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In: Carpenter G, Grossberg S (Eds): Neural networks for vision and image processing. Bradford Books, MIT Press, 1992.
 

Summary: 1
In: Carpenter G, Grossberg S (Eds): Neural networks for vision and image
processing. Bradford Books, MIT Press, 1992.
VISUAL ADAPTATION TO A NEGATIVE, BRIGHTNESS-REVERSED
WORLD: SOME PRELIMINARY OBSERVATIONS
Stuart Anstis, Dept of Psychology, UC San Diego, La Jolla CA 92093
Abstract
There have been many studies of visual adaptation to spatial rearrangements,
starting with Stratton's (1897) classic studies on adaptation to an upside-down
world. These have been reviewed by Rock (1966) and Howard (1982).
Luminance information is crucial to such visual tasks as extracting shape from
shading and recognising faces. If a picture of bumps and hollows is turned upside
down, or reversed in brightness, the perceived depth reverses (Ramachandran
1988). Cavanagh and Leclerc (1989) have shown that shadows are treated as such
only if they are darker than unshadowed regions. Extraction of depth by shape
from shading seems to be an early process which precedes perceptual grouping
(Ramachandran 1988a, b) and pop-out in visual search tasks (Enns 1990). Is shape
from shading affected by perceptual experience? Hershenberg (1971*?) showed
that chicks reared with grains lit from below preferred to peck at photographs of
grains lit from below versus lit from above. If humans adapt to reversed luminance,

  

Source: Anstis, Stuart - Department of Psychology, University of California at San Diego

 

Collections: Biology and Medicine