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vol. 163, no. 2 the american naturalist february 2004 Priority versus Brute Force: When Should
 

Summary: vol. 163, no. 2 the american naturalist february 2004
Priority versus Brute Force: When Should
Males Begin Guarding Resources?
Roger Ha¨rdling,1,* Hanna Kokko,2,
and Robert W. Elwood3,
1. Department of Animal Ecology, University of Lund, Ecology
Building, S-223 62 Lund, Sweden;
2. Department of Biological and Environmental Science,
University of Jyva¨skyla¨, P.O. Box 35, FIN-40351 Jyva¨skyla¨, Finland;
and Department of Ecology and Systematics, Division of
Population Biology, University of Helsinki, P.O. Box 65, FIN-
00014 Helsinki, Finland;
3. School of Biology and Biochemistry, Queen's University of
Belfast, Belfast, Northern Ireland BT7 1NN
Submitted May 9, 2003; Accepted August 24, 2003;
Electronically published February 13, 2004
abstract: When should males begin guarding a resource when
both resources and guarders vary in quality? This general problem
applies, for example, to migrant birds occupying territories in the
spring and to precopula in crustaceans where males grab females

  

Source: Agrell, Jep - Department of Ecology, Lunds Universitet
Kokko, Hanna.- Research School of Biological Sciences, Research School of Biological Sciences

 

Collections: Biology and Medicine; Environmental Sciences and Ecology