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Using Technology-Based Methods to Foster Learning in Large Lecture Classes: Evidence for the Pedagogic Value of Clickers
 

Summary: Using Technology-Based Methods to Foster Learning in Large Lecture Classes: Evidence
for the Pedagogic Value of Clickers
R. Mayer, A. Stull, K. Almeroth, B. Bimber, D. Chun,
M. Bulger, J. Campbell, A. Knight, and H. Zhang
University of California
Santa Barbara, CA 93106-5110
Objectives and Theoretical Framework
Today, many college courses are taught in large lecture halls that hold hundreds
of students. Instructors of large lecture courses may be concerned that this learning
environment can lead students to be cognitively passive. This study examines the
effectiveness of a technology-supported instructional method that is intended to allow
learner interactivity in a large lecture class, and thereby foster deeper learning. In
particular, proponents have proposed using a personal response system (or "clickers") in
which students press a button on a hand-held remote control device corresponding to
their answer to a multiple choice question projected on a screen, then see the class
distribution of answers, and discuss the thinking leading to the correct answer (Duncan,
2005).
Although the personal response systems seem promising, limited research has
been conducted on their effectiveness, and much of the research that been done has
focused less on learning outcomes and more on how helpful the participants found the

  

Source: Almeroth, Kevin C. - Department of Computer Science, University of California at Santa Barbara

 

Collections: Computer Technologies and Information Sciences