Published by Joanna Martin

The President’s Open Government Initiative asks three things of the federal government: transparency, participation, and collaboration. OSTI, in partnership with the DOE Office of Workforce Development for Teachers and Scientists (WDTS) and through a voluntary interagency coordinating group, has achieved all three in one project:

The White House recognized this achievement by posting on the Open Government Innovations Gallery (read more about the OSTP recognition on the DOE Blog and the DOE facebook page).

Published by Valerie Allen

Have you noticed that navigating through is faster than before?  We completed a major software upgrade the week prior to Thanksgiving in which highly technical improvements were made to the site.  While many of the improvements are “behind the scenes” some you might notice are:

Published by Mark Martin

Last year I introduced OSTI’s Web Metrics and how they help our organization measure how successful we are in disseminating the research information we curate for the Department of Energy.

Recently we have had the opportunity to enrich the functionality provided by our web metrics.  On June 25th, 2010, the Office of Management and Budget (OMB) released guidance that enabled the use of persistent cookies for web measurement on Government websites.
What is a persistent cookie?  Why are they important?  Both are great questions.

Published by Dr. Jeffrey Salmon
Picture of new cool roof

The Office of Science occupies many buildings around the country, but it owns only two of them.  One of them is making some news. The 134,629 sq. ft. (about 3 acres) roof of  the Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI) building in Oak Ridge, Tennessee is now officially a Cool Roof, that is, it’s energy efficient in ways that darker roofs are not.  Cool roofs are light in color, so reflect rather than absorb sunlight.  Oak Ridge gets lots of sunlight.  The previous roof was black, but worse, it was leaky and those leaks, controlled for years in some very innovative ways by the OSTI staff, were going to cause significant problems if not addressed.  OSTI needed to invest in a new roof to ensure employee safety, protect the structural integrity of the largest federal office building managed by the Office of Science and safeguard its databases and historical collection of scientific and technical information documents, some of which date back to the Manhattan Project and which exist nowhere else. 

Published by Kate Bannan

You need information about the environment, or physics, or chemistry, or the earth and don't know where to go. You want the information quickly, and from an authoritative source.  No problem.