GEOTHERMAL TECHNOLOGIES LEGACY COLLECTION - Bibliographic Citation


Bibliographic Citation



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Title: Assessing the Thermal Environmental Impacts of an Groundwater Heat Pump in Southeastern Washington State
Creator/Author: Freedman, Vicky L. ; Waichler, Scott R. ; Mackley, Rob D. ; Horner, Jacob A.
Publication Date:2012 Apr 01
OSTI Identifier:OSTI 1039833
Report Number(s):PNNL-SA-76515
DOE Contract Number:AC05-76RL01830
Document Type:Journal Article
Specific Type:
Coverage:
Resource Relation:Journal Name: Geothermics; Journal Volume: 42
Other Number(s):
Research Org:Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), Richland, WA (US)
Sponsoring Org:USDOE
Subject:15 GEOTHERMAL ENERGY; 32 ENERGY CONSERVATION, CONSUMPTION, AND UTILIZATION; COLUMBIA RIVER; EFFICIENCY; ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACTS; FLOW RATE; GROUND SOURCE HEAT PUMPS; HEAT PUMPS; HYDRAULIC CONDUCTIVITY; PLUMES; PRODUCTION; PUMPING; SENSITIVITY; SIMULATION; THERMAL ANALYSIS; WATER; GROUND WATER
Keywords:Geothermal, open-loop heat pumps, ground source heat pumps, GSHPs, groundwater, STOMP
Description/Abstract:A thermal analysis of a large-scale (e.g., 1900 gpm), open-loop ground source heat pump (GSHP) installed on the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) campus in southeastern Washington State has been performed using a numerical modeling approach. Water temperature increases at the upgradient extraction wells in the system and at the downgradient Columbia River are potential concerns, especially since heat rejection to the subsurface will occur year-round. Hence, thermal impacts of the open-loop GSHP were investigated to identify operational scenarios that minimized downgradient environmental impacts at the river, and upgradient temperature drift at the production wells. Simulations examined the sensitivity of the system to variations in pumping rates and injected water temperatures, as well as to hydraulic conductivity estimates of the aquifer. Results demonstrated that both downgradient and upgradient thermal impacts were more sensitive to injection flow rates than estimates of hydraulic conductivity. Higher injection rates at lower temperatures resulted in higher temperature increases at the extraction wells but lower increases at the river. Conversely, lower pumping rates and higher injected water temperatures resulted in a smaller temperature increase at the extraction wells, but higher increases at the river. The scenario with lower pumping rates is operationally more efficient, but does increase the likelihood of a thermal plume discharging into the Columbia River. However, this impact would be mitigated by mixing within the hyporheic zone and the Columbia River. The impact under current operational conditions is negligible, but future increases in heat rejection could require a compromise between maximizing operational efficiency and minimizing temperature increases at the shoreline.
Publisher:
Country of Publication:US
Language:English
Size/Format:Medium: X
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System Entry Date:2013 Dec 05
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