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J. Eukaryot. Microbiol., 51(5), 2004 pp. 529535 2004 by the Society of Protozoologists
 

Summary: 529
J. Eukaryot. Microbiol., 51(5), 2004 pp. 529535
2004 by the Society of Protozoologists
Plastid-Targeting Peptides from the Chlorarachniophyte Bigelowiella natans
MATTHEW B. ROGERS,a JOHN M. ARCHIBALD,a,1 MATTHEW A. FIELD,a CATHERINE LI,b BORIS STRIEPENb and
PATRICK J. KEELINGa
aCanadian Institute for Advanced Research, Department of Botany, University of British Columbia, 3529-6270 University Boulevard,
Vancouver, BC, V6T 1Z4, Canada, and
bCenter for Tropical & Emerging Global Diseases & Department of Cellular Biology, University of Georgia, 724 Biological Sciences Building,
Athens, Georgia 30602, USA
ABSTRACT. Chlorarachniophytes are marine amoeboflagellate protists that have acquired their plastid (chloroplast) through secondary
endosymbiosis with a green alga. Like other algae, most of the proteins necessary for plastid function are encoded in the nuclear genome
of the secondary host. These proteins are targeted to the organelle using a bipartite leader sequence consisting of a signal peptide
(allowing entry in to the endomembrane system) and a chloroplast transit peptide (for transport across the chloroplast envelope mem-
branes). We have examined the leader sequences from 45 full-length predicted plastid-targeted proteins from the chlorarachniophyte
Bigelowiella natans with the goal of understanding important features of these sequences and possible conserved motifs. The chemical
characteristics of these sequences were compared with a set of 10 B. natans endomembrane-targeted proteins and 38 cytosolic or nuclear
proteins, which show that the signal peptides are similar to those of most other eukaryotes, while the transit peptides differ from those
of other algae in some characteristics. Consistent with this, the leader sequence from one B. natans protein was tested for function in
the apicomplexan parasite, Toxoplasma gondii, and shown to direct the secretion of the protein.

  

Source: Archibald, John - Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Dalhousie University
Keeling, Patrick - Department of Botany, University of British Columbia

 

Collections: Biology and Medicine; Environmental Sciences and Ecology