.6 72.2 72.3 71.0 2003 70.4 71.0 69.3 63.9 64.8 75.9 55.6 69.6 77.6 71.8 73.7 74.8 2004 76.1 74.9 74.1 72.9 71.1 70.5 74.3 74.9 74.5 72.5 77.7 78.4 2005 81.0 79.1 78.9 74.5 76.2 85.2 80.8 74.1 80.3 78.0 81.0 81.0 2006 78.2 77.9 77.1 70.3 69.8 67.8 70.1 76.8 73.8 78.1 78.2 78.7 2007 77.0 80.1 73.9 74.4 62.5 77.4 68.0 77.1 67.8 74.0 75.2 78.5 2008 78.0 78.1 78.2 67.8 69.9 70.3 72.2 71.4 73.2 68.0 79.2 78.9 2009 78.8 78.7 76.5 71.7 70.4 67.9 64.8 77.2 68.5 72.4 72.6 78.2 2010 77.6 78.6 75.3 64.5 61.1 68.0 66.9 66.1 72.7 69.1 77.7 77.3 2011 79.4 75.3 74.8 72.3 54.3 60.9 70.6 78.8 70.9 77.6 78.7 71.5

131

MICC09 S. Al-Ghadhban 1 Comparative Study of MIMO-OFDM  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

MICC09 S. Al-Ghadhban 1 Comparative Study of MIMO-OFDM Uplink Scheduling Criteria Samir Al-Ghadhban KFUPM, Dhahran, Saudi Arabia 14 Dec 2009 #12;MICC09 S. Al-Ghadhban 2 Introduction: Multiple Input t t h t h t = H ... #12;MICC09 S. Al-Ghadhban 3 MIMO Capacity 0 5 10 15 0.9 0.92 0.94 0.96 0

Al-Ghadhban, Samir

132

COMPARATIVE ABSORPTION OF COLOSTRAL IgG1 AND IgM IN THE NEWBORN CALF  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

COMPARATIVE ABSORPTION OF COLOSTRAL IgG1 AND IgM IN THE NEWBORN CALF EFFECTS OF THYROXINE, CORTISOL Nutritionnelles, l.N.R.A., Centre de Theix, 63110 Beaumont France Résumé ABSORPTION DES IgGl ET IgM COLOSTRALES conditions. Les résultats suivants ont été obtenus : - la capacité d'absorption des IgGl et des IgM varie

Boyer, Edmond

133

State and National Wind Resource Potential 30 Percent Capacity...  

Wind Powering America (EERE)

Note - 50% exclusions are not cumulative. If an area is non-ridgecrest forest on FS land, it is just excluded at the 50% level one time. 1) Exclude areas of slope > 20% Derived...

134

Table 2. Percent of Households with Vehicles, Selected Survey...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

or More","NA","NA",93.75,96.42857143,91.27516779,97.46835443 "Race of Householder1" " White",88.61111111,"NA",91.54929577,91.68704156,90.27093596,92.77845777 " Black...

135

Kentucky Natural Gas % of Total Residential - Sales (Percent)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2002 92.9 92.8 93.1 92.8 91.4 93.2 94.3 94.4 95.3 91.9 93.4 94.2 2003 93.8 94.2 93.1 93.4 96.9 95.2 94.6 94.5 95.7 92.2 93.9 94.0 2004 94.0 93.9 92.9 92.7 96.0 94.9 95.0 95.3 95.6 93.7 93.7 95.1 2005 94.5 94.5 94.6 94.0 95.7 95.3 95.9 95.8 96.1 93.8 95.3 95.7 2006 96.2 95.5 95.8 98.0 95.5 97.7 96.8 97.3 97.2 95.6 96.4 96.2 2007 96.2 95.9 96.2 95.8 96.4 96.6 96.7 96.9 97.0 95.7 95.8 96.3 2008 96.4 95.9 96.1 96.1 96.0 96.8 97.0 96.5 96.4 95.4 95.7 95.8 2009 95.8 95.3 95.2 94.9 95.3 95.6 95.1 95.6 95.5 94.8 94.9 95.6 2010 95.4 95.7 95.9 95.7 96.0 96.7 96.5 96.3 96.1 94.8 95.3 95.8 2011 95.1 95.0 95.2 95.4 94.9 94.5 95.9 96.5 96.1 97.2 96.3 96.1

136

Colorado Natural Gas % of Total Residential - Sales (Percent...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 100.0 1990's 99.8 99.6 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 1.0 100.0 2000's 100.0 100.0 100.0...

137

Percent of Industrial Natural Gas Deliveries in Connecticut Represente...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1990's 66.4 55.8 55.8 2000's 47.3 54.0 48.9 45.3 44.0 46.4 48.5 50.0 47.3 37.5 2010's 31.1 31.0 32.3...

138

Connecticut Natural Gas % of Total Residential - Sales (Percent...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 100.0 1990's 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 1.0 100.0 2000's 100.0 99.0 99.0...

139

National Cost-effectiveness of ASHRAE Standard 90.1-2010 Compared to ASHRAE Standard 90.1-2007  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

2972 2972 Prepared for the U.S. Department of Energy under Contract DE-AC05-76RL01830 National Cost-effectiveness of ASHRAE Standard 90.1-2010 Compared to ASHRAE Standard 90.1-2007 BA Thornton SA Loper V Mendon MA Halverson EE Richman MI Rosenberg M Myer DB Elliott November 2013 PNNL-22972 National Cost-effectiveness of ASHRAE Standard 90.1-2010 Compared to ASHRAE Standard 90.1-2007 BA Thornton SA Loper V Mendon MA Halverson EE Richman MI Rosenberg M Myer DB Elliott November 2013 Prepared for The U.S. Department of Energy under Contract DE-AC05-76RL01830 Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Richland, Washington 99352 iii Executive Summary Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) prepared this analysis for the U.S. Department of

140

Percent of Industrial Natural Gas Deliveries in New Hampshire Represented  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2001 13.5 16.2 17.9 15.4 9.9 5.0 3.7 8.5 13.7 14.1 17.5 16.5 2002 16.4 11.2 14.6 9.0 8.3 9.0 5.2 10.1 7.7 29.4 32.3 17.4 2003 6.7 7.2 19.4 17.0 10.6 13.5 13.0 12.3 13.4 15.5 21.1 26.3 2004 30.3 9.1 10.7 10.4 7.1 5.5 3.9 4.3 5.6 8.7 9.7 17.0 2005 17.6 17.5 12.0 6.5 6.9 6.6 3.3 10.0 5.5 6.4 13.7 13.0 2006 16.3 24.3 18.2 18.2 17.7 12.9 4.8 9.1 8.0 12.8 8.8 15.6 2007 11.7 16.6 12.0 8.4 15.3 8.9 5.4 7.0 6.0 8.5 10.7 45.8 2008 23.0 22.9 22.0 15.0 16.4 16.2 14.6 12.3 11.2 13.6 16.1 20.0 2009 30.5 28.1 25.0 16.7 15.5 16.3 14.5 13.7 13.3 16.5 18.7 23.1 2010 18.0 16.4 15.4 12.2 10.3 8.8 8.6 10.9 8.0 10.7 13.6 14.1

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "1 percent compared" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Graduates 0 2 3 2 2 1 2 2 1 1 2 Percent of Graduates with  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

D Completions and Placement, Ten Year Trend 2002-2003 to 2011-2012 French and Italian Placement Category As of 4/2/2013 #12;12 Number of Grads with Placement Info French and Italian, PhD Graduates First First Placement Category by Broad Field Category 77% 14% 18% 60% 11% 68% 36% 18% 3% 13% 42% 11% 3% 4% 7

Grzybowski, Bartosz A.

142

Percent of Commercial Natural Gas Deliveries in South Carolina Represented  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1989 98.5 98.5 98.6 98.3 98.1 98.2 98.1 97.7 97.7 97.8 98.0 97.3 1990 98.6 98.4 98.3 98.1 92.2 97.6 97.6 97.5 97.9 97.3 98.0 98.6 1991 98.7 98.9 98.7 96.9 97.4 97.5 97.3 97.7 97.7 97.4 98.9 98.9 1992 99.1 99.1 98.9 98.6 98.5 95.8 95.5 95.8 97.0 99.7 100.0 100.0 1993 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 95.1 94.6 100.0 95.3 100.0 100.0 1994 100.0 100.0 100.0 99.7 97.8 98.3 97.0 95.7 95.2 95.6 96.2 99.9 1995 97.8 97.5 96.7 95.0 95.6 88.4 95.0 95.1 95.3 95.3 95.9 100.0 1996 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 97.5 96.9 100.0 97.3 97.3 96.4 97.4 100.0 1997 100.0 98.3 97.8 96.0 100.0 100.0 99.9 97.1 98.8 99.9 100.0 98.0

143

Connecticut Natural Gas % of Total Residential - Sales (Percent)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2002 99.3 99.3 99.2 99.3 99.1 99.2 99.0 99.0 86.9 99.5 99.1 99.2 2003 100.0 98.7 98.7 98.4 98.2 98.4 98.2 98.0 97.6 97.9 98.2 98.5 2004 98.7 98.7 98.7 98.5 97.8 98.7 98.0 98.8 98.7 97.8 98.8 98.9 2005 99.0 99.0 98.9 98.7 98.6 98.5 98.5 98.5 98.5 98.3 98.3 98.6 2006 98.7 98.6 98.7 98.4 98.3 98.4 98.4 98.5 98.3 97.9 98.2 98.3 2007 98.4 98.6 98.6 98.3 98.3 97.3 98.4 97.6 95.5 97.9 97.5 98.2 2008 98.2 98.0 98.1 97.9 97.3 95.8 97.8 97.4 97.4 96.8 97.2 97.8 2009 97.8 98.0 97.9 97.4 97.3 97.2 97.3 97.4 97.1 96.5 96.9 97.3 2010 97.8 97.7 97.6 97.0 96.9 97.3 97.1 97.1 96.8 95.9 96.7 97.0 2011 97.0 97.4 97.0 96.3 96.6 96.5 96.4 96.6 97.0 95.6 96.3 96.5

144

Massachusetts Natural Gas % of Total Residential - Sales (Percent)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2002 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 99.8 100.0 100.0 2003 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2004 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2005 99.9 99.9 99.9 99.9 99.8 99.9 99.8 99.8 99.9 99.8 99.8 99.8 2006 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 99.9 99.9 99.9 99.9 99.9 99.9 99.9 99.9 2007 99.9 99.9 99.9 99.9 99.9 99.9 99.9 99.9 99.9 99.9 99.9 99.9 2008 89.7 89.7 89.3 86.2 78.4 70.7 68.4 68.3 68.1 77.4 83.6 89.3 2009 90.8 93.1 87.5 86.3 84.5 64.9 72.9 66.1 67.2 78.4 83.0 87.7 2010 91.5 89.7 88.6 82.6 77.8 68.7 65.0 61.5 67.4 75.8 84.1 93.4

145

Virginia Natural Gas % of Total Residential - Sales (Percent)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2002 88.0 91.4 90.8 89.2 91.0 91.3 88.4 91.6 88.4 88.0 89.0 89.1 2003 88.6 88.6 87.7 87.7 85.5 91.4 80.6 86.1 83.9 86.4 88.3 89.1 2004 88.5 88.5 88.0 87.2 84.7 86.1 87.7 85.7 87.7 88.3 88.4 89.3 2005 90.9 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 91.2 100.0 2006 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2007 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2008 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2009 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2010 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0

146

New Jersey Natural Gas % of Total Residential - Sales (Percent)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2002 98.0 97.8 97.7 97.9 92.7 97.0 98.1 97.2 97.2 95.4 96.1 95.6 2003 94.9 95.0 95.5 95.0 95.1 95.2 95.3 95.1 96.7 94.4 94.9 94.7 2004 94.5 95.4 95.0 95.4 95.8 95.2 95.2 94.4 95.0 94.2 94.4 94.7 2005 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2006 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2007 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2008 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2009 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2010 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0

147

Percent of Commercial Natural Gas Deliveries in Massachusetts Represented  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1989 99.9 99.9 99.9 99.9 99.9 99.9 99.9 99.9 99.9 99.9 99.9 99.9 1990 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 99.8 99.8 99.8 99.7 99.7 1991 99.8 99.8 99.9 99.9 99.9 99.8 99.7 99.6 99.6 99.8 99.9 99.9 1992 99.9 99.9 99.8 99.8 99.7 99.8 99.7 99.6 99.6 99.6 99.7 99.8 1993 98.9 98.7 98.5 97.7 96.5 97.7 96.8 89.2 97.5 96.7 96.9 97.8 1994 75.2 78.4 72.5 69.8 69.8 61.2 67.0 86.0 79.7 90.6 81.2 87.1 1995 87.9 89.4 92.0 88.3 88.0 82.7 74.6 77.3 77.5 81.0 81.6 79.5 1996 84.7 83.5 82.4 80.2 79.2 71.3 68.1 61.3 55.4 69.5 62.5 68.9 1997 68.0 69.0 72.9 74.1 69.9 48.5 46.0 41.3 43.8 48.7 62.9 68.6

148

Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #720: March 26, 2012 Eleven Percent of  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

0: March 26, 0: March 26, 2012 Eleven Percent of New Light Trucks Sold have Gasoline Direct Injection to someone by E-mail Share Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #720: March 26, 2012 Eleven Percent of New Light Trucks Sold have Gasoline Direct Injection on Facebook Tweet about Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #720: March 26, 2012 Eleven Percent of New Light Trucks Sold have Gasoline Direct Injection on Twitter Bookmark Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #720: March 26, 2012 Eleven Percent of New Light Trucks Sold have Gasoline Direct Injection on Google Bookmark Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #720: March 26, 2012 Eleven Percent of New Light Trucks Sold have Gasoline Direct Injection on Delicious Rank Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #720: March 26, 2012 Eleven Percent of New Light Trucks Sold have Gasoline Direct Injection on Digg

149

Comparison of the percent recoveries of activated charcoal and Spherocarb after storage utilizing thermal desorption  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

between the two adsorbents. The parameters of storage in- cluded various durations of time, temperatures, and concentrations. Rather than the present conventional solvent desorption methods, thermal desorption was used in the analysis of samples... Duncan's Multiple Range Test For Variable Percent. 32 6 Mean Percent Recoveries For The Interaction Between Type Of Adsorbent And Storage Time . 7 Mean Percent Recoveries For The Interaction Between Sample Concentration And Storage Time. 39 40 8...

Stidham, Paul Emery

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

150

EECBG 11-002 Clarification of Ten Percent Limitation on Use of...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE), Energy Efficiency and Conservation Block Grant Program (EECBG), ten percent limitation, administrative expenses, the Energy...

151

1-cc August2010.xls  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

August 2010 August 2010 Section 1. Commentary Electric Power Data The contiguous United States, as a whole, experienced temperatures that were significantly above average in August 2010. Accordingly, the total population-weighted cooling degree days for the United States were 22.8 percent above the August normal. Retail sales of electricity increased 8.1 percent compared to August 2009. Over the same period, the average U.S. retail price of electricity increased 1.0 percent. For the 12-month period ending August 2010, the U.S. average retail price of electricity decreased 0.9 percent over the previous 12-month period ending August 2009. In August 2010, total electric power generation in the United States increased 7.3 percent compared to August 2009. Over the

152

Policy ForumSeries "Beyond 33 Percent: California's Renewable Energy Future,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Policy ForumSeries "Beyond 33 Percent: California's Renewable Energy Future, From Near with the UC Davis Policy Institute is the UC Davis Energy Institute. Renewables Beyond 33 Percent October 17 as it transitions to a renewable energy future. Featuring panelists from government, industry and academia

California at Davis, University of

153

PRESS RELEASES OF SENATOR PETE DOMENICI Domenici Supports 12 Percent Increase for Nuclear Energy, Disputes Fusion  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

PRESS RELEASES OF SENATOR PETE DOMENICI Domenici Supports 12 Percent Increase for Nuclear Energy his support for a 12 percent increase in federal funding for nuclear energy research, but challenged of modern nuclear power plants. Domenici is chairman of the Energy and Water Development Appropriations

154

1-es September2010.xls  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

September 2010 September 2010 Section 1. Commentary Electric Power Data The contiguous United States, as a whole, experienced temperatures that were significantly above average in September 2010. Accordingly, the total population-weighted cooling degree days for the United States were 26.5 percent above the September normal. Retail sales of electricity increased 6.1 percent compared to September 2009. Over the same period, the average U.S. retail price of electricity increased 0.5 percent. For the 12-month period ending September 2010, total sales of electricity increased 3.5 percent over the previous 12-month period ending September 2009. In September 2010, total electric power generation in the United States increased 5.3 percent compared to September 2009.

155

Wind Energy Could Produce 20 Percent of U.S. Electricity By 2030 |  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Could Produce 20 Percent of U.S. Electricity By 2030 Could Produce 20 Percent of U.S. Electricity By 2030 Wind Energy Could Produce 20 Percent of U.S. Electricity By 2030 May 12, 2008 - 11:30am Addthis DOE Report Analyzes U.S. Wind Resources, Technology Requirements, and Manufacturing, Siting and Transmission Hurdles to Increasing the Use of Clean and Sustainable Wind Power WASHINGTON, DC - The U.S Department of Energy (DOE) today released a first-of-its kind report that examines the technical feasibility of harnessing wind power to provide up to 20 percent of the nation's total electricity needs by 2030. Entitled "20 Percent Wind Energy by 2030", the report identifies requirements to achieve this goal including reducing the cost of wind technologies, citing new transmission infrastructure, and

156

Wind Energy Could Produce 20 Percent of U.S. Electricity By 2030 |  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Wind Energy Could Produce 20 Percent of U.S. Electricity By 2030 Wind Energy Could Produce 20 Percent of U.S. Electricity By 2030 Wind Energy Could Produce 20 Percent of U.S. Electricity By 2030 May 12, 2008 - 11:30am Addthis DOE Report Analyzes U.S. Wind Resources, Technology Requirements, and Manufacturing, Siting and Transmission Hurdles to Increasing the Use of Clean and Sustainable Wind Power WASHINGTON, DC - The U.S Department of Energy (DOE) today released a first-of-its kind report that examines the technical feasibility of harnessing wind power to provide up to 20 percent of the nation's total electricity needs by 2030. Entitled "20 Percent Wind Energy by 2030", the report identifies requirements to achieve this goal including reducing the cost of wind technologies, citing new transmission infrastructure, and

157

Recovery Act Exceeds Major Cleanup Milestone, DOE Complex Now 74 Percent  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Recovery Act Exceeds Major Cleanup Milestone, DOE Complex Now 74 Recovery Act Exceeds Major Cleanup Milestone, DOE Complex Now 74 Percent Remediated Recovery Act Exceeds Major Cleanup Milestone, DOE Complex Now 74 Percent Remediated The Office of Environmental Management's (EM) American Recovery and Reinvestment Act Program recently achieved 74 percent footprint reduction, exceeding the originally established goal of 40 percent. EM has reduced its pre-Recovery Act footprint of 931 square miles, established in 2009, by 688 square miles. Reducing its contaminated footprint to 243 square miles has proven to be a monumental task, and a challenge the EM team was ready to take on from the beginning. Recovery Act Exceeds Major Cleanup Milestone, DOE Complex Now 74 Percent Remediated More Documents & Publications 2011 ARRA Newsletters

158

Comparative metabolism of phenobarbitone in the rat (CFE) and mouse (CF1)  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The fate of orally administered [14C]phenobarbitone (40 mg/kg) was studied comparatively in CFE rats and CF1 mice. Metabolism and elimination were rapid. Hydroxylation was more complete in rats than in mice but the major metabolite in both species was p-hydroxyphenobarbitone, which was excreted mostly in the urine in both free and conjugated form. Unmetabolized phenobarbitone was excreted in the urine of both rat and mouse. Two minor metabolites appeared to be common to both species. The effect of pretreatment with non-radioactive phenobarbitone on the metabolism of [14C]phenobarbitone was minimal in the rat but afforded a twofold increase in p-hydroxylation in the mouse (in vivo). Despite the good yield of p-hydroxyphenobarbitone in the intact rat, [14C]phenobarbitone was not metabolized by liver-microsomal preparations from either untreated or phenobarbitone-induced rats.

J.V. Crayford; D.H. Hutson

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

159

Graduates 6 2 1 5 5 1 4 2 2 2 3 Percent of Graduates with  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Placement Database As of 4/2/2013 #12;29 Number of Grads with Placement Info Art History, PhD Graduates is captured in the TGS PhD Placement Database using graduate responses from the Exit Survey and Survey of Earned Doctorates, and updated with the help of faculty and staff after each graduation. The database

Grzybowski, Bartosz A.

160

Graduates 2 1 5 5 1 4 2 2 2 6 3 Percent of Graduates with  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Placement Database As of 7/15/2014 #12;30 Number of Grads with Placement Info Art History, PhD Graduates is captured in the TGS PhD Placement Database using graduate responses from the Exit Survey and Survey of Earned Doctorates, and updated with the help of faculty and staff after each graduation. The database

Grzybowski, Bartosz A.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "1 percent compared" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Graduates 6 6 2 1 5 5 1 4 2 2 3 Percent of Graduates with  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Placement Database #12;33 Number of Grads with Placement Info Art History, PhD Graduates First Placement is captured in the TGS PhD Placement Database using graduate responses from the Exit Survey and Survey of Earned Doctorates, and updated with the help of faculty and staff after each graduation. The database

Grzybowski, Bartosz A.

162

8 FEBRUARY 2005 Over 95 percent of the approximate1y 1.5 million  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

States each year are framed with wood, the world's most sustainable building material. Wood, and molded wall panels as both skin and structural ele- ments. The exterior application of structural wood building materials because they consume wood much faster than native subterranean termites

163

Coal deposit characterization by gamma-gamma density/percent dry ash relationships  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

: pb = C + Va(pa) Equation 3 where C is a constant. Ash content can therefore be geophysically determined as variations In log-derived bulk density measurements are in direct response to variations in ash content. However, when any of the above... by applying the relationships between geophysi cally-derived gamma-gamma density and laboratory-derived percent dry ash. The linear gamma-gamma density/percent dry ash relationship is dependent upon a constant fuel ratio (percent fixed carbon...

Wright, David Scott

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

164

If I generate 20 percent of my national electricity from wind...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

generate 20 percent of my national electricity from wind and solar - what does it do to my GDP and Trade Balance ? Home I think that the economics of fossil fuesl are well...

165

EECBG 11-002 Clarification of Ten Percent Limitation on Use of Funds for Administrative Expenses  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE), Energy Efficiency and Conservation Block Grant Program (EECBG), ten percent limitation, administrative expenses, the Energy Independence and Security Act of 2007.

166

Fact #727: May 14, 2012 Nearly Twenty Percent of Households Own Three or More Vehicles  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Household vehicle ownership has changed over the last six decades. In 1960, over twenty percent of households did not own a vehicle, but by 2010, that number fell to less than 10%. The number of...

167

97 percent of special nuclear material de-inventoried from LLNL | National  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

97 percent of special nuclear material de-inventoried from LLNL | National 97 percent of special nuclear material de-inventoried from LLNL | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Home > NNSA Blog > 97 percent of special nuclear material de-inventoried ... 97 percent of special nuclear material de-inventoried from LLNL Posted By Office of Public Affairs

168

Comparing Simulations of Lipid Bilayers to Scattering Data: The GROMOS 43A1-S3 Force Field  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, and excellent, fit to neutron scattering data occurs at an interpolated AN = 66.6 ?2 and the best lipid bilayers. It was not, however, compared to neutron scattering data which has become particularlyComparing Simulations of Lipid Bilayers to Scattering Data: The GROMOS 43A1-S3 Force Field Anthony

Nagle, John F.

169

world cultures Journal of Comparative and Cross-Cultural Research Vol 14 No 1 Fall 2003  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Domestically usable articles 22 7.6 3 Currency 20 6.9 Total 289 100.0 DENSITY: Density of Population CODE Central Mexico 5 1.7 4 Egypt 5 1.7 5 Shang 6 2.1 6 West Africa 4 1.4 7 Mesopotamia 9 3.1 8 Indus 5 1 variables. FACTOR1: Scale Factor, the sum of URBAN, DENSITY, FIXITY, and AGRICULT. FACTOR2: Technology

White, Douglas R.

170

Better Buildings Challenge Partners Pledge 20 Percent Energy Drop By 2020 |  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Better Buildings Challenge Partners Pledge 20 Percent Energy Drop Better Buildings Challenge Partners Pledge 20 Percent Energy Drop By 2020 Better Buildings Challenge Partners Pledge 20 Percent Energy Drop By 2020 November 9, 2011 - 10:00am Addthis This is the Atlanta Better Buildings Challenge Breakout Session Panel with representatives from the City of Atlanta Office of Sustainability, Southface, the U.S. General Services Administration, and two Atlanta BBC partner organizations. | Photo courtesy of Fred Perry Photography This is the Atlanta Better Buildings Challenge Breakout Session Panel with representatives from the City of Atlanta Office of Sustainability, Southface, the U.S. General Services Administration, and two Atlanta BBC partner organizations. | Photo courtesy of Fred Perry Photography Maria Tikoff Vargas

171

If I generate 20 percent of my national electricity from wind and solar -  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

If I generate 20 percent of my national electricity from wind and solar - If I generate 20 percent of my national electricity from wind and solar - what does it do to my GDP and Trade Balance ? Home > Groups > DOE Wind Vision Community I think that the economics of fossil fuesl are well understood. Some gets to find the fuel and sell it. The fuel and all associated activities factor into the economic equation of the nation and the wrold. What is the economics of generating 20 percent of my total capacity from say wind? And all of it replaces coal powered electricty ? What happended to GDP ? Is the economy a net gain or net loss ? The value of the electricity came into the system, but no coal is bought or sold. Submitted by Jamespr on 6 May, 2013 - 17:46 0 answers Groups Menu You must login in order to post into this group.

172

Moab Mill Tailings Pile 25 Percent Disposed: DOE Moab Project Reaches  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Mill Tailings Pile 25 Percent Disposed: DOE Moab Project Mill Tailings Pile 25 Percent Disposed: DOE Moab Project Reaches Significant Milestone Moab Mill Tailings Pile 25 Percent Disposed: DOE Moab Project Reaches Significant Milestone June 3, 2011 - 12:00pm Addthis Media Contacts Donald Metzler Moab Federal Project Director (970) 257-2115 Wendee Ryan S&K Aerospace Public Affairs Manager (970) 257-2145 Grand Junction, CO - One quarter of the uranium mill tailings pile located in Moab, Utah, has been relocated to the Crescent Junction, Utah, site for permanent disposal. Four million tons of the 16 million tons total has been relocated under the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Project managed by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). A little over 2 years ago, Remedial Action Contractor EnergySolutions began

173

Recovery Act Exceeds Major Cleanup Milestone, DOE Complex Now 74 Percent Remediated  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

November 2, 2012 November 2, 2012 WASHINGTON, D.C. - The Office of Environmental Management's (EM) American Recovery and Reinvestment Act Program recently achieved 74 percent footprint reduction, exceeding the originally established goal of 40 percent. EM has reduced its pre-Recovery Act footprint of 931 square miles, established in 2009, by 688 square miles. Reducing its contaminated footprint to 243 square miles has proven to be a monu- mental task, and a challenge the EM team was ready to take on from the beginning. In 2009, EM identified a goal of 40 percent footprint reduction by September 2011 as its High Priority Performance Goal. EM achieved that goal in April 2011, five months ahead of schedule, and continues to achieve footprint reduction, primarily at Savannah River Site and Hanford. Once

174

Moab Reaches 40-Percent Mark in Tailings Removal | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Moab Reaches 40-Percent Mark in Tailings Removal Moab Reaches 40-Percent Mark in Tailings Removal Moab Reaches 40-Percent Mark in Tailings Removal December 24, 2013 - 12:00pm Addthis A haul truck carrying a container is loaded with mill tailings at the Moab site. Once loaded and lidded, the container will be placed on a railcar for shipment by train to the Crescent Junction disposal site. A haul truck carrying a container is loaded with mill tailings at the Moab site. Once loaded and lidded, the container will be placed on a railcar for shipment by train to the Crescent Junction disposal site. MOAB, Utah - The Moab Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Project had a productive year, despite continued budget constraints and a first-ever, three-month curtailment of shipping operations last winter. On June 18, the project reached a significant milestone of having shipped 6

175

Comparing Comments in the L1 and the L2 during the Peer Review Process.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??This study analyzes the use of ESL students L1 and L2 during the peer review process in terms of the number of comments and suggestions (more)

Myers, Terra Suzanne

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

176

Achieving a ten percent greenhouse gas reduction by 2020 Response to  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

's environmental and economic goals are to ensure ... (e) greenhouse gas emissions will be at least ten per cent). The Nova Scotia Department of Energy also assumes this level of emissions by 2020 in its background paper of carbon dioxide. #12;Energy Research Group: Achieving a ten percent greenhouse gas reduction 2 shows NRCan

Hughes, Larry

177

What is the problem? Buildings account for 40 percent of U.S.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

What is the problem? Buildings account for 40 percent of U.S. energy use and a similar percentage with buildings and appliances are projected to grow faster than those from any other sector. In order to ensure that building energy consumption be significantly reduced. One way this can be achieved is through

178

Experimental Verification of Comparability between Spin-Orbit and Spin-Diffusion Lengths Yasuhiro Niimi,1,* Dahai Wei,1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

measurements are comparable to the spin diffusion lengths determined from lateral spin valve ones. Even spin-orbit length nicely follows a linear law as a function of the diffusion coefficient, clearly valve devices or along edges of samples with spin Hall effects (SHEs). Such a large spin accumulation

Otani, Yoshichika

179

1st Genomics-Bioinformatics Day on "Comparative Genomics" April 24th 2003 in the Medawar Building in the  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1st Genomics-Bioinformatics Day on "Comparative Genomics" April 24th 2003 in the Medawar Building. There is a need, however, for researchers interested in genomics and bioinformatics to meet, so Jotun Hein, Richard Mott and Chris Ponting have organised the first Genomics/Bioinformatics day. It is our intention

Goldschmidt, Christina

180

Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 1999 - Table 1  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Summary of AEO99 Cases Summary of AEO99 Cases Case Name Description Integration mode Reference Baseline economic growth, world oil price, and technology assumptions Fully Integrated Low Economic Growth Gross Domestic product grows at an average annual rate of 1.5 percent, compared to the reference case growth of 2.1 percent. Fully Integrated High Economic Growth Gross domestic product grows at an average annual rate of 2.6 percent, compared to the reference case growth of 2.1 percent. Fully Integrated Low World Oil Price World oil prices are $14.57 per barrel in 2020, compared to $22.73 per barrel in the reference case. Partially Integrated High World Oil Price World oil prices are $29.35 per barrel in 2020, compared to $22.73 per barrel in the reference case. Partially Integrated Residential: 1999 Technology

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "1 percent compared" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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181

Human Papillomavirus 16 and 18 L1 Serology Compared across Anogenital Cancer Sites  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Anogenital Cancer Sites 1 Joseph J. Carter Margaret M. Madeleine Katherine Shera Stephen M. Schwartz Kara L. Cushing-Haugen Gregory...1425-1430, 1995. 34 Kirnbauer R., Hubbert N. L., Wheeler C. M., Becker T. M., Lowy D. R., Schiller J. T...

Joseph J. Carter; Margaret M. Madeleine; Katherine Shera; Stephen M. Schwartz; Kara L. Cushing-Haugen; Gregory C. Wipf; Peggy Porter; Janet R. Daling; James K. McDougall; and Denise A. Galloway

2001-03-03T23:59:59.000Z

182

Comparative LCAO-LAPW study of C1 chemisorption on the Ag(001) surface  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A comparison is made between the results of self-consistent linear-combination-of-atomic-orbitals and linear-augmented-plane-wave calculations for a clean three-layer Ag(001) slab and one with adsorbed C1 in c(22) simple-overlayer and mixed-layer geometries.

D. R. Hamann, L. F. Mattheiss, and H. S. Greenside

1981-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

183

Reliability evaluation for large-scale bulk transmission systems: Volume 1, Comparative evaluation, method development, and recommendations: Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This volume (1 of 2) contains a comparative evaluation of existing transmission system reliability programs (SYREL, GATOR, RECS) and relevant mathematical methods for transmission reliability analysis. Several new and enhanced methods in the areas of network analysis, contingency selection, remedial action, and reliability index calculation, developed and tested during the project, are described. Recommendations for methods to be used in a production grade transmission reliability assessment program are presented. 69 figs., 41 tabs.

Lam, B.P.; Lawrence, D.J.; Reppen, N.D.; Ringlee, R.J.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

184

New Water Booster Pump System Reduces Energy Consumption by 80 Percent and Increases Reliability  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This case study outlines how General Motors (GM) developed a highly efficient pumping system for their Pontiac Operations Complex in Pontiac, Michigan. In short, GM was able to replace five original 60- to 100-hp pumps with three 15-hp pumps whose speed could be adjusted to meet plant requirements. As a result, the company reduced pumping system energy consumption by 80 percent (225,100 kWh per year), saving an annual $11,255 in pumping costs. With a capital investment of $44,966 in the energy efficiency portion of their new system, GM projected a simple payback of 4 years.

