Newsletter for Office of Scientific and Technical Information

OSTI.gov Newsletter

Citations to Journal Articles from Energy Frontier Research Centers Now Available on OSTI’s SciTech Connect

Energy Frontier Research Centers map displaying 46 EFRCs in 35 states plus the District of Columbia. $2 to $5 million per year per center. ~850 Senior Investigators; ~2000 students, postdoctoral fellows, and technical staff; ~115 institutions. Citations to more than 2,400 journal articles by researchers at the Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Science’s suite of Energy Frontier Research Centers (EFRCs) are now available on the OSTI SciTech Connect database (go directly to the EFRC citations that have been added to SciTech Connect). Included are citations to 43 EFRC videos.

The 46 EFRCs are major collaborative research efforts to accelerate high-risk, high-reward fundamental research that will provide a strong scientific basis for transformative energy technologies of the future. The EFRCs have world-class teams of researchers, often from multiple institutions, bringing together leading scientists from universities, national laboratories, nonprofit organizations, and for-profit firms. The EFRCs provide an important bridge between basic research and energy technologies and complement other research activities funded by the Department of Energy.

The Centers were selected in 2009 by scientific peer review and funded at $2 million – $5 million per year for a 5-year initial award period, subject to Congressional appropriations. These integrated, multi-investigator Centers are tackling some of the toughest scientific challenges hampering advances in energy technologies. The 46 EFRC awards span the full range of energy research challenges described in the Basic Energy Sciences series of workshop reports in which the community defined basic research that is needed to enable advances related to clean energy technologies, including: solar energy utilization, clean and efficient combustion, electrical energy storage, carbon capture and sequestration, advanced nuclear systems, catalysis, materials in extreme environments, hydrogen science, solid state lighting, and superconductivity.

More information about the EFRCs can be found at http://science.energy.gov/bes/efrc/. The EFRCs are supported by DOE’s Office of Science, Basic Energy Sciences program.