Home

About

Advanced Search

Browse by Discipline

Scientific Societies

E-print Alerts

Add E-prints

E-print Network
FAQHELPSITE MAPCONTACT US


  Advanced Search  

 
Mismatch between Herbivore Behavior and Demographics Contributes to Scale-Dependence of Host Susceptibility in Two Pine Species
 

Summary: Mismatch between Herbivore Behavior and Demographics Contributes
to Scale-Dependence of Host Susceptibility in Two Pine Species
Tiina Ylioja, Daniel H. Slone, and Matthew P. Ayres
Abstract: The impacts on forests of tree-killing bark beetles can depend on the species composition of potential
host trees. Host susceptibility might be an intrinsic property of tree species, or it might depend on spatial
patterning of alternative host species. We compared the susceptibility of loblolly pine (Pinus taeda) and Virginia
pine (P. virginiana) to southern pine beetle (Dendroctonus frontalis) at two hierarchical levels of geographic
scale: within beetle infestations in heterospecific stands (extent ranging from 0.28 to 0.65 ha), and across a forest
landscape (extent 72,500 ha) that was dominated by monospecific stands. In the former, beetles preferentially
attacked Virginia pine (tree mortality 65100% in Virginia pine versus 066% in loblolly pine), but in the
latter, loblolly stands were more susceptible than Virginia stands. This hierarchical transition in host suscepti-
bility was predicted from knowledge of (1) a behavioral preference of beetles for attacking loblolly versus
Virginia pine, (2) a negative correlation between preference and performance, and (3) a mismatch in the domain
of scale between demographics and host selection by individuals. There is value for forest management in
understanding the processes that can produce hierarchical transitions in ecological patterns. FOR. SCI. 51(6):
522531.
Key Words: Spatial scale, hierarchical transition, disturbance, Scolytinae, Pinus.
B
ARK BEETLES (Coleoptera, Curculionidae, Scolyti-
nae) that kill trees can have powerful, widespread

  

Source: Ayres, Matthew.P. - Department of Biological Sciences, Dartmouth College

 

Collections: Environmental Sciences and Ecology