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Animal Conservation (2005) 8, 18 C 2005 The Zoological Society of London. Printed in the United Kingdom DOI:10.1017/S1367943004001842 Geographical partitioning of microsatellite variation
 

Summary: Animal Conservation (2005) 8, 18 C 2005 The Zoological Society of London. Printed in the United Kingdom DOI:10.1017/S1367943004001842
Geographical partitioning of microsatellite variation
in the sarus crane
Kenneth L. Jones1,
, Jeb A. Barzen2
and Mary V. Ashley1
1 University of Illinois at Chicago, Department of Biological Sciences, (M\C 066), Chicago, IL 60607-7060, USA
2 International Crane Foundation, P.O. Box 447, E11376 Shady Lane Road, Baraboo, WI 53913-0447, USA
(Received 18 March 2004; accepted 25 August 2004)
Abstract
The sarus crane (Grus antigone) ranges across two continents and is the only species of crane (Gruidae)
that breeds in India and Southeast Asia. Four subspecies, the Indian sarus (G. a. antigone), the eastern sarus
(G. a. sharpii), the Australian sarus (G. a. gillae) and the extinct Philippine sarus (G. a. luzonica) were originally
described through morphological, plumage, and/or geographical differences. The ranges of the Indian and
eastern sarus converge in eastern India and Myanmar, but the Australian sarus has a disjunct Australian
distribution. This study assesses population genetic structure of the current sarus populations utilising 13
DNA microsatellite loci. Population structure within this species was investigated utilising traditional FST and
Bayesian clustering methods. While significant divergence was observed among populations when individuals
were assigned to geographical populations, analyses based solely on individual genotypes demonstrated a
clinal nature to the variation. The results of this study suggest that the Indian and eastern sarus cranes represent

  

Source: Ashley, Mary V. - Department of Biological Sciences, University of Illinois at Chicago

 

Collections: Biology and Medicine; Environmental Sciences and Ecology