Accelerating Science Discovery - Join the Discussion

Published by Erin Anderson

my energy pledge

Personnel of the Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI) recently contributed to the Department of Energy's (DOE) "2013 Energy Pledge Campaign"!  The 2013 Energy Pledge Campaign was part of DOE's efforts regarding the National Day of Service.  Federal Agencies and Individuals joined together to make commitments to a wide range of causes, including energy conservation.

Published by Linda McBrearty
@OSTIgov Twitter is Trending

Social media has changed the way we look at everything. Just in the past few years, society has moved from a limited amount of news sources to an infinite network of information. And we don’t necessarily have to go looking for data because links, advertisements and news stories seem to be popping up on every screen, message or page. That’s why it’s more important than ever to know where valuable scientific and technical information can be accessed. One way the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI) is reaching out  to folks interested in high quality federally-funded scientific and technical information is through their Twitter account @OSTIgov.

Published by Philip Ellis

AndrakaPhoto of Jack Andraka from his Twitter feed

When we think of scientists, most of us picture professionals working in labs or in university settings.  But how did these people get to become scientists?  They were born into the world like everyone else and could have selected from a myriad different career paths.  The evidence does not suggest that scientists necessarily have children who become scientists.  Thus the reality is that “new” scientists come from the general public fortuitously, and this reality is often unappreciated.

Many researchers and institutions devoted to motivating the next generation, including for example, the Davidson Institute for Talent Development, a national non-profit concerned with supporting “profoundly gifted students”, stress the importance of exposing youngsters to the latest scientific thoughts and discoveries through the internet and other sources.  The public availability of current, up-to-date scientific and technical information is essential in this regard and the benefits of its availability are tremendous. 

Published by Kathy Chambers
Stanislaw Ulam

The year was 1945, the year I was born. That in itself is of great significance to me.  However, it was a momentous year in history. World War II came to its merciful end and the development of the first electronic computer – the ENIAC—was nearing completion. At a post-war Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), mathematician Stanislaw Ulam envisioned the possibilities of reviving statistical techniques that would have a huge impact on science and technology research today. (Read the history of Stanislaw Ulam in the special edition of Los Alamos Science No. 15, 1987.)

Published by Lorrie Johnson
ScienceCinema

More than 2,600 videos showcasing DOE’s most exciting research are available on ScienceCinema.  Grab the popcorn and see science in “ACTION!”

Curious about DOE’s work in robotics, antimatter, or outer space?  How about microbes, bugs, or mutants?