185

Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2001 - Table 1. Summary of AEO2001  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1 Cases 1 Cases Case name Description Integration mode Reference Baseline economic growth, world oil price, and technology assumptions Fully integrated Low Economic Growth Gross domestic product grows at an average annual rate of 2.5 percent, compared to the reference case growth of 3.0 percent. Fully integrated High Economic Growth Gross domestic product grows at an average annual rate of 3.5 percent, compared to the reference case growth of 3.0 percent. Fully integrated Low World Oil Price World oil prices are $15.10 per barrel in 2020, compared to $22.41 per barrel in the reference case. Fully integrated High World Oil Price World oil prices are $28.42 per barrel in 2020, compared to $22.41 per barrel in the reference case. Fully integrated Residential: 2001 Technology

186

SAVANNAH RIVER SITE TANK CLEANING: CORROSION RATE FOR ONE VERSUS EIGHT PERCENT OXALIC ACID SOLUTION  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Until recently, the use of oxalic acid for chemically cleaning the Savannah River Site (SRS) radioactive waste tanks focused on using concentrated 4 and 8-wt% solutions. Recent testing and research on applicable dissolution mechanisms have concluded that under appropriate conditions, dilute solutions of oxalic acid (i.e., 1-wt%) may be more effective. Based on the need to maximize cleaning effectiveness, coupled with the need to minimize downstream impacts, SRS is now developing plans for using a 1-wt% oxalic acid solution. A technology gap associated with using a 1-wt% oxalic acid solution was a dearth of suitable corrosion data. Assuming oxalic acid's passivation of carbon steel was proportional to the free oxalate concentration, the general corrosion rate (CR) from a 1-wt% solution may not be bound by those from 8-wt%. Therefore, after developing the test strategy and plan, the corrosion testing was performed. Starting with the envisioned process specific baseline solvent, a 1-wt% oxalic acid solution, with sludge (limited to Purex type sludge-simulant for this initial effort) at 75 C and agitated, the corrosion rate (CR) was determined from the measured weight loss of the exposed coupon. Environmental variations tested were: (a) Inclusion of sludge in the test vessel or assuming a pure oxalic acid solution; (b) acid solution temperature maintained at 75 or 45 C; and (c) agitation of the acid solution or stagnant. Application of select electrochemical testing (EC) explored the impact of each variation on the passivation mechanisms and confirmed the CR. The 1-wt% results were then compared to those from the 8-wt%. The immersion coupons showed that the maximum time averaged CR for a 1-wt% solution with sludge was less than 25-mils/yr for all conditions. For an agitated 8-wt% solution with sludge, the maximum time averaged CR was about 30-mils/yr at 50 C, and 86-mils/yr at 75 C. Both the 1-wt% and the 8-wt% testing demonstrated that if the sludge was removed from the testing, there would be a significant increase in the CR. Specifically, the CR for an agitated 1-wt% pure oxalic acid solution at 45 or 75 C was about 4 to 10 times greater than those for a 1-wt% solution with sludge. For 8-wt% at 50 C, the effect was even larger. The lower CRs suggest that the cathodic reactions were altered by the sludge. For both the 1-wt% and 8-wt% solution, increasing the temperature did not result in an increased CR. Although the CR for a 1-wt% acid with sludge was considered to be non-temperature dependent, a stagnant solution with sludge resulted in a CR that was greater at 45 C than at 75 C, suggesting that the oxalate film formed at a higher temperature was better in mitigating corrosion. For both a 1 and an 8-wt% solution, agitation typically resulted in a higher CR. Overall, the testing showed that the general CR to the SRS carbon steel tanks from 1-wt% oxalic acid solution will remain bounded by those from an 8-wt% oxalic acid solution.

Ketusky, E.; Subramanian, K.

2011-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

187

Extraction of Plutonium into 30 Percent Tri-Butyl Phosphate from Nitric Acid Solution Containing Fluoride, Aluminum, and Boron  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This work consists of experimental batch extraction data for plutonium into 30 volume-percent tri-butyl phosphate at ambient temperature from such a solution matrix and a model of this data using complexation constants from the literature.

Kyser, E.A.

2000-01-06T23:59:59.000Z

188

"EIA-914 Production Weighted Response Rates, Percent"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

EIA-914 Production Weighted Response Rates, Percent" EIA-914 Production Weighted Response Rates, Percent" "Areas",38353,38384,38412,38443,38473,38504,38534,38565,38596,38626,38657,38687,38718,38749,38777,"application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel"

189

A correlation of water solubility in jet fuels with API gravity: aniline point percent aromatics, and temperature.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A CORRELATION OF WATER SOLUBILITY IN JET FUELS WITH API GRAVITY, ANILINE POINT PERCENT AROMATICS, AND TEMPERATURE A Thesis By ALONZO B YINGTON Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment... of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE January, 1964 Major Subject: Petroleum Engineering A CORRELATION OF MATER SOLUBILITT IH JET FUELS WITS API GEAVITT, ANILINE POINT, PERCENT ARONATICS, AND TENPERATURE A Thesis By ALOHZO BYIHGTOH Approved...

Byington, Alonzo

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

190

Five percent platinum-tungsten oxide-based electrocatalysts for phosphoric acid fuel cell cathodes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A Pt-tungsten oxide-based electrocatalyst has been fabricated by an inexpensive chemical route for use as an oxygen cathode in 99% phosphoric acid at 180 C. The effect of %WO{sub 3} (wt/wt) on the Pt-tungsten oxide/C-based electrode performance was studied. The electrocatalytic properties for the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR), e.g., exchange current density and mass activity of a 5% Pt-40% WO{sub 3}-based electrode were found to be twice as high as those of 10% Pt, which contains double the amount of platinum. The Tafel slope and specific activity of the two electrodes are similar. It was shown that an increase in its electrochemically active surface area was the only reason for the performance of the 5% Pt-40% WO{sub 3}-based electrode. The electrocatalytic parameters of the 5% Pt-40% WO{sub 3}-based electrode for the ORR were compared to those of the 2% Pt-1% H{sub 2}WO{sub 4}-based electrode.

Savadogo, O.; Beck, P. [Ecole Polytechnique, Montreal, Quebec (Canada). Lab. d`Electrochimie et de Materiaux Energetiques

1996-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

191

Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2000-Table 1. Summary of the  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0 Cases 0 Cases Case Name Description Integration mode Reference Baseline economic growth, world oil price, and technology assumptions Fully Integrated Low Economic Growth Gross Domestic product grows at an average annual rate of 1.7 percent, compared to the reference case growth of 2.2 percent. Fully Integrated High Economic Growth Gross domestic product grows at an average annual rate of 2.6 percent, compared to the reference case growth of 2.2 percent. Fully Integrated Low World Oil Price World oil prices are $14.90 per barrel in 2020, compared to $22.04 per barrel in the reference case. Fully Integrated High World Oil Price World oil prices are $28.04 per barrel in 2020, compared to $22.04 per barrel in the reference case. Fully Integrated Residential: 2000 Technology

192

Annual Energy Outlook 2000 - Table G1 - Summary of the AEO2000 Cases  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

AEO2000 Cases AEO2000 Cases Case name Description Integration mode Reference in text Reference in Appendix G Reference Baseline economic growth, world oil price, and technology assumptions Fully integrated — — Low Economic Growth Gross domestic product grows at an average annual rate of 1.7 percent, compared to the reference case growth of 2.2 percent. Fully integrated p. 49 — High Economic Growth Gross domestic product grows at an average annual rate of 2.6 percent, compared to the reference case growth of 2.2 percent. Fully integrated p. 49 — Low World Oil Price World oil prices are $14.90 per barrel in 2020, compared to $22.04 per barrel in the reference case. Fully integrated p. 50 — High World Oil Price World oil prices are $28.04 per barrel in 2020, compared to $22.04 per barrel in the reference case.

193

Comparative Fellowships  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Comparative Genomics IGERT Graduate Fellowships & Training Integrative Graduate Education for genomics, including genotyping, sequencing, microarray research, and computers for biocomputing needs. · Genomic Analysis and Technology Core · Biotechnology Computing Facility · Protemics Analysis Lab · Bio5

Watkins, Joseph C.

194

Test Comparability  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

KU ScholarWorks | http://kuscholarworks.ku.edu Test Comparability 2010 by Christine Keller and David Shulenburger This work has been made available by the University of Kansas Libraries Office of Scholarly Communication and Copyright. Please... and Shulenburger, David. Test comparability, with Christine Keller in the Letters section of Change, September/October 2010, p. 6. Published version: http://www.changemag.org/Archives/Back%20 Issues/September-October%202010/letters-to-editor.html Terms of Use...

Keller, Christine; Shulenburger, David E.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

195

Percent of Industrial Natural Gas Deliveries in Montana Represented by the  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2001 3.0 3.1 2.8 2.6 2.3 1.9 0.9 0.8 1.0 1.2 1.9 3.0 2002 3.0 2.9 3.6 2.3 2.0 1.2 0.9 0.7 0.8 1.1 2.1 3.4 2003 2.9 2.8 3.3 2.1 1.8 1.0 1.0 0.8 0.8 0.6 1.2 1.6 2004 1.8 2.4 1.9 1.0 1.5 1.4 1.1 0.7 0.8 1.1 1.8 2.4 2005 3.1 2.9 2.2 2.3 1.8 1.4 0.9 0.6 0.7 1.0 1.3 2.3 2006 1.3 1.0 1.1 0.9 0.6 0.4 0.2 0.1 0.2 0.3 0.6 1.0 2007 1.0 1.2 0.9 0.9 0.5 0.4 0.3 0.3 0.4 0.5 0.7 1.0 2008 1.3 1.4 1.8 1.1 0.9 0.5 0.6 0.5 0.5 0.4 0.8 0.9 2009 2.5 1.7 1.5 1.2 0.8 0.5 0.3 0.3 0.4 0.6 1.0 1.8 2010 2.3 2.4 2.3 1.8 1.4 0.5 0.7 0.6 0.6 1.5 1.0 2.0 2011 1.9 3.3 2.1 1.3 0.9 0.6 0.5 0.5 0.4 0.5 1.7 1.3

196

A COMPARATIVE ASTROCHEMICAL STUDY OF THE HIGH-MASS PROTOSTELLAR OBJECTS NGC 7538 IRS 9 AND IRS 1  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We report the results of a spectroscopic study of the high-mass protostellar object NGC 7538 IRS 9 and compare our observations to published data on the nearby object NGC 7538 IRS 1. Both objects originated in the same molecular cloud and appear to be at different points in their evolutionary histories, offering an unusual opportunity to study the temporal evolution of envelope chemistry in objects sharing a presumably identical starting composition. Observations were made with the Texas Echelon Cross Echelle Spectrograph, a sensitive, high spectral resolution (R {lambda}/{Delta}{lambda} {approx_equal} 100,000) mid-infrared grating spectrometer. Forty-six individual lines in vibrational modes of the molecules C{sub 2}H{sub 2}, CH{sub 4}, HCN, NH{sub 3}, and CO were detected, including two isotopologues ({sup 13}CO, {sup 12}C{sup 18}O) and one combination mode ({nu}{sub 4} + {nu}{sub 5} C{sub 2}H{sub 2}). Fitting synthetic spectra to the data yielded the Doppler shift, excitation temperature, Doppler b parameter, column density, and covering factor for each molecule observed; we also computed column density upper limits for lines and species not detected, such as HNCO and OCS. We find differences among spectra of the two objects likely attributable to their differing radiation and thermal environments. Temperatures and column densities for the two objects are generally consistent, while the larger line widths toward IRS 9 result in less saturated lines than those toward IRS 1. Finally, we compute an upper limit on the size of the continuum-emitting region ({approx}2000 AU) and use this constraint and our spectroscopy results to construct a schematic model of IRS 9.

Barentine, John C.; Lacy, John H. [Department of Astronomy, University of Texas at Austin, 1 University Station, C1400, Austin, TX 78712-0259 (United States)

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

197

Percent of Industrial Natural Gas Deliveries in Ohio Represented by the  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2001 13.1 9.8 10.4 6.2 3.9 3.4 1.5 4.8 1.2 2.9 5.6 6.4 2002 5.4 6.2 5.4 4.8 1.9 1.7 1.6 2.1 2.5 2.3 4.9 6.7 2003 6.3 7.0 5.4 4.0 1.8 2.4 2.0 1.7 1.7 2.4 3.3 4.6 2004 5.1 5.7 4.0 3.8 2.1 2.3 1.7 2.3 2.2 2.7 3.4 4.5 2005 5.7 6.6 4.5 2.6 2.0 1.6 2.1 2.0 1.9 2.6 3.3 4.8 2006 4.6 4.7 4.0 2.7 2.1 2.2 2.2 2.1 2.2 2.2 3.0 3.5 2007 3.9 4.8 3.5 2.6 1.8 1.8 1.9 1.4 1.5 1.2 2.2 3.7 2008 3.9 4.2 3.5 2.5 1.1 1.7 1.9 1.4 1.4 1.6 2.7 4.1 2009 4.8 4.7 3.8 2.2 2.1 2.6 1.7 1.4 1.1 1.6 2.0 3.2 2010 4.7 4.4 3.2 1.4 0.7 0.7 0.7 0.6 0.7 1.5 1.7 2.9 2011 4.0 3.5 3.0 1.5 1.0 0.7 0.5 0.7 1.0 0.8 1.9 2.8

198

Percent of Industrial Natural Gas Deliveries in Colorado Represented by the  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2001 0.0 0.1 0.0 0.2 0.6 1.2 2.9 2.8 1.7 0.4 0.4 0.1 2002 0.1 0.1 1.4 1.1 1.9 1.7 2.1 3.3 1.7 0.7 0.6 0.6 2003 0.1 0.0 0.3 1.2 0.8 0.9 1.9 3.0 2.7 0.9 0.4 0.1 2004 0.1 0.1 0.3 1.1 0.8 1.5 1.5 2.3 2.0 0.3 0.2 0.0 2005 0.8 0.8 0.6 0.7 0.6 0.4 0.3 0.6 0.5 0.4 0.5 0.7 2006 0.1 0.1 0.2 0.6 1.1 1.5 1.6 2.0 1.0 0.3 0.1 0.1 2007 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.2 0.5 0.8 1.3 1.5 0.7 0.2 0.2 0.1 2008 0.7 0.8 0.7 0.5 0.5 0.5 0.5 0.5 0.4 0.4 0.6 0.5 2009 0.6 0.8 0.4 0.8 0.2 0.4 0.4 0.5 0.4 0.5 0.6 0.5 2010 8.3 5.3 6.0 5.7 5.3 3.9 2.6 2.9 2.9 5.0 5.5 6.3 2011 8.9 9.0 8.3 8.6 6.5 4.3 5.2 5.5 5.7 6.9 8.5 8.6

199

Percent of Industrial Natural Gas Deliveries in Maine Represented by the  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2001 7.1 9.5 8.2 5.5 7.6 14.7 17.1 12.4 4.5 8.9 4.5 3.6 2002 13.5 1.7 6.8 1.5 1.6 1.2 100.0 0.8 100.0 0.7 0.8 1.0 2003 10.9 12.0 11.3 10.5 11.9 9.1 7.6 10.1 9.0 7.3 9.2 16.5 2004 2.0 1.7 1.5 1.7 1.8 2.3 1.3 2.0 1.6 1.5 1.6 1.8 2005 3.8 4.1 3.6 3.0 2.8 2.5 3.2 2.0 1.4 3.4 3.2 3.8 2006 1.3 1.3 0.8 0.9 0.8 0.8 0.8 0.8 0.7 1.0 0.9 0.8 2007 0.9 1.0 4.3 0.9 0.4 0.3 0.6 0.4 0.5 0.7 0.6 1.3 2008 1.1 0.9 1.5 0.6 0.5 0.3 0.8 0.6 0.6 1.0 0.9 0.9 2009 1.8 2.2 1.5 0.8 0.5 1.3 1.0 0.5 2.1 0.8 0.8 1.2 2010 1.2 0.8 1.2 0.7 0.5 0.3 0.4 0.4 0.4 0.4 0.3 0.7 2011 0.7 0.9 0.7 1.0 0.4 0.4 0.2 0.2 0.3 0.3 0.5 0.6

200

Percent of Industrial Natural Gas Deliveries in Kansas Represented by the  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2001 3.0 2.9 3.2 2.9 7.8 9.4 18.1 21.2 16.4 7.7 7.9 4.4 2002 5.0 5.1 6.6 13.0 12.4 16.1 22.4 18.5 11.6 5.7 4.3 4.3 2003 2.4 3.4 3.2 8.2 11.0 6.9 14.8 21.1 9.1 5.3 5.0 3.1 2004 2.7 2.8 4.6 10.3 9.4 14.0 13.4 11.0 9.2 2.6 2.4 2.3 2005 1.7 1.4 1.4 3.2 6.6 8.2 16.3 19.2 9.0 3.8 2.5 1.7 2006 1.7 2.0 3.2 5.7 9.4 12.9 16.2 16.9 9.4 3.6 2.1 2.1 2007 1.3 1.5 1.5 1.4 4.9 9.8 16.2 17.3 9.6 4.0 2.8 1.7 2008 1.6 1.5 2.7 7.5 10.4 13.4 18.9 17.9 10.9 4.1 1.7 1.6 2009 1.5 2.0 4.4 4.6 6.3 9.2 16.6 17.0 11.0 3.3 1.5 1.1 2010 1.2 1.2 1.2 2.5 6.5 10.6 17.3 18.2 12.5 5.8 3.7 1.9 2011 1.5 1.7 5.6 10.4 11.0 17.0 20.8 19.9 12.8 4.9 3.6 1.6

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201

346 IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON POWER SYSTEMS, VOL. 18, NO. 1, FEBRUARY 2003 Congestion-Management Schemes: A Comparative  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

: A Comparative Analysis Under a Unified Framework Ettore Bompard, Member, IEEE, Pedro Correia, George Gross of Science and Technology through scholarship PRAXIS XXI/BD/13801/97. The work of G. Gross was supported. G. Gross was with the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Illinois

Gross, George

202

Percent of Industrial Natural Gas Deliveries in Arkansas Represented by the  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2001 6.8 10.0 9.1 4.6 6.6 4.9 5.5 3.8 4.0 5.6 5.3 5.4 2002 6.1 6.1 6.5 5.0 4.1 3.9 5.1 3.8 3.8 5.0 4.8 4.9 2003 5.4 5.9 5.8 4.6 4.0 3.8 4.5 5.2 5.9 6.5 6.2 6.1 2004 6.5 6.8 6.3 5.7 5.1 6.0 5.8 4.4 4.9 7.2 7.0 5.0 2005 5.5 6.2 5.6 5.3 4.7 4.6 4.3 3.8 4.6 6.8 5.5 5.1 2006 5.3 5.7 5.2 4.6 4.0 4.1 3.7 3.3 4.1 5.4 5.5 5.8 2007 4.5 5.6 4.4 4.2 3.8 3.8 3.3 3.4 3.7 4.5 4.5 3.7 2008 4.1 4.6 3.9 4.0 3.1 2.8 3.0 2.9 3.2 4.8 5.4 4.4 2009 4.5 4.6 3.9 3.9 2.7 2.9 2.9 2.4 3.1 3.8 4.5 3.9 2010 4.0 3.9 3.6 3.1 2.4 2.5 2.2 2.1 2.4 2.7 2.2 2.0 2011 2.7 3.0 2.1 1.9 1.4 1.3 2.1 1.4 1.7 1.8 2.3 2.5

203

ITER: Japan to assign 20 percent of construction work to EU firms; Proposal for EU official to assume chief executive  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ITER: Japan to assign 20 percent of construction work to EU firms; Proposal for EU official to assume chief executive position MAINICHI (Top Play) (Lead para.) December 7, 2004 Japan and the European Experimental Reactor (ITER). Japan yesterday revealed the details of a proposal to host the project. Tokyo has

204

Percent of Commercial Natural Gas Deliveries in Colorado Represented by the  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1989 98.0 98.1 98.3 97.8 97.3 97.3 95.0 91.8 95.8 95.6 96.9 97.2 1990 98.1 98.0 97.9 97.6 97.3 97.4 94.7 94.5 95.5 94.6 97.0 97.0 1991 96.8 97.1 96.1 96.2 96.9 97.2 93.7 93.9 93.6 92.3 94.7 96.3 1992 96.7 96.7 95.9 95.7 95.1 96.0 94.2 93.3 93.6 91.2 93.7 96.2 1993 96.6 96.4 96.5 95.8 95.2 95.5 93.0 93.1 95.2 90.6 94.1 95.9 1994 95.9 96.1 95.7 94.9 95.3 94.3 91.2 91.7 93.1 91.5 93.2 95.5 1995 95.9 96.0 95.1 94.3 95.1 95.5 92.3 89.7 89.3 89.8 93.5 93.8 1996 94.5 95.5 93.8 93.1 92.4 92.5 88.0 87.1 90.6 89.1 92.8 94.3 1997 94.6 95.4 94.4 93.9 93.7 92.9 86.2 83.1 90.2 86.9 89.8 93.0 1998 95.4 95.1 96.1 95.8 95.0 91.6 92.0 91.1 93.2 87.5 94.0 95.2

205

Percent of Commercial Natural Gas Deliveries in Maryland Represented by the  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1989 97.1 96.6 97.1 96.7 95.9 95.1 94.3 94.7 94.1 94.2 94.6 96.8 1990 97.6 97.1 96.0 95.7 94.3 94.5 93.6 93.1 92.6 93.3 94.7 95.6 1991 97.3 97.5 97.1 96.6 95.9 94.8 94.5 94.7 94.1 95.8 96.5 97.4 1992 97.2 97.2 96.3 95.6 94.1 92.8 93.1 92.7 94.1 95.0 97.0 97.4 1993 97.3 97.4 96.5 96.3 94.6 96.2 95.0 93.4 93.4 95.4 97.1 98.1 1994 98.1 98.3 98.2 95.8 95.8 95.4 95.2 94.1 95.2 96.2 96.5 97.8 1995 97.9 98.5 97.8 96.7 95.9 96.2 94.4 94.9 95.6 94.7 95.6 97.0 1996 94.9 96.5 93.7 92.4 86.2 86.8 81.4 85.0 87.0 87.3 92.2 93.2 1997 83.9 81.9 77.6 71.5 61.9 56.1 51.6 50.3 48.6 51.7 64.7 53.1 1998 47.0 49.3 45.6 32.1 26.8 24.3 22.2 22.7 23.0 25.2 38.3 37.7

206

Percent of Commercial Natural Gas Deliveries in Michigan Represented by the  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1989 75.8 74.5 76.0 71.7 64.9 47.6 51.7 50.8 57.5 64.4 69.5 73.5 1990 73.1 74.0 74.5 72.3 67.4 58.1 49.6 51.5 52.2 62.1 70.1 74.6 1991 73.0 72.2 72.4 67.3 62.1 51.2 44.3 41.2 47.5 60.1 87.2 70.0 1992 73.7 74.5 71.4 70.5 66.6 55.5 48.5 51.6 49.9 61.1 68.6 73.1 1993 74.5 72.3 72.6 68.0 63.7 51.6 50.5 54.4 50.9 63.1 68.1 73.1 1994 73.7 71.6 70.8 66.3 60.1 45.7 41.7 42.3 45.4 55.4 63.4 69.8 1995 72.5 72.2 71.2 68.0 61.5 45.8 41.6 39.0 46.9 57.1 68.0 72.5 1996 73.7 72.1 73.1 68.5 64.4 46.1 44.2 41.3 44.6 55.8 67.2 70.2 1997 70.0 70.2 67.3 66.2 58.6 45.7 55.7 40.7 39.7 54.2 64.8 65.7 1998 70.8 66.5 65.7 60.1 44.3 42.3 39.6 37.5 42.5 47.8 57.9 64.7

207

Percent of Industrial Natural Gas Deliveries in Maryland Represented by the  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2001 15.4 11.4 9.7 7.2 6.7 4.5 9.7 6.3 6.3 7.0 6.6 10.3 2002 10.3 11.3 13.0 5.3 5.8 6.0 4.5 5.8 4.3 6.9 7.1 11.9 2003 10.5 13.2 11.4 9.1 7.8 6.6 6.3 6.2 7.1 12.1 11.9 12.9 2004 11.2 10.7 8.8 9.1 6.4 4.7 5.0 5.6 7.2 7.2 9.4 10.9 2005 11.3 11.5 11.3 9.8 5.5 5.1 4.9 5.3 5.2 6.2 9.4 10.7 2006 8.7 10.4 8.9 6.1 4.5 4.4 3.7 3.9 6.5 5.8 7.7 9.2 2007 13.1 13.7 11.0 9.9 6.1 3.7 4.5 3.8 6.9 3.5 8.4 10.4 2008 9.5 10.4 7.5 6.6 4.7 3.1 3.0 4.2 4.5 4.5 6.7 9.6 2009 12.8 10.9 8.0 4.2 1.7 2.2 2.0 2.0 3.6 2.8 3.4 7.6 2010 7.3 7.1 6.3 4.1 3.3 2.3 2.1 4.3 4.6 5.1 6.1 10.6 2011 11.3 10.0 8.0 7.2 4.2 3.5 2.2 3.6 3.9 3.9 4.9 5.0

208

Percent of Industrial Natural Gas Deliveries in Kentucky Represented by the  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2001 27.3 21.8 18.9 13.8 17.8 15.8 17.4 17.4 17.3 19.6 16.5 16.9 2002 16.8 18.2 18.9 17.2 15.5 16.5 18.0 19.1 16.3 18.0 18.8 18.4 2003 20.6 20.1 18.7 19.5 19.2 20.3 16.6 16.0 18.1 18.2 18.1 18.4 2004 18.8 18.3 16.3 16.0 14.6 16.6 16.2 15.2 15.5 15.6 17.5 20.3 2005 16.5 17.5 17.3 16.0 15.8 15.2 16.1 14.9 17.4 17.9 17.2 19.7 2006 15.6 16.9 17.6 14.8 14.9 14.2 16.0 15.7 14.6 15.7 15.5 17.6 2007 16.6 18.1 17.0 17.7 16.1 17.5 16.6 14.7 15.3 16.1 16.6 16.5 2008 19.1 20.3 18.1 17.7 17.7 16.4 16.4 15.9 16.1 17.0 15.8 18.1 2009 17.3 19.7 16.0 17.8 19.4 21.5 18.1 18.8 18.2 16.1 17.4 17.8 2010 18.0 18.5 19.6 19.1 18.5 16.8 15.8 16.9 16.1 18.0 17.6 18.6

209

Percent of Industrial Natural Gas Deliveries in New Jersey Represented by  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2001 29.3 31.1 27.6 21.9 21.2 19.6 18.6 15.6 18.5 16.8 15.6 21.1 2002 23.5 22.2 23.5 21.5 18.7 18.3 17.4 16.9 18.0 18.5 22.1 26.0 2003 21.1 23.1 26.0 26.8 23.9 18.0 15.3 17.3 13.3 14.9 13.0 18.4 2004 19.5 22.5 18.1 16.6 15.0 13.7 11.6 15.1 13.6 13.6 15.4 18.5 2005 22.4 22.7 21.9 17.6 15.7 15.4 17.7 20.4 16.9 19.4 20.1 25.4 2006 23.6 22.4 21.6 19.0 17.0 16.3 18.5 19.1 15.6 16.6 19.9 21.8 2007 21.5 23.6 20.8 23.0 17.1 17.5 17.7 19.8 19.9 20.0 21.2 23.1 2008 16.5 15.9 16.1 9.9 11.1 8.6 4.0 5.6 4.6 7.7 9.7 13.7 2009 18.4 13.1 12.9 6.5 4.2 4.2 3.1 3.9 4.9 6.2 8.8 11.6 2010 14.6 17.7 9.8 7.1 4.9 3.6 3.0 3.5 3.0 4.2 6.8 12.3

210

Percent of Commercial Natural Gas Deliveries in Indiana Represented by the  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1989 94.1 93.9 94.3 92.6 92.6 97.2 96.7 96.8 89.1 91.9 97.7 98.9 1990 99.2 98.5 93.4 90.1 92.1 90.6 92.2 89.7 88.4 91.8 98.4 98.6 1991 94.2 93.3 93.2 93.2 92.6 89.2 89.9 89.6 92.6 98.5 97.9 95.4 1992 93.6 92.4 98.6 99.1 99.7 99.9 92.8 99.6 91.9 99.8 99.9 98.0 1993 94.5 94.1 99.6 99.5 100.0 91.9 90.4 91.1 92.9 90.7 92.2 96.1 1994 94.1 97.5 93.7 91.5 88.4 85.6 84.6 85.9 84.3 86.7 91.3 91.4 1995 89.7 89.9 89.5 87.0 83.4 76.1 73.5 72.7 77.9 80.9 90.7 93.4 1996 98.1 98.6 97.9 97.4 93.7 88.9 91.6 86.8 86.8 91.5 96.1 97.4 1997 97.1 96.7 93.4 91.1 58.0 59.4 85.4 86.8 87.2 93.9 96.0 94.0 1998 85.1 83.9 88.3 78.9 75.8 69.8 59.1 70.2 57.3 69.0 74.5 82.6

211

Percent of Commercial Natural Gas Deliveries in Idaho Represented by the  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1989 88.9 90.2 90.6 89.0 82.8 85.9 86.8 83.0 84.1 79.3 84.6 87.4 1990 91.5 90.4 89.7 87.7 85.8 88.1 86.1 85.2 85.0 79.3 86.3 86.4 1991 91.0 91.7 88.5 87.4 87.4 86.8 84.7 84.0 82.9 73.6 85.1 87.5 1992 89.4 89.0 87.1 85.2 83.1 80.2 81.0 82.4 80.2 77.9 82.2 88.3 1993 89.4 89.9 91.0 87.9 87.4 82.3 82.8 81.3 79.2 77.7 81.5 87.8 1994 87.8 88.6 88.1 85.9 83.2 82.7 84.2 80.1 80.6 79.4 84.1 87.6 1995 89.7 89.1 86.5 85.5 86.0 85.3 83.7 82.5 80.4 77.1 85.9 85.5 1996 88.8 90.1 88.2 87.2 85.7 86.0 82.4 81.9 80.0 77.3 84.9 87.6 1997 87.8 89.7 87.7 86.1 86.4 83.3 83.1 82.8 82.5 76.4 83.1 86.9 1998 90.2 88.9 88.3 86.7 85.7 85.6 84.2 83.3 80.6 75.3 83.9 86.1

212

Percent of Commercial Natural Gas Deliveries in Arizona Represented by the  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1989 96.1 96.3 94.1 93.5 92.8 91.7 89.1 89.1 91.6 91.6 94.8 95.3 1990 97.6 97.4 96.3 94.9 95.6 92.8 92.0 90.9 94.6 96.4 96.7 97.0 1991 98.0 94.9 93.5 92.6 91.7 89.6 87.0 88.1 88.5 92.8 92.8 97.7 1992 97.2 97.0 96.3 92.7 89.9 88.9 86.3 86.0 90.5 91.2 89.1 92.9 1993 93.3 93.4 92.5 90.1 91.2 90.6 88.3 89.5 90.2 92.1 90.7 92.5 1994 94.2 92.5 91.9 89.9 90.5 88.3 87.2 86.4 89.3 90.4 89.9 91.5 1995 91.7 92.8 88.7 86.9 87.8 87.9 84.5 84.8 86.5 88.4 87.9 87.2 1996 89.6 90.2 86.9 83.7 84.8 83.6 82.1 78.5 83.5 83.2 84.1 84.1 1997 87.3 87.8 86.5 83.8 86.1 82.6 79.7 78.6 83.8 81.0 83.1 85.8 1998 87.1 87.4 86.9 85.2 83.6 86.4 84.4 83.0 83.7 79.9 82.9 84.0

213

Percent of Industrial Natural Gas Deliveries in Florida Represented by the  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2001 6.1 4.5 3.5 4.7 5.9 3.6 1.9 2.9 2.5 2.5 3.3 4.0 2002 4.1 4.5 4.1 3.6 3.5 4.2 3.2 3.5 3.9 3.4 3.8 4.4 2003 4.2 5.9 4.4 3.9 3.5 3.7 3.3 2.6 3.7 3.2 4.4 3.3 2004 4.6 3.8 4.2 3.3 3.3 3.7 2.9 3.2 4.4 3.3 4.1 3.6 2005 2.7 4.1 3.8 3.4 3.1 3.2 3.4 3.5 3.4 3.7 3.5 3.6 2006 3.0 2.8 3.0 2.8 2.3 2.4 5.3 2.9 3.0 2.4 4.2 3.1 2007 2.6 3.1 3.5 2.3 2.9 4.0 2.8 2.6 3.6 2.5 3.7 3.6 2008 2.9 3.3 3.4 2.5 2.9 2.4 2.8 2.5 3.2 3.0 3.3 3.3 2009 3.5 3.4 4.8 3.3 3.1 2.8 2.8 2.9 2.8 3.4 3.1 2.8 2010 2.6 3.4 2.9 2.7 3.6 2.3 2.5 5.1 3.0 2.8 2.8 2.6 2011 3.1 4.3 2.6 2.8 2.8 2.6 2.9 2.9 2.8 3.1 3.8 2.4

