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Differential plague-transmission dynamics determine Yersinia pestis population genetic structure on local,
 

Summary: Differential plague-transmission dynamics determine
Yersinia pestis population genetic structure on local,
regional, and global scales
Jessica M. Girard*
, David M. Wagner*
, Amy J. Vogler*, Christine Keys*, Christopher J. Allender*, Lee C. Drickamer*,
and Paul Keim*
*Department of Biological Sciences, Northern Arizona University, Flagstaff, AZ 86011-5640; and Translational Genomics Research Institute, 400 North Fifth
Street, Suite 1600, Phoenix, AZ 85004
Edited by Stanley Falkow, Stanford University, Stanford, CA, and approved April 12, 2004 (received for review March 4, 2004)
Plague, the disease caused by the bacterium Yersinia pestis, has
greatly impacted human civilization. Y. pestis is a successful global
pathogen, with active foci on all continents except Australia and
Antarctica. Because the Y. pestis genome is highly monomorphic,
previous attempts to characterize the population genetic structure
within a single focus have been largely unsuccessful. Here we
report that highly mutable marker loci allow determination of Y.
pestis population genetic structure and tracking of transmission
patterns at two spatial scales within a single focus. In addition, we
found that in vitro mutation rates for these loci are similar to those

  

Source: Allan, Gery - Department of Biological Sciences, Northern Arizona University

 

Collections: Biology and Medicine; Environmental Sciences and Ecology