Home

About

Advanced Search

Browse by Discipline

Scientific Societies

E-print Alerts

Add E-prints

E-print Network
FAQHELPSITE MAPCONTACT US


  Advanced Search  

 
Frontiers in Behavioral Neuroscience www.frontiersin.org August 2010 | Volume 4 | Article 158 | 1 BEHAVIORAL NEUROSCIENCE
 

Summary: Frontiers in Behavioral Neuroscience www.frontiersin.org August 2010 | Volume 4 | Article 158 | 1
BEHAVIORAL NEUROSCIENCE
Original research article
published: 24 August 2010
doi: 10.3389/fnbeh.2010.00158
Fear is often measured as freezing (defined as the suppression of all
movement except that required for respiration) (Curti, 1935, 1942;
GrossenandKelley,1972;FanselowandBolles,1979;Fanselow,1984),
a prominent species-specific defense reaction in both rats and mice,
with a long history of study (discussed below) (Bolles, 1970).
Contextual fear has garnered a very high level of interest because
it is dependent on the hippocampus and as such, has become a
leading model of declarative memory. As with human declarative
memory, hippocampal lesions produce a time-limited and selec-
tive deficit of contextual fear, such that lesions made 1 day after
training produce a severe retrograde amnesia of contextual fear,but
those made one month or more after training produce little or no
deficit (Kim and Fanselow,1992;Anagnostaras et al.,1999b).Cued
memory usually does not depend on the hippocampus, but can,
especially as in trace conditioning, or when the ventral hippocam-

  

Source: Anagnostaras, Stephan - Neurosciences Program & Department of Psychology, University of California at San Diego

 

Collections: Biology and Medicine