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Cornell Roundtable on Environmental Studies Topics Conservation benchmarking: Climate Change and the Future of Restoration Ecology
 

Summary: Cornell Roundtable on Environmental Studies Topics
Conservation benchmarking: Climate Change and the Future of Restoration Ecology
Bernd Blossey (NTRES)
November 18 2010
12:30 2:00 PM
G01 BioTech
Conservation benchmarking: Climate Change and the Future of Restoration Ecology
Since the 1980s scholars have recognized restoration ecology as a distinct sub-field, but the idea
that ecosystems can be restored to some former or better state long predates that recognition. In
the United States, many conservation areas are currently managed to resemble a vision of the
landscape before European contact (e.g. removal of non-native species). However, a number of
historians, philosophers, anthropologists, and conservationists have critiqued the use of historical
reference communities, on the grounds that they (1) reinforce a nature-culture dichotomy, (2)
deny histories of intensive Native American land-use, and (3) are based upon severely biased
ecological and historical records. Climate change further challenges the use of historical
baselines; climate change researchers suggest that past species assemblages will not survive or
thrive in their historical ranges.

  

Source: Angenent, Lars T. - Department of Biological and Environmental Engineering, Cornell University

 

Collections: Renewable Energy; Engineering