Home

About

Advanced Search

Browse by Discipline

Scientific Societies

E-print Alerts

Add E-prints

E-print Network
FAQHELPSITE MAPCONTACT US


  Advanced Search  

 
ANNUAL REPORT FY 2010 ANNUAL REPORT FY 2010
 

Summary: ANNUAL REPORT FY 2010
ANNUAL REPORT FY 2010
encounter art
ANNUAL REPORT FY 2010
What defines a year at the Williams College Museum of Art? As always, faculty and students from different fields
of learning coming together to bring fresh perspectives to a traditional visual motif like landscape. So, in 2010 we
did, indeed, focus on the idea of landscape: as topography, sustainer of life, site of conservation activism, cultural
icon, metaphor, and object of awe and spiritual reverence. We gave landscape a panoramic view of itself and we then
turned it inward to reach its most mysterious incarnation: as a metaphor for the workings of the human brain.
Each exhibition took as its starting point the museum's collection and then branched out like so many tributaries
of a river to extend its thematic reach and to traverse time, geography, and aesthetic sensibilities. This innovative
approach to teaching with art, placing it in the broadest possible context and making it relevant to the lives of our
students and to our community today, is what continues to define the Williams College Museum of Art.
We began our year celebrating some of the most ravishing landscapes in our collection starting with those created
by Maurice Prendergast. The museum is extremely fortunate to be the repository of the largest collection of works
by Maurice Prendergast and his brother Charles, including sketchbooks, letters, photographs and mementos that
bring to life a colorful period in which it was de rigueur for artists from the United States to make a pilgrimage to
the great cultural capitals of Europe. Prendergast in Italy took us through the Italian countryside and from Rome to
Venice. Here Maurice began experimenting with new approaches to painting gleaned from his encounters with
emerging European modernism. The sense of immediacy in his application of paint, combined with the modest

  

Source: Aalberts, Daniel P. - Department of Physics, Williams College

 

Collections: Physics