214

Percent of Commercial Natural Gas Deliveries in U.S. Total Represented by  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1983 NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA 1984 NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA 1985 NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA 1986 NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA 1987 NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA 1988 93.8 93.3 92.5 91.7 89.4 87.5 86.3 87.2 87.6 87.4 88.7 89.7 1989 91.0 91.2 90.8 89.2 88.2 86.1 85.1 85.1 84.6 85.2 87.7 90.7 1990 90.8 88.8 88.3 86.9 85.5 83.8 81.8 81.7 80.3 81.2 84.7 87.9 1991 89.4 88.5 87.8 84.0 83.2 80.0 79.3 81.6 78.1 78.7 85.1 86.1 1992 87.1 85.2 84.7 84.0 79.3 79.4 76.0 76.1 78.0 80.9 83.1 85.6 1993 86.6 86.3 86.4 84.9 82.2 79.0 79.2 78.0 78.3 79.9 83.0 85.1

215

Percent of Commercial Natural Gas Deliveries in New York Represented by the  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1989 90.4 90.1 89.3 85.0 85.4 81.3 78.6 78.2 73.6 74.8 82.4 89.7 1990 90.5 92.3 85.6 85.3 78.9 77.8 80.2 80.1 76.5 75.8 80.7 81.5 1991 86.2 85.4 84.4 81.0 75.8 72.8 76.8 75.1 73.1 75.0 79.5 81.1 1992 81.0 78.9 79.5 77.3 72.4 70.9 72.9 69.3 69.3 76.0 82.6 81.5 1993 81.4 81.5 82.3 77.8 71.3 66.2 69.1 72.1 72.8 74.1 77.9 77.2 1994 83.7 83.4 83.3 77.7 73.4 73.2 74.7 73.4 75.1 76.4 78.0 81.9 1995 80.8 82.8 79.3 76.3 71.7 66.5 66.5 64.1 68.1 72.3 77.2 79.9 1996 NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA 1997 74.3 72.1 69.3 67.7 59.1 53.5 53.3 54.6 56.2 59.3 65.6 68.3 1998 55.3 60.7 59.0 53.6 48.2 49.8 43.2 43.2 43.3 50.2 53.3 56.7

216

Percent of Commercial Natural Gas Deliveries in Ohio Represented by the  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1989 87.4 88.1 87.1 86.0 81.2 74.4 75.5 75.0 78.9 85.1 87.8 90.3 1990 89.9 89.2 89.9 86.4 82.4 78.5 77.0 75.6 77.7 83.0 87.9 91.4 1991 91.6 90.0 87.2 83.6 78.6 74.7 75.5 73.7 75.6 82.6 87.8 89.8 1992 89.1 88.0 88.4 85.7 78.9 73.9 72.0 73.5 73.1 84.2 85.7 88.5 1993 89.4 87.0 86.9 83.8 76.1 73.9 74.6 69.4 72.6 82.8 84.5 86.3 1994 87.4 86.5 84.9 78.4 75.9 70.5 66.7 67.5 66.5 75.1 78.7 81.5 1995 81.0 80.0 78.6 76.8 67.8 61.4 62.9 59.0 58.3 69.9 77.9 79.2 1996 77.3 76.1 76.1 72.3 63.1 42.1 56.4 53.9 65.1 68.5 72.4 74.0 1997 73.2 69.3 70.0 65.6 58.9 50.2 47.4 49.3 50.4 55.0 67.3 67.4 1998 61.5 61.2 61.1 54.9 42.3 45.6 48.0 36.3 44.9 56.3 50.7 50.3

217

Percent of Industrial Natural Gas Deliveries in Indiana Represented by the  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2001 15.1 14.0 7.1 7.1 4.2 3.7 5.2 1.0 5.5 8.3 6.6 10.2 2002 8.4 8.1 10.1 6.4 5.3 6.2 5.3 5.9 6.6 12.5 12.6 12.4 2003 14.2 12.9 8.9 7.2 7.0 5.9 6.2 5.7 9.3 6.2 11.3 9.3 2004 9.2 8.9 8.9 6.9 6.4 6.2 6.9 6.5 7.3 7.9 10.4 11.6 2005 9.8 7.7 9.6 5.8 6.3 5.5 5.5 6.7 8.2 8.2 10.6 8.9 2006 8.2 9.3 7.4 4.3 7.0 5.0 6.4 5.9 6.3 8.2 8.3 8.4 2007 9.3 9.4 5.8 7.6 6.1 5.5 6.0 5.0 6.9 6.8 9.5 9.1 2008 8.4 7.5 7.0 6.7 5.5 4.5 4.7 4.7 5.3 9.1 8.4 7.6 2009 8.6 8.5 5.3 6.3 7.1 6.2 6.8 5.0 6.2 7.8 6.8 8.1 2010 7.5 6.4 5.7 5.4 4.1 4.4 4.6 4.3 5.0 4.7 5.5 6.3 2011 4.5 4.8 4.8 3.5 3.4 3.2 3.5 2.2 2.5 2.4 3.1 4.0

218

Percent of Commercial Natural Gas Deliveries in Nebraska Represented by the  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1989 96.8 96.5 97.1 99.8 99.7 99.8 99.9 99.9 99.7 98.8 98.1 98.5 1990 95.6 95.3 94.1 93.2 92.3 89.6 96.9 94.2 93.0 90.2 89.9 93.5 1991 93.6 93.3 91.8 87.9 85.4 88.2 96.4 95.2 85.8 86.1 90.5 91.4 1992 91.7 91.6 89.9 90.9 88.7 81.7 85.6 83.6 80.5 84.5 87.1 90.9 1993 94.1 94.7 94.5 93.4 89.5 88.4 88.1 87.8 82.9 85.2 84.8 92.0 1994 88.2 88.9 85.8 82.3 79.2 72.9 75.9 77.8 65.1 62.2 73.5 80.7 1995 81.4 80.6 79.2 79.8 76.0 71.8 70.4 68.4 NA NA NA NA 1996 83.8 79.1 77.7 77.3 69.8 66.0 51.8 54.1 66.2 40.3 68.6 76.6 1997 82.4 91.9 74.2 77.5 67.0 68.6 67.6 69.2 63.2 50.0 72.4 77.2 1998 80.4 78.6 77.9 72.1 74.6 67.1 66.3 82.0 74.5 80.4 66.5 51.5

219

Percent of Industrial Natural Gas Deliveries in Nebraska Represented by the  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2001 25.7 29.6 30.3 21.0 19.7 16.7 8.3 12.9 13.3 18.6 12.0 18.7 2002 22.6 19.5 29.3 17.6 15.0 24.0 7.4 8.4 8.8 16.4 18.9 19.6 2003 20.3 22.7 24.9 19.3 17.1 24.1 8.7 9.7 10.9 15.7 17.7 19.4 2004 19.7 21.4 24.7 19.0 18.3 14.2 9.2 10.6 16.5 18.8 16.0 16.6 2005 24.4 20.0 24.6 18.5 19.0 18.2 10.0 8.6 12.9 15.1 14.2 18.3 2006 13.8 15.1 17.1 13.3 13.0 9.8 8.3 7.7 10.5 11.5 10.2 12.4 2007 12.1 13.0 14.5 11.6 9.7 8.9 7.1 6.4 6.9 9.8 8.5 10.5 2008 12.0 13.8 13.2 13.6 12.4 8.5 8.0 7.1 8.6 7.4 8.0 11.4 2009 11.8 12.1 10.5 10.2 8.8 7.6 6.6 6.1 7.3 7.8 9.0 8.7 2010 11.1 11.7 10.5 9.1 7.0 7.8 6.8 6.5 7.2 7.4 7.6 7.5

220

Percent of Commercial Natural Gas Deliveries in New Jersey Represented by  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1989 99.0 98.9 98.7 98.3 96.2 94.7 94.2 93.4 93.5 94.7 99.0 99.7 1990 99.6 99.3 96.6 94.4 94.3 93.2 89.3 86.4 87.1 86.2 91.7 96.5 1991 98.1 96.5 95.8 91.8 92.3 89.1 89.5 80.6 89.2 90.0 93.2 97.0 1992 96.9 95.7 92.1 87.7 94.1 91.3 88.6 80.7 80.7 86.4 94.8 96.9 1993 93.6 94.0 93.7 91.2 88.5 86.4 87.1 79.8 84.6 90.0 92.4 93.8 1994 94.9 96.2 96.3 89.8 87.4 85.1 81.4 82.2 83.6 88.0 89.6 92.1 1995 93.7 92.4 91.3 87.4 84.5 80.0 78.7 75.1 83.8 72.6 81.9 82.9 1996 81.3 80.5 78.9 73.5 68.8 66.3 62.0 60.0 61.8 67.2 69.4 70.2 1997 60.9 89.2 58.4 55.9 45.7 50.1 44.8 47.8 47.2 47.0 48.2 52.0 1998 63.8 64.1 66.9 60.1 51.7 59.2 55.7 57.9 54.8 53.3 60.2 59.7

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221

Ten-percent solar-to-fuel conversion with nonprecious materials  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...2013) Hydrogen, fuel cells, & infrastructure technologies program. Hydrogen production. Available at http://www1.eere.energy.gov/hydrogenandfuelcells/mypp/. Accessed April 30, 2014 . 10 Walter MG ( 2010 ) Solar water splitting cells...

Casandra R. Cox; Jungwoo Z. Lee; Daniel G. Nocera; Tonio Buonassisi

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

222

Percent of Commercial Natural Gas Deliveries in Nevada Represented by the  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1989 98.0 98.1 96.9 95.0 94.2 94.3 92.7 91.7 91.2 96.2 97.2 98.8 1990 99.1 99.4 97.7 97.0 96.4 96.7 95.7 95.0 95.1 96.8 98.4 99.1 1991 99.4 99.4 94.3 92.2 90.6 87.2 84.0 85.2 79.5 84.3 82.2 89.0 1992 90.6 89.5 88.3 87.2 83.7 84.0 84.8 81.4 82.7 88.9 88.5 95.4 1993 97.0 96.0 94.3 91.0 92.5 90.6 89.7 86.7 89.6 89.7 90.9 93.5 1994 93.8 89.3 86.1 81.3 80.1 79.6 76.4 74.5 76.4 73.9 76.7 81.4 1995 81.5 83.2 77.4 78.9 77.1 76.5 72.8 70.0 71.3 67.8 70.8 75.2 1996 79.1 80.5 78.2 76.4 74.2 73.0 69.2 66.7 67.6 64.0 70.8 74.9 1997 77.2 79.7 78.0 69.2 64.7 60.9 73.2 63.1 62.9 65.9 67.9 73.3 1998 76.5 79.1 75.1 72.9 71.0 70.0 65.2 55.2 55.5 62.6 63.6 69.9

223

Percent of Industrial Natural Gas Deliveries in New York Represented by the  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2001 13.3 14.8 13.4 11.3 10.4 10.0 9.2 10.2 4.2 4.8 15.5 9.7 2002 12.2 12.1 11.1 11.1 11.9 10.9 9.4 10.4 13.5 7.7 9.4 11.2 2003 11.5 11.6 12.1 10.9 10.9 12.3 10.5 12.0 8.0 5.8 10.5 10.1 2004 12.4 13.5 11.5 13.0 11.1 11.5 9.3 8.7 8.0 7.6 8.7 9.8 2005 17.0 16.9 17.4 14.3 10.2 11.1 15.9 16.5 14.3 11.9 12.4 14.8 2006 14.8 14.0 11.5 9.6 7.6 11.4 11.0 9.9 9.6 10.8 13.6 13.7 2007 13.5 18.5 12.7 13.3 10.1 7.8 10.2 9.0 11.0 9.7 11.2 15.1 2008 16.6 13.4 13.1 10.6 9.0 9.2 9.0 7.7 9.3 9.8 11.3 12.9 2009 14.7 15.7 13.5 12.0 10.0 9.4 7.5 8.5 8.0 8.2 9.6 15.0 2010 14.2 14.8 11.4 10.3 8.8 7.5 8.0 10.3 9.0 8.1 9.6 11.0

224

Percent of Industrial Natural Gas Deliveries in Iowa Represented by the  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2001 9.5 10.3 7.4 5.5 6.3 3.3 6.0 4.5 5.4 7.8 10.9 9.9 2002 8.5 5.3 8.3 6.1 4.9 5.4 5.4 5.2 5.6 10.4 12.8 10.2 2003 10.3 8.9 9.3 6.7 5.2 6.0 5.5 5.6 6.3 8.8 10.6 9.1 2004 10.4 8.9 8.8 5.7 4.9 5.3 4.0 4.8 5.1 8.4 16.2 12.9 2005 11.8 9.6 9.8 7.7 7.8 8.0 8.8 8.3 9.1 11.5 12.5 10.7 2006 10.3 9.5 9.6 6.1 7.4 6.4 5.7 6.7 7.1 9.4 11.9 10.2 2007 8.9 8.1 6.4 6.1 5.8 5.2 4.2 5.0 5.8 6.6 7.0 7.5 2008 7.9 6.5 5.8 5.0 6.0 5.0 4.6 5.0 5.1 7.2 9.1 10.2 2009 6.9 7.2 6.4 4.7 4.3 4.6 4.5 4.4 4.3 7.3 9.4 10.2 2010 9.3 7.6 5.7 4.9 4.2 4.3 4.4 5.5 5.6 5.0 5.5 6.5 2011 6.5 6.5 5.5 5.3 4.6 5.1 4.2 4.4 5.9 5.6 6.2 5.8

225

Percent of Commercial Natural Gas Deliveries in Kentucky Represented by the  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1989 97.1 96.6 96.4 94.9 91.0 89.2 89.5 88.2 89.8 90.7 94.4 97.0 1990 97.2 96.9 96.3 94.8 91.6 91.6 89.5 89.5 89.1 93.3 95.0 96.2 1991 97.1 95.7 94.7 89.8 86.4 85.5 87.5 88.0 91.1 91.5 95.7 95.5 1992 95.4 94.2 93.6 91.9 87.9 86.9 86.7 87.4 87.9 93.0 94.6 94.9 1993 91.6 91.6 95.3 93.5 92.4 93.5 89.9 81.6 88.1 88.5 94.5 95.4 1994 93.6 95.9 94.6 92.1 88.2 85.4 83.0 83.5 83.4 87.6 87.9 89.9 1995 90.8 91.2 89.9 86.3 87.4 80.6 76.5 81.5 81.7 85.7 91.0 92.7 1996 93.8 92.0 92.1 90.3 84.0 91.1 85.9 85.4 84.3 88.9 88.9 91.9 1997 92.5 91.5 90.3 89.0 86.3 88.6 84.0 80.3 84.9 89.9 89.9 91.3 1998 90.4 90.1 90.4 86.2 84.8 82.2 76.5 79.1 81.9 82.3 87.1 88.6

226

1-cc January2009.xls  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Chris Cassar at 202-586-5448, or at Christopher.Cassar@eia.doe.gov. Chris Cassar at 202-586-5448, or at Christopher.Cassar@eia.doe.gov. Monthly Flash Estimates of Data for: January 2009 Section 1. Commentary Electric Power Data Near normal temperatures prevailed across the contiguous United States in January 2009, marking the fifth straight month that temperatures have been close to average. However, regional differences in temperature occurred as the western United States experienced warmer than normal temperatures while the Northeast and the central United States experienced below average temperatures. Accordingly, heating degree days for the contiguous United States as a whole were 3.9 percent above the average for the month of January 2009 and 6.8 percent above a warmer January 2008. Even with the colder weather, retail sales of electricity decreased 1.8 percent compared to January 2008. This decrease in January

227

Percent of Commercial Natural Gas Deliveries in Florida Represented by the  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1989 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 1990 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 96.2 96.1 96.3 96.1 96.4 96.0 96.7 94.9 1991 96.5 97.0 97.5 98.1 97.8 97.8 97.9 97.8 98.2 97.8 96.8 96.8 1992 96.8 97.2 97.4 98.2 98.3 98.2 98.1 98.1 98.3 98.2 97.4 97.0 1993 97.2 97.2 97.2 98.3 98.4 98.4 98.3 98.3 98.3 98.2 97.3 97.0 1994 97.3 97.6 97.8 98.3 97.6 98.3 98.2 98.4 98.5 97.9 97.8 97.0 1995 96.7 97.3 97.5 97.9 97.9 98.1 98.2 97.8 98.1 97.8 97.4 96.7 1996 96.7 96.9 96.7 97.6 97.8 97.6 97.5 97.2 97.6 97.4 97.0 96.1 1997 97.1 97.4 97.7 98.3 98.3 98.2 97.7 97.9 97.8 97.5 96.4 96.1

228

Percent of Industrial Natural Gas Deliveries in Vermont Represented by the  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2001 95.2 80.1 79.2 79.2 69.2 67.8 65.6 67.7 70.7 73.3 76.0 79.0 2002 77.7 78.3 78.6 78.2 72.6 66.8 66.7 65.1 66.8 72.6 76.2 85.5 2003 87.3 100.0 100.0 75.7 74.2 72.4 75.0 67.7 70.4 73.2 77.4 80.1 2004 79.9 84.7 80.7 82.2 78.6 73.8 70.0 68.3 69.2 76.4 82.1 83.7 2005 83.6 86.4 82.6 78.0 74.4 71.5 72.1 83.9 94.3 82.4 75.7 96.4 2006 93.0 87.6 82.4 77.2 73.3 72.9 71.7 69.7 71.5 76.3 75.1 79.5 2007 83.0 84.1 81.8 76.2 72.2 71.7 71.4 71.2 73.9 76.6 78.7 82.2 2008 81.0 84.1 83.3 78.8 76.0 76.0 76.9 76.1 74.1 77.7 80.2 83.2 2009 82.6 85.8 77.5 76.6 74.2 73.8 73.8 72.4 72.8 77.4 76.0 81.5 2010 81.6 78.8 78.4 75.2 73.0 74.0 74.2 73.8 73.0 76.3 77.3 82.7

229

Percent of Industrial Natural Gas Deliveries in Alaska Represented by the  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2001 99.6 99.6 99.6 99.7 97.1 92.7 90.5 89.6 94.4 94.9 99.3 99.3 2002 99.3 99.2 99.2 99.3 80.9 79.0 78.8 78.4 86.9 99.4 96.3 99.6 2003 97.3 98.3 81.5 78.0 62.0 62.8 61.5 54.7 55.2 70.5 100.0 95.4 2004 94.3 77.2 72.2 65.1 68.5 66.1 60.9 54.9 55.5 58.7 76.9 73.3 2005 76.0 75.0 71.9 66.3 71.4 64.0 61.8 63.1 67.6 76.6 70.9 69.0 2006 66.8 63.2 71.2 60.6 60.5 63.6 55.1 60.2 64.8 61.6 78.2 70.2 2007 77.8 76.7 78.2 73.6 78.3 72.5 59.1 59.3 73.8 63.5 71.8 68.8 2008 100.0 100.0 83.8 82.2 57.2 60.9 54.5 72.1 75.9 93.1 83.1 100.0 2009 77.2 77.4 82.7 70.6 44.2 54.8 55.5 78.9 84.3 79.0 82.4 83.1

230

Percent of Commercial Natural Gas Deliveries in Oregon Represented by the  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1989 99.1 99.2 98.7 98.3 97.6 97.6 97.0 97.2 97.4 96.7 97.3 98.0 1990 98.2 98.6 98.4 97.4 97.4 97.5 96.6 96.6 96.9 95.6 96.5 98.1 1991 98.7 98.3 97.8 97.7 97.5 98.0 97.3 97.2 97.2 95.9 97.6 98.0 1992 98.6 98.4 97.4 97.7 97.7 97.8 97.9 96.7 97.8 94.6 97.4 98.4 1993 98.6 99.0 98.5 98.0 97.6 97.8 97.6 97.5 97.3 93.6 96.5 98.2 1994 98.5 98.6 98.3 97.4 97.6 97.7 98.1 97.7 97.9 97.0 97.8 98.6 1995 98.5 98.5 98.2 98.2 97.9 97.8 98.1 97.9 98.1 96.7 97.9 98.4 1996 98.4 98.8 98.6 98.1 98.2 98.3 98.1 98.0 97.6 97.0 98.3 98.6 1997 98.8 98.9 98.8 98.5 98.5 98.1 98.3 98.3 98.0 97.5 98.4 98.4 1998 99.3 99.2 99.1 98.9 98.8 99.0 98.9 98.6 98.7 98.4 99.0 99.1

231

Percent of Industrial Natural Gas Deliveries in Utah Represented by the  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2001 11.9 9.2 10.7 10.1 9.5 9.5 10.1 11.5 9.4 9.2 11.0 13.8 2002 14.0 13.8 12.6 15.8 13.0 13.4 12.1 13.6 13.5 12.8 15.0 13.7 2003 14.5 14.6 13.1 14.9 14.1 13.2 11.8 12.7 13.8 13.9 13.2 13.1 2004 13.8 15.2 13.3 14.6 12.7 12.7 18.4 46.5 26.9 24.3 23.4 23.8 2005 18.4 18.6 18.4 17.7 18.6 21.3 20.0 21.2 21.3 21.5 18.3 19.9 2006 22.3 23.2 22.5 24.0 24.0 24.7 24.2 13.9 13.4 15.3 15.8 16.0 2007 14.4 13.6 14.4 14.6 13.3 12.7 14.5 14.9 13.8 13.4 14.2 14.8 2008 13.5 13.1 13.1 12.4 12.7 12.8 13.2 12.1 11.6 12.0 12.7 12.3 2009 13.3 10.3 12.0 9.8 11.7 12.8 11.6 13.4 14.0 13.1 12.0 12.5 2010 12.0 9.8 10.9 11.7 12.0 13.3 13.2 12.6 13.4 12.8 11.9 12.6

232

Percent of Industrial Natural Gas Deliveries in Arizona Represented by the  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2001 33.6 44.6 45.1 46.7 45.0 48.3 48.5 41.4 43.8 54.6 54.8 55.3 2002 55.5 54.5 47.0 46.9 41.4 41.7 36.1 34.9 36.7 33.1 32.9 33.0 2003 37.3 38.2 36.6 36.4 36.4 35.7 37.7 38.8 44.8 45.3 45.3 48.8 2004 58.9 65.1 52.4 51.8 51.2 55.8 50.6 52.0 51.7 53.3 55.4 57.8 2005 47.4 48.2 43.8 47.9 46.2 40.8 40.9 38.2 40.1 40.3 42.7 43.5 2006 37.1 41.1 37.8 37.6 36.4 37.6 38.3 35.9 37.9 39.7 37.1 37.6 2007 36.3 35.8 34.0 35.0 32.8 32.4 26.5 26.4 24.4 28.9 29.7 30.4 2008 32.5 30.5 30.2 27.5 28.3 30.7 25.9 25.0 28.6 30.6 31.5 31.3 2009 32.5 34.6 31.8 30.4 29.8 28.5 25.9 23.5 24.4 27.1 28.8 28.4 2010 28.6 28.5 25.4 26.7 21.9 22.5 21.3 21.4 22.8 24.5 29.0 27.8

233

Percent of Commercial Natural Gas Deliveries in Montana Represented by the  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1989 98.3 98.9 98.8 98.6 97.4 96.8 96.4 96.3 96.3 97.5 97.9 98.1 1990 97.9 97.8 97.6 98.6 96.9 98.4 96.3 95.8 93.3 96.9 97.6 99.6 1991 98.5 98.1 98.0 97.7 97.8 96.9 95.8 95.8 95.8 96.3 96.5 97.2 1992 97.1 98.0 96.7 96.5 96.6 94.9 95.4 96.8 90.6 92.0 92.8 94.6 1993 95.4 94.0 94.9 93.9 94.9 91.1 91.2 91.2 87.5 88.8 91.5 93.5 1994 92.7 93.0 92.7 91.8 91.9 89.6 88.7 87.8 87.5 89.0 91.2 93.1 1995 93.0 92.5 92.5 91.9 92.0 90.1 89.6 88.9 88.2 88.8 91.8 91.9 1996 92.2 93.7 91.9 92.6 90.8 90.8 87.8 87.2 86.1 87.5 91.6 92.7 1997 93.5 93.1 92.0 91.3 90.4 88.9 90.6 87.6 85.8 88.2 90.6 92.3 1998 86.4 80.5 80.5 76.4 72.1 66.7 67.7 68.6 64.2 70.5 74.9 77.0

234

Percent of Commercial Natural Gas Deliveries in Georgia Represented by the  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1989 96.6 93.6 89.7 88.2 85.3 81.7 80.7 80.2 83.0 86.4 89.4 96.8 1990 96.5 90.3 88.7 86.9 82.0 80.9 80.1 82.5 78.9 84.3 87.9 94.1 1991 92.1 90.7 88.8 84.7 81.6 79.7 79.6 80.3 78.8 82.8 90.7 92.5 1992 90.8 90.6 89.3 88.2 85.0 82.7 79.7 83.3 83.4 84.6 87.9 92.9 1993 91.5 92.9 94.6 90.9 86.5 83.0 85.4 84.9 85.6 86.0 91.2 93.0 1994 97.0 94.9 92.4 90.3 89.3 86.8 87.9 89.0 86.1 88.6 91.6 92.6 1995 96.1 97.1 93.3 90.7 89.7 88.4 87.4 88.4 87.9 91.1 94.8 97.2 1996 97.7 98.1 96.9 94.9 92.2 89.0 88.7 88.1 86.6 90.6 92.2 93.2 1997 94.3 93.5 90.0 88.5 85.4 84.3 81.0 81.9 82.9 85.6 88.6 91.6 1998 90.7 91.3 88.8 86.3 83.7 80.9 71.5 71.5 73.6 74.6 77.4 79.2

235

Percent of Commercial Natural Gas Deliveries in Arkansas Represented by the  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1989 95.3 95.6 95.9 94.3 91.3 91.5 87.2 86.2 88.2 87.5 90.7 93.4 1990 95.8 94.8 93.7 93.2 90.7 88.8 88.4 86.9 87.4 86.8 90.6 91.5 1991 93.8 94.7 96.1 91.0 87.7 85.1 84.8 85.5 85.9 86.5 90.5 92.3 1992 93.0 94.7 91.3 92.7 88.4 87.0 85.9 85.4 86.4 87.6 88.7 90.8 1993 92.5 93.0 92.8 91.8 87.6 84.2 85.9 84.7 85.7 87.8 92.7 98.7 1994 93.9 95.9 95.4 94.8 91.2 91.7 94.2 94.3 96.6 95.3 96.4 97.4 1995 97.2 98.0 96.3 95.1 93.3 93.1 91.5 93.4 92.3 91.8 92.6 100.0 1996 96.4 97.0 95.6 96.3 92.4 94.2 88.5 91.6 92.7 90.2 94.1 95.7 1997 96.3 96.8 95.2 93.8 91.8 91.1 90.3 91.8 91.3 92.6 90.4 95.9 1998 95.5 95.4 94.0 93.0 88.8 86.8 86.1 84.9 82.4 81.5 86.1 89.0

236

Using image processing to measure tree crown diameters and estimate percent crown closure  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. 92 15739. 78 12458. 89 14827. 1D 34621. 61 29827. 54 31822. 85 2'l709. 21 17220. 59 16172. 18 16078. 61 15824. 26 28936. 74 26003. 63 26839. 35 24482. 40 16616. 60 15824. 26 26422. 72 zszee. es 14828. 65 14340. 70 23922. 95 22465. 35...

Gabriel, Darren Kyle

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

237

Ten-percent solar-to-fuel conversion with nonprecious materials  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

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2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

238

Percent of Industrial Natural Gas Deliveries in Rhode Island Represented by  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2001 41.4 29.5 26.1 37.6 29.0 29.3 26.0 26.2 22.4 26.8 29.3 13.6 2002 27.3 27.3 27.3 27.3 27.3 27.3 27.3 27.3 27.3 27.3 27.3 27.3 2003 15.7 18.9 21.5 19.6 26.7 11.7 16.8 18.8 18.6 22.1 18.5 22.3 2004 13.9 16.7 14.5 16.8 21.1 11.7 16.7 15.3 16.0 19.4 10.5 23.0 2005 17.8 14.7 15.9 11.0 16.3 16.5 12.9 13.8 16.3 13.2 16.5 19.7 2006 18.6 18.7 16.4 15.0 12.5 13.3 8.8 10.5 11.4 12.8 10.5 15.7 2007 13.0 19.0 15.1 12.7 10.1 14.3 8.0 6.3 17.1 8.3 9.0 10.9 2008 19.9 14.2 16.6 7.2 8.2 9.5 10.7 7.0 13.2 8.2 15.2 23.1 2009 12.2 14.7 8.0 12.3 9.5 7.8 6.7 9.5 10.8 3.5 8.6 7.0 2010 7.3 6.2 5.2 3.8 3.8 6.3 5.5 4.2 5.7 9.3 7.7 10.4

239

Percent of Commercial Natural Gas Deliveries in Rhode Island Represented by  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1989 100.0 100.0 100.0 87.1 83.9 47.7 48.9 40.4 44.6 82.7 100.0 100.0 1990 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 75.5 80.2 97.3 91.1 1991 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 1992 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 1993 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 1994 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 1995 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 1996 100.0 99.3 98.4 98.2 97.8 92.0 84.1 86.8 49.9 66.5 87.3 89.1 1997 89.6 91.7 82.2 88.5 80.8 72.4 71.1 67.9 68.7 71.1 80.7 64.1

240

Percent of Industrial Natural Gas Deliveries in Nevada Represented by the  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2001 32.2 25.0 16.8 19.7 13.2 12.9 38.9 31.5 31.7 41.7 48.4 68.2 2002 58.3 44.3 59.1 37.8 44.2 40.0 17.5 18.2 19.5 21.2 23.0 28.8 2003 25.6 28.9 20.3 22.8 14.8 13.2 13.6 11.9 12.5 15.8 23.9 21.7 2004 21.4 23.6 14.9 15.1 12.4 11.3 10.7 11.5 13.4 15.9 20.9 22.6 2005 24.3 25.3 17.8 18.4 14.8 14.1 9.6 12.3 13.6 15.9 18.3 19.5 2006 20.9 21.8 22.3 14.7 14.8 11.9 11.7 10.6 11.5 16.9 16.6 23.7 2007 22.1 26.8 17.9 16.6 14.8 11.6 11.3 10.2 10.6 13.6 20.4 25.3 2008 27.5 26.4 21.5 17.5 17.4 9.7 10.4 9.2 8.1 11.3 23.4 26.0 2009 21.4 23.7 19.2 19.9 13.9 11.5 8.7 9.4 11.2 16.2 20.4 26.7 2010 23.5 26.8 23.1 19.6 18.0 13.4 12.7 11.0 10.9 13.6 22.0 22.3

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "1 percent compared" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Comparative Guide to DCE Marketing Services Tiers All live CME courses accredited by HMS DCE receive Base Marketing Services.1 These newly streamlined  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Comparative Guide to DCE Marketing Services Tiers All live CME courses accredited by HMS DCE receive Base Marketing Services.1 These newly streamlined services offer Course Directors and Administrators a standardized, comprehensive and economical solution for email and print marketing. Strategic

Paulsson, Johan

242

Percent of Commercial Natural Gas Deliveries in Alaska Represented by the  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1989 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 1990 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 1991 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 1992 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 1993 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 1994 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 1995 100.0 83.9 83.2 83.8 81.9 76.4 72.0 71.3 72.1 69.2 72.9 77.9 1996 73.4 78.9 76.0 62.5 59.1 55.0 51.2 53.1 50.7 54.2 58.2 61.8 1997 60.3 59.0 57.7 57.1 54.8 50.5 49.9 45.0 49.9 52.2 51.9 54.3

243

Slide 1  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

0 0 Surveillance and Maintenance Report for the LM Rocky Flats Site 2 Surface Water Monitoring and Operations Third Quarter 2010 Third Quarter 2010 3 Pond Operations - Third Quarter 2010  Terminal Pond Discharges: * Pond C-2: July 31 through August 12, 2010, 7.0 MG  Transfers: * A-3 to A-4: intermittently during the quarter; total of 3.0 MG  Pond Levels: * As of October 1, 2010, Ponds A-3, A-4, B-5, and C-2 and the Landfill Pond were holding approximately 15.3 MG (15.4 percent of capacity) December 31, 2010, Pond Levels * Landfill (21.5 percent) * A-3 (0.0 percent) * A-4 (22.6 percent) * B-5 (23.8 percent) * C-2 (2.4 percent) 4 Hydrologic Data - Third Quarter 2010  Precipitation * 2.4 inches total precipitation * 59 percent of WY 1993-2009 average  Flow rates

244

Percent of Commercial Natural Gas Deliveries in Utah Represented by the  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1989 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 1990 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 1991 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 1992 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 1993 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 1994 83.8 85.2 82.9 82.4 77.7 77.9 76.4 79.0 79.8 83.7 83.8 85.9 1995 85.5 85.5 82.5 83.1 80.0 79.3 73.9 71.3 75.2 79.4 80.2 82.8 1996 84.0 85.6 82.8 82.3 77.7 72.9 73.3 71.9 78.4 79.5 81.2 84.4 1997 86.2 87.1 82.9 83.7 78.8 76.9 72.7 71.6 74.7 80.1 83.0 86.4

245

State and National Wind Resource Potential 30 Percent Capacity Factor at 80 Meters  

Wind Powering America (EERE)

Note - 50% exclusions are not cumulative. If an area is non-ridgecrest forest on FS land, it is just excluded at the 50% level one time. Note - 50% exclusions are not cumulative. If an area is non-ridgecrest forest on FS land, it is just excluded at the 50% level one time. 1) Exclude areas of slope > 20% Derived from 90 m national elevation dataset. 6) 100% exclude 3 km surrounding criteria 2-5 (except water) Merged datasets and buffer 3 km 5) 100% exclusion of airfields, urban, wetland and water areas. USGS North America Land Use Land Cover (LULC), version 2.0, 1993; ESRI airports and airfields (2006); U.S. Census Urbanized Areas (2000 and 2003) 10) 50% exclusion of non-ridgecrest forest Ridge-crest areas defined using a terrain definition script, overlaid with USGS LULC data screened for the forest categories. Other Criteria 8) 50% exclusion of remaining Dept. of Defense lands except

246

A combined cycle designed to achieve greater than 60 percent efficiency  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In cooperation with the US Department of Energy`s Morgantown Energy Technology Center, Westinghouse is working on Phase 2 of an 8-year Advanced Turbine Systems Program to develop the technologies required to provide a significant increase in natural gas-fired combined cycle power generation plant efficiency. In this paper, the technologies required to yield an energy conversion efficiency greater than the Advanced Turbine Systems Program target value of 60% are discussed. The goal of 60% efficiency is achievable through an improvement in operating process parameters for both the combustion turbine and steam turbine, raising the rotor inlet temperature to 2,600 F (1,427 C), incorporation of advanced cooling techniques in the combustion turbine expander, and utilization of other cycle enhancements obtainable through greater integration between the combustion turbine and steam turbine.

