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An observational based analysis of ozone trends and production for urban areas in North Carolina
 

Summary: An observational based analysis of ozone trends and
production for urban areas in North Carolina
Viney P. Aneja *, Andrea A. Adams, S.P. Arya
Department of Marine, Earth and Atmospheric Sciences, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC 27695-8208, USA
Received 8 September 1998; received in revised form 2 February 1999; accepted 11 August 1999
Importance of this paper: Ozone is a ``criteria pollutant'' in the United States necessitating its monitoring, and control of
its precursor emissions. We have determined that ozone concentrations, [O3], measured simultaneously upwind and
downwind (along the predominant wind direction) of an urban area could be used to indicate the intensity of O3 production
in the urban area. The increase in O3 in the urban center over the course of a day is due to photochemical production. This
delta-ozone, D(O3), de®ned as the dierence between the daily maximum [O3] measured downwind and that measured
upwind of the urban center reŻects the net increment of photochemical O3 added to an airmass over the course of a day as it
advects over the city.
Abstract
An observational based analysis of ozone production for Raleigh and Charlotte, North Carolina, was performed for
the years 1981±1990. A trend analysis was carried out for the 10 yr period for Raleigh. The third quartile average for
Raleigh indicated a slight upward trend of about 0.5 parts per billion by volume (ppbv) per year in ozone concentration,
but this may not be statistically signi®cant. During the period studied, Raleigh was designated as out of compliance for
ozone, with a classi®cation of moderate for non-attainment areas in 1989. There were three exceedences of the National
Ambient Air Quality Standard (NAAQS) of 0.12 parts per million by volume (ppmv) each in 1980, 1983, and 1987; and
13 exceedences in 1988. Based on a regression analysis, it was identi®ed that the variability in ozone concentration in the

  

Source: Aneja, Viney P. - Department of Marine, Earth and Atmospheric Sciences, North Carolina State University

 

Collections: Environmental Sciences and Ecology; Geosciences