Accelerating Science Discovery - Join the Discussion

Published by Kate Bannan

National Engineers’ Week was started in 1951 by the National Society of Professional Engineers.  The celebration is held in conjunction with President George Washington's Birthday; our first President is considered by many engineers to be the nation's first engineer because of his survey work.

Engineers use imagination and analytical skills to invent, design, improve and build things and turn ideas into reality, apply basic research and dream up creative and practical solutions.  Engineering has made numerous contributions to modern life, and has made it more comfortable, safe and prosperous.  Engineers change the world.

Published by Dr. Walt Warnick
Data points of light travel over the world.

Sometimes something complex can work so seamlessly that it’s easy to miss. We think that’s the case with our solution in achieving search interoperability.

As you may know, “search interoperability” is just a fancy way of saying that lots of scientific databases scattered far and wide can be made to work together so that your job as a seeker of science information is easy. You can go to one search box, say Science.gov, type in your search term, and get results from over a hundred important repositories and a couple of thousand scientific websites – with one click.

Published by Kate Bannan

logo for National Nuclear Science Week

Nuclear science comprises many fields. From astrophysics to radioisotopes, nuclear science starts with the atom. The atom, and its fundamental building blocks of protons and neutrons, is the bundle of radioactive energy that makes so much possible.

National Nuclear Science Week is designed to recognize the contributions of nuclear science and those who work in it every day.   Did you know that nuclear science is used in archeology, food safety and nuclear medicine?  Or to help industry with such things as locating cracks in steel, getting rid of dust from film, or measuring the amount of air whipped into ice cream?  And that nuclear power provides 20% of the electricity in the United States?

Published by Kate Bannan
U.S. Department of Energy

 

 

 

The rules have changed. In a single generation, revolutions in technology have transformed the way we live, work and do business . . . .  In America, innovation doesn't just change our lives.  It is how we make our living. . . .This is our generation’s Sputnik moment.”

President Obama

2011 State of the Union Address

The mission of the U.S. Department of Energy(DOE) is to ensure America’s security and prosperity by addressing its energy, environmental and nuclear challenges through transformative science and technology solutions.  DOE delivers breakthroughresearch and innovation.

Published by Kate Bannan
snowflake

With winter just around the corner, can snow be far behind?

We’ve all heard that no two snowflakes are alike, but what do we really know about them?

Snowflakes always have six sides.   Their form and shape depends on temperature and moisture.   Snowflake shapes fall into six main categories:  plate (flat), column, stars, dendrite (lacy), needle and capped column. When it is extremely cold, snow becomes fine and powdery and the snowflakes’ design becomes simpler, usually needle or rod shaped. When the temperature is close to freezing point, snowflakes become much larger and more complex in design.