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vol. 156, no. 1 the american naturalist july 2000 Alkaloid Uptake Increases Fitness in a Hemiparasitic Plant via
 

Summary: vol. 156, no. 1 the american naturalist july 2000
Alkaloid Uptake Increases Fitness in a Hemiparasitic Plant via
Reduced Herbivory and Increased Pollination
Lynn S. Adler*
Center for Population Biology and Department of Entomology,
Section of Evolution and Ecology, University of California at
Davis, Davis, California 95616
Submitted September 10, 1999; Accepted February 11, 2000
abstract: It has been historically difficult to manipulate secondary
compounds in living plants to assess how these compounds influence
plant-herbivore and plant-pollinator interactions. Using a hemipar-
asitic plant that takes up secondary compounds from host plants, I
experimentally manipulated secondary compounds in planta and as-
sessed their effects on herbivores and pollinators in the field. Here,
I show that the uptake of alkaloids in the annual hemiparasite Cas-
tilleja indivisa resulted in decreased herbivory, increased visitation by
pollinators, and increased lifetime seed production. These results
indicate that resistance traits such as alkaloids can increase plant
fitness directly by reducing herbivore attack and indirectly by in-
creasing pollinator visitation to defended plants. Thus, selection for

  

Source: Adler, Lynn - Department of Plant, Soil and Insect Sciences, University of Massachusetts at Amherst

 

Collections: Environmental Sciences and Ecology