Accelerating Science Discovery - Join the Discussion

Published by Tim Byrne

The redesign of OSTIblog makes it easier to find and view blog articles.  The OSTIblog home screen now displays the title, image and opening paragraph for the last five articles.  Earlier articles can be paged through, again viewing five per page. 

The new menu bar has tabs for Topics, Authors, and Archive. The Topics tab allows users to browse OSTIblog articles assigned to one of four topic areas:  Personal Perspectives, Products and Content, Science Communications, and Technology.  There is also an option to browse by the name of an OSTI database, search tool or other product.  The last choice under the Topics tab is to browse OSTIblog articles by subject tags

Published by Dr. Walt Warnick

Throughout our history, the Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI) has worked to make authoritative science information ever more efficiently available to researchers and the public alike. Our core mission – ensuring access to and preservation of U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) research results – has not changed. But the technology we apply to that mission has changed a lot over the past 20 years. By adopting Internet technology carefully and early, pioneering new advances in that technology to meet our needs and partnering with other stakeholders in the scientific and technical information community (STI), OSTI aspires to achieve our mission better than ever before.

Published by Linda McBrearty

OSTI’s involvement in public access is accelerating! The week of June 24th, 2013, The White House recognized Champions of Change: Open Science at an event in the Eisenhower Executive Office Building. OSTI’s Director Walt Warnick was invited to nominate individuals who had been instrumental in championing public access to open science. As a result of Walt’s involvement in Public Access to scientific information, he was invited to attend this important event. Two notable Champions of Change who were honored were Jack Andraka, a Maryland high school student who at age 15 created a novel paper sensor that detects pancreatic, ovarian, and lung cancer in 5 minutes for as little as 3 cents; Jack has a huge Twitter following and is a passionate speaker about open access, STEM education and universal Internet availability. The other is Paul Ginsparg who created arXiv.org, an open access e-print network that serves as the primary daily information feed for global communities of researchers in physics, mathematics, computer science, and related fields and is the most popular e-print server in the world.

Published by Lorrie Johnson
ScienceCinema

Looking for a good summer movie?  Over 600 new videos have been added to ScienceCinema recently.  Learn more about the Higgs Boson, and what it means for the universe, in “Unraveling the Higgs Boson Discovery”.  Or, watch “Breakthrough: Using Microbes to Make Advanced Biofuels” to learn how the Joint BioEnergy Institute is using microbes to convert non-food crops and agricultural waste into fuels for cars, trucks, and planes.  Interested in harnessing the sun’s power?

Published by Kathy Chambers

Perhaps the most beautiful and eerie displays of light in our sky are a phenomenon known as the auroras. This natural glow of light in the sky in high latitude regions usually displays ribbons of colors from a fluorescent green to brilliant purple to a vivid crimson somewhat like an unexpected beautiful sunrise or sunset.  Observers often call it the greatest show on Earth.

Auroras are triggered by geomagnetic storms when gusts of solar plasma wind strike the Earth’s magnetic field; charged particles rain down over the north and south magnetic poles, lighting up the atmosphere and causing the air to glow.