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Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA Vol. 90, pp. 3559-3563, April 1993
 

Summary: Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA
Vol. 90, pp. 3559-3563, April 1993
Neurobiology
Brain structures and life-span in primate species
JOHN M. ALLMAN, TODD MCLAUGHLIN, AND ATIYA HAKEEM
Division of Biology (216-76), California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125
Communicated by Carver A. Mead, January 8, 1993
ABSTRACT In haplorhine primates, when the effect of
body weight is removed, brain weight is correlated with
maximum recorded life-span. In this paper we have analyzed
the relationships between volumes of specific brain structures
and life-span. When the effect of body weight is removed, the
volumes of many brain structures are significantly, positively
correlated with maximum recorded life-span. However, the
volumes ofthe medulla and most frwst-order sensory structures
do not correlate with life-span. The cerebellum is the brain
structure that best correlates with life-span. Parts of the
cerebellum are particularly vulnerable to age-related loss of
mass in humans. For another measure of the life cycle, female
reproductive age, a similar set of brain structures is signifi-

  

Source: Allman, John M. - Division of Biology, California Institute of Technology

 

Collections: Biology and Medicine