Accelerating Science Discovery - Join the Discussion

Published by Dr. Walt Warnick

Compared to the pre-Web world of the early 1990s, OSTI now enables about a thousand-fold more information transactions.

Published by Tim Byrne

OSTI now offers librarians and others, free of charge, the opportunity to download records of DOE research and development (R&D) information in MARC (MAchine-Readable Cataloging) format.

Published by Valerie Allen

Science.Gov 5.0 is now available!

The first thing you'll notice is the new main page design. The same elements are there, but reconfigured to update the website look and feel. We have also added seven deep web sources (see DOE press release) into the search. 

Published by Sol Lederman

OSTI is founded on the principle that science advances only if knowledge is shared. The OSTI Corollary takes this concept to a new level. It holds that accelerating the spread of knowledge accelerates the advance of science. The advance of science can also be accelerated by funding more bright scientists. In the following blog article, Dr. Bob Marianelli reminisces and gives his perspectives about advancing science throughout his remarkable career.

Dr. Marianelli led a distinguished career as a DOE Program Manager and Director of the Chemistry Division. He had the privilege to shape and manage the process by which the Department of Energy identifies bright chemists and follows their progress. Along the way, he fostered the work of many truly extraordinary scientists, including six who went on to win the Nobel Prize, perhaps the top honor a scientist can receive. In addition to fostering the work of top scientists, Dr. Marianelli played a key role in the construction of a huge facility at Pacific Northwest National Lab, and he positively influenced the direction of other major research facilities.

 

 

Love of science and learning from an early age

Published by Dr. Walt Warnick

The life of every person in the world today has been shaped by successive technological transformations. The printing press transformed communication and education, beginning in the mid 15th century. Sailing and navigation technology of the late 15th century allowed Europeans to learn about other continents, beginning the global network of trade.