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OSTIblog Articles in the Science Communications Topic

#Energypledge

by Erin Anderson 06 Mar, 2013 in Science Communications

my energy pledge

Personnel of the Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI) recently contributed to the Department of Energy's (DOE) "2013 Energy Pledge Campaign"!  The 2013 Energy Pledge Campaign was part of DOE's efforts regarding the National Day of Service.  Federal Agencies and Individuals joined together to make commitments to a wide range of causes, including energy conservation.

Related Topics: energy conservation, energy efficiency, energy pledge, hybrid vehicles, recycling, sustainability, unplug

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Where Do New Scientists Come From?

by Philip Ellis 07 Feb, 2013 in Science Communications

AndrakaPhoto of Jack Andraka from his Twitter feed

When we think of scientists, most of us picture professionals working in labs or in university settings.  But how did these people get to become scientists?  They were born into the world like everyone else and could have selected from a myriad different career paths.  The evidence does not suggest that scientists necessarily have children who become scientists.  Thus the reality is that “new” scientists come from the general public fortuitously, and this reality is often unappreciated.

Many researchers and institutions devoted to motivating the next generation, including for example, the Davidson Institute for Talent Development, a national non-profit concerned with supporting “profoundly gifted students”, stress the importance of exposing youngsters to the latest scientific thoughts and discoveries through the internet and other sources.  The public availability of current, up-to-date scientific and technical information is essential in this regard and the benefits of its availability are tremendous. 

Related Topics: antibodies, cancer, high school, labs, open access journals, pancreatic cancer, scientists, test

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The Unbelievable Accuracy of the Monte Carlo Method

by Kathy Chambers 18 Jan, 2013 in Science Communications
Stanislaw Ulam

The year was 1945, the year I was born. That in itself is of great significance to me.  However, it was a momentous year in history. World War II came to its merciful end and the development of the first electronic computer – the ENIAC—was nearing completion. At a post-war Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), mathematician Stanislaw Ulam envisioned the possibilities of reviving statistical techniques that would have a huge impact on science and technology research today. (Read the history of Stanislaw Ulam in the special edition of Los Alamos Science No. 15, 1987.)

Related Topics: eniac, Enrico Fermi, LANL, Los Alamos, Monte Carlo, Stanislaw Ulam

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The Manhattan Project -- Its Operations

by Mary Schorn 29 Nov, 2012 in Science Communications

Major operations for the Manhattan Engineer District (Manhattan Project) took place in remote site locations in the states of Tennessee, New Mexico, and Washington, with additional research being conducted in university laboratories at Chicago and Berkeley.

At the Metallurgical Laboratory in Chicago, Enrico Fermi's experiments at the CP-1 pile took place to determine the exact amount of neutron reduction needed for a safe and controlled sustained nuclear reaction.  A second pile (CP-2), with external cooling, was built at Argonne in order to move the continuing experiments away from populated areas.

Related Topics: 70th Anniversary, atomic bomb, DOE Research & Development (R&D) Accomplishments, electromagnetic, gaseous diffusion, Manhattan Project, nuclear chain reaction, plutonium, uranium, World War II

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The Secret City Is Emerging from Its Past

by Dr. Walt Warnick 09 Nov, 2012 in Science Communications
OSTI

Oak Ridge is rapidly emerging from a secret city into the hub of open science information.  How did this happen? It’s an amazing story. 

In 1942, deep within the quiet farm hills of East Tennessee, a secret city called Oak Ridge was created seemingly overnight.  Approximately 75,000 workers worked tirelessly to refine uranium ore into fissionable material. When the first atomic bomb was dropped in Japan and World War II came to an end, their work for the Manhattan Project was revealed to them and to the world. Their secret is still commemorated today. Oak Ridge, Tennessee has much to be proud of:  Science created its beginning and science continues to be vital to its future.

Related Topics: osti, Science.gov, WorldWideScience.org (WWS)

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Exploring DOE Data Treasures

by Jannean Elliott 12 Oct, 2012 in Science Communications
treasure chest

There are databases, and then there are treasure maps. The DOE Data Explorer (DDE) merges the two concepts into a product offering the best of both. DDE’s database provides the features needed for simple retrieval or advanced searching. The treasure map aspect comes from DDE’s content, which links you to collections of data and non-text information wherever those collections reside.

Instead of sailing the seven seas, you can browse DDE’s seven types of content. Choose “Browse by Content Type” from the drop down menu on the DDE homepage and hit the “Submit” button.

Related Topics: cern, DOE Data Explorer (DDE), national laboratories

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A Big Year for Science.gov

by Valerie Allen 09 Oct, 2012 in Science Communications
Science.gov, multimedia content, updated interface, enhanced navigation, Spanish

This is a big year for Science.gov, the interagency federal science information portal on the web since 2002.  A major upgrade has just been completed and is available at http://www.science.gov

  • An updated look is in place, with a slideshow demonstrating some of the major activities of the 13 participating science agencies
  • Multimedia sources are now available and automatically searched 
  • Visualization of related and narrower topics is an optional display, as is the ability to navigate visually
  • A Spanish version, Ciencia.Science.gov, is linked from Science.gov
  • New databases and websites have been added
  • Upgraded software enhances the results page

Related Topics: CENDI, ciencia.science.gov, Science.gov, sti

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Celebrating the 20th Anniversary of Nobel Prizes for Two DOE-associated Researchers

by Mary Schorn 05 Oct, 2012 in Science Communications
DOE R&D Accomplishments

DOE-associated researchers have contributed to the advancement of a variety of science disciplines as a result of research they have conducted. Twenty years ago, the work of two of these researchers (Georges Charpak and Rudolph Marcus) was recognized when they were awarded Nobel Prizes.

Georges Charpak was awarded the Nobel Prize in Physics "for his invention and development of particle detectors, in particular the multiwire proportional chamber".

Related Topics: Charpak, DOE Research & Development (R&D) Accomplishments, electron transfer reactions, Lederman, Marcus, multiwire chamber, particle detectors

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Science and a Movie

by Kathy Chambers 18 Sep, 2012 in Science Communications

DOE’s ScienceCinema is now showing “A LANL Scientist’s Dream Takes Off to Zap Rocks on Mars” starring Roger Wiens.

At age 9, Roger Wiens and his brother built rockets, a whole fleet of rockets. They also built a telescope that allowed them to draw craters they saw on Mars when  it neared close to earth. Little did Roger know that he would be putting a camera on Mars 40 years later. Roger Wiens is now a LANL planetary scientist and the principal investigator of the Mars Science Laboratory mission’s ChemCam team. The ChemCam instrument fires a laser at Martian rocks and looks at the resultant flash to determine the composition. Data obtained from Chemcam is helping to answer the question of about life on Mars. Visit DOE’s ScienceCinema to catch Roger’s excitement along with a team of 40 people at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) and the collabortaion of the French Space Agency IRAP as the Curiosity rover reaches Mars.

Related Topics: Energy Citations Database (ECD), Los Alamos, Mars, ScienceCinema

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Mars Science Laboratory Curiosity – ChemCam

by Dr. William Watson 12 Sep, 2012 in Science Communications
NASA/JPL-Caltech

How do you run chemical tests at a geologic site millions of miles away from you to see what the rocks and soil are made of? Curiosity’s new instrument ChemCam, developed at Los Alamos National Laboratory, is designed to determine how much light is emitted at each frequency by a geologic sample when it’s heated by a laser beam. Since different materials have different light-emission patterns, measuring the patterns shows what materials emitted them.

Slide presentations giving a general view of Los Alamos contributions to ChemCam:

Related Topics: ChemCam, data, Los Alamos

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