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OSTIblog Articles in the products and content Topic

OSTI and DataCite – Easing Access, Citation and Reuse of Data

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OSTI and DataCite – Easing Access, Citation and Reuse of Data

OSTI joined DataCite  to facilitate finding, accessing, citation of, and reusing publicly available scientific research datasets produced by U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) – funded researchers.  Through the OSTI Data ID Service, Digital Object Identifiers (DOIs) are assigned to research datasets, then registered with DataCite.  When registered, these datasets are announced with other forms of STI made available by OSTI as part of its mission to advance science.

This service facilitates:

  • Easier finding of datasets across the international community of researchers via DataCite’s DOI resolving tools.
  • Linkage between DOE’s R&D documents and the underlying datasets that were generated during the work.
  • A standard way to include data in the accepted bibliographic citation framework.
  • A better way to ensure researchers can be sure they locate the exact dataset used in someone's previous work, thus allowing validation of results or a new use for that data.

OSTI became a member of DataCite in January 2011.

Related Topics: bibliographic, citation, data sets, datacite, scientific

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WorldWideScience and data

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WorldWideScience and data

WorldWideScience.org now offers the capability to search scientific data collections.  Six new data sources have been added to WWS.org, representing a significant milestone in improving access to scientific data from around the world.  Users seeking scientific datasets can conduct a real-time, one-stop search and immediately gain access not only to the metadata but to the actual scientific data itself.

WorldWideScience.org’s unique federated searching capability meets many of the challenges users face in the discovery of scientific and numeric data.  Unless users are very familiar with a particular data center or know that specific datasets exist, it is very difficult to identify and locate scientific data.  WWS.org provides access to over 80 of the world’s most authoritative scientific information and data sources, all nationally sponsored or sanctioned.  Users can simultaneously search across many databases/collections in text, multimedia, and data formats, and receive consolidated, relevance-ranked results.  In most cases, links direct the user to the full text document; or in the case of scientific data sources, the user can often link directly to datasets.  As access to scientific data becomes increasingly important, WWS.org offers the ability to easily identify, search, and access this information – contributing to the spread of scientific knowledge and advancements worldwide.

Related Topics: data, databases, multimedia, relevance ranked, scientific, WorldWideScience.org (WWS)

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OSTI by the numbers

by Tim Byrne 02 Nov, 2012 in Products and Content

For those of you who like numbers, I thought I would give you a few numbers about some of OSTI’s databases and search products. 

  • The DOE Information Bridge now has over 300,000 full-text STI reports. While most of these are post 1991, there are over 84,000 reports published prior to 1990.
  • The Energy Citations Database contains over 2.4 million citations and they are not just technical reports. ECD has over 1.4 million journal articles.
  • DOepatents has over 27,000 patents resulting from DOE-sponsored research and development.
  • The E-Print Network searches over 5.5 million e-prints, over 35,000 websites, over 3100 scholarly societies, and over 50 databases.
  • The Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC) distributes over 1300 software packages.
  • ScienceCinema has over 2600 science and technology related videos for your viewing pleasure.
  • Science.gov searches 55 databases from 13 federal agencies.
  • WorldWideScience.org lets you search 83 collections from over 70 countries in 9 different languages.

Related Topics: DOepatents, E-Print Network (EPN), Energy Citations Database (ECD), Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC), Information Bridge (IB), Science.gov, ScienceCinema, WorldWideScience.org (WWS)

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Get scientific e-prints

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Get scientific e-prints

The E-print Network provides a vast, integrated network of electronic scientific and technical information created by scientists and research engineers active in their respective fields, all full-text searchable.  Documents such as these are the means by which today’s scientists and researchers communicate their recent findings to their colleagues and by which they propose new ideas of how the world works to their peers for their collective judgment.  Documents such as these then are of the sort that becomes the central body of scientific information.  While the E-print Network is intended for use by scientists, engineers, and students at advanced levels, it is freely available for all users.

The gateway provides access to over 35,000 websites and numerous research databases worldwide containing over 5.5 million e-prints in basic and applied sciences in areas such as physics, computer and information technologies, biology and life sciences, environmental sciences, materials science, chemistry, nuclear sciences and engineering, energy research, and other disciplines of interest to DOE.

Related Topics: colleagues, documents, E-Print Network (EPN), e-prints, full text, physics, researchers, science, scientists, searchable

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Do You Have a Favorite Science Teacher? Adopt-A-Doc in Their Honor

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Do You Have a Favorite Science Teacher? Adopt-A-Doc in Their Honor

What is Adopt-A-Doc?  Adopt-A-Doc is another way OSTI is working to increase the availability of important research.  You can be a part of accelerating scientific discovery and help make important research available online by sponsoring the digitization of any adoptable U.S Department of Energy (DOE) technical report.   Your report will be made full-text searchable by DOE search engines like Science Accelerator.gov and Science.gov; as well as be exposed to general purpose search engines like Google, Bing, and Yahoo.

The Adopt-A-Doc database currently has over 200,000 technical reports that have not been digitized and are available for adoption.  You may find a technical report that you want to share with others or you think worthy of making broadly available on the web to support the advancement of science.  The Adopt-A-Doc service is available for a nominal fee and allows you to request recognition via a certificate of appreciation indicating that the electronic technical report was made possible by your contribution. The certificate will appear as the first page of the document for the indefinite future.  You may also request an acknowledgment in honor or in memory of a recipient.

For more information, please visit www.osti.gov/adoptadoc, or contact Debbie Nuchols at nucholsd@osti.gov or (865) 576-5699.

