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OSTIblog Articles in the science communications Topic

Champions of Change: Open Science

OSTI’s involvement in public access is accelerating! The week of June 24th, 2013, The White House recognized Champions of Change: Open Science at an event in the Eisenhower...

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#Energypledge

Personnel of the Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI) recently contributed to the Department of Energy's (DOE) "2013 Energy Pledge Campaign"!  The 2013 Energy Pledge Campaign was part of DOE's efforts regarding the National Day of Service.  Federal Agencies and Individuals joined together to make commitments to a wide range of causes, including energy...

Related Topics: energy conservation, energy efficiency, energy pledge, hybrid vehicles, recycling, sustainability, unplug

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Where Do New Scientists Come From?

Photo of Jack Andraka from his Twitter feed

When we think of scientists, most of us picture professionals working in labs or in university settings.  But how did these people get to become scientists?  They were born into the world like everyone else and could have selected from a myriad different career paths.  The evidence does not suggest that scientists necessarily have children who become scientists.  Thus the reality is that “new” scientists come from the general public fortuitously, and...

Related Topics: antibodies, cancer, high school, labs, open access journals, pancreatic cancer, scientists, test

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The Unbelievable Accuracy of the Monte Carlo Method

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The Unbelievable Accuracy of the Monte Carlo Method

The year was 1945, the year I was born. That in itself is of great significance to me.  However, it was a momentous year in history. World War II came to its merciful end and the development of the first electronic computer – the ENIAC—was nearing completion. At a post-war Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), mathematician Stanislaw Ulam envisioned the possibilities of reviving statistical techniques that would have a...

Related Topics: eniac, Enrico Fermi, LANL, Los Alamos, Monte Carlo, Stanislaw Ulam

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The Manhattan Project -- Its Immediate Influences

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The Manhattan Project -- Its Immediate Influences

With the Manhattan Project on the brink of success in spring 1945, the atomic bomb became an increasingly important element in American strategy to bring an end to World War II.

Because of the generally accepted view that the Japanese would fight to the bitter end, a costly invasion of the home islands seemed likely, even though some American policy makers held that successful combat delivery of one or more atomic bombs might convince the Japanese that further resistance was futile.  They contended that the bomb could...

Related Topics: 70th Anniversary, atomic bomb, DOE Research & Development (R&D) Accomplishments, Japan, Manhattan Project, plutonium, uranium, World War II

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The Manhattan Project -- Its Operations

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The Manhattan Project -- Its Operations

Major operations for the Manhattan Engineer District (Manhattan Project) took place in remote site locations in the states of Tennessee, New Mexico, and Washington, with additional research being conducted in university laboratories at Chicago and Berkeley.

At the Metallurgical Laboratory in Chicago, Enrico Fermi's experiments at the CP-1 pile took place to determine the exact amount of neutron reduction needed for a safe and controlled sustained nuclear reaction.  A...

Related Topics: 70th Anniversary, atomic bomb, DOE Research & Development (R&D) Accomplishments, electromagnetic, gaseous diffusion, Manhattan Project, nuclear chain reaction, plutonium, uranium, World War II

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The Secret City Is Emerging from Its Past

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The Secret City Is Emerging from Its Past

Oak Ridge is rapidly emerging from a secret city into the hub of open science information.  How did this happen? It’s an amazing story. 

In 1942, deep within the quiet farm hills of East Tennessee, a secret city called Oak Ridge was created seemingly overnight.  Approximately 75,000 workers worked tirelessly to refine uranium ore into fissionable material. When the first atomic bomb was dropped in Japan and World War II came to an end, their work for the Manhattan Project was revealed to them and to the world. Their secret is still ...

Related Topics: osti, Science.gov, WorldWideScience.org (WWS)

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Exploring DOE Data Treasures

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Exploring DOE Data Treasures

There are databases, and then there are treasure maps. The DOE Data Explorer (DDE) merges the two concepts into a product offering the best of both. DDE’s database provides the features needed for simple retrieval or advanced searching. The treasure map aspect comes from DDE’s content, which links you to collections of data and non-text information wherever those collections reside.

Instead of sailing the seven seas, you can browse DDE’s seven types of content. Choose “...

Related Topics: cern, DOE Data Explorer (DDE), national laboratories

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A Big Year for Science.gov

This is a big year for Science.gov, the interagency federal science information portal on the web since 2002.  A major upgrade has just been completed and is available at http://www.science.gov

  • An updated look is in place, with a slideshow demonstrating some of the major activities of the 13 participating science agencies
  • Multimedia sources are now available and automatically searched 
  • Visualization of related...

    Related Topics: CENDI, ciencia.science.gov, Science.gov, sti

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Celebrating the 20th Anniversary of Nobel Prizes for Two DOE-associated Researchers

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Celebrating the 20th Anniversary of Nobel Prizes for Two DOE-associated Researchers

DOE-associated researchers have contributed to the advancement of a variety of science disciplines as a result of research they have conducted. Twenty years ago, the work of two of these researchers (Georges Charpak and Rudolph Marcus) was recognized when they were awarded Nobel Prizes.

Georges Charpak was awarded the Nobel Prize in Physics "for his invention and development of particle detectors, in particular the multiwire proportional chamber".

"It's hard to imagine a particle physics experiment that wouldn't use...

Related Topics: Charpak, DOE Research & Development (R&D) Accomplishments, electron transfer reactions, Lederman, Marcus, multiwire chamber, particle detectors

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