Accelerating Science Discovery - Join the Discussion

Published by Kate Bannan
U.S. Department of Energy

 

 

 

The rules have changed. In a single generation, revolutions in technology have transformed the way we live, work and do business . . . .  In America, innovation doesn't just change our lives.  It is how we make our living. . . .This is our generation’s Sputnik moment.”

President Obama

2011 State of the Union Address

The mission of the U.S. Department of Energy(DOE) is to ensure America’s security and prosperity by addressing its energy, environmental and nuclear challenges through transformative science and technology solutions.  DOE delivers breakthroughresearch and innovation.

Published by Kate Bannan
snowflake

With winter just around the corner, can snow be far behind?

We’ve all heard that no two snowflakes are alike, but what do we really know about them?

Snowflakes always have six sides.   Their form and shape depends on temperature and moisture.   Snowflake shapes fall into six main categories:  plate (flat), column, stars, dendrite (lacy), needle and capped column. When it is extremely cold, snow becomes fine and powdery and the snowflakes’ design becomes simpler, usually needle or rod shaped. When the temperature is close to freezing point, snowflakes become much larger and more complex in design.

Published by Kristin Bingham
NLM Plus

WebLib, a start-up company which won a Department of Energy (DOE) Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) grant, managed by the Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI), has just won a celebrated Challenge.gov contest using technology developed for DOE.

Published by Kate Bannan

International Education Weekwas first held in 2000; today it's celebrated annually in more than 100 countries worldwide.  IEW is a joint initiative of the US Departments of Stateand Education, and is part of the federal government’s efforts to promote programs that prepare Americans for a global environment and attract future leaders from abroad to study, learn and exchange experiences in the United States.

Science and technology have been and will continue to be engines of US economic growth and national security. Excellence in discovery and innovation in science and engineering and in STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics) education will strengthen the US economy, increase the capacity of US research and sustain our nation’s leadership role in increasingly competitive international science.

Published by Dr. Walt Warnick
outside sign for public access area

As a reader of this blog, you are naturally a stakeholder in the government's public access policies – specifically, public access to scholarly publications containing federally-funded research results.  As the largest government funder of research in the physical sciences as well as a key funder across a broad spectrum of other science and technology fields, the Department of Energy, through our national laboratories and grantees, produces an enormous number of scholarly publications each year.