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On the phase behavior of stretched, supercooled and glassy water, its dependence on confinement, and its relation to that of other network
 

Summary: On the phase behavior of stretched, supercooled and glassy water, its
dependence on confinement, and its relation to that of other network
and molecular systems.
C. Austen Angell*
Dept. of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ 85287
*Corresponding author: caa@asu.edu
1. Introduction
There are at least two forms of amorphous solid water, one much denser than the other,
and with density dependent on the pressure of vitrification1, 2. There is controversy over
all aspects of these glassy states, including the importance of confinement which allows
very subdivided states of water to avoid crystallization during slow cooling. There is
also controversy concerning the behavior of stretched water, particularly the evidence
for a large difference in density between the states of water that cavitate
homogeneously, depending on the direction of temperature change3-5. States that reach
their tensile limit on isochoric cooling from high temperatures, cavitate at much lower
densities than states that cavitate during isochoric heating from low temperatures.
2. Experimental/theoretical methods
We discuss the experimental approaches that have been used in the study of
glassforming properties, supercooled and stretched liquid properties, and
confinement effects.

  

Source: Angell, C. Austen - Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Arizona State University

 

Collections: Materials Science; Chemistry