Briesch, M.S.; Bannister, R.L.; Diakunchak, I.S.; Huber, D.J. [Westinghouse Electric Corp., Orlando, FL (United States)

1995-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

247

Compare Activities by Number of Computers  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Number of Computers Number of Computers Compare Activities by ... Number of Computers Office buildings contained the most computers per square foot, followed by education and outpatient health care buildings. Education buildings were the only type with more than one computer per employee. Religious worship and food sales buildings had the fewest computers per square foot. Percent of All Computers by Building Type Figure showing percent of all computers by building type. If you need assistance viewing this page, please call 202-586-8800. Computer Data by Building Type Number of Buildings (thousand) Total Floorspace (million square feet) Number of Employees (thousand) Total Computers (thousand) Computers per Million Square Feet Computers per Thousand Employees All Buildings 4,657

248

Compare All CBECS Activities: Electricity Generation  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

By Electricity Generation By Electricity Generation Compare Activities by ... Electricity Generation Capability For commercial buildings as a whole, approximately 8 percent of buildings had the capability to generate electricity, and only 4 percent of buildings actually generated any electricity. Most all buildings generated electricity only for the purpose of emergency back-up. Inpatient health care and public order and safety buildings were much more likely to have the capability to generate electricity than other building types. Over half of all inpatient health care buildings and about one-third of public order and safety buildings actually used this capability. Electricity Generation Capability and Use by Building Type Top Specific questions may be directed to: Joelle Michaels

249

Comparative ranking of 0. 1-10 MW/sub e/ solar thermal electric power systems. Volume II. Supporting data. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report is part of a two-volume set summarizing the results of a comparative ranking of generic solar thermal concepts designed specifically for electric power generation. The original objective of the study was to project the mid-1990 cost and performance of selected generic solar thermal electric power systems for utility applications and to rank these systems by criteria that reflect their future commercial acceptance. This study considered plants with rated capacities of 1-10 MW/sub e/, operating over a range of capacity factors from the no-storage case to 0.7 and above. Later, the study was extended to include systems with capacities from 0.1 to 1 MW/sub e/, a range that is attractive to industrial and other nonutility applications. Volume I summarizes the results for the full range of capacities from 0.1 to 1.0 MW/sub e/. Volume II presents data on the performance and cost and ranking methodology.

Thornton, J.P.; Brown, K.C.; Finegold, J.G.; Gresham, J.B.; Herlevich, F.A.; Kriz, T.A.

1980-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

250

Bloom, fruit development, and embryo development of peaches in a mild-winter region, and use of percent dry weight of ovule as a maturity index  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

persica (L.) Batsch] were examined, and percent dry weight of ovule (PDO) was studied as an embryo maturity index for stratification-germination in the breeding program. Differences in bloom times of 5 bloom period (BP) reference cultisms resulted...

Bacon, Terry A

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

251

Comparative Genomics Analysis and Phenotypic Characterization of Shewanella putrefaciens W3-18-1: Anaerobic Respiration, Bacterial Microcompartments, and Lateral Flagella  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Respiratory versatility and psychrophily are the hallmarks of Shewanella. The ability to utilize a wide range of electron acceptors for respiration is due to the large number of c-type cytochrome genes present in the genome of Shewanella strains. More recently the dissimilatory metal reduction of Shewanella species has been extensively and intensively studied for potential applications in the bioremediation of radioactive wastes of groundwater and subsurface environments. Multiple Shewanella genome sequences are now available in the public databases (Fredrickson et al., 2008). Most of the sequenced Shewanella strains were isolated from marine environments and this genus was believed to be of marine origin (Hau and Gralnick, 2007). However, the well-characterized model strain, S. oneidensis MR-1, was isolated from the freshwater lake sediment of Lake Oneida, New York (Myers and Nealson, 1988) and similar bacteria have also been isolated from other freshwater environments (Venkateswaran et al., 1999). Here we comparatively analyzed the genome sequence and physiological characteristics of S. putrefaciens W3-18-1 and S. oneidensis MR-1, isolated from the marine and freshwater lake sediments, respectively. The anaerobic respirations, carbon source utilization, and cell motility have been experimentally investigated. Large scale horizontal gene transfers have been revealed and the genetic divergence between these two strains was considered to be critical to the bacterial adaptation to specific habitats, freshwater or marine sediments.

Qiu, D.; Tu, Q.; He, Zhili; Zhou, Jizhong

2010-05-17T23:59:59.000Z

252

1  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

9 9 7 2 1 9 7 4 1 9 7 6 1 9 7 8 1 9 8 0 1 9 8 2 1 9 8 4 1 9 8 6 1 9 8 8 1 9 9 0 1 9 9 2 1 9 9 4 1 9 9 6 0 2 4 6 8 10 12 14 Percent 7. Net Imports as a Percentage of Total Consumption of Natural Gas, 1972-1996 Figure Sources: 1972-1975: Bureau of Mines, Minerals Yearbook, "Natural Gas" chapter. 1976-1978: Energy Information Administration (EIA), Energy Data Reports, Natural Gas Annual. 1979: EIA, Natural Gas Production 1979. 1980-1989: EIA, Form EIA-176, "Annual Report of Natural and Supplemental Gas Supply and Disposition"; Form EIA-759, "Monthly Power Plant Report"; and Form FPC-14, "Annual Report for Importers and Exporters of Natural Gas"; 1990: EIA, Form EIA-176, Form EIA-759, Form FPC-14, and Form EIA-64A, "Annual Report of the Origin of Natural Gas Liquids Production"; 1991-1994: EIA, Form EIA-176, Form EIA-759,

253

Organizations around the world lose an estimated five percent of their annual revenues to fraud, according to a survey of fraud experts conducted by the Association of Certified  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Organizations around the world lose an estimated five percent of their annual revenues to fraud, according to a survey of fraud experts conducted by the Association of Certified Fraud Examiners (ACFE, the University's total expense for scholarships and fellowships was $110,067,000. Fraud cost includes reported

Sanders, Seth

254

www.global.unam.mx www.unam.mx UNAM is home to more than 45 research institutes, centers and university programs; 50 percent of the  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and university programs; 50 percent of the research carried out in Mexico is generated by our institution. Our researchers cover the spectrum of disciplines, including energy, engineering, environmental sciences, genomic sciences, medicine, nanotechnologies, sustainable development, and water. Nationwide, one out of every 3

Petriu, Emil M.

255

7 September 2011 Despite the lagging U.S. economy, salaries for aggregated geoscience-related occupations increased by 1.1 percent between  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. See AGI's 2011 Status of the Geoscience Workforce report, Appendix A for full explanation,320), petroleum engineers ($127,970), and engineering managers ($125,900), and geoscientists ($93,380). Mean Petroleum Engineers Geoscientists Atmospheric and Space Scientists Mining and Geological Engineers

Kammer, Thomas

256

Texas A&M Transportation Institute | 2012 Page | 1 City of Mesquite, Texas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

reporting two or more races, percent, 2010 3.1% 2.9% Persons of Hispanic or Latino Origin, percent, 2010 (b) 31.6% 23.7% White persons not Hispanic, percent, 2010 41.6% 36.2% Foreign born persons, percent, 2006 units in multi-unit structures, percent, 2006-2010 26.1% 10.2% Median household income 2006-2010 $51

257

Using LiDAR and normalized difference vegetation index to remotely determine LAI and percent canopy cover at varying scales  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

: (1) Develop scanning LiDAR and multispectral imagery methods to estimate PCC and LAI over both hardwood and coniferous forests; (2) investigate whether a LiDAR and normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI) data fusion through linear regression...

Griffin, Alicia Marie Rutledge

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

258

Comparative bioaccumulation of trace elements between Nautilus pompilius and N.1 macromphalus (Cephalopoda: Nautiloidea) from Vanuatu and New-Caledonia2  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

clearly highlighted that the digestive gland32 played a key role in the bioaccumulation and storage of Ag are exposed to trace elements that are present in their diet and dissolved in49 seawater. This double exposure bioavailability of53 the metal in diet and seawater (Rainbow and Wang, 2001). Comparative analysis of trace54

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

259

Fischer-Tropsch Synthesis: Influence of CO Conversion on Selectivities H2/CO Usage Ratios and Catalyst Stability for a 0.27 percent Ru 25 percent Co/Al2O3 using a Slurry Phase Reactor  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The effect of CO conversion on hydrocarbon selectivities (i.e., CH{sub 4}, C{sub 5+}, olefin and paraffin), H{sub 2}/CO usage ratios, CO{sub 2} selectivity, and catalyst stability over a wide range of CO conversion (12-94%) on 0.27%Ru-25%Co/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} catalyst was studied under the conditions of 220 C, 1.5 MPa, H{sub 2}/CO feed ratio of 2.1 and gas space velocities of 0.3-15 NL/g-cat/h in a 1-L continuously stirred tank reactor (CSTR). Catalyst samples were withdrawn from the CSTR at different CO conversion levels, and Co phases (Co, CoO) in the slurry samples were characterized by XANES, and in the case of the fresh catalysts, EXAFS as well. Ru was responsible for increasing the extent of Co reduction, thus boosting the active site density. At 1%Ru loading, EXAFS indicates that coordination of Ru at the atomic level was virtually solely with Co. It was found that the selectivities to CH{sub 4}, C{sub 5+}, and CO{sub 2} on the Co catalyst are functions of CO conversion. At high CO conversions, i.e. above 80%, CH{sub 4} selectivity experienced a change in the trend, and began to increase, and CO{sub 2} selectivity experienced a rapid increase. H{sub 2}/CO usage ratio and olefin content were found to decrease with increasing CO conversion in the range of 12-94%. The observed results are consistent with water reoxidation of Co during FTS at high conversion. XANES spectroscopy of used catalyst samples displayed spectra consistent with the presence of more CoO at higher CO conversion levels.

W Ma; G Jacobs; Y Ji; T Bhatelia; D Bukur; S Khalid; B Davis

2011-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

260

1  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Vanadium catalysts break down Vanadium catalysts break down biomass for fuels March 26, 2012 Vanadium catalysts break down biomass into useful components Due to diminishing petroleum reserves, non-food biomass (lignocellulose) is an attractive alternative as a feedstock for the production of renewable chemicals and fuels. The Department of Energy estimates the United States could produce as much as 1.3 billion tons per year of lignocellulose, enough to replace 30 percent of the current U.S. petroleum consumption. - 2 - Transforming lignin efficiently is a challenge However, efficient transformation of lignin, an integral and problematic component of lignocellulose, into useful compounds is a major challenge, primarily because lignin is a randomized aromatic polymer that is resistant to decomposition.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "1 percent compared" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

1  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Variations of Ozonosphere: Physical Model Variations of Ozonosphere: Physical Model and Forecast into XXI Century V. V. Zuev Institute of Atmospheric Optics Russian Academy of Sciences Tomsk, Russia Introduction Because of its ability to effectively absorb the shortwave portion of solar ultraviolet (UV) radiation, ozonosphere plays an important role in determining the radiation budget of the atmosphere. Therefore, general circulation model (GCM) predictions of climate change cannot be made correctly without adequate treatment of real tendencies in ozonosphere behavior. The widely accepted anthropogenic theory of ozonosphere destruction fails to completely explain present-day tendencies. Current Behavior of Ozonosphere Figure 1 shows the global distribution of total ozone trends (in percent per decade), calculated from EP/

262

February 2007 www.stsc.hill.af.mil 29 In Europe, 85 percent of IT sector compa-  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

/IEC 12207 and/or ISO 9001:2000 and ISO/IEC 15504 process assessment becomes pos- sible with a minimum impact and use the concepts, processes, and practices proposed by the ISO's international software engineering standards. At the Brisbane meeting of ISO/IEC JTC1/SC7 in 2004, Canada raised the issue of small enterprises

Québec, Université du

263

Oxygen enriched combustion system performance study. Phase 2: 100 percent oxygen enriched combustion in regenerative glass melters, Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The field test project described in this report was conducted to evaluate the energy and environmental performance of 100% oxygen enriched combustion (100% OEC) in regenerative glass melters. Additional objectives were to determine other impacts of 100% OEC on melter operation and glass quality, and to verify on a commercial scale that an on-site Pressure Swing Adsorption oxygen plant can reliably supply oxygen for glass melting with low electrical power consumption. The tests constituted Phase 2 of a cooperative project between the United States Department of Energy, and Praxair, Inc. Phase 1 of the project involved market and technical feasibility assessments of oxygen enriched combustion for a range of high temperature industrial heating applications. An assessment of oxygen supply options for these applications was also performed during Phase 1, which included performance evaluation of a pilot scale 1 ton per day PSA oxygen plant. Two regenerative container glass melters were converted to 100% OEC operation and served as host sites for Phase 2. A 75 ton per day end-fired melter at Carr-Lowrey Glass Company in Baltimore, Maryland, was temporarily converted to 100% OEC in mid- 1990. A 350 tpd cross-fired melter at Gallo Glass Company in Modesto, California was rebuilt for permanent commercial operation with 100% OEC in mid-1991. Initially, both of these melters were supplied with oxygen from liquid storage. Subsequently, in late 1992, a Pressure Swing Adsorption oxygen plant was installed at Gallo to supply oxygen for 100% OEC glass melting. The particular PSA plant design used at Gallo achieves maximum efficiency by cycling the adsorbent beds between pressurized and evacuated states, and is therefore referred to as a Vacuum/Pressure Swing Adsorption (VPSA) plant.

Tuson, G.B.; Kobayashi, H.; Campbell, M.J.

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

264

Compare All CBECS Activities: Natural Gas Use  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Natural Gas Use Natural Gas Use Compare Activities by ... Natural Gas Use Total Natural Gas Consumption by Building Type Commercial buildings in the U.S. used a total of approximately 2.0 trillion cubic feet of natural gas in 1999. Natural gas use was not dominated by any single activity, with seven activities each accounting for between 9 and 13 percent of all commercial natural gas use. Figure showing total natural gas consumption by building type. If you need assistance viewing this page, please call 202-586-8800. Natural Gas Consumption per Building by Building Type Inpatient health care buildings used by far the most natural gas per building. Figure showing natural gas consumption per building by building type. If you need assistance viewing this page, please call 202-586-8800.

265

Dissimilar-weld failure analysis and development. Comparative behavior of similar and dissimilar welds. Final report. [Welds of 2-1/4Cr-1Mo to 2-1/4Cr-1Mo using 2-1/4Cr-1Mo filler material; and austenitic to ferritic steel welds made by fusion welding alloy-800H to 2-1/4Cr-1Mo using nickel base filler metal ERNiCr-3  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The 593/sup 0/C (1100/sup 0/F) stress rupture behavior of similar metal welds (SMWs) and dissimilar metal welds (DMWs) was investigated under cyclic load and cyclic temperature conditions to provide insight into the question, ''Why do DMWs fail sooner than SMWs in the fossil fuel boilers.'' The weld joints of interest were an all ferritic steel SMW made by fusion welding 2-1/4Cr-1Mo to 2-1/4Cr-1Mo using 2-1/4Cr-1Mo filler metal and an austenitic to ferritic steel DMW made by fusion welding Alloy-800H to 2-1/4Cr-1Mo using a nickel base filler metal ERNiCr-3. The stress rupture behavior obtained on cross weld specimens was similar for both types of welds with only a 20% reduction in rupture life for the DMW. For rupture times less than 1500 hours, failures occurred in the 2-1/4Cr-1Mo base metal whereas, for rupture times greater than 1500 hours, failures occurred in the 2-1/4Cr-1Mo heat affected zone (HAZ). The HAZ failures exhibited a more brittle appearance than the base metal failures for both types of welds and it appears that the life of both joints was limited by the stress rupture properties of the HAZ. These results support the hypothesis that increased residual stresses due to abrupt changes in hardness (strength) of metals involved are the major contributors to the reduction in life of DMWs as compared to SMWs. 10 refs., 15 figs., 7 tabs.

Busboom, H.; Ring, P.J.

1986-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

266

Identification of a Novel Homozygous Deletion Region at 6q23.1 in Medulloblastomas Using High-Resolution Array Comparative Genomic Hybridization Analysis  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...homozygous deletion at 6q23.1 flanked by markers SHGC-14149 (6q22.33) and SHGC-110551 (6q23.1). Quantitative reverse transcription-PCR...and flanked by the sequence-tagged site markers SHGC-13149 and SHGC-110551. B, quantitative reverse...

Angela B.Y. Hui; Hirokuni Takano; Kwok-Wai Lo; Wen-Lin Kuo; Cleo N.Y. Lam; Carol Y.K. Tong; Qing Chang; Joe W. Gray; Ho-Keung Ng

2005-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

267

Test for Modeling Windows in DOE 2.1E for Comparing the Window Library with the Shading Coefficient Method for a Single-Family Residence in Texas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. The window simulation tests are performed using single-pane, double-pane, and low-e glass on two standard DOE 2.1E single-family house models: 1) the model which has the R-value for wall, roof and floor according to 2000 IECC (Quick Wall), and 2) the model...

Kim, S.; Haberl, J. S.

2008-07-18T23:59:59.000Z

268

Differential comparator cirucit  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A differential comparator circuit for an Analog-to-Digital Converter (ADC) or other application includes a plurality of differential comparators and a plurality of offset voltage generators. Each comparator includes first and second differentially connected transistor pairs having equal and opposite voltage offsets. First and second offset control transistors are connected in series with the transistor pairs respectively. The offset voltage generators generate offset voltages corresponding to reference voltages which are compared with a differential input voltage by the comparators. Each offset voltage is applied to the offset control transistors of at least one comparator to set the overall voltage offset of the comparator to a value corresponding to the respective reference voltage. The number of offset voltage generators required in an ADC application can be reduced by a factor of approximately two by applying the offset voltage from each offset voltage generator to two comparators with opposite logical sense such that positive and negative offset voltages are produced by each offset voltage generator.

Hickling, Ronald M. (Simi Valley, CA)

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

269

REVIEW REPORT: BUILDING C-400 THERMAL TREATMENT 90 PERCENT REMEDIAL DESIGN REPORT AND SITE INVESTIGATION, PGDP, PADUCAH, KENTUCKY  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

On 9 April 2007, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Headquarters, Office of Soil and Groundwater Remediation (EM-22) initiated an Independent Technical Review (ITR) of the 90% Remedial Design Report (RDR) and Site Investigation (RDSI) for thermal treatment of trichloroethylene (TCE) in the soil and groundwater in the vicinity of Building C-400 at the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PGDP). The general ITR goals were to assess the technical adequacy of the 90% RDSI and provide recommendations sufficient for DOE to determine if modifications are warranted pertaining to the design, schedule, or cost of implementing the proposed design. The ultimate goal of the effort was to assist the DOE Paducah/Portsmouth Project Office (PPPO) and their contractor team in ''removing'' the TCE source zone located near the C-400 Building. This report provides the ITR findings and recommendations and supporting evaluations as needed to facilitate use of the recommendations. The ITR team supports the remedial action objective (RAO) at C-400 to reduce the TCE source area via subsurface Electrical Resistance Heating (ERH). Further, the ITR team commends PPPO, their contractor team, regulators, and stakeholders for the significant efforts taken in preparing the 90% RDR. To maximize TCE removal at the target source area, several themes emerge from the review which the ITR team believes should be considered and addressed before implementing the thermal treatment. These themes include the need for: (1) Accurate and site-specific models as the basis to verify the ERH design for full-scale implementation for this challenging hydrogeologic setting; (2) Flexible project implementation and operation to allow the project team to respond to observations and data collected during construction and operation; (3) Defensible performance metrics and monitoring, appropriate for ERH, to ensure sufficient and efficient clean-up; and (4) Comprehensive (creative and diverse) contingencies to address the potential for system underperformance, and other unforeseen conditions These themes weave through the ITR report and the various analyses and recommendations. The ITR team recognizes that a number of technologies are available for treatment of TCE sources. Further, the team supports the regulatory process through which the selected remedy is being implemented, and concurs that ERH is a potentially viable remedial technology to meet the RAOs adjacent to C-400. Nonetheless, the ITR team concluded that additional efforts are needed to provide an adequate basis for the planned ERH design, particularly in the highly permeable Regional Gravel Aquifer (RGA), where sustaining target temperatures present a challenge. The ERH design modeling in the 90% RDR does not fully substantiate that heating in the deep RGA, at the interface with the McNairy formation, will meet the design goals; specifically the target temperatures. Full-scale implementation of ERH to meet the RAOs is a challenge in the complex hydrogeologic setting at PGDP. Where possible, risks to the project identified in this ITR report as ''issues'' and ''recommendations'' should be mitigated as part of the final design process to increase the likelihood of remedial success. The ITR efforts were organized into five lines of inquiry (LOIs): (1) Site investigation and target zone delineation; (2) Performance objectives; (3) Project and design topics; (4) Health and safety; and (5) Cross cutting and independent cost evaluation. Within each of these LOIs, the ITR team identified a series of unresolved issues--topics that have remaining uncertainties or potential project risks. These issues were analyzed and one or more recommendations were developed for each. In the end, the ITR team identified 27 issues and provided 50 recommendations. The issues and recommendations are briefly summarized below, developed in Section 5, and consolidated into a single list in Section 6. The ITR team concluded that there are substantive unresolved issues and system design uncertainties, resulting in technical and financial risks to DOE.

Looney, B; Jed Costanza, J; Eva Davis, E; Joe Rossabi, J; Lloyd (Bo) Stewart, L; Hans Stroo, H

2007-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

270

The effects of storage time, storage temperature, and concentration on percent recoveries of thermally desorbed diffusive dosimeter samples contaminated with chloroform  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, the Analabs Thermal Desorber. 4. The Programmed Thermal Desorber on the left and linear chart recorder on the far right. 5. Gas Chromatograph Peak, Integrator Counting, and GC Conditions for Chloroform. 10 17 19 21 24 6. Photograph Illustrating.... A 2 x 3 x 3 Factorial Treatment Design . 13. Analysis of Variance Table for the Experimental Data 14. Mean Percent Recovery vs. Storage Temperature for 7 Days and 14 Days Storage Time At Concentration I (5 ppm - 8 hours). 26 27 28 29 30 31...

Gallucci, Joseph Matthew

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

271

Comparative genomics and genome evolution in yeasts  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Sternberg and Janet Thornton Comparative genomics and genome evolution in yeasts Kenneth...powerful model system for comparative genomics research. The availability of multiple...cerevisiae |evolution|bioinformatics|genomics| 1. Introduction The rationale put...

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

272

Mechanical code comparator  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A new class of mechanical code comparators is described which have broad potential for application in safety, surety, and security applications. These devices can be implemented as micro-scale electromechanical systems that isolate a secure or otherwise controlled device until an access code is entered. This access code is converted into a series of mechanical inputs to the mechanical code comparator, which compares the access code to a pre-input combination, entered previously into the mechanical code comparator by an operator at the system security control point. These devices provide extremely high levels of robust security. Being totally mechanical in operation, an access control system properly based on such devices cannot be circumvented by software attack alone.

Peter, Frank J. (Albuquerque, NM); Dalton, Larry J. (Bernalillo, NM); Plummer, David W. (Albuquerque, NM)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

273

Comparing Light Bulbs  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Comparing Light Bulbs Grades: K-4, 5-8 Topic: Energy Efficiency and Conservation Owner: U.S. Environmental Protection Agency This educational material is brought to you by the U.S....

274

Comparing greenhouse gasses  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Controlling multiple substances that jointly contribute to climate warming requires some method to compare the effects of the different gases because the physical properties (radiative effects, and persistence in the ...

Reilly, John M.; Babiker, Mustafa H.M.; Mayer, Monika.

275

Virtual Optical Comparator  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Virtual Optical Comparator, VOC, was conceived as a result of the limitations of conventional optical comparators and vision systems. Piece part designs for mechanisms have started to include precision features on the face of parts that must be viewed using a reflected image rather than a profile shadow. The VOC concept uses a computer generated overlay and a digital camera to measure features on a video screen. The advantage of this system is superior edge detection compared to traditional systems. No vinyl charts are procured or inspected. The part size and expensive fixtures are no longer a concern because of the range of the X-Y table of the Virtual Optical Comparator. Product redesigns require only changes to the CAD image overlays; new vinyl charts are not required. The inspection process is more ergonomic by allowing the operator to view the part sitting at a desk rather than standing over a 30 inch screen. The procurement cost for the VOC will be less than a traditional comparator with a much smaller footprint with less maintenance and energy requirements.

Thompson, Greg

2008-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

276

1  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Enabling time travel for the scholarly web July 16, 2013 Banishing the dreaded Internet search where 30 percent of research paper hyperlinks fail to connect LOS ALAMOS, N.M., July...

277

1'"":"""":1.R---  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in emissions and fuel/oil consumption due to the expedited maintenance operations (environmental & energy Road Springfield, Virginia 22161 19. Security Classif.(ofthis report) Unclassified 1 20. Security was developed as part of the University Transportation Centers Program, which is funded 50 percent in oil

278

Bonneville Power Administrator Compares  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Bonneville Power Administrator Compares Missouri Basin Reservoirs with Pacific Northwest's by Pat-16 was the dinner speech of a former Nebraskan from Schuyler, James Jura. Now administrator of the Bonneville Power Administration, Portland, Ore., Jura has been with Bonneville for the past 10 ears. He spoke to the group

Nebraska-Lincoln, University of

279

Table HC1.2.1. Living Space Characteristics by  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1. Living Space Characteristics by" 1. Living Space Characteristics by" " Total, Heated, and Cooled Floorspace, 2005" ,,,"Total Square Footage" ,"Housing Units",,"Total1",,"Heated",,"Cooled" "Living Space Characteristics","Millions","Percent","Billions","Percent","Billions","Percent","Billions","Percent" "Total",111.1,100,225.8,100,179.8,100,114.5,100 "Total Floorspace (Square Feet)1" "Fewer than 500",3.2,2.9,1.2,0.5,1.1,0.6,0.4,0.3 "500 to 999",23.8,21.4,17.5,7.7,15.9,8.8,7.3,6.4 "1,000 to 1,499",20.8,18.7,24.1,10.7,22.6,12.6,13,11.4 "1,500 to 1,999",15.4,13.9,24.5,10.9,22.2,12.4,14,12.2

280

Raw Results from Evaluating the ADOM-SME Tool Table 1. Comparing the results provided by the tool and the students to the Question 1 in Part A: To what  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

) Recommendation Ranking order Reasons1 Ranking order Reasons1 Requirement Extraction Client 1 Lng 1 Bhv Future user 2 Lng 7 Bhv Draw up an initial set of requirements 3 Bhv, Lng 2 Bhv, Lng Refine the requirement document 4 Lng, Bhv 4 Bhv Client initial inform 5 Lng 5 Lng Requirement extraction 6 Bhv 3 Bhv Obtain

Reinhartz-Berger, Iris

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "1 percent compared" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Encuentre y Compare Autos  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Usted está aquí: Encuentre un Auto - Inicio Usted está aquí: Encuentre un Auto - Inicio Encuentre y Compare Autos Busque por Modelo Vamos ¿Necesita ayuda para escoger un auto? woman shopping for car Búsqueda por MPG, precio, marca, carrocería, y mucho más Búsqueda Avanzada Busque por Clase 2015 2014 2013 2012 2011 2010 2009 2008 2007 2006 2005 2004 2003 2002 2001 2000 1999 1998 1997 1996 1995 1994 Autos Pequeños Sedans Familiares Sedans Exclusivos Sedans de Lujo Autos Grandes Hatchbacks/Tres Puertas Coupés Convertibles Modelos Deportivos Vagonetas Camiones de Carga Camionetas Minivans Vans MPG Combinado >= 45 40 35 30 25 20 15 10 Vamos Véa Autos Nuevos sedan Pequeños sedan Sedans coupe Coupes hatchback Tres Puertas sporty car Deportivos luxury car Autos Lujosos station wagon Vagonetas minivan Minivans truck

282

Find and Compare Cars  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

You are here: Find a Car - Home You are here: Find a Car - Home Find and Compare Cars Browse by Model Go Need help choosing a car? woman shopping for car Search by MPG, price, make, body style, and much more with our Power Search Search by Class 2015 2014 2013 2012 2011 2010 2009 2008 2007 2006 2005 2004 2003 2002 2001 2000 1999 1998 1997 1996 1995 1994 Small Cars Family Sedans Upscale Sedans Luxury Sedans Large Sedans Hatchbacks Coupes Convertibles Sports/Sporty Cars Station Wagons Pickup Trucks Sport Utility Vehicles Minivans Vans Combined MPG >= 45 40 35 30 25 20 15 10 Go Browse New Cars sedan Small Cars sedan Sedans coupe Coupes hatchback Hatchbacks sporty car Sporty Cars luxury car Luxury Cars station wagon Wagons minivan Minivans truck Trucks SUV SUVs hybrid Hybrid Vehicles diesel Diesel Vehicles flex-fuel vehicle

283

Comparative genomics analysis of Liberibacter species to elucidate pathogenesis and culturability  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Vol. 1 (2014) Comparative genomics analysis of Liberibacterof citrus, comparative genomics of this strain with other

Leonard, Michael T.; Fagen, Jennie R.; McCullough, Connor M.; Davis-Richardson, Austin G.; Davis, Michael J.; Triplett, Eric W.

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

284

Comparing Intra-Arterial Chemotherapy Combined With Intravesical Chemotherapy Versus Intravesical Chemotherapy Alone: A Randomised Prospective Pilot Study for T1G3 Bladder Transitional Cell Carcinoma After Bladder-Preserving Surgery  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: To compare the efficacy of intra-arterial chemotherapy combined with intravesical chemotherapy versus intravesical chemotherapy alone for T1G3 bladder transitional cell carcinoma (BTCC) followed by bladder-preserving surgery. Materials and Methods: Sixty patients with T1G3 BTCC were randomly divided into two groups. After bladder-preserving surgery, 29 patients (age 30-80 years, 24 male and 5 female) received intra-arterial chemotherapy in combination with intravesical chemotherapy (group A), whereas 31 patients (age 29-83 years, 26 male and 5 female) were treated with intravesical chemotherapy alone (group B). Twenty-nine patients were treated with intra-arterial epirubicin (50 mg/m{sup 2}) + cisplatin (60 mg/m{sup 2}) chemotherapy 2-3 weeks after bladder-preserving surgery once every 4-6 weeks. All of the patients received the same intravesical chemotherapy: An immediate prophylactic was administered in the first 6 h. After that, therapy was administered one time per week for 8 weeks and then one time per month for 8 months. The instillation drug was epirubicin (50 mg/m{sup 2}) and lasted for 30-40 min each time. The end points were tumour recurrence (stage Ta, T1), tumour progression (to T2 or greater), and disease-specific survival. During median follow-up of 22 months, the overall survival rate, tumour-specific death rate, recurrence rate, progression rate, time to first recurrence, and adverse reactions were compared between groups. Results: The recurrence rates were 10.3 % (3 of 29) in group A and 45.2 % (14 of 31) in group B, and the progression rates were 0 % (0 of 29) in group A and 22.6 % (7 of 31) in group B. There was a significant difference between the two groups regarding recurrence (p = 0.004) and progression rates (p = 0.011). Median times to first recurrence in the two groups were 15 and 6.5 months, respectively. The overall survival rates were 96.6 and 87.1 %, and the tumour-specific death rates were 0 % (0 of 29) and 13.5 % (4 of 31) in groups A and B, respectively. During the intra-arterial chemotherapy cycle, although more than 50 % patients experienced some toxicities, most were minor and reversible [grade 1-2 (46.7 %) vs. grade 1-2 (6.9 %)]. Conclusion: These findings suggest that combining intra-arterial chemotherapy with intravesical chemotherapy could delay tumour recurrence and progression compared with intravesical chemotherapy alone and this type treatment is relatively safe.

