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THEMATIC COLLECTION: INTRODUCTION Automated Corneal-Reflection
 

Summary: THEMATIC COLLECTION: INTRODUCTION
Automated Corneal-Reflection
Eye Tracking in Infancy:
Methodological Developments
and Applications to Cognition
Richard N. Aslin and Bob McMurray
Department of Brain and Cognitive Sciences
University of Rochester
Since the mid-1800s, experimental psychologists have been using eye movements
and gaze direction to make inferences about perception and cognition in adults
(Müller, 1826, cited in Boring, 1942). In the past 175 years, these oculomotor mea-
sures have been refined (see Kowler, 1990) and used to address similar questions in
infants (see Aslin, 1985, 1987; Bronson, 1982; Haith, 1980; Maurer, 1975). The
general rationale for relying on these visual behaviors is that where one is looking
is closely tied to what one is seeing. This is not to deny the fact that we can detect
visual stimuli in the peripheral visual field, but rather that there is a bias to attend to
and process information primarily when it is located in the central portion of the
retina. Thus, although the direction of gaze is not perfectly correlated with the up-
take of visual information (e.g., as in a blank stare or a covert shift of attention),
there is a strong presumption that the direction of gaze can provide important in-

  

Source: Aslin, Richard N. - Department of Brain and Cognitive Sciences, University of Rochester

 

Collections: Biology and Medicine