Accelerating Science Discovery - Join the Discussion

Published by Mary Schorn
President Roosevelt Establishes the Manhattan Project

On August 13, 1942, the Manhattan Engineer District, whose name was based upon the geographical location of its headquarters, was established.  In September, the Army appointed Colonel Leslie R. Groves to head the effort.  Groves held that the exigencies of war required scientists to move from laboratory research to development and production in record time.  Though traditional scientific caution might be short-circuited in the process, there was no alternative if a bomb was to be built in time to be used in the current conflict (World War II).

Various isotope separation methods (uranium enrichment) to produce uranium-235 were being researched at this time.  One was gaseous diffusion being done at Columbia and another was the electromagnetic method being done at Berkeley under Ernest O. Lawrence.  Based upon the success of the electromagnetic method, the S-1 (The Office of Scientific Research and Development Section On Uranium) Executive Committee recommended building plants in Tennessee at Site X (now Oak Ridge).

Published by Rita Hohenbrink
OpenNet gets a new look

The newly redesigned OpenNet contains spotlights on declassified collections. This quarter the spotlight is on the Human Radiation Experiments collection. OpenNet provides easy, timely access to the Department of Energy’s declassified documents, including information declassified in response to Freedom of Information Act requests. In addition to these documents, OpenNet references older document collections from several DOE sources

Published by Nena Moss
ScienceLab

It’s August! Are you ready to get back to school? If you’re attending or teaching a science class this year, be sure to check out ScienceLab, Students' go-to source...

Published by Kathy Chambers
Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory -- Image: Lawrence Berkeley National Labor

Research involving nanoscale dimensions enable development of innovative materials to help solve challenges in the world you live in. As an example, printing electronic circuitry on flexible and stretchable backplanes could revolutionize a number of industries, including smart devices.

Published by Kathy Chambers
Quantum dots – small semiconducting nanocrystals (Image: ANL)

  In the world of nanomanufacturing, new materials, devices, components and products are emerging at a breathtaking rate. Next-generation nanocoatings are being developed to enhance wear resistance of industrial materials.  An infrared retina that includes adaptive sensors has been patented. Self-cleaning skin-like prosthetic polymer surfaces have been developed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). ORNL is also well on its way to creating nano catalysts for diesel engine emission remediation