Accelerating Science Discovery - Join the Discussion

Published by Sam Rosenbloom

The Randolph-Sheppard Act was signed into law by President Roosevelt in 1936. The act established a priority for blind vendors on Federal property.  Nearly 77 years later, walking toward the snack stand operated by a blind vendor, the irony always occurs to me as I read an unusual brass plaque on the hallway that commemorates the origin of the Human Genome Project and its champion, Dr. Charles DeLisi. The irony is that Rick, the blind vendor who could one day benefit from that project, cannot see the plaque. 

It takes individuals with an almost futuristic vision, able to counter criticism by those with less foresight, to take leaps of faith to establish such a far-reaching effort such as the Human Genome Project. Dr. DeLisi was apparently such a person. 

Dr. DeLisi, then Director of the Office of Health and Environmental Research at the Department of Energy, recognized the available technology and came up with the idea to sequence the human genome in 1985.  

Published by Dr. Jeffrey Salmon
Picture of the National Library of Energy Logo

While I have not taken a formal survey, my experience over many years as a Department of Energy (DOE) employee suggest to me that most people have no idea what DOE does.  Let me amend that.  Many people know exactly what we do.  DOE controls the price of gas at the pump; it manages natural gas drilling, builds pipe lines and regulates refineries.  As it turns out, people know a great deal about DOE, it’s just that most of it is dead wrong.

Look it up and you’ll find that “[t]he mission of the Energy Department is to ensure America’s security and prosperity by addressing its energy, environmental and nuclear challenges through transformative science and technology solutions.”  Hmm.  Nothing about gas prices there.

Once you get a bead on the DOE mission you are ready to mine its extraordinary set of resources. 

Published by Dr. Walt Warnick

American Citizens Need Basic Research

Some time ago, a friend, a young father of two, lay in a hospital bed seriously ill. The physician said there was no treatment. The pancreas was secreting substances that were digesting itself and destroying surrounding tissue. Some patients recover on their own; others do not.

Natural laws may allow some remedy which will assist the body's own defenses and cause the pancreas to heal. If there was such a remedy, why did the physician not use it? The answer is the lack of knowledge -- not of just one physician, but of the medical profession as a whole. Unless the physician is a researcher, he waits for others to discover the remedy. He waits because no predecessor mastered the natural laws which govern the pancreas.

The young father in my story is a real person. His name is Vince Dattoria.

Published by Kathy Chambers
The Campanile and Mt. Tamalpais from Berkeley Memorial Stadium at sunset

Overlooking the eastern shore of the beautiful San Francisco Bay is UC Berkeley, founded during the gold rush days as the flagship institution of the University of California. This campus has become one of the preeminent universities in the world. UC Berkeley has consistently ranked highest among the world’s public institutions for its achievements in teaching and for the quality and breadth of its research enterprise.

Berkeley’s core research community is made up of some 1,600 full time faculty, 10,000 graduate students, and approximately 1,400 post-doctoral fellows from throughout the world. An astounding 22 current and former faculty and 29 alumni have received the Nobel Prize. The first atom-smashing cyclotron was developed here and UC Berkeley faculty played a key role in building the world’s first atomic bomb.

Published by Brian Hitson

Scientific videos just became even more plentiful and even more accessible through OSTI’s multimedia search tool ScienceCinema. Over a three-month period and with the help of a wonderful summer intern working alongside OSTI staff, we have added 560 new science videos to ScienceCinema from DOE Labs. Now, ScienceCinema contains over 3,200 videos highlighting exciting research sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy and CERN. Using innovative, state-of-the-art audio indexing and speech recognition technology, ScienceCinema allows users to quickly search videos, and identify the exact point in the video where the search terms were spoken.