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Accounting for finite-size effects in simulations of disperse particle-laden flows
 

Summary: Accounting for finite-size effects in simulations of disperse
particle-laden flows
S.V. Apte *, K. Mahesh, T. Lundgren
Department of Mechanical Engineering, Oregon State University, 204 Rogers Hall, Corvallis, OR 97331, United States
Department of Aerospace Engineering and Mechanics, University of Minnesota, 107, Akerman Hall, Minneapolis, MN 55455, United States
Received 27 November 2006; received in revised form 22 May 2007
Abstract
A numerical formulation for Eulerian­Lagrangian simulations of particle-laden flows in complex geometries is developed. The for-
mulation accounts for the finite-size of the dispersed phase. Similar to the commonly used point-particle formulation, the dispersed par-
ticles are treated as point-sources, and the forces acting on the particles are modeled through drag and lift correlations. In addition to the
inter-phase momentum exchange, the presence of particles affects the fluid phase continuity and momentum equations through the dis-
placed fluid volume. Three flow configurations are considered in order to study the effect of finite particle size on the overall flowfield: (a)
gravitational settling, (b) fluidization by a gaseous jet, and (c) fluidization by lift in a channel. The finite-size formulation is compared to
point-particle representations, which do not account for the effect of finite-size. It is shown that the fluid displaced by the particles plays
an important role in predicting the correct behavior of particle motion. The results suggest that the standard point-particle approach
should be modified to account for finite particle size, in simulations of particle-laden flows.
Published by Elsevier Ltd.
Keywords: Particle-laden flows; LES/DNS; Point-particles; Particle­fluid interactions
1. Introduction
Many engineering problems involve two-phase flows,

  

Source: Apte, Sourabh V. - School of Mechanical, Industrial, and Manufacturing Engineering, Oregon State University

 

Collections: Engineering