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DOI: 10.1002/adma.200700082 Biospecific Recognition of Tethered Small Molecules Diluted
 

Summary: DOI: 10.1002/adma.200700082
Biospecific Recognition of Tethered Small Molecules Diluted
in Self-Assembled Monolayers**
By Mitchell J. Shuster, Amit Vaish, Matthew E. Szapacs, Mary E. Anderson, Paul S. Weiss,
and Anne M. Andrews*
A model system for the capture of large biomolecule targets
by small-molecule probes has been developed using a combi-
nation of insertion self-assembly and chemical functionaliza-
tion. Key to selective molecular recognition of small mole-
cules is the ability to tether these such that they are readily
accessible for binding. This is particularly challenging because
the tether alters a significant fraction of the probe molecule.
It is also critical to space small-molecule probes so that they
are dilute and exposed, rather than clustered via phase sepa-
ration on capture surfaces, particularly when trying to bind
large-molecule targets (e.g., proteins, nucleic acids).[15]
Opti-
mal dilution avoids the effects of steric hindrance[68]
and mul-
tivalent non-specific interactions. Dilute surface coverage is

  

Source: Andrews, Anne M. - Huck Institutes of the Life Sciences, Pennsylvania State University

 

Collections: Biology and Medicine