Accelerating Science Discovery - Join the Discussion

Published by Kathy Chambers
Stanislaw Ulam

The year was 1945, the year I was born. That in itself is of great significance to me.  However, it was a momentous year in history. World War II came to its merciful end and the development of the first electronic computer – the ENIAC—was nearing completion. At a post-war Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), mathematician Stanislaw Ulam envisioned the possibilities of reviving statistical techniques that would have a huge impact on science and technology research today. (Read the history of Stanislaw Ulam in the special edition of Los Alamos Science No. 15, 1987.)

Published by Lorrie Johnson
ScienceCinema

More than 2,600 videos showcasing DOE’s most exciting research are available on ScienceCinema.  Grab the popcorn and see science in “ACTION!”

Curious about DOE’s work in robotics, antimatter, or outer space?  How about microbes, bugs, or mutants? 

Published by Dr. Walt Warnick

When I became Director of the DOE’s Office of Scientific and Technical Information in 1997, we had a grand vision for a new era of global discovery. The way we provided access to scientific and technical information could be revolutionized. The internet showed promise, unbelievable promise. How exciting it was to become OSTI’s leader at that point in time.  

Although the development of the Department of Energy’s web-searchable databases greatly enabled our scientific community to access R&D collections, the search technology was inefficient. How could we make the information more easily accessible to the public? Somehow we had to wrap our arms around and embrace new technologies. We had the talent, we had the motivation, and we definitely had the energy. We knew there was a better way to improve the Government’s service to its people.

Published by Valerie Allen
Science.gov 10th Anniversary

Ten years ago this month Science.gov was launched!  The cross-agency portal was created to break down the stovepipes of science information, knowing that it is difficult to know which federal agency holds what information.  Thanks to longtime relationships between the agency senior information managers of CENDI as well as a partnership with USA.gov, and with the efforts of many, many supporters, a unique and grassroots project was undertaken and still provides an important service today.  A special thanks to our Science.gov Alliance co-chairs during these years:  Eleanor Frierson, NAL/USDA (retired); Tom Lahr, NBII/USGS (retired); Cindy Etkin, GPO; Tina Gheen, LOC; Annie Simpson, USGS.

Published by Mark Martin
OSTI and DataCite

OSTI joined DataCite  to facilitate finding, accessing, citation of, and reusing publicly available scientific research datasets produced by U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) – funded researchers.  Through the OSTI Data ID Service, Digital Object Identifiers (DOIs) are assigned to research datasets, then registered with DataCite.  When registered, these datasets are announced with other forms of STI made available by OSTI as part of its mission to advance science.