Home

About

Advanced Search

Browse by Discipline

Scientific Societies

E-print Alerts

Add E-prints

E-print Network
FAQHELPSITE MAPCONTACT US


  Advanced Search  

 
Perception & Psychophysics 1990, 48 (6), 583-592
 

Summary: Perception & Psychophysics
1990, 48 (6), 583-592
Detection and discrimination of coherent motion
LYN MOWAFY, RANDOLPH BLAKE, and JOSEPH S. LAPPIN
Vanderbilt University, Nashville, Tennessee
When viewing a pair of bars defined by the difference of spatial Gaussian functions (DOGs),
human observers can discriminate accurately the relative movements of the bars, even when
they differ in spatial frequency. On each trial, observers viewed two brief presentation intervals
in which a pair of vertically oriented DOGs moved randomly back and forth within a restricted
range. During one interval, both bars moved in the same horizontal direction and by the same
magnitude (correlated movements); in the other interval, their movements were uncorrelated.
When discrimination accuracy is related to the simultaneous detection of two independent move-
ments, it was found that, if observers can detect the movements of spatially separated bars, they
can tell whether their relative movements are correlated. Performance remained remarkably
accurate even when the two bars differed in spatial frequency by more than two octaves or were
presented separately to the two eyes. Apparently, the accurate discrimination of coherent mo-
tion involves an efficient spatial integration of optical motion information over multiple spatial
locations and multiple spatial scales.
The human visual system is remarkably adept at detect-
ing motion: contour displacements of just a few arc sec-

  

Source: Anderson, Barton L. - School of Psychology, University of Sydney

 

Collections: Biology and Medicine