Chen, Junxing, E-mail: Junxingchen@hotmail.com; Yao, Zhijun, E-mail: yaozhijun1985@qq.com; Qiu, Shaopeng, E-mail: qiushp@mail.sysu.edu.cn; Chen, Lingwu, E-mail: chenlingwu@hotmail.com [First Affiliated Hospital of Sun Yat-Sen University, Department of Urology (China)] [First Affiliated Hospital of Sun Yat-Sen University, Department of Urology (China); Wang, Yu, E-mail: zsyyjr@163.com; Yang, Jianyong, E-mail: yangjianyong_2011@163.com; Li, Jiaping, E-mail: jpli3s@126.com [First Affiliated Hospital of Sun Yat-Sen University, Department of Interventional Oncology (China)] [First Affiliated Hospital of Sun Yat-Sen University, Department of Interventional Oncology (China)

2013-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

285

A laboratory study comparing the effectiveness of three dust palliatives on unpaved roads  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of the factors are palliative application rate (i. e. L/m'), method of application (mixed-in-place or topically sprayed), moisture content of the aggregate during application of the palliative, concentration of palliative, percent fines, mineralogy... of the magnesium chloride solution used was 30 percent by weight. Selected application rates included 1, 8 L/m' (0. 4 gal/yd'), l. l L/m' (0. 25 gal/ yd'), and 0. 45 L/m' (0. 1 gal/ yd ) to span the range used in common practice, manufacturer's recommendations...

Ehsan, Mehbuba

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

286

Annual Energy Outlook 2001 - Table G1  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

the AEO2001 cases the AEO2001 cases Case name Description Integration mode Reference in text Reference in Appendix G Reference Baseline economic growth, world oil price, and technology assumptions Fully integrated — — Low Economic Growth Gross domestic product grows at an average annual rate of 2.5 percent, compared to the reference case growth of 3.0 percent. Fully integrated p. 57 — High Economic Growth Gross domestic product grows at an average annual rate of 3.5 percent, compared to the reference case growth of 3.0 percent. Fully integrated p. 57 — Low World Oil Price World oil prices are $15.10 per barrel in 2020, compared to $22.41 per barrel in the reference case. Fully integrated p. 58 — High World Oil Price World oil prices are $28.42 per barrel in 2020, compared to $22.41 per barrel in the reference case.

287

Layout 1  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

COMMERCIAL MOTOR VEHICLE COMMERCIAL MOTOR VEHICLE ROADSIDE TECHNOLOGY CORRIDOR October 2009 Issue !4 Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration Office of Analysis, Research, and Technology "In about 96 percent of cases there was not a statistically significant degradation of the brakes during the FOT." (Page 1) "Nearly 64 percent of vehicles flagged by SIRIS were placed OOS, and fully 77 percent were found to exhibit one or more safety flaws." (Page 3) Brake Wear and Performance FOT The Oak Ridge National Laboratory com- pleted the Brake Wear and Performance Test (BWPT) field operation test (FOT) and data analysis in September 2009. This effort in- cluded assisting the Tennessee Department of Safety (TDOS) in the procurement and installa- tion of a Performance-Based Brake Testing

288

Comparing and Contrasting Health and  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

/ private partnership Institutional Change In Health: · The Affordable Care Act (ACA) · The recognitionComparing and Contrasting Health and Transportation as Complex Sociotechnical Systems System: Comparing and Contrasting Health and Transportation as Complex Sociotechnical Systems Ideas about

Entekhabi, Dara

289

1  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

by Foreign Direct Investors by Foreign Direct Investors in U.S. Energy 2005 Findings Total acquisitions and divestitures by foreign direct investors (FDI) in the U.S. energy industry fell 18 percent in 2005, with much of the decline attributable to divestitures. Acquisitions by FDI declined moderately, with most of the fall due to lower levels of investment in electric power. Divestitures by FDI fell 33 percent, their lowest level since 1999, with both coal and petroleum refining and marketing and mid/downstream natural gas falling to nearly zero. The largest acquisition was Norsk Hydro's (Norway) purchase of Spinnaker Exploration, an oil and gas producer with assets largely in the Gulf of Mexico. The largest divestiture was Credit Suisse's (Switzerland) sale of American Ref-Fuel Holdings, an

290

The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has inventoried over 30000 major hazardous waste sites in the US of which about 80 percent present some threat to groundwater supplies. The remediation of each of these  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in the US of which about 80 percent present some threat to groundwater supplies. The remediation of each new and innovative strategies are developed. Much of the problem and initial cost of subsurface remediation concerns site characterization. A three-dimensional picture of the heterogeneous subsurface

Rubin, Yoram

291

Comparative assembly hubs: Web-accessible browsers for comparative genomics  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......GENOME ANALYSIS Comparative assembly hubs: Web-accessible browsers for comparative genomics...pipeline to easily generate collections of Web-accessible UCSC Genome Browsers interrelated...hub listed on the UCSC browser public hubs Web page. Contact: benedict@soe.ucsc......

Ngan Nguyen; Glenn Hickey; Brian J. Raney; Joel Armstrong; Hiram Clawson; Ann Zweig; Donna Karolchik; William James Kent; David Haussler; Benedict Paten

2014-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

292

Phylogeny and comparative genome analysis of a Basidiomycete fungi  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Fungi of the phylum Basidiomycota, make up some 37percent of the described fungi, and are important from the perspectives of forestry, agriculture, medicine, and bioenergy. This diverse phylum includes the mushrooms, wood rots, plant pathogenic rusts and smuts, and some human pathogens. To better understand these important fungi, we have undertaken a comparative genomic analysis of the Basidiomycetes with available sequenced genomes. We report a phylogeny that sheds light on previously unclear evolutionary relationships among the Basidiomycetes. We also define a `core proteome? based on protein families conserved in all Basidiomycetes. We identify key expansions and contractions in protein families that may be responsible for the degradation of plant biomass such as cellulose, hemicellulose, and lignin. Finally, we speculate as to the genomic changes that drove such expansions and contractions.

Riley, Robert W.; Salamov, Asaf; Grigoriev, Igor; Hibbett, David

2011-03-14T23:59:59.000Z

293

Washington Update May 1, 2012  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-E) and the Energy Efficiency and #12;Renewable Energy (EERE) programs. The House bill would reduce funding for EERE.4 million (36 percent) below the President's request. The Senate bill recommends $1.98 billion for EERE

294

Applications of the LM392 Comparator Op Amp IC  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Applications of the LM392 Comparator Op Amp IC The LM339 quad comparator and the LM324 op amp operation and ease of use has contributed to the wide range of applications for these devices. The LM392 FIGURE 1. 00749302 Q1, Q2, Q3 = 2N2369 Q4 = 2N2907 C1, A1 = LM392 amplifier-comparator dual *1% metal

Lanterman, Aaron

295

1  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

ARM AERI with Trent FTS Spectra for the ARM AERI with Trent FTS Spectra for the Measurement of Greenhouse Radiative Fluxes W. F. J. Evans and E. Puckrin Trent University Peterborough, Ontario T. P. Ackerman Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Richland, Washington Introduction For the past several years, measurements of the atmospheric thermal infrared spectra have been made at the mid-latitude site of Trent University in Peterborough, Ontario, at a high resolution of 0.25 cm -1 . These measurements are similar to those conducted with the Atmospheric Emitted Radiance Interferometer (AERI) instrument at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program sites, which has a lower resolution of 1 cm -1 . We compare the ARM AERI spectra with those measured at Trent University for clear-sky conditions, and use the same analysis techniques on both spectra to derive

296

Great Cities Institute Comparative Urbanisms  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Great Cities Institute Comparative Urbanisms Seminar Series Governance and Social Innovation those "socially innovative strategies" undertaken by citizens in different European cities, identity, governance and social innovation. Her upcoming publications include "Multilevel Governance

Illinois at Chicago, University of

297

PEV Market Briefing: May 2014 In our 2013 market briefing, we noted that 2012 PEV sales were reaching about 50 percent  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, and faster growth in Asia due to a surge in China. Source: http://ev-sales.blogspot.com The U.S. market1 PEV Market Briefing: May 2014 In our 2013 market briefing, we noted that 2012 PEV sales were later, PEV sales around the world continue to grow at a similar pace. In 2013, global sales of PEVs were

California at Davis, University of

298

THE COMPARATIVE VALUE OF BIOLOGICAL CARBON SEQUESTRATION  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

THE COMPARATIVE VALUE OF BIOLOGICAL CARBON SEQUESTRATION BRUCE A. MCCARL, BRIAN C. MURRAY, AND UWE A. SCHNEIDER A. Abstract Carbon sequestration via forests and agricultural soils saturates over time to sequestration because of (1) an ecosystems limited ability to take up carbon which we will call saturation

McCarl, Bruce A.

299

Computational and Comparative Investigations of Syntrophic Acetate-  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the constructed biogas reactors to run efficiently. (photo: (Shahid Manzoor) #12;Computational and Comparative of the W-L pathway genes operon. Keywords: hydrogenotrophic methanogenesis, biogas, Wood-Ljungdahl pathway.1 Importance of bacteria 17 2.2 Anaerobic environment 17 2.3 Importance of Biogas 18 2.4 Syntrophic

300

X-Ray Diffraction from Calcite for Wave-Lengths 1.5 to 5 Angstroms  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Theoretical expressions for the coefficient of reflection, percent reflection, and width of the line to be expected from the second crystal of a double spectrometer in the (1, -1) position, based on Darwin's theory of reflection from a perfect crystal, as modified by Prins, are evaluated for calcite for six lines in the region 1.54 to 5A. This region includes, at 3.06A, the critical absorption limit of calcium. With a specially designed double-crystal spectrometer, these properties of the rocking curve from the second crystal for ten wave-lengths, copper K? radiation and nine spectrum lines selected from the uranium M series, are experimentally measured and these results compared with the calculated values. The agreement between the observed and calculated rocking curve widths is excellent throughout the entire region and gives no evidence of mosaic structure in the crystals. The calculated values of percent reflection are consistently above those observed by some 16 percent. Good agreement is obtained for the values of the coefficient of reflection for wave-lengths shorter than 4A including those close to and on either side of the calcium absorption limit. No correction for temperature motion of the atoms has been attempted, but it seems possible that such a correction would give very satisfactory agreement between theory and experiment, showing that calcite surfaces may be obtained for which there is no evidence of mosaic structure from the diffraction of x-rays.

Lyman G. Parratt

1932-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "1 percent compared" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

: ................................................................................................................................................................................................. 1 1. ......................................................  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

: ................................................................................................................................................................................................. 1 1. ............................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................ 1 2

Moon, Sue B.

302

Word Pro - Untitled1  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1 1 Table 1.14 Sales of Fossil Fuels Produced on Federal and American Indian Lands, Fiscal Years 2003-2011 Fiscal Year 7 Crude Oil and Lease Condensate Natural Gas Plant Liquids 1 Natural Gas 2 Coal 3 Total Fossil Fuels 4 Sales 5,6 Sales as Share of Total U.S. Production Sales 5,6 Sales as Share of Total U.S. Production Sales 5,6 Sales as Share of Total U.S. Production Sales 5,6 Sales as Share of Total U.S. Production Sales 5,6 Sales as Share of Total U.S. Production Million Barrels Quadrillion Btu Percent Million Barrels Quadrillion Btu Percent Trillion Cubic Feet Quadrillion Btu Percent Million Short Tons Quadrillion Btu Percent Quadrillion Btu Percent 2003 R 689 R 4.00 R 33.3 R 94 R 0.35 R 14.9 R 7.08 R 7.81 R 35.5 R 466 R 9.58 R 43.3 R 21.74 R 37.2 2004 R 680 R 3.94 R 33.8 R 105 R .39 R 16.0 R 6.68 R 7.38 R 34.0 R 484 R 9.89 R 43.9 R 21.60 R 37.0

303

Comparative case studies of health reform in England  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Comparative case studies of health reform in England Report submitted to the Department of Health........................................................................................14 1.1 Presenting the Health System Reform policy agenda...................................14 1 ..........................................................................................64 Demand Side Reform.........................................

Birmingham, University of

304

Comparative Effectiveness of Revascularization Strategies  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...the probability that he or she would be selected for PCI. We verified the performance of the propensity model by comparing the distribution of covariates and propensity scores between treatment groups both before and after inverse probability weighting. Statistical Analysis. Summary statistics are presented... A large PCI registry and a large CABG registry were linked to claims records, with data adjusted for propensity score, to compare clinical outcomes. Patients selected for CABG had a long-term survival advantage over those selected for PCI.

Weintraub W.S.; Grau-Sepulveda M.V.; Weiss J.M.

2012-04-19T23:59:59.000Z

305

Slide 1  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

WRP Energy Committee Webinar WRP Energy Committee Webinar May 30, 2013 2 Jobs are key 3 * Since 2010, 12 companies have located or expanded * 1,937+ in jobs * $1.049 billion of capital investment Source: Arizona Commerce Authority 4 5 Arizona Corporation Commission * 2006 - Commission approves Renewable Energy Standard and Tariff (REST). * Requires regulated electric utilities must generate 15 percent of their energy from renewable resources by 2025. * 30 percent is a "carve out" for distributed energy. * Utilities on track to meet these goals. 6 Mesquite Solar - 150MW Located 60 miles southwest of Phoenix Completed in January 2013 Photo courtesy of Sempra Energy 7 Agua Caliente Generating Station - 290MW Currently the world's largest operating PV power plant

306

ALGORITHMS FOR CONSTRUCTING COMPARATIVE MAPS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. In this paper we present e#cient algorithms that help in automating this e#ort and o#er an explicit setALGORITHMS FOR CONSTRUCTING COMPARATIVE MAPS Debra S. Goldberg Susan McCouch Jon Kleinberg expert analysis, a simple linear algorithm, and a more complex stack­based algorithm. All three methods

Kleinberg, Jon

307

1  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

in U.S. Energy in U.S. Energy by Foreign Direct Investors in 2006 Findings Based on EIA's latest analysis of information on acquisitions and divestitures by foreign direct investors in the U.S. energy industry, net acquisitions were negative (i.e., the value of divestitures exceeded the value of acquisitions) in 2006, as divestitures reached a six year high. The rise in divestitures was driven by a single transaction, Scottish Power's sale of PacificCorp, the parent of two large electric utilities in the West. Divestitures also rose in the oil and gas production and petroleum refining and marketing and mid/downstream natural sectors. Acquisitions by foreign direct investors rose 24 percent from 2005, but were well below the high levels of

308

1  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Nontoxic quantum dot research Nontoxic quantum dot research improves solar cells December 10, 2013 Record power-conversion efficiency at Los Alamos from quantum-dot sensitized photovoltaics LOS ALAMOS, N.M., Dec. 10, 2013-Solar cells made with low-cost, nontoxic copper- based quantum dots can achieve unprecedented longevity and efficiency, according to a study by Los Alamos National Laboratory and Sharp Corporation. "For the first time, we have certified the performance of a quantum dot sensitized solar cell at greater than 5 percent, which is among the highest reported for any quantum dot solar cell," said Hunter McDaniel, a Los Alamos postdoctoral researcher and the lead author on a paper appearing in Nature Communications this week. "The robust nature - 2 - of these devices opens up the possibility for commercialization of this emerging low-cost

309

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Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

HAWC Observatory captures first image HAWC Observatory captures first image April 30, 2013 An international team of researchers, including scientists from Los Alamos, has taken the first image of the High-Altitude Water Cherenkov Observatory, or HAWC. The facility is designed to detect cosmic rays and the highest energy gamma rays ever observed from astrophysical sources. HAWC is under construction inside the Parque Nacional Pico de Orizaba, a Mexican national park. Although only 10 percent of the observatory is constructed, the team has made its first astrophysical image-a shadow in the detected directions of cosmic rays caused by the Moon. Full-time operations at HAWC will begin this summer with one third of the observatory, making HAWC the most sensitive, wide field of view, continuously operating gamma-

310

1  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Analysis of the AERI/LBLRTM QME Analysis of the AERI/LBLRTM QME D. C. Tobin, D. D. Turner, H. E. Revercomb, and R. O. Knuteson University of Wisconsin-Madison Madison Wisconsin S. A. Clough, and K. Cady-Pereira Atmospheric and Environmental Research, Inc. Cambridge, Massachusetts Introduction A Quality Measurement Experiment (QME) comparing clear-sky downwelling longwave radiance at the surface from observations and model calculations has been performed by the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program for many years (e.g., Brown et al. 1995; Clough et al. 1996). This QME has been used to (1) validate and improve absorption models and spectral line parameters used within the Line-by-Line Radiative Transfer Model (LBLRTM), (2) assess the ability to define the atmospheric

311

1  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

SCM Sensitivity to Microphysics, Radiation, SCM Sensitivity to Microphysics, Radiation, and Convection Algorithms S. F. Iacobellis, R. C. J. Somerville, and D. E. Lane Scripps Institution of Oceanography University of California San Diego, California Introduction In this paper, we briefly describe several ongoing sensitivity studies using our single-column model (SCM) and Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) observations. These studies investigate the sensitivity of model results to 1) the parameterization of cumulus convection, 2) the parameterization of longwave radiation, and 3) the initial profiles of temperature and humidity. Our SCM results indicate: * SCM with the Relaxed Arakawa-Schubert (RAS) convection scheme produces a significantly more realistic vertical distribution of cloud amount compared to model results using the Community

312

The Comparative Logistics Project www.ed-w.info  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Comparative Logistics Project www.ed-w.info The Impact of e-Commerce on the Japanese Raw Fish Supply Chain Edmund W. Schuster and Kazunari Watanabe #12;The Comparative Logistics Project www in the Japanese market #12;The Comparative Logistics Project www.ed-w.info 1. Introduction (continued) · E

Brock, David

313

Quantum chemical study of reactions of episulfonium ions. 1. Comparative MNDO study of opening of the episulfonium ion ring by neutral nucleophiles and SN2 substitution in protonated methylthiol  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

1. From MNDO quantum chemical calculations, opening of the episulfonium ion ring by neutral nucleophiles X (X=NH

V. I. Faustov; W. A. Smit

1989-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

314

Enhancer Identification through Comparative Genomics  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

With the availability of genomic sequence from numerousvertebrates, a paradigm shift has occurred in the identification ofdistant-acting gene regulatory elements. In contrast to traditionalgene-centric studies in which investigators randomly scanned genomicfragments that flank genes of interest in functional assays, the modernapproach begins electronically with publicly available comparativesequence datasets that provide investigators with prioritized lists ofputative functional sequences based on their evolutionary conservation.However, although a large number of tools and resources are nowavailable, application of comparative genomic approaches remains far fromtrivial. In particular, it requires users to dynamically consider thespecies and methods for comparison depending on the specific biologicalquestion under investigation. While there is currently no single generalrule to this end, it is clear that when applied appropriately,comparative genomic approaches exponentially increase our power ingenerating biological hypotheses for subsequent experimentaltesting.

Visel, Axel; Bristow, James; Pennacchio, Len A.

2006-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

315

Quantum Fluctuations in Josephson Junction Comparators  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We have developed a method for calculation of quantum fluctuation effects, in particular of the uncertainty zone developing at the potential curvature sign inversion, for a damped harmonic oscillator with arbitrary time dependence of frequency and for arbitrary temperature, within the Caldeira-Leggett model. The method has been applied to the calculation of the gray zone width Delta Ix of Josephson-junction balanced comparators driven by a specially designed low-impedance RSFQ circuit. The calculated temperature dependence of Delta Ix in the range 1.5 to 4.2K is in a virtually perfect agreement with experimental data for Nb-trilayer comparators with critical current densities of 1.0 and 5.5 kA/cm^2, without any fitting parameters.

Thomas J. Walls; Timur V. Filippov; Konstantin K. Likharev

2002-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

316

Annual Energy Outlook Forecast Evaluation - Table 1. Forecast Evaluations:  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Average Absolute Percent Errors from AEO Forecast Evaluations: Average Absolute Percent Errors from AEO Forecast Evaluations: 1996 to 2000 Average Absolute Percent Error Average Absolute Percent Error Average Absolute Percent Error Average Absolute Percent Error Average Absolute Percent Error Variable 1996 Evaluation: AEO82 to AEO93 1997 Evaluation: AEO82 to AEO97 1998 Evaluation: AEO82 to AEO98 1999 Evaluation: AEO82 to AEO99 2000 Evaluation: AEO82 to AEO2000 Consumption Total Energy Consumption 1.8 1.6 1.7 1.7 1.8 Total Petroleum Consumption 3.2 2.8 2.9 2.8 2.9 Total Natural Gas Consumption 6.0 5.8 5.7 5.6 5.6 Total Coal Consumption 2.9 2.7 3.0 3.2 3.3 Total Electricity Sales 1.8 1.6 1.7 1.8 2.0 Production Crude Oil Production 5.1 4.2 4.3 4.5 4.5

317

ACHIEVING CALIFORNIA'S 33 PERCENT RENEWABLE PORTFOLIO  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. To remedy this limitation, the report presents a new feed-in tariff approach that is modelled on successful as the basis for feed-in tariff rates that do not achieve the renewable goal, or do so at a higher cost than and risks because of their diversification effects. KEYWORDS Feed-in tariffs, portfolio analysis, generation

318

COMPARATIVE MEDICINE LABORATORY ANIMAL FACILITIES  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

infectious waste is weighed and recorded on a log prior to burning. The log must include the date and time MEDICAL WASTE 1.0 Purpose: This procedure outlines handling of hazardous waste. 2.0 Scope: This procedure disposal of their hazardous waste. 3.0 Procedure: 3.1 Hazardous wastes are disposed of according

Krovi, Venkat

319

1  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

NPI, Inc. NPI, Inc. NPS i ENVIRONMENTAL PURCHASING IN THE NATIONAL PARK SERVICE: A HOW-TO GUIDE Table of Contents 1.0 Introduction 1-1 1.1 Context for Environmental Purchasing 1-1 1.2 Intended Audience 1-2 1.3 Objectives and Scope of Guide 1-3 2.0 Government Mandates Relating To Environmental Purchasing 2-1 2.1 Legislative Mandates 2-1

320

Compare All CBECS Activities: Size  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

By Building Size By Building Size Compare Activities by ... Building Size Total Floorspace by Building Type There was approximately 67.3 billion square feet of commercial floorspace in the U.S. in 1999. Because there are many of them, office buildings comprised the largest amount of commercial floorspace. Figure showing total floorspace by building type. If you need assistance viewing this page, please call 202-586-8800. Square Feet per Building by Building Type Inpatient health buildings were by far the largest building type, on average, while food service and food sales buildings were the smallest. Figure showing square feet per building by building type. If you need assistance viewing this page, please call 202-586-8800. Establishments per Building by Building Type

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "1 percent compared" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Compare Activities by Building Age  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Activities by Building Age Activities by Building Age Compare Activities by ... Building Age Median Age of Building by Building Type Vacant buildings, retail stores (other than malls), and religious worship buildings tended to be the oldest buildings. Food sales buildings (which were predominantly convenience stores) and outpatient health care buildings were mainly newer buildings. Figure showing median age of building by building type. If you need assistance viewing this page, please call 202-586-8800. Specific questions may be directed to: Joelle Michaels joelle.michaels@eia.doe.gov CBECS Manager Release date: July 24, 2002 Page last modified: May 4, 2009 2:52 PM http://www.eia.gov/consumption/commercial/data/archive/cbecs/pba99/compareage.html If you are having any technical problems with this site, please contact the EIA

322

Compare Activities by Energy Conservation  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Energy Conservation Energy Conservation Compare Activities by ... Energy Conservation Inpatient health care buildings had the highest incidence of conservation features among all building types. For almost all building types, at least half of the buildings reported having a regularly scheduled maintenance program for the heating and/or cooling equipment. Reference: Definitions of Conservation Features Number of Buildings With Conservation Features by Building Type Number of Buildings (thousand) All Buildings Variable Air-Volume System Economizer Cycle HVAC Maintenance Energy Management and Control System (EMCS) Specular Reflector Electronic Ballasts All Buildings 4,657 550 567 2,786 460 843 2,167 Principal Building Activity Education 327 53 76 262 112 75 208 Food Sales 174

323

1-cc June2011.xls  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1 1 Section 1. Commentary Electric Power Data The contiguous United States experienced temperatures that were above normal in June 2011. In particular, southern states experienced significantly above average temperatures which exacerbated drought conditions present in the region. Accordingly, the total population-weighted cooling degree days for the United States were 20.2 percent above the June normal (though still less than in June 2010; see Table 11.1). In June 2011, retail sales of electricity remained relatively unchanged from June 2010. Over the same period, the average U.S. retail price of electricity increased 0.9 percent. The average U.S. retail price of electricity for the 12- month period ending June 2011 increased 1.6 percent over the previous 12-month period ending June 2010.

324

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Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

EnviROnMEnTAl AssEssMEnT EnviROnMEnTAl AssEssMEnT Williston to Stateline Transmission Line Project Mountrail Williams Electric Cooperative DOE/EA - 1896 December 2011 WILLISTON TO STATELINE TRANSMISSION LINE PROJECT DRAFT ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT DECEMBER 2011 DOE/EA - 1896 DRAFT ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT Table of Contents 1.0 INTRODUCTION .................................................................................................. 1-1 1.1 Purpose of and Need for Action.................................................................................... 1-4 1.1.1 Western's Response to MWEC's Interconnection Request............................ 1-4 1.1.2 MWEC's Need for the Interconnection Request ............................................ 1-4 1.2 Authorizing Actions...................................................................................................... 1-5

325

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Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

EnviROnMEnTAl AssEssMEnT EnviROnMEnTAl AssEssMEnT Williston to Stateline Transmission Line Project Mountrail Williams Electric Cooperative DOE/EA - 1896 December 2011 WILLISTON TO STATELINE TRANSMISSION LINE PROJECT DRAFT ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT DECEMBER 2011 DOE/EA - 1896 DRAFT ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT Table of Contents 1.0 INTRODUCTION .................................................................................................. 1-1 1.1 Purpose of and Need for Action.................................................................................... 1-4 1.1.1 Western's Response to MWEC's Interconnection Request............................ 1-4 1.1.2 MWEC's Need for the Interconnection Request ............................................ 1-4 1.2 Authorizing Actions...................................................................................................... 1-5

326

Word Pro - Untitled1  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Table 1.5 Energy Consumption, Expenditures, and Emissions Indicators Estimates, Selected Years, 1949-2011 Year Energy Consumption Energy Consumption per Capita Energy Expenditures 1 Energy Expenditures 1 per Capita Gross Output 3 Energy Expenditures 1 as Share of Gross Output 3 Gross Domestic Product (GDP) Energy Expenditures 1 as Share of GDP Gross Domestic Product (GDP) Energy Consumption per Real Dollar of GDP Carbon Dioxide Emissions 2 per Real Dollar of GDP Quadrillion Btu Million Btu Million Nominal Dollars 4 Nominal Dollars 4 Billion Nominal Dollars 4 Percent Billion Nominal Dollars 4 Percent Billion Real (2005) Dollars 5 Thousand Btu per Real (2005) Dollar 5 Metric Tons Carbon Dioxide per Million Real (2005) Dollars 5 1949 31.982 214 NA NA NA NA 267.2 NA R 1,843.1 R 17.35 R 1,197 1950 34.616 227 NA NA NA NA

327

1  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

to Stateline Transmission Line Project to Stateline Transmission Line Project Mountrail Williams Electric Cooperative DOE/EA - 1896 April 2012 ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT WILLISTON TO STATELINE TRANSMISSION LINE PROJECT ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT APRIL 2012 DOE/EA - 1896 ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT Williston to Stateline Page i APRIL 2012 Transmission Line Project DOE/EA 1896 Table of Contents 1.0 INTRODUCTION .................................................................................................. 1-1 1.1 Purpose of and Need for Action.................................................................................... 1-4 1.1.1 Western's Response to MWEC's Interconnection Request ............................ 1-4 1.1.2 MWEC's Need for the Interconnection Request ............................................ 1-5

328

1  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Williston to Stateline Transmission Line Project Williston to Stateline Transmission Line Project Mountrail Williams Electric Cooperative DOE/EA - 1896 April 2012 ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT WILLISTON TO STATELINE TRANSMISSION LINE PROJECT ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT APRIL 2012 DOE/EA - 1896 ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT Williston to Stateline Page i APRIL 2012 Transmission Line Project DOE/EA 1896 Table of Contents 1.0 INTRODUCTION .................................................................................................. 1-1 1.1 Purpose of and Need for Action.................................................................................... 1-4 1.1.1 Western's Response to MWEC's Interconnection Request ............................ 1-4 1.1.2 MWEC's Need for the Interconnection Request ............................................ 1-5

329

Comparing Accelerated Testing and Outdoor Exposure | Department...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Comparing Accelerated Testing and Outdoor Exposure Comparing Accelerated Testing and Outdoor Exposure Presented at the PV Module Reliability Workshop, February 26 - 27 2013,...

330

Cetane Performance and Chemistry Comparing Conventional Fuels...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Cetane Performance and Chemistry Comparing Conventional Fuels and Fuels Derived from Heavy Crude Sources Cetane Performance and Chemistry Comparing Conventional Fuels and Fuels...

331

Table S1. Values for density (trees/ha) and percent stocking (Stock) for the Missouri, US, Ozarks. Due to lack of a stocking chart for oaks in floodplain forests, stocking may be overestimated for some floodplain forests.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Oak Woodland/Forest Hills floodplains 476 218 673 189 87 267 Floodplain Forests OZ14 Oak-Pine Hills floodplains 252 124 340 111 55 150 Floodplain Forests OZ9 Oak-Pine Hills floodplains 136 64 189 48 23 67 Oak Woodland/Forest Hills valleys/toe slopes 228 146 266 65 42 76 Forest OZ5 Oak Woodland/Forest Hills

Sprott, Julien Clinton

332

1  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

the impact of 3D radiative effects on the local scale becomes increasingly relevant (Randall et al. 2003). In a recent study, we examined this issue by comparing the heating...

333

1  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

comparable benchmark value; therefore, the ammonia map has no set value for the blue to green color break. As shown in Figure 2, the Shiprock well network is dense. For this...

334

Comparative Microbial Genomics group CenterforBiologicalSequenceAnalysisTheTechnicalUniversityofDenmarkDTU  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Comparative Microbial Genomics group Centerfor%-8531)1-803,% - or - Where Does Vibrio cholera come from? #12;Comparative Microbial Genomics group CenterforBiologicalSequenceAnalysisTheTechnicalUniversityofDenmarkDTU #12;Comparative Microbial Genomics

Ussery, David W.

335

Human-mouse comparative genomics: successes and failures to reveal functional regions of the human genome  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Deciphering the genetic code embedded within the human genome remains a significant challenge despite the human genome consortium's recent success at defining its linear sequence (Lander et al. 2001; Venter et al. 2001). While useful strategies exist to identify a large percentage of protein encoding regions, efforts to accurately define functional sequences in the remaining {approx}97 percent of the genome lag. Our primary interest has been to utilize the evolutionary relationship and the universal nature of genomic sequence information in vertebrates to reveal functional elements in the human genome. This has been achieved through the combined use of vertebrate comparative genomics to pinpoint highly conserved sequences as candidates for biological activity and transgenic mouse studies to address the functionality of defined human DNA fragments. Accordingly, we describe strategies and insights into functional sequences in the human genome through the use of comparative genomics coupled wit h functional studies in the mouse.

Pennacchio, Len A.; Baroukh, Nadine; Rubin, Edward M.

2003-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

336

Homogeneous vs Heterogeneous Clustered Sensor Networks: A Comparative Study  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Homogeneous vs Heterogeneous Clustered Sensor Networks: A Comparative Study Vivek Mhatre elected, serve for the entire lifetime of the network) in a homoge- neous network, it is evident

Rosenberg, Catherine P.

337

Measuring and comparing structural fluctuation patterns in large protein datasets  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......readily calculated from any ensemble of protein conformations, such as...comparing the conformational ensembles that characterise protein fluctuations. Each method...such as intrinsically disordered regions of a protein. 3.2.1 Overall performance......

Edvin Fuglebakk; Julin Echave; Nathalie Reuter

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

338

1  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Instrument Measurement Manufacturer Sampling Rate (interval) Accuracy HeightRange Thermometer Temperature Vaisala 1 min. avgs. (1 sec) 0.41C 2 m RH Sensor Relative humidity...

