Home

About

Advanced Search

Browse by Discipline

Scientific Societies

E-print Alerts

Add E-prints

E-print Network
FAQHELPSITE MAPCONTACT US


  Advanced Search  

 
Biometric Consortium Conference (BC2003), Crystal City, VA Performance Comparison of Visual and Thermal Signatures for Face Recognition
 

Summary: Biometric Consortium Conference (BC2003), Crystal City, VA
Performance Comparison of Visual and Thermal Signatures for Face Recognition
J. Heo, B. Abidi, S. Kong, and M. Abidi
Imaging, Robotics, and Intelligent Systems Laboratory
Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering
The University of Tennessee
Knoxville, TN 37996-2100
E-mail: jheo@utk.edu
Face recognition is a rapidly growing research area due to increasing demands for security in commercial
and law enforcement applications. Face recognition systems have reached a significant level of maturity
with some practical success. However, face recognition still remains a challenging problem due to large
variation in face images. The performance of face recognition systems varies significantly according to
the environment where face images are taken and according to the way user-defined parameters are
adjusted in several applications. Recognition based only on the visual spectrum remains limited in
uncontrolled operating environments such as outdoor situations and low illumination conditions. Visual
face recognition also has difficulty in detecting disguised faces, which is critical for high-end security
applications. The thermal infrared (IR) spectrum comprises mid-wave infrared (MWIR) (3-5Ám), long-
wave infrared (LWIR) (8-12Ám), and short-wave infrared (SWIR) (0.9-1.7Ám); all longer than the visible
spectrum (0.4-0.7Ám). Thermal IR imagery is independent of ambient lighting since thermal IR sensors
only measure the heat emitted by objects. The use of thermal imagery has great advantages in poor

  

Source: Abidi, Mongi A. - Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Tennessee

 

Collections: Computer Technologies and Information Sciences