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1238 NATURE MEDICINE VOLUME 4 NUMBER 11 NOVEMBER 1998 NEWS & VIEWS
 

Summary: 1238 NATURE MEDICINE VOLUME 4 NUMBER 11 NOVEMBER 1998
NEWS & VIEWS
ALARGE ENSEMBLE of proteins act in concert
to orchestrate the function of the sen-
sory cells in the cochlea, through which
we hear, and the vestibular apparatus of
the inner ear, the organ that senses gravity
and acceleration. Defects in any one of
these proteins can result in deafness.
Progress in the genetics of hearing loss is
advancing at a dizzying speed with more
than 40 loci for nonsyndromic hearing
loss (NSHL; deafness with or without
vestibular impairment, but with no addi-
tional symptoms) mapped so far. Esti-
mates of the number of genes involved in
NSHL stand at over 100 (ref.1). This num-
ber may seem inflated but, given the intri-
cacy and fine precision required for the
smooth operation of inner ear structures,

  

Source: Avraham, Karen - Department of Human Genetics and Molecular Medicine, Tel Aviv University

 

Collections: Biology and Medicine