339

Investigation of coal structure. Quarterly report, January 1, 1993--March 31, 1993  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The goal of the present work is to conduct multi-stage sequences of extraction experiments and direct solvent swelling measurements of raw and extracted coal to study in a greater depth the role of intra- and intermolecular interactions in the structure of coal. One of the possible ways to investigate the structure of coal is to extract it with a series of procedures. The individual extraction step chosen will be such that it weaken or disrupt intra- and intermolecular interactions that are particular to the rank of the test coal. To date, we attempted to extract raw and pyridine extracted (PI) DECS 16 coal with two solvents; 1:1 volume percent carbon disulfide & 1-methyl-2-pyrrolidinone (NMEP) mixed solvent and 1:3 volume percent 1M tetrabutylammonium hydroxide (TBAH) in methanol & pyridine. Also, raw DECS 16 coal was o-butylated followed by pyridine extraction in a soxhlet apparatus and the ultimate extraction yields were compared with o-butylated pyridine extracted coal.

Not Available

1993-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

340

"RSE Table E1.1. Relative Standard Errors for Table E1.1;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

.1. Relative Standard Errors for Table E1.1;" .1. Relative Standard Errors for Table E1.1;" " Unit: Percents." " "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," " " "," ",," "," ",," "," ",," ","Shipments" "Economic",,"Net","Residual","Distillate",,"LPG and",,"Coke and"," ","of Energy Sources" "Characteristic(a)","Total(b)","Electricity(c)","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(d)","Natural Gas(e)","NGL(f)","Coal","Breeze","Other(g)","Produced Onsite(h)"

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "1 percent compared" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

"RSE Table C1.1. Relative Standard Errors for Table C1.1;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

.1. Relative Standard Errors for Table C1.1;" .1. Relative Standard Errors for Table C1.1;" " Unit: Percents." " "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," " " "," ","Any",," "," ",," "," ",," ","Shipments" "NAICS"," ","Energy","Net","Residual","Distillate",,"LPG and",,"Coke and"," ","of Energy Sources" "Code(a)","Subsector and Industry","Source(b)","Electricity(c)","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(d)","Natural Gas(e)","NGL(f)","Coal","Breeze","Other(g)","Produced Onsite(h)"

342

Comparing Server Energy Use and Efficiency Using Small Sample Sizes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report documents a demonstration that compared the energy consumption and efficiency of a limited sample size of server-type IT equipment from different manufacturers by measuring power at the server power supply power cords. The results are specific to the equipment and methods used. However, it is hoped that those responsible for IT equipment selection can used the methods described to choose models that optimize energy use efficiency. The demonstration was conducted in a data center at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory in Berkeley, California. It was performed with five servers of similar mechanical and electronic specifications; three from Intel and one each from Dell and Supermicro. Server IT equipment is constructed using commodity components, server manufacturer-designed assemblies, and control systems. Server compute efficiency is constrained by the commodity component specifications and integration requirements. The design freedom, outside of the commodity component constraints, provides room for the manufacturer to offer a product with competitive efficiency that meets market needs at a compelling price. A goal of the demonstration was to compare and quantify the server efficiency for three different brands. The efficiency is defined as the average compute rate (computations per unit of time) divided by the average energy consumption rate. The research team used an industry standard benchmark software package to provide a repeatable software load to obtain the compute rate and provide a variety of power consumption levels. Energy use when the servers were in an idle state (not providing computing work) were also measured. At high server compute loads, all brands, using the same key components (processors and memory), had similar results; therefore, from these results, it could not be concluded that one brand is more efficient than the other brands. The test results show that the power consumption variability caused by the key components as a group is similar to all other components as a group. However, some differences were observed. The Supermicro server used 27 percent more power at idle compared to the other brands. The Intel server had a power supply control feature called cold redundancy, and the data suggest that cold redundancy can provide energy savings at low power levels. Test and evaluation methods that might be used by others having limited resources for IT equipment evaluation are explained in the report.

Coles, Henry C.; Qin, Yong; Price, Phillip N.

2014-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

343

1  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

4.1 4.1 The Shortwave (SW) Clear-Sky Detection and Fitting Algorithm: Algorithm Operational Details and Explanations Revision 1, January 2004 C. N. Long and K. L. Gaustad Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Richland, Washington Work supported by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Energy Research, Office of Health and Environmental Research C. N. Long and K. L. Gaustad, December 2000, ARM TR-004.1 Contents 1. Introduction........................................................................................................................................... 1 2. Preparing the Raw Input Files............................................................................................................... 2 3. Running the Clear ID and Fitting Algorithm (swclrid1a)

344

RSE Table S1.1 and S1.2. Relative Standard Errors for Tables S1.1 and S1.2  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

S1.1 and S1.2. Relative Standard Errors for Tables S1.1 and S1.2;" S1.1 and S1.2. Relative Standard Errors for Tables S1.1 and S1.2;" " Unit: Percents." " "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," " " "," "," ",," "," ",," "," ",," ","Shipments" "SIC"," ",,"Net","Residual","Distillate",,"LPG and",,"Coke and"," ","of Energy Sources" "Code(a)","Major Group and Industry","Total(b)","Electricity(c)","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(d)","Natural Gas(e)","NGL(f)","Coal","Breeze","Other(g)","Produced Onsite(h)"

345

Comparative naval architecture analysis of diesel submarines  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Many comparative naval architecture analyses of surface ships have been performed, but few published comparative analyses of submarines exist. Of the several design concept papers, reports and studies that have been written ...

Torkelson, Kai Oscar

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

346

COMPARATIVE COSTS OF CALIFORNIA CENTRAL STATION ELECTRICITY  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CALIFORNIA ENERGY COMMISSION COMPARATIVE COSTS OF CALIFORNIA CENTRAL STATION ELECTRICITY GENERATION and Anitha Rednam, Comparative Costs of California Central Station Electricity Generation Technologies Manager Ruben Tavares - Acting Manager ELECTRICITY ANALYSIS OFFICE Sylvia Bender Deputy Director

Laughlin, Robert B.

347

Table 5.1. U.S. Number of Vehicles, Vehicle-Miles, Motor Fuel...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

(billion dollars) (percent) 0.9 0.8 1.1 1.0 1.1 1.0 1.1 1.1 1.0 Race of Householder White ... 138.6 88.4 1,592 88.8 80.5 88.9 10.0...

348

A Statistical Framework for Spatial Comparative Genomics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A Statistical Framework for Spatial Comparative Genomics Rose Hoberman May 2007 CMU-CS-07, or the U.S. Government. #12;Keywords: spatial comparative genomics, comparative genomics, gene clusters, max-gap clusters, gene teams, whole genome duplication, paralogons, synteny, ortholog detection #12

349

1  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Effect of Stratus on Solar Radiation: A Study Using Effect of Stratus on Solar Radiation: A Study Using Millimeter Wave Cloud Radar and Microwave Radiometer Data From the Southern Great Plains M. Sengupta and T. P. Ackerman Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Richland, Washington E. E. Clothiaux The Pennsylvania State University University Park, Pennsylvania Introduction Clouds are important players in the global radiation budget with low-level water clouds being one of the most influential types. Classified as stratocumulus and stratus, these water clouds cover 34% of oceans and 18% of land at any given time (Considine et al. 1997). A 50% plus global coverage, a high albedo when compared to the ocean, and temperatures comparable to the surface causes the low stratiform clouds to provide about 60% of the annually averaged net cloud radiative forcing (Hartmann et al.

350

1  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Broadband Heating Rate Product Flux Profiles Compared Broadband Heating Rate Product Flux Profiles Compared to Clouds and the Earth's Radiant Energy System Radiation Transfer Data Product D. Rutan and F. Rose Analytical Services and Materials Inc. Hampton, Virginia T. Charlock National Aeronautics and Space Administration-Langley Research Center Hampton, Virginia E. Mlawer Atmospheric and Environmental Research, Inc. Lexington, Massachusetts T. Shippert Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Richland, Washington S. Kato Hampton University Hampton, Virginia Introduction The Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program's Broadband Heating Rate Product (BBHRP) is designed to be a standard for validation of radiative heating rates computed by global climate models, cloud resolving models, etc. Inputs for the local scale BBHRP calculations are based on

351

1  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Patent Rights Management and Operating Contracts, For- Profit Contractor, Advance Class Waiver Alt 1 DEAR 970.5227-1 Rights in Data-Facilities. This clause is included in...

352

User-orientated comparative analysis of climate compatible development  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

User-orientated comparative analysis of climate compatible development User-orientated comparative analysis of climate compatible development planning methodologies and tools Jump to: navigation, search Name User-orientated comparative analysis of climate compatible development planning methodologies and tools Agency/Company /Organization Climate and Development Knowledge Network (CDKN) Sector Energy, Land, Climate Topics Implementation, Low emission development planning, Policies/deployment programs Website http://www.cdkn.org/wp-content Program Start 2011 Program End 2011 References User-orientated comparative analysis of climate compatible development planning methodologies and tools[1] User-orientated comparative analysis of climate compatible development planning methodologies and tools Screenshot In response to demand from a range of practitioners and government

353

Is ZF a hack? Comparing the complexity of some  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Is ZF a hack? Comparing the complexity of some (formalist interpretations of) foundational systems is a hack'.1 This statement was the reason for this paper. 1 Actually his statement was not that strong. He [. . .] with Bram, and he called ZF set theory a `hack.' I more or less agree, but playing with it in the context

Wiedijk, Freek

354

Is ZF a hack? Comparing the complexity of some  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Is ZF a hack? Comparing the complexity of some (formalist interpretations of) foundational systems that `ZF is a hack'. 1 This statement was the reason for this paper. 1 Actually his statement was talking [. . .] with Bram, and he called ZF set theory a `hack.' I more or less agree, but playing

Wiedijk, Freek

355

A comparative analysis of two PEM fuel cell modeling tools  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A comparative analysis of two PEM fuel cell modeling tools M.L. Sarmiento-Carnevali*1 , S. Strahl1-electrolyte- membrane (PEM) fuel cells, Energy, 33(9): 1331-1352, 2008. [2] M. Mangold, A. Bück, and R. Hanke-Rauschenbach, Passivity based control of a distributed PEM fuel cell model, Journal of Process Control, 20(3): 292

Batlle, Carles

356

Comparing radial velocities of atmospheric lines with radiosonde measurements  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......30km u m1 0.01 E-W wind component, east positive v m1 0.01 N-S wind component, north positive...mesoscale models [MM5 (4), WRF (5), MesoNH (6...model augmented by some local weather stations. Details...KAMM) and compare with wind measurements taken at......

P. Figueira; F. Kerber; A Chacon; C. Lovis; N. C. Santos; G. Lo Curto; M. Sarazin; F. Pepe

2012-03-11T23:59:59.000Z

357

Word Pro - Untitled1  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1 1 Table 10.5 Estimated Number of Alternative-Fueled Vehicles in Use and Fuel Consumption, 1992-2010 Year Alternative and Replacement Fuels 1 Liquefied Petroleum Gases Compressed Natural Gas Liquefied Natural Gas Methanol, 85 Percent (M85) 3 Methanol, Neat (M100) 4 Ethanol, 85 Percent (E85) 3,5 Ethanol, 95 Percent (E95) 3 Elec- tricity 6 Hydro- gen Other Fuels 7 Subtotal Oxygenates 2 Bio- diesel 10 Total Methyl Tertiary Butyl Ether 8 Ethanol in Gasohol 9 Total Alternative-Fueled Vehicles in Use 11 (number) 1992 NA 23,191 90 4,850 404 172 38 1,607 NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA 1993 NA 32,714 299 10,263 414 441 27 1,690 NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA 1994 NA 41,227 484 15,484 415 605 33 2,224 NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA 1995 172,806 50,218 603 18,319 386 1,527

358

1  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

National Centers for National Centers for Environmental Prediction Global Forecast System at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program Southern Great Plains Site F. Yang, H-L. Pan, S. Moorthi, and S. Lord Environmental Modeling Center, National Centers for Environmental Prediction Camp Springs, Maryland S. Krueger Department of Meteorology University of Utah Salt Lake City, Utah Abstract Since 2001 output from the National Centers for Environmental Prediction global weather forecast system (GFS) has been routinely processed to produce single column profiles at locations corresponding to the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program sites. In the present study, GFS forecast was examined and compared with ARM observations at the Southern Great Plain Central Facility for the

359

LM111/LM211/LM311 Voltage Comparator  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

LM111/LM211/LM311 Voltage Comparator 1.0 General Description The LM111, LM211 and LM311 are voltage comparators that have input currents nearly a thousand times lower than devices like the LM106 or LM710A. Both the inputs and the outputs of the LM111, LM211 or the LM311 can be isolated from system ground

Lanterman, Aaron

360

1  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

the additional qualitative information box. EECBG Financing Program Annual Report Page 1 of 3 EECBG Financing Program Annual Report OMB control number (1910-5150) Expiration...

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to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

1  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

environmental management systems. The Laboratory's 2008 Best-in-Class winners are: Wastewater Recycling Saves More Than 1 Million AnnuallyThe Radioactive Liquid Waste...

362

1  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Inspiration from world-class scientists leads Patricia Langan to nanoscience August 1, 2012 Patricia Langan inspired by her colleagues feels driven to be just like them Patricia...

363

1  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Major New Mexico employers sign STEM education proclamation November 1, 2014 Six major employers in New Mexico are collaborating to put New Mexico on the forefront of science,...

364

1  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

for the problem of cloud optics starting from the independent pixel approximation (IPA). 1 Fifteenth ARM Science Team Meeting Proceedings, Daytona Beach, Florida, March...

365

1  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

storage gets new hope September 1, 2009 Economical hydrogen-based vehicles could result from rechargeable 'chemical fuel tank' Ammonia borane (AB) is a potential hydrogen releasing...

366

1  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Data triage enables extreme-scale computing August 1, 2014 The growing scale, size, and complexity of computing require prioritization to manage the data. However, resources are...

367

RSE Table N1.1 and N1.2. Relative Standard Errors for Tables N1.1 and N1.2  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1 and N1.2. Relative Standard Errors for Tables N1.1 and N1.2;" 1 and N1.2. Relative Standard Errors for Tables N1.1 and N1.2;" " Unit: Percents." " "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," " " "," "," ",," "," ",," "," ",," ","Shipments" "NAICS"," ",,"Net","Residual","Distillate",,"LPG and",,"Coke and"," ","of Energy Sources" "Code(a)","Subsector and Industry","Total(b)","Electricity(c)","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(d)","Natural Gas(e)","NGL(f)","Coal","Breeze","Other(g)","Produced Onsite(h)"

368

1  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

B. SCIENTIFIC/TECHNICAL REPORTING B. SCIENTIFIC/TECHNICAL REPORTING (Reports/Products must be submitted with appropriate DOE F 241. The 241 forms are available at www.osti.gov/elink.) Report/Product Form Final Scientific/Technical Report DOE F 241.3 Conference papers/proceedings* DOE F 241.3 Software/Manual DOE F 241.4 Other (see special instructions) DOE F 241.3 * Scientific and technical conferences only C. FINANCIAL REPORTING SF-425 Federal Financial Report D. CLOSEOUT REPORTING Patent Certification Other E. OTHER REPORTING Annual Indirect Cost Proposal Audit of For-Profit Recipients SF-428 Tangible Personal Property Report Forms Family Other Frequency No. of Copies Addressees 1 1 1 1 1

369

Comparing Photosynthetic and Photovoltaic Efficiencies and Recognizing...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Comparing Photosynthetic and Photovoltaic Efficiencies and Recognizing the Potential for Improvement Authors: Blankenship, R. E., Tiede, D. M., Barber, J., Brudvig, G. W., Fleming,...

370

Considerations When Comparing LED and Conventional Lighting  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

When comparing LED lighting performance to conventional lighting, buyers will want to consider energy efficiency, operating life and lumen depreciation, light output/distribution, color quality,...

371

Cetane Performance and Chemistry Comparing Conventional Fuels...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Cetane Performance and Chemistry Comparing Conventional Fuels and Fuels Derived from Heavy Crude Sources Bruce Bunting, Sam Lewis, John Storey OAK RIDGE NATIONAL LABORATORY U. S....

372

1  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Cyber Security Awareness and Training Program Plan Cyber Security Awareness and Training Program Plan A Competency and Functional Framework for Security Workforce Development January 2009 1 U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Cyber Security Awareness and Training Program Plan and Essential Body of Knowledge (EBK) A Competency and Functional Framework For Cyber Security Workforce Development Office of the Chief Information Officer Office of the Associate CIO for Cyber Security January 2009 Cyber Security Awareness and Training Program Plan A Competency and Functional Framework for Security Workforce Development January 2009 2 Table of Contents Executive Summary ........................................................................................................ 4 1.1 Purpose

373

1  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

77-2005 77-2005 Long-Term Surveillance and Maintenance Plan for the U.S. Department of Energy Miamisburg Closure Project, Mound Site, Miamisburg, Ohio Volume I: (LTS&M Plan and referenced LM Plans and information) September 2005 Information in this document is subject to revision until the EM mission is completed at the Miamisburg Closure Project at the Mound Site S0136900 Draft Document U.S. Department of Energy LTS&M Plan⎯Mound Site, Miamisburg, Ohio September 2005 Doc. No. S0136900 Page iii Contents Acronyms...................................................................................................................................... vii 1.0 Purpose and Objective........................................................................................................1-1

374

1  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

New Alternatives for Data Access and New Alternatives for Data Access and Distribution from the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program Archive R.A. McCord, G. Palanisamy, R.C. Ward, R.T. Cederwall, D.P. Kaiser, and S.T. Moore Oak Ridge National Laboratory Oak Ridge, Tennessee Introduction The Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program and the Archive are seeking to give scientists an alternative mechanism to access and download ARM measurements that would be more flexible and efficient for both the data users and the Archive. This "new information sharing method" would allow the data requesters to dynamically select the measurements, locations, and time ranges required for their research, as compared to the current file-based method of ARM data delivery, which

375

1  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Integrated Cloud Liquid and Precipitable Integrated Cloud Liquid and Precipitable Water Vapor Retrievals from the ARM Microwave Radiometer During SHEBA Y. Han, E. R. Westwater, and S. Y. Matrosov University of Colorado Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Sciences National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Environmental Technology Laboratory Boulder, Colorado M. D. Shupe Science and Technology Corporation National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Environmental Technology Laboratory Boulder, Colorado Introduction Dual frequency, ground-based, Microwave Radiometers (MWRs) have been used for more than 20 years to derive columnar amounts of both water vapor (WV) and cloud liquid and a large number of studies have been made comparing retrievals of precipitable water vapor by MWRs vs. radiosondes and vs.

376

1  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

How well do State-of-the-Art Techniques Measuring the How well do State-of-the-Art Techniques Measuring the Vertical Profile of Tropospheric Aerosol Extinction Compare? B. Schmid and J. Redemann Bay Area Environmental Research Institute Sonoma, California R. Ferrare NASA Langley Research Center Hampton, Virginia C. Flynn, D. Turner, and J. Barnard Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Richland, Washington R. Elleman and D. Covert University of Washington Seattle, Washington A. Strawa, J. Eilers, and A.G. Hallar NASA Ames Research Center Moffett Field, California E. Welton and B. Holben NASA GSFC Greenbelt, Maryland H. Jonsson Center for Interdisciplinary Remotely-Piloted Aircraft Studies Marina, California K. Ricci Los Gatos Research Inc. Mountain View, California M. Clayton SAIC/NASA Langley Research Center

377

1  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Meltwater effects on flow of Greenland's Meltwater effects on flow of Greenland's ice sheet less severe for sea level rise than earlier feared, scientists say August 19, 2013 LOS ALAMOS, N.M., Aug. 19, 2013-The effects of increased melting on the future motion of and sea-level contribution from Greenland's massive ice sheet are not quite as dire as previously thought, according to a new study from an international team of researchers. In a paper published this month in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (PNAS), the team found that accelerating ice sheet movement from increasing meltwater lubrication is likely to have only a minor role in future sea-level rise, when compared with other factors like increased iceberg production and surface melting. Greenland's ice sheet is the world's second largest body of ice. A melt event impacting

378

1  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Current Parameterization of Mixed-Phase Current Parameterization of Mixed-Phase Clouds using In Situ Profiles Measured During the Mixed Phase Cloud Experiment G.M. McFarquhar and G. Zhang University of Illinois Urbana, Illinois J. Verlinde Pennsylvania State University University Park, Pennsylvania M. Poellot University of North Dakota Grand Forks, North Dakota A. Heymsfield National Center for Atmospheric Research Boulder, Colorado G. Kok Droplet Measurement Technologies Boulder Colorado Introduction General circulation models (GCMs) suggest that high latitude regions exhibit an enhanced greenhouse warming compared to low latitudes. Data collected during Mixed-Phase Cloud Experiment (MPACE) are critically needed to understand the complex interactions between clouds, the atmosphere and the

379

1  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Results from the Longwave Effective Cloud Fraction Results from the Longwave Effective Cloud Fraction in the Cloudiness Intercomparison E.E. Takara and R.G. Ellingson Department of Meteorology Florida State University Tallahassee, Florida Introduction While it may seem to be a simple quantity, cloud amount is somewhat elusive. Different types of instruments placed next to each other can give different cloud amounts because they use different parts of the spectrum, have different fields of view, sampling rates, etc. Another consideration is that cloud amount depends on the physical scale under consideration. The cloud amount appropriate for comparison to a single pyrgeometer is not likely to be useful for a grid square with 100-km sides. In terms of N e , the average longwave surface flux F, over an area that is compared to individual clouds,

380

1  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Longwave Radiation in the Longwave Radiation in the ECMWF Forecast System J.-J. Morcrette European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts Shinfield Park, Reading Berkshire, United Kingdom Abstract The surface downward longwave radiation (LWR) was computed by the European Centre for Medium- Range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF) forecast system used for the 40-year reanalysis. The LWR is compared with surface radiation measurements for the April to May 1999 period, available as part of the Baseline Surface Radiation Network (BSRN), Surface Radiation Budget Network (SURFRAD), and Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Programs. Comparisons on a one-hour basis are emphasized. This allows discrepancies to be more easily linked to differences between model description and observations of temperature, humidity, and clouds. It also allows the model and

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "1 percent compared" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

1  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Single-Column Modeling, GCM Parameterizations and Single-Column Modeling, GCM Parameterizations and Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Data R.C.J. Somerville and S.F. Iacobellis Scripps Institution of Oceanography/USCD La Jolla, California Introduction Our overall goal is identical to that of the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program: the development of new and improved parameterizations of cloud-radiation effects and related processes, using ARM data at all three ARM sites, and the implementation and testing of these parameterizations in global and regional models. To test recently developed prognostic parameterizations based on detailed cloud microphysics, we have first compared single-column model (SCM) output with ARM observations at the Southern Great Plains (SGP), North Slope of Alaska (NSA) and Topical Western

382

1  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Sources of Data Providing Land Use and Land Cover Estimates for the U.S. Sources of Data Providing Land Use and Land Cover Estimates for the U.S. (next update: 2016) This document provides a crosswalk between major Federal land use and land cover datasets and provides details on the definitions, coverage, and methodologies used by the agencies. The purpose of this document is to clarify the differences between land use and land cover data and to facilitate users' understanding of the comparability of these data. Various U.S. Federal agencies produce land use or land cover estimates. Some agencies produce estimates for the entire U.S., while others produce estimates covering fewer land or ownership types; for many agencies the scope and scale of the estimates are designed to meet specific legislated mandates passed by Congress. Just as the scope and

383

1  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Fluxes During ZCAREX-99: Fluxes During ZCAREX-99: Measurements and Calculations G. S. Golitsyn, P. P. Anikin, E. M. Feigelson, I. A. Gorchakova, I. I. Mokhov, E. V. Romashova, M. A. Sviridenkov, and T. A. Tarasova Oboukhov Institute of Atmospheric Physics Russian Academy of Sciences Moscow, Russia Introduction During the preliminary winter Cloud-Aerosol-Radiation Experiment at Zvenigorod (ZCAREX-99), global shortwave and thermal fluxes were measured in parallel with characteristics of aerosol and clouds and meteorological parameters of atmosphere. For clear-sky and overcast cloudiness conditions, the measured fluxes were compared with those calculated by different techniques. The cloud radiative forcing for ice and mixed clouds was estimated on the basis of the experimental data.

384

1  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Black Carbon Content, Aerosol Black Carbon Content, Aerosol Optical and Microphysical Characteristics in Moscow and the Moscow Region M.A. Sviridenkov, A.S. Emilenko, A.A. Isakov, and V.M. Kopeikin A.M. Obukhov Institute of Atmospheric Physics, RAS Moscow, Russia Introduction Aerosol loading in the atmosphere is determined by particle generation, growth, transport, and deposition processes. Large cities (e.g., Moscow) are significant sources of aerosols because soot acts as the main light-absorbing constituent. The urban effect on the aerosol characteristics may be studied by comparing measurements from the center of a megacity and in rural region, free from powerful anthropogenic aerosol sources. Experiment Aerosol scattering characteristics and black carbon (BC) mass concentration were simultaneously

385

1  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Boundary Layer Cloud Climatology at the ARM TWP Nauru Boundary Layer Cloud Climatology at the ARM TWP Nauru Site P. Kollias Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Science/ Environmental Technology Laboratory University of Colorado Boulder, Colorado B.A. Albrecht University of Miami Miami, Florida Introduction Boundary layer (BL) clouds are fundamental in regulating the vertical structure of water vapor and entropy in the lowest 2 km of the Earth's atmosphere. Data on fair-weather cumuli have also received relatively little recent attention compared with marine stratocumulus clouds. Studies made thirty years ago, Barbados Oceanographic and Meteorological Experiment (BOMEX, 1969) and the Atlantic Trade- Wind Experiment (ATEX, 1969), provided key analyses (Augstein et al., 1973; Holland and Rassmusen,

386

1  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

skin temperatures (Figure 4b), the RMS error decreased to 3.6% with a bias of -10.1 Wm -2 . The remaining bias may be due to discrepancies in the LW and infrared surface...

387

1  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

LOS ALAMOS, New Mexico, December 1, 2011-A strangely powerful, long-lasting gamma-ray burst on Christmas Day, 2010 has finally been analyzed to the satisfaction of a...

388

1  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

absorption of radiation." Contributions to Atmospheric Physics, 52, 1-16. Kiehl, JT, JJ Hack, GB Bonan, BA Boville, BP Briegleb, DL Williamson, and PJ Rasch. 1996. Description of...

389

1  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

talk about the most complex scientific instrument ever built-the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). The talk, entitled "The Large Hadron Collider Adventure," is at 1:10 p.m. in Los...

390

1  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

specific ribosome arrangement. Manuscript CELL-D-13-01947R1. Published in Cell, July 3, 2014. The collaborating institutions are Charite, Berlin, Germany; Max-Plank Institut fur...

391

1  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

hours before peak storm intensity. Figure 4. Intermediate cyclone composite horizontal wind (m s-1) fields for (a,b,c) the general circulation models and (d,e,f) ERA and...

392

1  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 31 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9...

393

COMPARATIVE COSTS OF CALIFORNIA CENTRAL STATION ELECTRICITY  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CALIFORNIA ENERGY COMMISSION COMPARATIVE COSTS OF CALIFORNIA CENTRAL STATION ELECTRICITY GENERATION COMMISSION Joel Klein Principal Author Ivin Rhyne Manager ELECTRICITY ANALYSIS OFFICE Sylvia Bender DeputyCann Please use the following citation for this report: Klein, Joel. 2009. Comparative Costs of California

394

1.1 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 1.1.1 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

( ) 2011 3 #12;#12;1 1 1.1 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 1.1.1 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 1.1.2 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 1.1.3 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 1.2 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 1.2.1

Tanaka, Jiro

395

Fig1.xls  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

December 2009 December 2009 1 December 2009 Short-Term Energy Outlook December 8, 2009 Release Highlights  EIA expects the price of West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil will average about $76 per barrel this winter (October-March). The forecast for the monthly average WTI price dips to $75 early next year then rises to $82 per barrel by December 2010, assuming U.S. and world economic conditions continue to improve. EIA's forecast assumes that U.S. real gross domestic product (GDP) grows by 1.9 percent in 2010 and world oil-consumption-weighted real GDP grows by 2.6 percent.  Rising crude oil prices contribute to an increase in the annual average regular-

396

1  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

U.S. Department of Energy Summary of Annual Site Environmental Reports for CY 2012 U.S. Department of Energy Summary of Annual Site Environmental Reports for CY 2012 September 2013 Doc. No. S10618 Page 1 Office of Legacy Management's Summary of Annual Site Environmental Reports 1.0 Reporting Requirement Department of Energy (DOE) Order 231.1B, Environment, Safety and Health Reporting, requires that each DOE site prepare an Annual Site Environmental Report (ASER) documenting the site's environmental conditions. The ASER is submitted to DOE-Headquarters annually and is available to the public. An attachment, "ASER Reporting and Closure Sites," to DOE's Guidance for the Preparation of Department of Energy Annual Site Environmental Reports for Calendar Year 2012, dated July 13, 2013 , recognizes that each Legacy Management (LM) site

397

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Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Radiatively-Induced Anvil Spreading Radiatively-Induced Anvil Spreading S.K. Krueger and M.A. Zulauf University of Utah Salt Lake City, Utah Abstract Observations show that cirrus clouds often result from the life cycle of convective cloud systems. Figure 1 is a schematic of the life cycle of a convective system that is consistent with satellite observations of convective systems. Figure 2 shows an example of such observations. Machado and Rossow (1993), using satellite imagery, found that relatively thin high clouds constitute a large part of the area covered by such systems, especially when considering the system's entire life cycle. Figure 1. Schematic of the life cycle of a convective system (from Machado and Rossow [1993]). 1 Fifteenth ARM Science Team Meeting Proceedings, Daytona Beach, Florida, March 14-18, 2005

398

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Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

S Shafer S Shafer 2012.10.01 16:44:41 -06'00' U.S. Department of Energy Summary of Annual Site Environmental Reports September 2012 Doc. No. S09366 Page 1 Office of Legacy Management's Summary of Annual Site Environmental Reports 1.0 Reporting Requirement DOE Order 231.1B, Environment, Safety and Health Reporting, requires that each DOE site prepare an Annual Site Environmental Report (ASER) documenting the site's environmental conditions. The ASER is submitted to DOE-Headquarters annually and is available to the public. An attachment, "ASER Reporting and Closure Sites," to DOE's Guidance for the Preparation of Department of Energy Annual Site Environmental Reports for Calendar Year 2011, dated May 7, 2012, recognizes that each LM site has unique characteristics and suggests two alternatives to

399

1  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

N N Framework for the Avian and Bat Monitoring Plan U.S. Department of the Interior Minerals Management Service MMS Cape Wind Energy Project January 2009 Final EIS Appendix N Framework for the Avian and Bat Monitoring Plan Framework for the Avian and Bat Monitoring Plan for the Cape Wind Proposed Offshore Wind Facility PREPARED BY: U.S. DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR MINERALS MANAGEMENT SERVICE 381 ELDEN STREET HERNDON, VA 20170 AND CAPE WIND ASSOCIATES 75 ARLINGTON STREET SUITE 704 BOSTON, MA 02116 SEPTEMBER 19, 2008 TABLE OF CONTENTS 1.0 INTRODUCTION ................................................................................................................................. 1 2.0 SUMMARY OF AVAILABLE INFORMATON ON MONITORING TECHNIQUES AND THEIR

400

Off-set stabilizer for comparator output  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A stabilized off-set voltage is input as the reference voltage to a comparator. In application to a time-interval meter, the comparator output generates a timing interval which is independent of drift in the initial voltage across the timing capacitor. A precision resistor and operational amplifier charge a capacitor to a voltage which is precisely offset from the initial voltage. The capacitance of the reference capacitor is selected so that substantially no voltage drop is obtained in the reference voltage applied to the comparator during the interval to be measured.