Related Topics: Adopt-A-Doc, appreciation, certificate, digitization, electronic documents, honor, memory, scientific information

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Wind Turbines and Wear and Tear

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Wind Turbines and Wear and Tear

A modern wind turbine has more than 8,000 component parts that must withstand the wear and tear of wind stresses. DOE researchers and stakeholders have been working hard to predict and eliminate wind stress related barriers and extend the lifespan of wind turbines.  Working on a paper on this subject? OSTI can save you wear and tear by providing web tools that eliminate the need to search through database after database to find the research you need.  For example, if you use DOE’s Science Accelerator, you could search through 11 DOE databases, and in about 10 seconds or less, retrieve hundreds of documents about the use of simulations to understand wind turbine shear stress.  You could learn about wind turbine gearbox reliability in Energy Citations Database, a database that contains research results submitted by DOE offices, national labs and technology centers and their contractors.  Or you have the option to search the resources of 13 government agencies in Science.gov to instantly find thousands of records...

Related Topics: osti.gov, Science Accelerator, Science.gov, wind

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Powering Curiosity; Exploring New Horizons - DOE's MMRTG

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Powering Curiosity; Exploring New Horizons - DOE's MMRTG

DOE's RTG is doing it again. The Department's Multi-Mission Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generator (MMRTG) is providing continuous power to the Mars rover Curiosity.  This radioactive power source is "essentially a nuclear battery that will operate the rover’s instruments, robotic arm, wheels, computers and radio. It is fueled with plutonium-238 that gives off heat as it naturally decays. No moving parts are required to convert this heat into electricity."1

The MMRTG "can go farther, travel to more places, and power and heat a larger and more capable scientific payload compared to the solar power alternative NASA studied. The radioisotope power system gives Curiosity the potential to be the longest-operating, farthest-traveling, most productive Mars surface mission in history." 1

With the Curiosity safely on Mars, it begins its mission to explore and investigate "whether conditions have been favorable for microbial life and [to] preserve clues it finds in the rocks. Curiosity will analyze dozens of samples drilled from rocks or scooped from the ground as it explores with greater range than any previous Mars rover."1

"For 50 years, radioisotope power sources have safely and reliably fueled dozens of U.S. missions to explore seven planets in the solar system, including the [current] New Horizons mission to Pluto as well as Apollo, Voyager, Galileo and Cassini missions. Radioisotope power systems have a record for reliability and longevity unmatched by any other NASA spacecraft power system."1

The New Horizons spacecraft is about half way between Earth and Pluto with...

Related Topics: Curiosity, DOE Research & Development (R&D) Accomplishments, Mars rover, MMRTG, New Horizons, Pluto, plutonium, Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generator, RTG, space battery

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OpenNet gets a new look!

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OpenNet gets a new look!

The newly redesigned OpenNet contains spotlights on declassified collections. This quarter the spotlight is on the Human Radiation Experiments collection. OpenNet provides easy, timely access to the Department of Energy’s declassified documents, including information declassified in response to Freedom of Information Act requests. In addition to these documents, OpenNet references older document collections from several DOE sources. This database is updated regularly as more information becomes available. The OpenNet web site is sponsored by the Office of Health, Safety and Security Office of Classification. OpenNet is intended to make information that is no longer classified more readily available to the public. This action supports DOE’s Open Government Initiative.  Through OpenNet you can find more information on openness policy and openness initiative information resources.

Related Topics: declassified, human, Open government, openness, OpenNet, radiation

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Science.gov Mobile: Top Ten in Federal Apps!

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Science.gov Mobile: Top Ten in Federal Apps!

   Hard work and innovation pay off!  Government Computer News (GCN) and Information Week have published their Top Ten Federal mobile apps lists, and Science.gov was the only interagency mobile application named to both!  Since last year, over 100 federal agencies have established mobile apps in response to a recent White House initiative requiring them to make their services available for mobile use.  GCN evaluated the apps on their usefulness, how helpful they actually were, and also on that intangible “cool factor.”  GCN applauded Science.gov Mobile’s surprisingly powerful search engine that checks science data from 13 federal agencies and said “It could probably even be a boon to researchers to keep them from duplicating research, and it will certainly help your kids get an A on their science papers.”  Information Week published its “10 Handy Mobile Apps From Uncle Sam” and noted that: “(The) Science.gov site searches scientific information from more than 50 databases and 2,100 government-affiliated websites. On-the-go science buffs can now access that data trove via a mobile version of the website or a downloadable Android app. Users can get Wikipedia and EurekAlert! results related to their searches.”

Researchers are like the rest of us.  They’re pressed for time, often multi-tasking, and looking for that competitive edge. Discovery can come at any moment and it’s critical to have resources at your fingertips, now more than ever.  That’s one of the reasons that Science.gov launched its mobile application in September 2011.  And this handy scientific search tool isn’t just for scientists, it’s a great application for teachers preparing lessons or for kids doing...

Related Topics: alerts, apps, mobile, Science.gov

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DOE research videos available on ScienceCinema

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DOE research videos available on ScienceCinema

Scientific videos highlighting research and development (R&D) sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) are available on ScienceCinema. ScienceCinema uses innovative, state-of-the-art audio indexing and speech recognition technology to enable users to quickly find video files produced by the DOE national laboratories, other DOE research facilities and CERN (the European Organization for Nuclear Research). When users search for scientific words and phrases, precise snippets of the video where the search term was spoken are provided along with a timeline.

More than 2,500 videos are currently available in ScienceCinema, and the database will continue to grow as new R&D-related videos are produced by DOE programs, labs and facilities and submitted to OSTI. Scientific videos, animations, interactive visualizations and other multimedia are expected to become an increasingly prominent form of scientific communications. ScienceCinema was recently recognized as one of DOE’s six new initiatives in the DOE Open Government Plan 2.0 for making the federal government more transparent, participatory and collaborative. 

Related Topics: audio indexing, communications, open government plan, r&d, ScienceCinema, scientific, transparency, videos

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