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Publ. Astron. Soc. Aust., 2002, 19, 328336 Operation of the Near Infrared Sky Monitor at the South Pole
 

Summary: Publ. Astron. Soc. Aust., 2002, 19, 328336
Operation of the Near Infrared Sky Monitor at the South Pole
J. S. Lawrence1, M. C. B. Ashley1, M. G. Burton1, P. G. Calisse1, J. R. Everett1,
R. J. Pernic2, A. Phillips1 and J. W. V. Storey1
1School of Physics, University of New South Wales, NSW 2052, Australia
jl@phys.unsw.edu.au
2Yerkes Observatory, The University of Chicago, Williams Bay, Wisconsin 53191, USA
Received 2002 June 20, accepted 2002 October 3
Abstract: The near infrared sky spectral brightness has been measured at the South Pole with the Near
Infrared Sky Monitor (NISM) throughout the 2001 winter season. The sky is found to be typically more
than an order of magnitude darker than at temperate latitude sites, consistent with previous South Pole
observations. Reliable robotic operation of the NISM, a low power, autonomous instrument, has been
demonstrated throughout the Antarctic winter. Data analysis yields a median winter value of the 2.4 m
(Kdark) sky spectral brightness of 120 Jy arcsec-2 and an average of 210 80 Jy arcsec-2. The 75%,
50%, and 25% quartile values are 270 100, 155 60, and 80 30 Jy arcsec-2, respectively.
Keywords: atmospheric effects -- radiative transfer -- site testing -- infrared: general
1 Introduction
Previous observations of the infrared sky spectral bright-
ness at the South Pole have indicated that it is up to two
orders of magnitude lower than that observed at the best

  

Source: Ashley, Michael C. B. - School of Physics, University of New South Wales

 

Collections: Physics