Lunsford, James S. (Los Alamos, NM)

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

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to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Comparing Commercial Lighting Energy Requirements | Building Energy Codes  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Comparing Commercial Lighting Energy Requirements Comparing Commercial Lighting Energy Requirements ASHRAE Standard 90.1-2004 and the 2003 International Energy Conservation Code include requirements for interior and exterior lighting in new construction, additions, and alterations for all commercial buildings, including residential structures with four or more stories above grade. Publication Date: Wednesday, May 13, 2009 ta_comparing_commercial_lighting_energy_requirements.pdf Document Details Affiliation: DOE BECP Document Number: PNNL-SA-49098 Focus: Compliance Building Type: Commercial Code Referenced: ASHRAE Standard 90.1-2004 2003 IECC Document type: Technical Articles Target Audience: Architect/Designer Builder Code Official Contractor Engineer Contacts Web Site Policies U.S. Department of Energy USA.gov Last Updated: Wednesday, July 25, 2012 - 15:22

402

1  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

use: use: The Special T&Cs may be modified to delete non-applicable provisions or to add provisions required in special circumstances (e.g. high-risk recipients or programmatic needs.) The instructions for use of the provision (blue text), including this page, should be deleted prior to distribution. If there are no instructions, the provision is required and must be included in the Special T&Cs. Additional approvals for inclusion of some provisions may be required by local policy, procedure and guidance. Special T&Cs can be put into column style by clicking on Format, then columns and choosing the number of columns desired. 1 SPECIAL TERMS AND CONDITIONS FOR USE IN MOST GRANTS AND COOPERATIVE AGREEMENTS JULY 2008 1a. RESOLUTION OF CONFLICTING CONDITIONS

403

1  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

photo: Structural and energetic model of Cs photo: Structural and energetic model of Cs + exchange with K + in a layer lattice silicate mineral (e.g., muscovite). Muscovite is a 2:1 layer silicate containing structural layers of octahedrally coordinated Al(III) over- and underlain by layers of tetrahedrally coordinated Si(IV). Isomorphic substitutions in these layers lead to charge imbalance and a cation exchange capacity. These types of exchange reactions control the migration veloc- ity of radio-cesium beneath leaked single shell tanks at Hanford and other DOE sites. Environmental Dynamics and Simulation researchers have 1) developed molecular models of this exchange reaction; 2) identified the key layer lattice silicates in Hanford sediments controlling Cs + exchange using advanced spectroscopic techniques such as synchrotron

404

1  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Horizontal and Vertical Profiles of In-Situ Cloud Horizontal and Vertical Profiles of In-Situ Cloud Properties Measured During Tropical Warm Pool International Cloud Experiment G. McFarquhar, M. Freer, and J. Um University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign Urbana, Illinois G. Kok Droplet Measurement Technologies Boulder, Colorado R. McCoy and T. Tooman Sandia National Laboratories Livermore, California J. Mace University of Utah Salt Lake City, Utah Introduction In-situ measurements of ice particle sizes, shapes and numbers were made in fresh anvils, aging anvils and in generic cirrus during TWP-ICE. The vertical profiles and horizontal profiles performed by the Scaled Composites Proteus aircraft were made on 7 different days as illustrated in Table 1. Table 1. Summary of flights conducted during TWP-ICE; *designates that spiral was conducted over Darwin,

405

(1)  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

RFI for DOE Docket No. RRTT-IR-001 RFI for DOE Docket No. RRTT-IR-001 1 4/3/2012 I. INTRODUCTION The City of Los Angeles is a municipal corporation and charter city organized under the provisions of the California Constitution. Los Angeles Department of Water and Power (LADWP) is a proprietary department of the City of Los Angeles that supplies both safe and reliable water and power to Los Angeles' residents, approximately 1.4 million customers, pursuant to the Los Angeles City Charter. LADWP is a vertically integrated utility that owns generation, transmission and distribution facilities. LADWP owns and operates over 20,000 circuit miles of AC and DC lines, with voltages up to 500 KV. Of its total number of circuit miles, approximately 3,000 circuit miles are out-of- LA basin, therefore enabling the

406

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Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Darwin ARCS3 Darwin ARCS3 P. T. May, T. D. Keenan, and C. J. Jakob Bureau of Meteorological Research Center Melbourne 3001, Victoria, Australia B. Forgan Australian Bureau of Meteorology Melbourne 3001, Victoria, Australia R. Mitchell, S. A. Young, and M. Platt Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organization Aspendale, Victoria, Australia Introduction Darwin is located near 12°S, 131°E and the northern coast of Australia and is affected by a classic mon- soonal environment within the "maritime continent." As shown in Figure 1, almost all rainfall occurs during the period November to April associated with the onset of the annual "wet season." The rainfall Figure 1. Annual distribution of rainfall at Darwin, Australia, (right) and associated spatial

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Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Scanning Filter Photometer for Measuring the Scanning Filter Photometer for Measuring the Sky Brightness in the Solar Almucantar A. Kh. Shukurov, S. M. Pirogov, and G. S. Golitsyn A. M. Oboukhov Institute of Atmospheric Physics Russian Academy of Science Moscow, Russia Description The operating prototype of an instrument has been developed and built up for measuring the scattered solar radiation and its polarization in the solar almucantar for azimuth angles A ranged from 0 to 170 degrees at different zenith angles Z. At A = 0 the direct sun light is measured. The view of the instrument is shown in Figure 1. The instrument calibration is supplied by the etalon Lambertian screen. The instrument consists of: (1) Sun-tracker with the accuracy of one angular minute, (2) photometer

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Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

1-02) 1-02) Section II STANDARD TERMS AND CONDITIONS FOR COST REIMBURSEMENT CONTRACTS THE FOLLOWING CLAUSES APPLY TO THIS CONTRACT AS INDICATED UNLESS SPECIFICALLY DELETED, OR EXCEPT TO THE EXTENT THEY ARE SPECIFICALLY SUPPLEMENTED OR AMENDED IN WRITING IN THE SIGNATURE PAGE OR SECTION I. CR01 - ACCEPTANCE OF TERMS AND CONDITIONS Contractor, by signing this Agreement and/or delivering Items or services ordered under this agreement, agrees to comply with all the terms and conditions and all specifications and other documents that this Contract incorporated by reference or attachment. Sandia hereby objects to any terms and conditions contained in any acknowledgment of this Contract that are different from or in addition to those mentioned in this document. Failure of Sandia or Contractor to enforce any of the

409

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Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Progress Towards Higher-Fidelity Yet Efficient Modeling Progress Towards Higher-Fidelity Yet Efficient Modeling of Radiation Energy Transport through Three-Dimensional Clouds M.L. Hall Continuum Dynamics Los Alamos National Laboratory Los Alamos, New Mexico A.B. Davis Space and Remote Sensing Sciences Los Alamos National Laboratory Los Alamos, New Mexico Introduction Accurate modeling of radiative energy transport through cloudy atmospheres is necessary for both climate modeling with global climate models and remote sensing. The aspect ratio (horizontal/vertical) of the mesh cells used for radiation modeling in global climate models is so large that the cells are effectively shaped like square "pancakes," with rough dimensions of 100s of km horizontally and 1 km vertically, as seen in Figure 1a. In this situation, a reasonable and commonly-used approximation

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1  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

1-02) 1-02) SECTION II STANDARD TERMS AND CONDITIONS FOR CONSULTANT AND OTHER PROFESSIONAL PROVIDER SERVICE CONTRACTS THE FOLLOWING CLAUSES APPLY TO REQUESTS FOR QUOTATION AND CONTRACTS AS INDICATED UNLESS SPECIFICALLY DELETED, OR EXCEPT TO THE EXTENT THEY ARE SPECIFICALLY SUPPLEMENTED OR AMENDED IN WRITING IN THE COVER PAGE OR SECTION I. CO01 - ACCEPTANCE OF TERMS AND CONDITIONS Contractor, by signing this Contract and/or delivering Items or services ordered under this Contract, agrees to comply with all the terms and conditions and all specifications and other documents that this Contract incorporated by reference or attachment. Sandia hereby objects to any terms and conditions contained in any acknowledgment of this Contract that are different from or in addition to those

411

1  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Comparison of the Daily Cycle Comparison of the Daily Cycle of Lower-Tropospheric Winds Over the Open Ocean and Those Above a Small Island L. M. Hartten and W. M. Angevine Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Sciences University of Colorado National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Aeronomy Laboratory Boulder, Colorado Introduction The Nauru99 Intensive Operational Period (IOP) took place from June 16, 1999, (Day 167) to July 15, 1999, (Day 196) on and near the Republic of Nauru (0.5° S, 166.9° E). Nauru is a small (4 km by 6 km) island surrounded by a reef that is exposed at low tide (Figure 1). A narrow coastal belt encircles a sparsely vegetated 30 to 60 m high plateau comprised of coral pinnacles and phosphate-bearing rock. Figure 1. The Republic of Nauru. The 915-MHz profiler was located at "P"; the Atmospheric Radiation

412

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Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

1-02) 1-02) Section II STANDARD TERMS AND CONDITIONS FOR FIRM FIXED PRICE AND FIXED RATE CONTRACTS THE FOLLOWING CLAUSES APPLY TO THIS CONTRACT AS INDICATED UNLESS SPECIFICALLY DELETED, OR EXCEPT TO THE EXTENT THEY ARE SPECIFICALLY SUPPLEMENTED OR AMENDED IN WRITING IN THE SIGNATURE PAGE OR SECTION I. FP01 - ACCEPTANCE OF TERMS AND CONDITIONS Contractor, by signing this Agreement and/or delivering Items or services ordered under this Agreement, agrees to comply with all the terms and conditions and all specifications and other documents that this Contract incorporated by reference or attachment. Sandia hereby objects to any terms and conditions contained in any acknowledgment of this Contract that are different from or in addition to those mentioned in this document. Failure of Sandia or Contractor to enforce any

413

1  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

HFMRF Overview HFMRF Overview Section 2-3-1 High-Field Magnetic Resonance Facility The High-Field Magnetic Resonance Facility (HFMRF) brings a powerful synergy of creative scientific staff and unique instrumentation to bear on complex scientific problems. HFMRF is equipped with state-of-the-art nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and pulsed electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) instruments, all of which play a role in determining molecular structures that are relevant to environmental remediation efforts, materials development for national energy needs, and biological health effects. HFMRF offers unique tools and techniques designed in-house to enable novel research, including 1) in situ catalysis probes, 2) radionuclide NMR capabilities, 3) solid-state NMR cryogenic probes for direct

414

1  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Improving the Representation of Aerosol-Cloud- Improving the Representation of Aerosol-Cloud- Precipitation Interactions in Numerical Models D.B. Mechem and Y.L. Kogan Cooperative Institute for Mesoscale Meteorological Studies University of Oklahoma Norman, Oklahoma Introduction Accurately representing aerosol indirect effects in large-scale numerical models requires microphysical parameterizations that treat complex aerosol-cloud-precipitation interactions in a realistic manner. Here we address two important aspects of these microphysical interactions: 1. Development of a new parameterization of giant cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) for use in bulk microphysical models; 2. Aspects of droplet nucleation revealed by 3D large eddy simulation (LES) results but not captured by nucleation schemes based on simple empirical relations or 1D parcel models

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Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Climate change cripples forests Climate change cripples forests October 1, 2012 Southwestern US trees face rising drought stress and mortality as climate warms LOS ALAMOS, N.M., Oct. 1, 2012-Combine the tree-ring growth record with historic information, climate records and computer-model projections of future climate trends, and you get a grim picture for the future of trees in the southwestern United States. That's the word from a team of scientists from Los Alamos National Laboratory, the U.S. Geological Survey, University of Arizona, and several other partner organizations. - 2 - 3:01 Tree Death Study's Climate Change Connection Described in a paper published in Nature Climate Change this week, "Temperature as a potent driver of regional forest drought stress and tree mortality," the team concluded

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Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Generalized Expressions for Effective Radius, Cloud Generalized Expressions for Effective Radius, Cloud Radiative Properties, and Their Application to Studies of the First Indirect Aerosol Effect P.H. Daum and Y. Liu Brookhaven National Laboratory Upton, New York Abstract Radiative properties of clouds are often expressed as a function of effective radius r e defined as the ratio of the third to the second moment of the cloud droplet size distribution, and the value of r e in turn is parameterized as a "1/3" power-law: r e = a(L/N)^1/3 where L is the cloud liquid water content, N is the cloud droplet number concentration and a is an increasing function of the relative dispersion of the cloud droplet size distribution. We have recently shown that the relative dispersion of the cloud droplet size

417

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Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Chapter 4.2, Public R,~lations Contracts is a new chapter replacing Acquisition Letter 2002-03. Chapter 4.2, Public R,~lations Contracts is a new chapter replacing Acquisition Letter 2002-03. It requires coordination with the Office of Public Affairs, DOE or National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA), prior to contracting for public relations or communication services requirements. Chapter 38.1, Federal Supply Schedule Contracting is an update of the Strategic Acquisition Transactions Guide oj~ 2002, in response to Policy Flash 2004-23, "Proper Use of Other Agencies Contracts", It clarifies and improves procedures to be followed when placing awards under other Agency contracts, such as Federal Supply Schedules (FSS) and Government-wide Agency Contracts (GW ACs), as well as ordering procedures under Multiple Award Contracts. It provides that the Con1racting Officer placing an order on another agency's behalf is responsible

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National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

56 56 Page 2 of 2 The purpose of this modification is to revise and replace the following: A. Part I, Section H, Clause H-6, Parent Organization's Oversight Plan, Paragraph (c), the first sentence is deleted and replaced with the following: The estimated cost for the Parent Organization's Oversight Plan for FY11 (October 1, 2010 - September 30, 2011) is NTE $2,599,106.00. B. Part I, Section H, Clause H-31, Service Contract Act of 1965 (41 U.S.C. 351), is replaced with: H-31 SERVICE CONTRACT ACT OF 1965 (41 U.S.C. 351) The Service Contract Act of 1965 is not applicable to this contract. However, in accordance with the Section I Clause DEAR 970.5244-1, entitled, "Contractor Purchasing

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Office of Legacy Management (LM)

300 300 GJO-2003-431-TAC GJO-GWSHP 13.2-1 UMTRA Ground Water Project Baseline Performance Report for the Shiprock, New Mexico, UMTRA Project Site September 2003 Prepared by U.S. Department of Energy Grand Junction Office Grand Junction, Colorado Work Performed Under DOE Contract Number DE-AC13-02GJ79491 This page intentionally left blank Document Number U0179300 Contents DOE/Grand Junction Office Baseline Performance Report, Shiprock, New Mexico

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Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

FINAL FINAL ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT For a Loan and Grant to A123 Systems, Inc., for Vertically Integrated Mass Production of Automotive-Class Lithium-Ion Batteries DOE/EA-1690 April 2010 U.S. Department of Energy Loan Programs Office Washington, DC 20585 Final Environmental Assessment for A123 Loan and Grant DOE/EA-1690 i April 2010 CONTENTS Acronyms and Abbreviations .................................................................................................... viii Summary ................................................................................................................................ S-1

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While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Why sequence Comparative analysis of Aspergilli species?  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Comparative analysis of Aspergilli species? Comparative analysis of Aspergilli species? Aspergillus is not only one of the most important fungi for use in biotechnology it is also one of the most commonly found groups of fungi worldwide. This project seeks to sequence and annotate a series of additional Aspergillus species and Penicillium roqueforti to complement and strengthen the genomic data currently available for comparative studies. The data resulting from these species comparisonswill be of direct relevance to the DOE mission, particularly to howspecies have become adapted for utilization of specific carbon sources enabling efficientbiomass degradation. Principal Investigators: Ronald de Vries, CBS-KNAW Fungal Biodiversity Centre, the Netherlands Program: CSP 2011 Home > Sequencing > Why sequence Comparative analysis of Aspergilli

422

Comparative genomics and bioenergetics Jose Castresana *  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Review Comparative genomics and bioenergetics Jose Castresana * European Molecular Biology conclusions about the phylogenetic distribution and evolution of bioenergetic pathways to be drawn conservation used by prokaryotes. In addition, a thorough phylogenetic analysis of other bioenergetic protein

Castresana, Jose

423

Comparing greenhouse gases for policy purposes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In order to derive optimal policies for greenhouse gas emissions control, the discounted marginal damages of emissions of different gases must be compared. The greenhouse warming potential (GWP) index, which is most often ...

Schmalensee, Richard

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

424

MANAGEMENT AND COMPARATIVE ANALYSIS OF DATASET ENSEMBLES  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The primary Phase I technical objective was to develop a prototype that demonstrates the functionality of all components required for an end-to-end meta-data management and comparative visualization system.

Geveci, Berk [Senior Director, Scientific Computing

2010-05-17T23:59:59.000Z

425

Is ZF a hack? Comparing the complexity of some  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Is ZF a hack? Comparing the complexity of some postings on the forum called Advogato, Raph had written that `ZF is a hack'.1 This statement was the reason, and he called ZF set theory a `hack.' I more or less agree, but playing with it in the context

Wiedijk, Freek

426

ccsd00001953, A comparative analysis of the electron energy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-1027, 11801 M#19;exico D. F., MEXICO E-mail: cgt@nuclear.inin.mx Abstract. To establish the electron energyccsd­00001953, version 1 ­ 22 Oct 2004 A comparative analysis of the electron energy distribution place in ECR plasma sources, where low pressure plasma is sustained by electron impact ionization

427

Slide 1  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Workshop on Biofuels Projections in the Annual Energy Outlook Workshop on Biofuels Projections in the Annual Energy Outlook March 20, 2013 | Washington, DC By Howard Gruenspecht, Deputy Administrator Biofuels in the United States: Context and Outlook Topics addressed * Current role of biofuels * Biofuels outlook 2 Howard Gruenspecht, Biofuels in the United States: Context and Outlook March 20, 2013 Liquid biofuels currently provide about 1 percent of total U.S. energy 3 0 20 40 60 80 100 120 1980 1985 1990 1995 2000 2005 2010 2015 2020 2025 2030 2035 2040 U.S. primary energy consumption quadrillion Btu Source: EIA, Annual Energy Outlook 2013 Early Release History 2011 36% 20% 26% 8% 8% 1% Shares of total U.S. energy Nuclear Oil and other liquids Liquid biofuels Natural gas

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Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

17, 2008 DRAFT 17, 2008 DRAFT 1. A ROBUST INTERSTATE ELECTRIC TRANSMISSION NETWORK MUST BE DEVELOPED TO ENABLE OUR ELECTRICITY FUTURE The existing interstate electric transmission network is the result of actions taken by vertically integrated utilities to build generation and transmission to serve their customers' electricity demands, to provide for the wholesale purchase and sale of electricity with neighboring utilities, and to share generating capacity reserves so as to minimize installed capacity reserves. This system is now at an age requiring significant replacement of original infrastructure and one that is not robust enough to enable the electricity future projected for the United States. Broad-scale

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Office of Legacy Management (LM)

293-2006 293-2006 Office of Legacy Management 2006 Avian Wetland Surveys Monticello Mill Tailings Site September 2006 Work Performed by S.M. Stoller Corporation under DOE Contract No. DE-AC01-02GJ79491 for the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management, Grand Junction, Colorado This page intentionally left blank U.S. Department of Energy Avian Wetland Surveys at MMTS-2006 September 2006 Doc. No. S0255600 Page iii Contents Summary ....................................................................................................................................................... v 1.0 Introduction ........................................................................................................................................

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Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Raman Lidar at Southern Great Plains: New Measurement Capabilities D. Petty and J. Comstock Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Richland, Washington D. Turner Space Science and Engineering Center University of Wisconsin Madison, Wisconsin J. Goldsmith Sandia National Laboratory Livermore, California Z. Wang University of Wyoming Laramie, Wyoming Introduction The Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program (ARM) Raman Lidar (CARL) was designed and deployed for the purpose of collecting a long-term observational data set that can be used to study and improve the understanding of processes that affect atmospheric radiation and the description of these processes in climate models [1]. It operates as an unattended, turn-key system for profiling tropospheric

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Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

MSCF Overview MSCF Overview Section 2-6-1 Molecular Science Computing Facility The Molecular Science Computing Facility (MSCF) supports a wide range of computational activities in environmental molecular research, from benchmark calculations on small molecules to reliable calculations on large molecules, from solids to simulations of large biomolecules, and from reactive chemical transport modeling to regional cloud climate modeling. MSCF provides an integrated production computing environment with links to external facilities and laboratories within the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) system, collaborating universities, and industry. Capabilities MSCF provides computational resources for Computational Grand Challenges in environmental molecular science and basic and applied research

432

(1)  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

AUI Guidance AUI Guidance (1) Asset Utilization Index (AUI). AUI is the Department's corporate measure of facilities and land holdings against requirements. The index reflects the outcome from real property acquisition and disposal policy, planning, and resource decisions. (a) Utilization at the asset level is determined by evaluating the percentage of the real property asset required for mission accomplishment. Utilization can be determined on a gross square feet (GSF) basis or on a percentage of requirement basis. Utilization must be determined annually by conducting a site wide utilization survey of all assets. In general, utilization is the ratio (expressed in percentage) of the GSF required of an asset divided

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Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

CPCS Overview CPCS Overview 2-1 Chemistry & Physics of Complex Systems Facility The Chemistry & Physics of Complex Systems (CPCS) Facility supports the Department of Energy's (DOE) mission of fostering fundamental research in the natural sciences to provide the basis for new and improved energy technologies and for understanding and mitigating the environmental impacts of energy use and contaminant releases. This research provides a foundation for understanding interactions of atoms, molecules, and ions with materials and with photons and electrons. Particular emphasis is on interfacial processes. A distinguishing feature of research at the National Laboratories is their approach to problem solving. Significant scientific issues are addressed by using focused and multidis-

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Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Statistical Physics, Information Theory and Statistical Physics, Information Theory and Cloud Droplet Size Distributions Y. Liu and P. H. Daum Brookhaven National Laboratory Atmospheric Sciences Division Upton, New York Introduction Specification of cloud droplet size distributions is essential for the calculation of radiation transfer in clouds and cloud-climate interactions, and for remote sensing of cloud properties. Despite the effort and progress made over the last few decades, a number of vital issues remain unsolved. For example, 1) It is well known that observed droplet size distributions are generally much broader than those predicted by the classical uniform model (Howell 1949). This so-called spectral broadening issue has puzzled many generations of cloud physicists. 2) An increasing amount of observational evidence has shown that the

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Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Representing Cloud Processing of Aerosol in Representing Cloud Processing of Aerosol in Numerical Models DB Mechem and YL Kogan Cooperative Institute for Mesoscale Meteorological Studies University of Oklahoma Norman, Oklahoma Introduction The satellite imagery in Figure 1 provides dramatic examples of how aerosol influences the cloud field. Aerosol from ship exhaust can serve as nucleation centers in otherwise cloud-free regions, forming ship tracks (top image), or can enhance the reflectance/albedo in already cloudy regions. This image is a demonstration of the first indirect effect, in which changes in aerosol modulate cloud droplet radius and concentration, which influences albedo. It is thought that, through the effects it has on precipitation (drizzle), aerosol can also affect the structure

436

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Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Cloud Droplet Effective Radius: Cloud Droplet Effective Radius: Effects of Spectral Dispersion and Skewness of Cloud Droplet Size Distributions P. H. Daum and Y. Liu Department of Applied Science Brookhaven National Laboratory Upton, New York Introduction Effective radius r e (defined as the ratio of the third to the second moment of a droplet size distribution) is one of the crucial variables that determine the radiative properties of liquid water clouds (Hansen and Travis 1974). The inclusion and parameterization of r e in climate models has proven to be critical for assessing global climate change (Slingo 1990; Dandin et al. 1997). There has been increasing evidence for parameterizing r e as a 1/3 power law of the ratio of the cloud liquid water content (L) to the droplet

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Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

the Cloud Droplet Effective Radius Profile the Cloud Droplet Effective Radius Profile in Stratiform Clouds M. Ovtchinnikov and Y. L. Kogan Cooperative Institute for Mesoscale Meteorological Studies Norman, Oklahoma Introduction The droplet effective radius r e defined as ( ) ( ) ∫ ∫ = dr r n r dr r n r r 2 3 e , (1) where n(r) is the droplet size distribution (DSD). r e is an important parameter in cloud-radiation parameterizations in mesoscale and general circulation models. Although it is recognized that the vertical variations of r e may significantly affect outcome of such parameterizations, an assumption of constant r e is commonly used in today's models. This simplification is caused in part by the limited data available on the r e -height dependence obtained primarily from expensive aircraft sampling of a relatively

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Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Spectral Dependences of the Atmospheric Aerosol Optical Spectral Dependences of the Atmospheric Aerosol Optical Depth in the Extended Spectral Region of 0.4-4 μm S.M. Sakerin and D.M. Kabanov Institute of Atmospheric Optics Tomsk, Russia Introduction Regular measurements of the aerosol optical depth (AOD) in different regions are important for studying the aerosol climate forcing (see Report WMO 2005; Holben 1998). To date, the majority of measurements of AOD - τ А (λ) are carried out in the relatively narrow wavelength range 0.34-1 μm, where the effect of aerosol on the radiative processes is more significant then molecular absorption. To obtain a more accurate definition of the climatic role of atmospheric aerosol, it is necessary to obtain data in different regions and in a wider wavelength range of the incoming radiation. The results in the

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Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

0 PROGRAM TECHNOLOGIES AND STATE APPLICABILITY 0 PROGRAM TECHNOLOGIES AND STATE APPLICABILITY 2.1 INTRODUCTION This chapter provides detailed descriptions of leading technologies and associated R&D projects planned and anticipated under the Carbon Sequestration Program. This chapter also summarizes the current results of ongoing efforts to characterize existing CO 2 sources and potential repositories (sinks) and it describes the applicability of leading technologies by state. Finally, the chapter presents a series of model projects that are representative of the leading technologies anticipated for field or pilot tests and potential implementation during future phases of the Program. The model projects consist of hypothetical facilities that would be necessary to implement the objectives of each respective project, including assumptions about land requirements, process

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Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

eGSE America: eGSE America: Electric Aircraft PushBack Tractor (EAPT) Technical Specifications Revision 01 June 2008 Prepared by Electric Transportation Applications eGSE America: EAPT Technical Specifications 2 1 SCOPE This document outlines the specific design and performance requirements for the propulsion and energy management systems of a battery-powered, electric aircraft pushback tractor (hereafter "tractor"). This document shall apply to both a "towbar" and "towbarless" type of pushback tractor. The use of "shall" in this document indicates a mandatory requirement. The use of "should" indicates a recommendation or that which is advised but not required. 2 APPLICABLE DOCUMENTS Portions of the following documents, to the extent specified herein, are a part of this

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "1 percent compared" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

1  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Importance of Three-Dimensional Solar Importance of Three-Dimensional Solar Radiative Transfer in Small Cumulus Cloud Fields Derived from the NAURU MMCR and MWR K. F. Evans and S. A. McFarlane University of Colorado Boulder, Colorado W. J. Wiscombe National Aeronautics and Space Administration Goddard Space Flight Center Greenbelt, Maryland Introduction The radiative effects of cloud horizontal inhomogeneity may be divided into two parts (e.g., Varnai and Davies 1999): 1) the one-dimensional heterogeneity effect due to optical depth variability, and 2) the horizontal transport effect of light moving between columns. For climate applications in which domain averaged fluxes are important, the independent pixel approximation (IPA) correctly addresses the first effect, but not the second. There is evidence (Cahalan et al. 1994; Barker et al. 1998) that the IPA

442

1  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Aspect Ratios Derived Aspect Ratios Derived from Total Sky Imagers Data: Case Studies E. Kassianov and C. Long Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Introduction The Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program operates total sky imagers (TSIs) to retrieve hemispherical sky cover. Previously, we have demonstrated a method to convert surface measurements of sky cover determined from TSI observations to the vertically projected cloud fraction (Kassianov et al. 2005). To perform the conversion successfully, the measurements of cloud cover must be highly sampled (at least 1-minute sampling) and performed for a limited (100°) field-of-view (FOV). As a result of our study (Kassianov et al. 2005), the ARM Program added 100° FOV retrievals from TSI observations. We suggest that a comparison between the 100° and 160° FOV retrievals can yield

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Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Antibody evolution could guide HIV Antibody evolution could guide HIV vaccine development April 4, 2013 LOS ALAMOS, N. M., April 4, 2013-Observing the evolution of a particular type of antibody in an infected HIV-1 patient, a study spearheaded by Duke University, including analysis from Los Alamos National Laboratory, has provided insights that will enable vaccination strategies that mimic the actual antibody development within the body. The kind of antibody studied is called a broadly cross-reactive neutralizing antibody, and details of its generation could provide a blueprint for effective vaccination, according to the study's authors. In a paper published online in Nature this week, the team reported on the isolation, evolution and structure of a broadly neutralizing antibody from an

444

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Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Multi-Filter Rotating Shadowband Radiometers Mentor Multi-Filter Rotating Shadowband Radiometers Mentor Report and Baseline Surface Radiation Network Submission Status G. Hodges Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Sciences University of Colorado Boulder, Colorado Overview Currently 24 multi-filter rotating shadowband radiometers (MFRSRs) operate within the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program. Eighteen MFRSRs are located at Southern Great Plains (SGP) site, one is located at each of the North Slope of Alaska (NSA) and Tropical Western Pacific (TWP) sites, and one is part of the instrumentation of the ARM Mobile Facility. The SGP site, that has four extended facilities that are equipped for an MFRSR but do not have one due to instrument failure or a lack of spare instruments. Table 1 lists all the sites supporting MFRSRs along with the instrument

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Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

GCM Parameterization of Bimodal Size Spectra for GCM Parameterization of Bimodal Size Spectra for Mid-latitude Cirrus Clouds D. Ivanova, D. L. Mitchell, and W. P. Arnott Division of Atmospheric Sciences Desert Research Institute Reno, Nevada M. R. Poellot Department of Atmospheric Science University of North Dakota Grand Forks, North Dakota Introduction The solar radiative properties of ice clouds are primarily a function of the ice water content (IWC) and the effective diameter (Mitchell et al. 1998; Wyser and Yang 1998), defined as D eff = IWC /(ρ i P t ), (1) where ρ i = bulk ice density corresponding to refractive index measurements (0.92 g/m 3 ) and P t = projected area of size distribution (SD). However, D eff cannot be determined from the SD alone, but also depends on ice crystal shape and associated mass and area properties (Mitchell et al. 1998).

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Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Typical and Anomaly Spectral Behavior of Aerosol Optical Typical and Anomaly Spectral Behavior of Aerosol Optical Thickness of the Atmosphere in Western Siberia D. M. Kabanov, E. V. Makienko, R. F. Rakhimov, and S. M. Sakerin Institute of Atmospheric Optics Tomsk, Russia Introduction Despite the variety of dependencies of aerosol optical thickness (AOT) in the atmosphere, its general peculiarity is its gradual decrease as the wavelength increases (Angstrom formula): τ Α (λ) = β⋅λ -α . Anomalous situations are rare when the dependence τ Α (λ) in the range 0.35 µm to 1 µm has a quasi- neutral shape with one or more extremes (Rodionov 1970; Barteneva and Nikitinskaya 1991; Krauklis et al. 1990). In this paper, we analyze the typical dependencies τ Α (λ) in Western Siberia (Tomsk) and one example of anomalous transparency of the atmosphere observed at the intrusion of Arctic air.

