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segregation (and possibly identification of speakers) on the basis of spatial cues (31, 32).
 

Summary: segregation (and possibly identification of
speakers) on the basis of spatial cues (31, 32).
The usefulness of natural complex
sounds as stimuli in higher auditory areas
has been emphasized previously (4, 13).
The selectivity for specific types of MCs,
as found in auditory belt neurons, is higher
than expected. However, even in AL, neu-
rons rarely responded to a single call [al-
though they sometimes responded to calls
within the same phonetic category (33)].
This suggests that AL is still far from the
end-stage in processing auditory objects,
and recordings from awake animals in even
more anterior and lateral areas of the STG
may be promising. On the other hand, lack
of extreme selectivity may also indicate
that complex auditory patterns, such as vo-
calizations, are coded by networks of neu-
rons rather than a single cell.

  

Source: Alford, Simon - Department of Biological Sciences, University of Illinois at Chicago

 

Collections: Biology and Medicine