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Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Single Scattering Properties of Aggregates of Bullet Single Scattering Properties of Aggregates of Bullet Rosettes in Cirrus Cloud J. Um and G M. McFarquhar Department of Atmospheric Sciences University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign Urbana, Illinois Introduction During spiral descents of the University of North Dakota Citation through cirrus of a non-convective origin over the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program's Southern Great Plains (SGP) site during the 2000 Cloud Intensive Operations Period (IOP), aggregates of bullet rosettes (hereafter aggregates) were observed (Figure 1) using a Cloud Particle Imager (CPI) at temperatures between -15 and -50°C. Many of these aggregates consisted of clusters of 2 or more bullet rosettes attached together so that there was more than one point from which the component bullets emanated. Because of this,

448

1  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Global, Multi-Year Analysis of Clouds and Earth's Global, Multi-Year Analysis of Clouds and Earth's Radiant Energy System Terra Observations and Radiative Transfer Calculations T.P. Charlock National Aeronautics and Space Administration Langley Research Center Hampton, Virginia F.G. Rose and D.A. Rutan Analytical Services and Materials Inc. Hampton, Virginia L.H. Coleman, T. Caldwell, and S. Zentz Systems and Applied Sciences Inc. Hampton, Virginia Introduction An extended record of the Terra Surface and Atmosphere Radiation Budget (SARB) computed by Clouds and Earth's Radiant Energy System (CERES) is produced in gridded form, facilitating an investigation of global scale direct aerosol forcing. The new gridded version (dubbed FSW) has a spacing of 1° at the equator. A companion document (Rutan et al. 2005) focuses on advances to (and

449

1  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Special Status Report B. SCIENTIFIC/TECHNICAL REPORTING (Reports/Products must be submitted with appropriate DOE F 241. The 241 forms are available at www.osti.gov/elink.) Report/Product Form Final Scientific/Technical Report DOE F 241.3 Conference papers/proceedings* DOE F 241.3 Software/Manual DOE F 241.4 Other (see special instructions) DOE F 241.3 * Scientific and technical conferences only C. FINANCIAL REPORTING SF-425 Federal Financial Report D. CLOSEOUT REPORTING Patent Certification Other E. OTHER REPORTING Annual Indirect Cost Proposal Audit of For-Profit Recipients SF-428 Tangible Personal Property Report Forms Family Other Frequency No. of Copies Addressees 1

450

1  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

exceeds waste shipping exceeds waste shipping goal July 8, 2013 Lab breaks another record with three months remaining in fiscal year LOS ALAMOS, N.M., July 8, 2013-Los Alamos National Laboratory, which broke its waste shipping records in 2012, has exceeded last year's record with three months left to go in fiscal year 2013. During the past nine months, Los Alamos shipped 1,074 cubic meters of transuranic (TRU) and mixed low-level waste to the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant and other approved waste disposal facilities, exceeding last year's record of 920 cubic meters. - 2 - "Los Alamos continues to exceed expectations dispositioning waste from Area G," said Pete Maggiore, assistant manager for Environmental Operations at the Department of Energy's Los Alamos Field Office. "The success of this campaign has been made

451

1  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

HPMSF Overview HPMSF Overview Section 2-4-1 High-Performance Mass Spectrometry Facility The High-Performance Mass Spectrometry Facility (HPMSF) provides state-of-the-art mass spectrometry (MS) and separations instrumentation that has been refined for leading-edge analysis of biological problems with a primary emphasis on proteomics. Challenging research in proteomics, cell signaling, cellular molecular machines, and high-molecular weight systems receive the highest priority for access to the facility. Current research activities in the HPMSF include proteomic analyses of whole cell lysates, analyses of organic macro-molecules and protein complexes, quantification using isotopically labeled growth media, targeted proteomics analyses of subcellular fractions, and detection of

452

1  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

HFMRF Overview HFMRF Overview 2-3 High Field Magnetic Resonance Facility The High Field Magnetic Resonance Facility focuses on developing a fundamental, molecular-level understanding of biochemical and biological systems and their response to environmental effects. A secondary focus is in aspects of materials science and catalysis and the chemical mechanisms and processes operative in these areas. Resident and matrixed research staff within this facility offer expertise in the areas of structural biology, solid-state materials/catalyst characterization, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) techniques, and high- resolution spectroscopy of biological objects using a slow (1-100 Hz) magic angle spinning. Research activities include structure determination of large molecular assemblies such as protein, DNA

453

1  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

ALTERNATIVE POSITION - ALTERNATIVE POSITION - DOE EAC Electricity Adequacy Report Transmission Section - September 15, 2008 DRAFT FOR DISCU.S.SION PURPOSES ONLY 1. NATIONAL GOAL: A ROBUST NATIONAL ELECTRIC TRANSMISSION NETWORK THAT ENABLES OUR ELECTRICITY FUTURE There is a critical need to upgrade the nation's electric transmission grid. Two reasons in particular drive this need. First, increasing transmission capability will help ensure a reliable electric supply and provide greater access to economically-priced power. Second, with the growth in state-adopted renewable performance standards (RPS) and the increasing possibility of a national RPS, significant new transmission, much of it interregional, is needed to access renewable resources. At the same time, it is critical that transmission planning and development be done in the context

454

1  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

ALIVE Polarization Measurements ALIVE Polarization Measurements B. Cairns, K. Knobelspiesse, and M. Alexandrov Columbia University New York, New York A. Lacis and B. Carlson National Aeronautics and Space Administration-Goddard Institute for Space Studies Greenbelt, Maryland Atmospheric Correction The usual way that polarized reflectance measurements are corrected for the contribution of the surface is to assume that the contribution from the surface to the upwelling radiance at the surface or top of the atmosphere can be modeled simply as a direct beam interaction with the surface. The direct beam interaction is corrected for diffuse transmission effects by using a scaled optical depth where the scale factor is determined empirically. Figure 1 shows how well this approach works for a solar zenith angle

455

1  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Retrieving the Relative Number of Fine to Coarse Retrieving the Relative Number of Fine to Coarse Mode Aerosol from Ground-Based Visible and Infrared Observation L. Moy and D.D. Turner University of Wisconsin Madison, Wisconsin E. Kassianov Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Richland, Washington W.P. Arnott University of Nevada Reno, Nevada Introduction The size distribution of the radiatively important atmospheric aerosol is described typically by a bi- modal lognormal size distribution. Many groups attempt to retrieve the aerosol size distribution from passive radiometers that measure aerosol optical depth at a variety of wavelengths. Most of these ground-based instruments use silicon detectors and thus the aerosol optical depth observations are at wavelengths less than 1 μm; therefore, there is little sensitivity in these observations to the number of

456

1  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Quality, Compatibility and Synergy Analyses of Global Quality, Compatibility and Synergy Analyses of Global Aerosol Products M.-J. Jeong and Z. Li Department of Meteorology University of Maryland College Park, Maryland D. A. Chu and S.-C. Tsay Laboratory for Atmospheres NASA Goddard Space Flight Center Greenbelt, Maryland Introduction Global aerosol products play an important role in climate change studies due to their complex direct and indirect effects. While numerous global aerosol products have been generated from various satellite sensors, much more insight into these products is needed to understand them in terms of their strengths, weaknesses and synergies, in order to 1) make informative and creative use of the data, 2) to extract as much information as possible from the data, and 3) to filter out any inherent noise and uncertainties for

457

1  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Increasing water holding capacity for Increasing water holding capacity for irrigation April 3, 2012 Sediment buildup in irrigation researched by Small Business Association joint LANL, SNL expertise Perched above the Española Valley, the Santa Cruz reservoir overlooks more than 1,600 farms that depend on its water. Over the years, sedimentation has reduced the reservoir's capacity by 36%. Kenny Salazar, owner of Kenny Salazar Orchards and Santa Cruz Irrigation District (SCID) Board Chairman, is one of those farmers. In dry years, the SCID is forced to ration its water and shorten the growing season, affecting commercial farmers like Salazar, who have used the water to irrigate their fields for generations. - 2 - A multi-million dollar project is planned to raise the height of the dam and recover part of

458

1  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Determination and Findings: To increase micro-purchase threshold and Determination and Findings: To increase micro-purchase threshold and simplified acquisition threshold in support of Hurricane Sandy as a contingency operation. Based upon the following determination and findings, the FAR micro-purchase threshold and simplified acquisition threshold are increased in support of the Hurricane Sandy contingency operation as described below effective October 26, 2012 and continuing. Findings 1. The Department of Energy (DOE) is required to provide contingency operation support in response to Hurricane Sandy. 2. Increases in the micro-purchase threshold and the simplified acquisition threshold will facilitate DOE Contracting Offices' support of the disaster response efforts in the effected states and counties declared by the President as major disaster and/or emergency assistance areas.

459

1  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Analyses from TWP-ICE Analyses from TWP-ICE C.N. Long and J.H. Mather Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Richland, Washington N. Tapper and J. Beringer Monash University Melbourne, Australia B. Atkinson Australian Bureau of Meteorology Darwin, Australia Introduction Surface data collected during Tropical Warm Pool-International Cloud Experiment (TWP-ICE) includes radiation and standard meteorological measurements at six remote sites, as well as those at the ARM Climate Research Facility (ACRF) Darwin site (Figure 1). Five of these remote sites include not only unshaded broadband hemispheric shortwave (SW) and longwave (LW) instruments, but also a multi- detector SW radiometer designed to simultaneously measure both the downwelling diffuse and total SW

460

1  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

0 09) 0 09) Title: Standard Terms & Conditions for Consultants & other Professional Provider Services Owner: Procurement Policy & Quality Dept Initial Release Date: 11/30/09 Page 1 of 17 PPQD-TMPLT-008R00 Template Release Date: 06/12/09 Printed copies of this document are uncontrolled. Before using a printed copy to perform work, verify the version against the electronic document to ensure you are using the correct version. SANDIA CORPORATION SF 6432-CO (10-09) SECTION II STANDARD TERMS AND CONDITIONS FOR CONSULTANTS AND OTHER PROFESSIONAL PROVIDER SERVICES THE FOLLOWING CLAUSES APPLY TO REQUESTS FOR QUOTATION AND AGREEMENTS AS INDICATED UNLESS SPECIFICALLY DELETED, OR EXCEPT TO THE EXTENT THEY ARE SPECIFICALLY SUPPLEMENTED OR AMENDED IN WRITING IN THE COVER PAGE OR SECTION I.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "1 percent compared" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

1  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Use of Reflection from Vegetation for Estimating Use of Reflection from Vegetation for Estimating Broken-Cloud Optical Depth W. J. Wiscombe and A. Marshak National Aeronautics and Space Administration Goddard Space Flight Center Climate and Radiation Branch Greenbelt, Maryland Y. Knyazikhin Boston University Department of Geography Boston, Massachusetts A. B. Davis Los Alamos National Laboratory Space and Remote Sensing Sciences Group Los Alamos, New Mexico Introduction The objectives of our study are to exploit the sharp spectral contrast in vegetated surface reflectance across 0.7-µm wavelength (e.g., Tucker 1979) to retrieve cloud properties from ground-based radiance measurements. Based on this idea, we have developed a new technique to retrieve cloud optical depth in the simultaneous presence of broken clouds and green vegetation (Figure 1), using ground zenith

462

1  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Assessment of Albedo Derived from Moderate- Assessment of Albedo Derived from Moderate- Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer at the Southern Great Plains Site C. Schaaf, A. Strahler, J. Salomon, M. Roman, J. Hodges, and J. Liu Department of Geography/Center for Remote Sensing Boston University Boston, Massachusetts Summary The moderate-resolution imaging spectroradiometer (MODIS) bidirectional reflectance distribution function (BRDF)/Albedo product (Schaaf et al. 2002; Lucht et al. 2000) has been produced at 1 km resolution from Terra since March 2000 and as a combined product from Aqua and Terra since July 2002. The retrieval algorithm uses multi-spectral, atmospherically corrected, cloud-free surface reflectances over a 16-day period with a semi-empirical kernel-driven BRDF model to characterize the

463

1  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

High Clouds Microphysical Retrievals Intercomparison High Clouds Microphysical Retrievals Intercomparison J. M. Comstock, S. A. McFarlane, and D. D. Turner Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Richland, Washington R. d'Entremon Atmospheric Environmental Research, Inc. Lexington, Massachusetts D. H. DeSlover University of Wisconsin Madison, Wisconsin G. G. Mace Univerity of Utah Salt Lake City, Utah S. Y. Matrosov and M. D. Shupe National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration/Environmental Technology Laboratory Boulder, Colorado D. Mitchell Desert Research Institute Reno, Nevada K. Sassen University of Alaska Fairbanks, Alaska Z. Wang University of Maryland, Baltimore County/ National Aeronautics and Space Administration Goddard Space Flight Center Greenbelt, Maryland 1 Fourteenth ARM Science Team Meeting Proceedings, Albuquerque, New Mexico, March 22-26, 2004

464

1  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Removing nuclear waste, one shipment Removing nuclear waste, one shipment at a time June 26, 2012 Removing nuclear waste, one shipment at a time Elected officials and other dignitaries recently gathered at Los Alamos National Laboratory to celebrate the Lab's 1,000th shipment of transuranic waste to the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant. New Mexico Governor Susana Martinez, the keynote speaker at the event, congratulated the Laboratory for reaching a "significant milestone of cleanup of defense- generated nuclear waste here in New Mexico." "I am pleased to see the progress that has been made," said Martinez, citing the record number of waste shipments that have been transported to WIPP this year. - 2 - A milestone to be proud of Laboratory Director Charlie McMillan thanked the employees who made the

465

1  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Inspiration from world-class scientists Inspiration from world-class scientists leads Patricia Langan to nanoscience August 1, 2012 Patricia Langan inspired by her colleagues feels driven to be just like them Patricia Langan, a graduate research assistant, constantly learns new things while completing her dissertation in nanoscience and microsystems. She currently works with the Advanced Measurement Science Group on fluorescent protein engineering. Langan's project involves taking a green fluorescent protein and altering the protein's structure in order to change the colors of the emitted light. Green fluorescent protein was first isolated from Aequorea victoria, a glowing jellyfish, and is now being engineered because of the prospective widespread usage and growing needs of researchers. New fluorescent protein variants can be used in imaging

466

1  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Transmission Chapter DRAFT- September 18, 2008 Transmission Chapter DRAFT- September 18, 2008 NOTE: The purpose of this document is to seed discussion at the September 25-26, 2008 meeting of the DOE Electricity Advisory Committee (EAC). It does not represent the views of all members of the DOE EAC. Dissents received by publication of this draft document are included at the end. 1. NATIONAL GOAL: A ROBUST INTERSTATE ELECTRIC TRANSMISSION NETWORK THAT ENABLES OUR ELECTRICITY FUTURE The United States needs a national vision and policy to develop a robust interstate electric transmission system analogous to that of President Dwight Eisenhower when he enabled the development of a national interstate highway system over 50 years ago. Broad-scale planning historically has not been used for electric transmission because meeting larger, national needs

467

1  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Microphysical Properties of Thin Clouds Retrieved from Microphysical Properties of Thin Clouds Retrieved from Ground-Based Infrared Observations D.D. Turner and E. Eloranta University of Wisconsin Madison, Wisconsin J. Delamere Atmospheric and Environmental Research, Inc. Lexington, Massachusetts Introduction Both longwave and shortwave radiative fluxes are very sensitive to small changes in a cloud's integrated liquid water amount when the liquid water path (LWP) is below 100 g/m 2 (Figure 1, Turner et al. 2006). Therefore, to correctly model the radiative flux requires very accurate measurements of LWP when a cloud is optically thin. The primary ground-based instrument used by the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program to provide LWP are microwave radiometers (MWRs) that observe the

468

Comparative Biomedical Sciences Strategic Plan March 21, 2011 The goals of the Department of Comparative Biomedical Sciences will be to seek and obtain excellence  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 1 Comparative Biomedical Sciences Strategic Plan March 21, 2011 GOALS The goals of the Department of Comparative Biomedical Sciences will be to seek and obtain excellence in our performance: Developing Leaders in Veterinary and Biomedical Careers: CBS will focus on a learning environment

469

Word Pro - Untitled1  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Household End Uses: Fuel Types, Appliances, and Electronics Household End Uses: Fuel Types, Appliances, and Electronics Share of Households With Selected Appliances, 1980 and 2009 Space Heating by Main Fuel, 2009 Share of Households With Selected Electronics, 1997 and 2009 Air-Conditioning Equipment, 1980 and 2009 54 U.S. Energy Information Administration / Annual Energy Review 2011 1 Natural gas and electric. 2 Liquefied petroleum gases. 3 Includes kerosene. 4 Coal, solar, other fuel, or no heating equipment. 5 Video Cassette Recorder. 6 Digital Video Recorder. 7 Not collected in 1997. Note: Total may not equal sum of components due to independent rounding. Source: Table 2.6. 77 23 30 82 79 59 96 86 14 38 74 61 37 14 One Two or More Separate Clothes Clothes Dishwasher Microwave 0 20 40 60 80 100 Percent 1980 2009 1980 2009 0 20 40 60 80 100 Percent

470

Sequencing and comparing whole mitochondrial genomes ofanimals  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Comparing complete animal mitochondrial genome sequences is becoming increasingly common for phylogenetic reconstruction and as a model for genome evolution. Not only are they much more informative than shorter sequences of individual genes for inferring evolutionary relatedness, but these data also provide sets of genome-level characters, such as the relative arrangements of genes, that can be especially powerful. We describe here the protocols commonly used for physically isolating mtDNA, for amplifying these by PCR or RCA, for cloning,sequencing, assembly, validation, and gene annotation, and for comparing both sequences and gene arrangements. On several topics, we offer general observations based on our experiences to date with determining and comparing complete mtDNA sequences.

Boore, Jeffrey L.; Macey, J. Robert; Medina, Monica

2005-04-22T23:59:59.000Z

471

1.1.1.1.1.1 AP 1.1.1.1.2.1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Ladkin, K. Loer 0 AC crashes into landing zone near E1 taxiway 1 AC stalls since 2 CRW unable to recover stall 1.1.1.1.1.1 AP engaged 1.1.1.1.2.1 F/O (PF) triggers GA­lever 1.1.1.1.2.1.2 F/O moves hand on throttles 1.1.1.1.2.1.1 position of GA­lever 1.1.1.1.2.2.1.1 F/O (PF) tries to go direct into LAND mode 1.1.1.1

Ladkin, Peter B.

472

Comparing Target Finder and Portfolio Manager | ENERGY STAR Buildings &  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

» Comparing Target Finder and Portfolio Manager » Comparing Target Finder and Portfolio Manager Secondary menu About us Press room Contact Us Portfolio Manager Login Facility owners and managers Existing buildings Commercial new construction Industrial energy management Small business Service providers Service and product providers Verify applications for ENERGY STAR certification Design commercial buildings Energy efficiency program administrators Commercial and industrial program sponsors Associations State and local governments Federal agencies Tools and resources Training In this section Why you should design to earn the ENERGY STAR Follow EPA's step-by-step process Step 1: Assemble a team Step 2: Set an energy performance target Step 3: Evaluate your target using ENERGY STAR tools Comparing Target Finder and Portfolio Manager

473

1 1 1 2 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 1 1 2 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 2 1 1 1 2 Ch S B B S Ch Ch Ch S Ch 1 2 S B � dS, B B = 0 S Hr/2 = 10 Tf = 600 HZ HX |H| = Hr HS F f = 2 Hr y sin y y Ch = 1 � 0.05 Ch H = 0 S Ch = 1 Ch S #12;y Ch H0 = Hr z H0/Hr = 1.2 H0/Hr = 0 K K Ch H0/Hr HG(kx, ky) = vF (kxx + kyy ) + (m0 - mt)z , vF m

Martinis, John M.

474

IPE results as compared with NUREG-1150  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In 1990, the NRC published NUREG-1150 which assessed the risks for five U.S. nuclear power plants. This paper provides a comparison of the results and perspectives obtained from the NUREG-1150 study to those obtained form the Individual Plant Examination (IPE) program. Specifically, results and perspectives on core damage frequency and containment performance are compared.

Pratt, W.T.; Lehner, J. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States); Camp, A. [Sandia National Lab., Albuqurque, NM (United States); Chow, E. [Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Rockville, MD (United States)

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

475

Comparing Aerodynamic Models for Numerical Simulation of  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Comparing Aerodynamic Models for Numerical Simulation of Dynamics and Control of Aircraft and simulation of aircraft, yet other aerodynamics models exist that can provide more accurate results for certain simulations without a large increase in computational time. In this paper, sev- eral aerodynamics

Peraire, Jaime

476

Original article Neisseria Base: a comparative genomics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Original article Neisseria Base: a comparative genomics database for Neisseria meningitidis Lee S, septicemia and in some cases pneumonia. Genomic studies hold great promise for N. meningitidis research genomics database and genome browser that houses and displays publicly available N. meningitidis genomes

Jordan, King

477

A Novel Approach for Comparative Genomics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A Novel Approach for Comparative Genomics & Annotation Transfer Alban MANCHERON Raluca URICARU Eric is genome comparison good for?" Genome comparison is crucial for genome annotation, regulatory motifs identification, and vaccine design aims at finding genomic regions either specific to or in one

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

478

Hindawi Publishing Corporation Comparative and Functional Genomics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Hindawi Publishing Corporation Comparative and Functional Genomics Volume 2007, Article ID 47304, 7 pages doi:10.1155/2007/47304 Meeting Report eGenomics: Cataloguing Our Complete Genome Collection III, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824, USA 3 The Institute for Genomic Research, 9712 Medical

Newcastle upon Tyne, University of

479

"RSE Table N5.1. Relative Standard Errors for Table N5.1;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1. Relative Standard Errors for Table N5.1;" 1. Relative Standard Errors for Table N5.1;" " Unit: Percents." " "," "," "," "," "," "," "," ","Waste",," " " "," "," ","Blast"," "," ","Pulping Liquor"," ","Oils/Tars" "NAICS"," "," ","Furnace/Coke"," ","Petroleum","or","Wood Chips,","and Waste" "Code(a)","Subsector and Industry","Total","Oven Gases","Waste Gas","Coke","Black Liquor","Bark","Materials"

480

Slide 1  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Businesses Leading the Way to Recovery and Reinvestment Businesses Leading the Way to Recovery and Reinvestment Presenters Name: Veasey Wilson, VP Page # 1 The Savannah River Site Small Businesses Leading the Way to Recovery and Reinvestment Presenters Name: Veasey Wilson, VP Page # 2 The Savannah River Site * 198,334 acres, or about 310 square miles - Fourth largest DOE site in the United States (behind Nevada Test Site, Idaho National Laboratory and Hanford Site) - About the size of the District of Columbia * SRS workforce: Approximately 11,000 - Prime contractor (about 55 percent) - DOE-SR and DOE-NNSA - Other contractors Small Businesses Leading the Way to Recovery and Reinvestment Presenters Name: Veasey Wilson, VP Page # 3 Savannah River Nuclear Solutions, LLC Partner companies:

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "1 percent compared" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


481

Slide 1  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Workshop Workshop Institute of Medicine, National Academy of Sciences January 24, 2013 | Washington, DC By Howard Gruenspecht, Deputy Administrator Biofuels in the United States: Context and Outlook Topics addressed * Current role of biofuels * Biofuels outlook - EIA's Annual Energy Outlook 2013 Reference case * Biofuels and fuel market segmentation * Biofuels in the context of multiple policy issues 2 Howard Gruenspecht January 24, 2013 Liquid biofuels currently provide about 1 percent of total U.S. energy 3 0 20 40 60 80 100 120 1980 1985 1990 1995 2000 2005 2010 2015 2020 2025 2030 2035 2040 U.S. primary energy consumption quadrillion Btu Source: EIA, Annual Energy Outlook 2013 Early Release History 2011 36% 20% 26% 8% 8%

482

Comparing plasmonic and dielectric gratings for absorption enhancement in thin-film organic solar cells  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We theoretically investigate and compare the influence of square silver gratings and one-dimensional photonic crystal (1D PC) based nanostructures on the light absorption of organic...

Le, Khai Q; Abass, Aimi; Maes, Bjorn; Bienstman, Peter; Al, Andrea

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

483

E-Print Network 3.0 - autoradiographical study comparing Sample...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

3. Autoradiographic film analysis... .01 compared with NSC-T. Fig. 6. Autoradiographic image analysis of GLT-1b radioimmunoreactivity... repeated stress causes dendritic...

484

1.1.1.1. [1]. ,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

- 205 - 1.1.1.1. [1 . . 1) . " 2007 for nomadic activities) . ALIAS . 1> project item PALIO ACCESS AVANTI HIPS Goal User

Joo, Su-Chong

485

Distinct Pairing Symmetries in Nd1.85Ce0.15CuO4-? and La1.89Sr0.11CuO4 Single Crystals: Evidence from Comparative Tunneling Measurements  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We used point-contact tunneling spectroscopy to study the superconducting pairing symmetry of electron-doped Nd{sub 1.85}Ce{sub 0.15}CuO{sub 4-y} (NCCO) and hole-doped La{sub 1.89}Sr{sub 0.11}CuO{sub 4} (LSCO). Nearly identical spectra without zero bias conductance peak (ZBCP) were obtained on the (110) and (100) oriented surfaces (the so-called nodal and anti-nodal directions) of NCCO. In contrast, LSCO showed a remarkable ZBCP in the nodal direction as expected from a d-wave superconductor. Detailed analysis reveals an s-wave component in the pairing symmetry of the NCCO sample with {Delta}?k{sub B}T{sub c}=1.66, a value remarkably close to that of a weakly coupled Bardeen-Cooper-Schriffer (BCS) superconductor. We argue that this s-wave component is formed at the Fermi surface pockets centered at ({+-}{pi},0) and (0,{+-}{pi}) although a d-wave component may also exist.

Shan, L. [Chinese Academy of Sciences; Huang, Y. [Chinese Academy of Sciences; Gao, H. [Chinese Academy of Sciences; Wang, Y. [Chinese Academy of Sciences; Li, Shiliang [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Dai, Pengcheng [ORNL; Zhou, F. [Chinese Academy of Sciences; Xiong, J. [Chinese Academy of Sciences; Ti, W. X. [Chinese Academy of Sciences; Wen, H. H. [Chinese Academy of Sciences

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

486

INTRODUCTION SECTION 1 FISH AND WILDLIFE PROGRAM 1-13 September 13, 1995  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

INTRODUCTION SECTION 1 FISH AND WILDLIFE PROGRAM 1-13 September 13, 1995 to 6 percent by 2015 to rebuild weak fish and wildlife populations, the Council's program calls for participation and funding funding and staffing fish and wildlife rebuilding measures, or run the almost certain risk

487

Comparative immunological characterization of cytoplasmic protein from three heterofermentative Lactobacilli  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in the cytoplasmic protein fraction derived from each of the three heteroferrrentative meat isolates using Tris- glycine buffer 59 10 Comparison of retention times and area percent of major protein peaks in the cytoplasmic protein fraction derived from each.... cellobiosus isolate 186 in APT broth . . 42 Growth broth e of L. cellobiosus isolate 190 in APT Discontinuo s po patterns in sodi proteins ex isolates . lyacrylamide gel electrophoresis um barbital buffer of the cytoplasmic acted from three...

Hendrix, Pamela Yvonne

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

488

Discriminator based on voltage comparator for nuclear physics research  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper describes a simple discriminator of low-level pulses with integral discrimination based on a K521SA3 comparator. The discriminator can be used to record pulses with durations of greater than or equal to 0.1 usec and amplitudes of greater than or equal to 1 mV. the input-pulse amplitude must not exceed the supply-voltage amplitude. A schematic diagram of the discriminator is given. For operation of the NGR spectrometer in the constant-velocity mode, the comparator was gated by the bipolar vibrator-velocity signal. The described circuit is reliable under laboratory conditions and its use is promising in multi-input systems such as those with multisection coordinate detectors.

Vorob'ev, V.A.; Kiselev, A.A.; Kuz'min, R.N.

1985-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

489

Comparative analysis of twelve Dothideomycete plant pathogens  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Dothideomycetes are one of the largest and most diverse groups of fungi. Many are plant pathogens and pose a serious threat to agricultural crops grown for biofuel, food or feed. Most Dothideomycetes have only a single host and related Dothideomycete species can have very diverse host plants. Twelve Dothideomycete genomes have currently been sequenced by the Joint Genome Institute and other sequencing centers. They can be accessed via Mycocosm which has tools for comparative analysis

Ohm, Robin; Aerts, Andrea; Salamov, Asaf; Goodwin, Stephen B.; Grigoriev, Igor

2011-03-11T23:59:59.000Z

490

Comparing Efficiency Projections (released in AEO2010)  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

Realized improvements in energy efficiency generally rely on a combination of technology and economics. The figure below illustrates the role of technology assumptions in the Annual Energy Outlook 2010 projections for energy efficiency in the residential and commercial buildings sector. Projected energy consumption in the Reference case is compared with projections in the Best Available Technology, High Technology, and 2009 Technology cases and an estimate based on an assumption of no change in efficiency for building shells and equipment.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

491

The comparative ecology and biogeography of parasites  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...ecology and biogeography of parasites Robert Poulin 1 * Boris R. Krasnov 2 David Mouillot...Author for correspondence ( robert.poulin@otago.ac.nz ). 1 Department of...marine; filled circles) (data from Poulin et al. [89]). Acknowledgements We...

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

492

VISTA - computational tools for comparative genomics  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Comparison of DNA sequences from different species is a fundamental method for identifying functional elements in genomes. Here we describe the VISTA family of tools created to assist biologists in carrying out this task. Our first VISTA server at http://www-gsd.lbl.gov/VISTA/ was launched in the summer of 2000 and was designed to align long genomic sequences and visualize these alignments with associated functional annotations. Currently the VISTA site includes multiple comparative genomics tools and provides users with rich capabilities to browse pre-computed whole-genome alignments of large vertebrate genomes and other groups of organisms with VISTA Browser, submit their own sequences of interest to several VISTA servers for various types of comparative analysis, and obtain detailed comparative analysis results for a set of cardiovascular genes. We illustrate capabilities of the VISTA site by the analysis of a 180 kilobase (kb) interval on human chromosome 5 that encodes for the kinesin family member3A (KIF3A) protein.

Frazer, Kelly A.; Pachter, Lior; Poliakov, Alexander; Rubin,Edward M.; Dubchak, Inna

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

493

A comparative study of spline regression  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The least squares error and SSD as the number of breakpoints varies points may also be useful. Figure 6 (p. 32) shows three of these plots 32 D ~SO UI U . 00 0. 25 0. 50 0. 75 1. 00 1. 25 1. 50 1. 75 2. 00 2. 25 2. 50 2. 75 3. 00 X ()) R D I~O 0... COMPARISON OF THE COMPUTATIONAL METHODS FOR LEAST SQUARES SPL INES 2B 4. 6 THE CHOICE OF THE NUMBER OF BREAKPOINTS 29 4. 7 POSITIONING THE BREAKPOINTS 5. SMOOTHING SPLINES AND CROSS VALIDATION 33 5. 1 SMOOTHING SPLINES 5. 2 CROSS VALIDATION 5. 3...

Nougues, Arnaud

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

494

Southern California Trial Plantings of Eucalyptus1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Southern California Trial Plantings of Eucalyptus1 Paul W. Moore2 Following the Arab oil embargo to the Oregon border on the north. E. camaldulensis and its closely allied species E. teretecornis dominated times with 9 trees planted 3 X 3. Spacing was 10' X 10'. Soil San Emigdio Loam. One percent slope

Standiford, Richard B.

495

Topic 1: Displaying Data August 25, 2011  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

.1 Pie Chart A pie chart is a circular chart divided into sectors, illustrating relative magnitudes. · Variables are characteristics of an individual. In order to present data, we must first recognize the types in frequencies or percents. In a pie chart, the area is proportional to the quantity it represents. Example 4

Watkins, Joseph C.

496

Data:03cdcd62-7205-4b86-a032-ffbbcec1f344 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

cdcd62-7205-4b86-a032-ffbbcec1f344 cdcd62-7205-4b86-a032-ffbbcec1f344 No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: City of Sullivan, Illinois (Utility Company) Effective date: 2012/11/13 End date if known: Rate name: Industrial Power - 200,000 KWH or Above Usage Per Month - Single Phase - 75-167 kva - Outside City Limit Sector: Industrial Description: The City of Sullivan will determine the Power Factor each month and if found to be less than ninety percent (90%), the monthly demand charge may be increased by an amount equal to Twenty Cents ($0.20) per KWH of Demand for each percent, or fraction thereof, for each percent less than ninety percent (90%).

497

1.1.1.1. 1) " 2007 ( )  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

- 333 - 1.1.1.1. 1) . / [1 DEvelopment framework:JADE)[3] . u- , . . 2.2.2.2. 2.1] . , . 2.2 FIPA(The Foundation for Intelligent Physical Agents) ( 1

Joo, Su-Chong

498

AN INTERNATIONAL EFFORT TO COMPARE GAS HYDRATE RESERVOIR SIMULATORS  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AN INTERNATIONAL EFFORT TO COMPARE GAS HYDRATE RESERVOIR SIMULATORS Joseph W. Wilder 1 , George J. Moridis 2 , Scott J. Wilson 3 , Masanori Kurihara 4 , Mark D. White 5 , Yoshihiro Masuda 6 , Brian J. Anderson 7, 8 *, Timothy S. Collett 9 , Robert B. Hunter 10 , Hideo Narita 11 , Mehran Pooladi-Darvish 12 , Kelly Rose 7 , Ray Boswell 7 1 Department of Theoretical & Applied Math University of Akron 302 Buchtel Common Akron, OH 44325-4002 USA 2 Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, University of California Earth Sciences Division, 1 Cyclotron Rd., MS 90-1116 Berkeley, CA 94720 USA 3 Ryder Scott Company, Petroleum Consultants 621 17th Street, Suite 1550 Denver, Colorado 80293 USA 4 Japan Oil Engineering Company, Ltd. Kachidoki Sun-Square 1-7-3, Kachidoki, Chuo-ku,

499

Comparative genomics and evolution of eukaryotic phospholipidbiosynthesis  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Phospholipid biosynthetic enzymes produce diverse molecular structures and are often present in multiple forms encoded by different genes. This work utilizes comparative genomics and phylogenetics for exploring the distribution, structure and evolution of phospholipid biosynthetic genes and pathways in 26 eukaryotic genomes. Although the basic structure of the pathways was formed early in eukaryotic evolution, the emerging picture indicates that individual enzyme families followed unique evolutionary courses. For example, choline and ethanolamine kinases and cytidylyltransferases emerged in ancestral eukaryotes, whereas, multiple forms of the corresponding phosphatidyltransferases evolved mainly in a lineage specific manner. Furthermore, several unicellular eukaryotes maintain bacterial-type enzymes and reactions for the synthesis of phosphatidylglycerol and cardiolipin. Also, base-exchange phosphatidylserine synthases are widespread and ancestral enzymes. The multiplicity of phospholipid biosynthetic enzymes has been largely generated by gene expansion in a lineage specific manner. Thus, these observations suggest that phospholipid biosynthesis has been an actively evolving system. Finally, comparative genomic analysis indicates the existence of novel phosphatidyltransferases and provides a candidate for the uncharacterized eukaryotic phosphatidylglycerol phosphate phosphatase.

Lykidis, Athanasios

2006-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

500

Comparative analysis of selected fuel cell vehicles  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Vehicles powered by fuel cells operate more efficiently, more quietly, and more cleanly than internal combustion engines (ICEs). Furthermore, methanol-fueled fuel cell vehicles (FCVs) can utilize major elements of the existing fueling infrastructure of present-day liquid-fueled ICE vehicles (ICEVs). DOE has maintained an active program to stimulate the development and demonstration o fuel cell technologies in conjunction with rechargeable batteries in road vehicles. The purpose of this study is to identify and assess the availability of data on FCVs, and to develop a vehicle subsystem structure that can be used to compare both FCVs and ICEV, from a number of perspectives--environmental impacts, energy utilization, materials usage, and life cycle costs. This report focuses on methanol-fueled FCVs fueled by gasoline, methanol, and diesel fuel that are likely to be demonstratable by the year 2000. The comparative analysis presented covers four vehicles--two passenger vehicles and two urban transit buses. The passenger vehicles include an ICEV using either gasoline or methanol and an FCV using methanol. The FCV uses a Proton Exchange Membrane (PEM) fuel cell, an on-board methanol reformer, mid-term batteries, and an AC motor. The transit bus ICEV was evaluated for both diesel and methanol fuels. The transit bus FCV runs on methanol and uses a Phosphoric Acid Fuel Cell (PAFC) fuel cell, near-term batteries, a DC motor, and an on-board methanol reformer. 75 refs.

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1993-05-07T23:59:59.000Z